Tag Archives: Mesa

Final Rendering

Ronald McDonald House Completes $2.1M Capital Campaign

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix has completed a two-year, $2.1 million fund-raising campaign to cover all construction, furnishing and decorating expenses for the Valley’s third Ronald McDonald House and the first in the East Valley.

Renovation has begun on the 12,600 square foot former health care facility on the campus of Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, which is expected to open in November. The 248-bed Cardon Children’s Medical Center is operated by Banner Health.

The new facility will feature 16 bedrooms, including 2 apartments with kitchens for families with children with suppressed immune systems; a community kitchen, living and dining room; play area for children and outdoor area for adults and children. When completed, and in combination with the other two Ronald McDonald Houses, up to 79 families will have a home-away-from home every night. The new House will provide 5,840 nights a year.

“We now know it’s possible to be relieved and thrilled at the same time,” said Executive Director Nancy Roach, who has been at the helm of the organization for 14 years and has overseen fundraising and construction of two of the three Ronald McDonald Houses in the Valley. “Being able to serve families in the East Valley has been a longtime goal of ours. The community fully understood that by helping to fund this project, they ensure that families traveling to Cardon Children’s Medical Center can stay close to their children.”

The original Ronald McDonald House is located at 501 E. Roanoke Ave. A second House opened in 2008 on the campus of Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

The $2.1 million was secured primarily through private donations from individuals, foundations, corporate supporters and Valley-based McDonald’s owner/operators, who have committed to provide up to $150,000 of required operating expenses for the first three years. The Ronald McDonald House does not receive direct funding from the McDonald’s Corporation, but is generously supported by McDonald’s restaurant owner/operators in Central and Northern Arizona.

Among the largest donors to the project are the Gila River Indian Community, The Kemper Marley Foundation, The Halle Family Foundation, SRP, The Thunderbirds, Ronald McDonald House Charities Global and other generous community donors.

Plans for opening celebrations are underway and details will be announced later this summer.

HKS Architects of Phoenix designed the new house. UEB Builders is the general contractor.

For more information about Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix, visit www.rmhcphoenix.com. For more information about Cardon Children’s Medical Center, visit www.bannerhealth.com/CardonChildrens.

Matt Likens - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Merz acquires Mesa-based medical company Ulthera

Merz and Ulthera, Inc. today announced that they have entered a definitive merger agreement, pursuant to which Merz will acquire global medical device company Ulthera, a deal which will accelerate Merz’s growth in the aesthetics area and expand the company’s portfolio of treatment options in facial aesthetics.

Merz and Ulthera have entered a definitive merger agreement pursuant to which Merz will acquire Ulthera, Inc, a global medical device company focused on developing and commercializing technologies for aesthetic and medical applications using its therapeutic ultrasound platform technology. Valued at up to $600 million in upfront cash and milestone payments, the acquisition is the largest in Merz’s history.

“This acquisition represents an important strategic milestone for Merz,” said Philip Burchard, CEO of Merz Pharma Group, which has affiliates in 18 countries around the world. “We have a vision to be the most innovative company in aesthetics, and expanding into the rapidly growing field of energy devices will position us for long-term success in this area. The addition of Ulthera’s energy device technology complements and expands our global presence in the aesthetics space.”

Founded in 2004, Ulthera is a leader in non-surgical lifting and tightening treatments. Using therapeutic ultrasound technology, the Ulthera® System is the first and only ultrasound platform device to receive FDA clearance for lifting skin on the eyebrow, the neck and under the chin. Ulthera expects sales of more than $100 million in 2014.

“The aesthetic lift indication differentiates Ulthera from every other energy device available in the market today,” said Bill Humphries, President and CEO of Merz North America, Inc. “It is truly innovative technology, and we expect to leverage our in-house clinical expertise to develop further aesthetic and medical applications and bring them to the international marketplace.”

Merz and Ulthera have a shared mission: to bring innovations to market that meet the needs of physicians and improve the well-being of patients. This shared long-term vision provides a solid foundation for the combined company. “Joining with a like-minded, growing global healthcare company is a major milestone in the life of our company,” said Ulthera CEO Matt Likens. “Through our collaboration with Merz, we hope to introduce the Ulthera® System to new customers and markets around the world.”

“Building on this important new partnership, Merz will continue to seek innovative M&A and licensing opportunities on a global scale,” said Hans-Jörg Bergler, Head of Corporate Development for Merz Pharma Group.

The transaction has been approved by the boards of both companies and is subject to customary closing conditions, including the expiration or termination of the applicable waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976. The transaction is expected to close in the third quarter of 2014.

electricity

East Valley Energized by New SRP Line

A major new transmission project that will bring additional electricity and increased reliability to the Valley is now fully energized.

The final phase of the Palo Verde-Southeast Valley-Browning (PV-SEV) 500-kilovolt (kV) project was placed into service for the first time this month. This marked a major milestone for SRP, as it was the last segment of a new 150-mile transmission line that runs from the Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant area near Tonopah to the Browning Substation located in east Mesa.

“We are glad that after 14 years this project is in service,” said John Underhill, SRP’s senior director of System Operations. “The entire East Valley will benefit. This new transmission line, which originates in the West Valley, will now bring that power all the way around to the east. This provides us with another power source into that area, where little or no generating plants are being built east of the Santan Generating Station.”

Prior to the PV-SEV line, SRP depended on a single 500kV transmission line to bring energy from the Palo Verde energy hub to the East Valley. The final line segment, which spans 100 miles, is the last component of the PV-SEV 500-kV project that began construction in 2006, after six years of planning and approvals.

The project resulted from a study by SRP and other Arizona electric utilities, and approval by the Arizona Corporation Commission, showing a need for increased transmission capacity to meet increasing energy demands created by business and residential growth in central Arizona and Tucson. The study concluded that energy deliveries in central Arizona required a new transmission line and other equipment additions, significant upgrades to existing equipment, and the project overall would increase system reliability.

“Years of planning and hard work by many entities, including SRP employees and contract personnel, resulted in a quality project that will serve the needs of the customers for many years to come,” said Dan Hawkins, senior project manager of Major Transmission Projects for SRP.

The project has included the building of five large substations — Pinal West, Duke, Pinal Central, Abel and Dinosaur — and additions to the existing Hassayampa and Browning substations. Also as part of the project, two 500/230-kV transformers at Pinal Central and one 500/230-kV transformer at Duke, located in Pinal County, were energized May 30 and June 12, respectively. The PW-SEV-BOB Project will serve customers in Pinal, Pima and Maricopa counties.

“The design and building of the 150-mile system is really remarkable,” added Underhill. “I received a firsthand aerial view as our staff inspected the line in a helicopter. It’s impressive how we were able to build the line to blend in with the landscape.”

Partners in the transmission project include SRP (project manager), Tucson Electric Power Co., Electrical District #2, Electrical District #3, Electrical District #4, Western Area Power Administration and the Southwest Transmission Cooperative Inc.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, