Tag Archives: Mercy Medical Commons

Alter Group's Arizona Health and Technology Park, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

Mixed Use Medical Buildings in Arizona

Mixed Use Medical Buildings

Banner Health Systems’ 60-acre Gateway campus in Gilbert is buzzing with activity. The 120,000 SF MD Anderson Cancer Center is rising from the construction dust, a new mixed use medical office building was just completed, and an older office complex is being renovated and expanded.

The same healthcare giant just announced plans to build the Banner Health Center, housing doctors offices plus a variety of medical and lab services, on 11 acres in the Wells Retail Center in Maricopa.

And in one of the most unusual mixed use medical pairings, Arizona’s most prolific retail developer, Westcor (owned by Macerich), is teaming up with venerable healthcare provider John C. Lincoln to plot out 84 acres in northwest Phoenix for a community hospital/medical office/retail center/auto mall.

Healthcare-anchored, mixed use developments seem to be the current real estate trend. There are dozens around the state. Some are hospital centered, and others, such as the proposed Maricopa project and the 50-acre Arizona Health & Technology Park in Mesa, are designed to combine medically focused businesses and other community services.

The Mesa project’s plans include space for a dental clinic to serve the nearby Arizona School of Dentistry, other specialty outpatient service facilities, offices, and biotech research and development facilities.

Hamilton Espinosa, national healthcare specialist for DPR Construction, says clustering a variety of medical uses and complementary services is a national trend, not just a local one.

New hospitals are seldom designed as stand-alones. Campuses are master planned to grow as the surrounding community does, with room for expansion of inpatient beds, outpatient services and other ancillary services from specialized clinics to doctors’ offices to pharmacies and even restaurants and hotels.

It’s a natural progression, Espinosa says. Evolving medical technology has transformed many treatments that previously required a hospital stay into outpatient procedures. Add to the mix the need to rein in healthcare costs and — in Arizona, at least — a bounty of land.

Purchasing and master planning a big chunk of property, but building components as population and changing medical needs progress, makes sense in a cost-conscious and rapidly changing environment, Espinosa says.

He compares the mega-campus evolution to Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) planning of the state’s freeway needs.

“Healthcare providers have to be much more judicious in capital spending. There is more apprehension,” Espinosa says. “Like ADOT, they build what they can afford now and add later when they can afford it and as the census dictates (demand).”

Mixed-Use Medical,  AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

But far from being something new, master planning a campus that blends medical and other business services is old hat to Plaza Companies, says Sharon Harper, president of the Arizona-based real estate company.

Plaza pioneered the first mixed use, medically-anchored community in Peoria in 1982, Harper says. Plaza del Rio’s 185-acre campus was originally designed to meet all the needs of an active senior living complex and grew over time to also meet the needs of the thousands of employees who work in the ever-expanding community, Harper says.

It includes senior residences, skilled nursing facilities, dozens of doctors and dentists offices, several specialty hospitals, clinics and other outpatient medical centers, condos, apartments, shops, restaurants, schools, offices, science and research facilities. But there’s not a traditional inpatient hospital in the mix.

Next on the drawing board, according to Harper, are single-family homes.

Plaza del Rio is a hugely successful one-of-a-kind model of a medically-anchored, mixed use development, but Harper says big hospital-anchored campuses and small neighborhood-focused complexes are essential to the future of healthcare delivery.

Jason Meszaros, vice president for Irgens Healthcare Development Partners, which just completed Mercy Medical Commons, a medical office project adjacent to the Mercy Gilbert Medical Center campus, agrees that there is no one-size-fits-all solution. Arizona is relatively saturated with hospital beds, Meszaros says.

“The trend is we are done building hospitals for a while,” he adds.

The Desire For Mixed Use Medical Buildings

The focus for the foreseeable future will be filling out space on existing campuses with other services that make a hospital more competitive as a destination for patients, as well as for doctors and surgeons who want on-campus offices to cut daily commute times from inpatient to outpatient visits, he says.

“A hospital becomes an anchor for all types of real estate needs,” Meszaros says. “You most likely have hospitality needs, places for a family to stay. And you have lots of people who work there and in offices, and that drives retail. You need some place to eat lunch.”

But a bounty of available land on hospital campuses is only one motivation for mixing up healthcare real estate and other uses.

The changing needs and desires of aging baby boomers and new healthcare reform measures are also factors driving how and where medical services are provided now and into the future, says John Driscoll, president of Alter+Care, the healthcare division of the Alter Group. The company is developing the Arizona Health & Technology Park in Mesa.

“Boomers have been market changers over the years,” Driscoll says. “And the first boomers will be retiring this year.”

Lifestyle demands and the bubble of people moving to Medicare during the next two

Mixed-Use Medical,  AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

decades will require medical services that are more “competitive, attractive and affordable,” he says. And another 30 million insured people, many on Medicaid-like systems, means cost-effective real estate solutions will be key.

“There is no question in the future that healthcare providers will have to be more efficient,” Driscoll says.

Rather than a single model for healthcare real estate in the foreseeable future, there are several scenarios likely to emerge simultaneously based on a community’s needs and assets, he continues.

The giant, hospital-anchored campuses make sense for regional medical services, but the future focus will emphasize bringing healthcare closer and making it more convenient to those who use it on a regular basis.

Driscoll envisions smaller neighborhood-based destinations with a range of services such as medically-based fitness centers, post-surgery rehabilitation facilities, sports performance centers — “health villages with different kinds of services for people who are sick and to keep people well.”

“We’re seeing more co-mingling of medical and wellness services,” he says.

Future development also will be real estate-driven and may include adapting empty big boxes retailers to house medical services, he adds. Picture the shell of a former Borders Books or Ultimate Electronics housing a host of medical providers, such as acute care clinics, labs and medical imaging services.

Randy McGrane, managing director for Ensemble Real Estate, has already imagined that as the future of outpatient healthcare delivery. He adds that off-campus medical services are a bigger trend than the expansive hospital-centered developments.

The ratio of inpatient to outpatient medical services is about 60/40 now, McGrane says, but he predicts the numbers will reverse within 10 years.

Communities want medical services in their own neighborhoods, and retail centers are suffering from curtailed discretionary spending during the recession, he says. So, the empty retail anchor spaces are obvious and cost-effective solutions for both real estate segments.

In smaller neighborhood strip centers abandoned by a supermarket anchor, adding a clinic or urgent care facility could change the whole dynamic of the center. It could spawn new medical and/or retail services such as pharmacies or health-food shops, and the same type of services — dry cleaners, casual eateries and coffee shops, for example — that cluster around a supermarket to make a neighborhood commercial center a one-stop convenience for employees and customers, McGrane says.

And adding medical outpatient facilities to a big box-laden power center can re-energize flagging retail, bringing in new foot traffic and boosting business for all tenants, he says.

So who are the visionaries on top of the trends in changing healthcare delivery systems? Savvy industry giants already are planning multi-faceted networks that add satellite services in diverse locations, as well as boosting hospital campuses with a variety of services to remain competitive, according to the local industry experts.

The major players plotting out Arizona’s healthcare delivery systems of the future are the top hospital names, such as Scottsdale Healthcare, Banner Health, Catholic Healthcare West, John C. Lincoln and Abrazo Health Care, according to industry experts.

And the on-the-ball real estate developers, designers and construction companies have healthcare divisions in place ready to make it happen.

“There is growth in healthcare and in more sophisticated delivery of healthcare services,” Harper of Plaza Companies says. “It’s an exciting industry.

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www.altergroup.com
www.dpr.com
www.ensemble-llc.com
www.irgensllc.com
www.theplazaco.com

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AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

red-awards-2012

2011 RED Awards Winners & Honorable Mentions

On Feb. 22, AZRE hosted the 6th Annual, 2011 RED Awards reception at the Ritz-Carlton in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2010 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms participated in the process. All the winning projects and brokers are featured on the following pages.

View pictures from the 2011 RED Awards.
View the 2011 RED Awards candid shots as well.

2011 winners can order Awards, Plaques & Reprints


The project categories include:

  • Office
  • Industrial
  • Medical
  • Mixed-Use
  • Most Challenging
  • Hospitality
  • Multi-Family
  • Retail
  • Sustainable
  • Redevelopment
  • Public
  • Education
  • Tenant Improvement
PLUS:

  • Developer of the Year
  • Architect of the Year
  • General Contractor of the Year
  • Broker/Broker Team of the Year

Congratulations to all the 2011 RED Awards Winners

Best Hospitality Project, Small:

Winner:

The Phoenician Ballroom Expansion

Best Hospitality Project, Large:

Winner:

Talking Stick Resort

Best Industrial Project:

Winner:

Keller Electrical

Honorable Mention:

Power-One (Phase I & II)

Best Medical Project:

Winner:

Diamond Children’s Medical Center at UMC

Honorable Mention:

Ryan House at St. Joseph’s Medical Center

Best Mixed-Use Project:

Winner:

CityScape

Honorable Mention:

Gila River Indian Community, District One Service Center

Most Challenging Project:

Winner:

Soleri Bridge & Plaza

Honorable Mention:

Maricopa County Security Building

Best Office Project:

Winner:

Chandler City Hall

Honorable Mention:

Mercy Medical Commons

Best Multi-Family Project:

Winner:

Vi at Silverstone

Honorable Mention:

Sagewood, Phase 1

Brokerage Team: Leasing

Winner:

Tom Adelson, Kevin Calihan

Jim Fijan, Jerry Roberts

CB Richard Ellis

Brokerage Team: Sales

Winner:

Tyler Anderson, Sean Cunningham

CB Richard Ellis

General Contractor of the Year:

Winner:

Sundt Construction

Best Retail Project:

Winner:

Mountain Ranch Marketplace

Honorable Mention:

Scottsdale Pavilions – Theater/Food Court Renovation

Most Sustainable Project:

Winner:

White Tank Branch Library & Nature Center

Honorable Mention:

CREST Specialty School

Best Redevelopment Project:

Winner:

Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport

West Terminal Expansion Phase I

Honorable Mention:

Cowley Companies Warehouse Office

Best Public Project:

Winner:

Musical Instrument Museum

Honorable Mention:

Randall McDaniel Sports Complex

Best Education Project:

Winner:

Sedona-Oak Creek

Red Rock High School

Performing Arts Center

Honorable Mention:

Mesa Community College Red Mountain Campus

Best Tenant Improvement Project:

Winner:

Lumberyard Tap Room

Honorable Mention:

Polsinelli Shughart

Special Merit:

Winner:

Schuff Perini Climber

Broker – Leasing:

Winner:

Andy Kroot

Velocity Retail Group

Broker – Sales:

Winner:

Eric J. Wichterman

Cassidy Turley BRE Commercial

Developer of the Year:

Winner:

RED Development

Architect of the Year:

Winner:

RSP Architects


Presented by:

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Sponsored by:

D.P. Electric Logo
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RED Awards Banner

Best Office Project 2011

Chandler City Hall

Best Office Project 2011: Chandler City Hall, SmithGroupDeveloper: City of Chandler
Contractor:
Sundt Construction
Architect:
SmithGroup
Size:
125,000 SF
Location:
175 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler
Completed:
October 2010

Chandler City Hall is a low-to-mid-rise complex consisting of administrative offices, a public TV studio and Council Chambers. City Hall is a modern, efficient and environmentally appropriate building. The complex is designed with open space and shaded walkways. Flexibility within the building allows for change as both the community and the city’s technological needs evolve. The space within the building is multi-functional, able to accommodate individuals, small social groups and large gatherings. Space also includes bicycle storage and changing rooms. Above all, the new Chandler City Hall is not just another office building. It creates a sense of place and identity, giving the residents of Chandler a destination that serves as the city’s new community center.




Honorable Mention: Mercy Medical Commons

Honorable Mention, Office Project 2011: Mercy Medical CommonsDeveloper: Irgens Development Partners
Contractor:
Okland Construction
Architect:
Architectural Nexus
Broker:
Grubb & Ellis
Size:
47,000 SF
Location:
3645 S. Rome St., Gilbert
Completed:
September 2010

Mercy Medical Commons, AZRE March/April 2010

Medical: Mercy Medical Commons


MERCY MEDICAL COMMONS

Developer: Irgens Health Care Facilities Group (a division of Irgens Development Partners)
Contractor: Okland Construction Company
Architect: Architectural Nexus
Size: 48,000 SF
Location: SE of Val Vista Dr. & Mercy Rd. in Gilbert

The Class A medical office building will be constructed adjacent to the Mercy Gilbert Medical Center. Construction began in December 2009, with full occupancy expected by September. Pre-lease tenants include Advanced Surgical Associates, Arizona Cancer Specialists, Desert Oncology Associates and Scottsdale Medical Imaging. Brokerage firm is Cassidy Turley|BRE Commercial.

AZRE March/April 2010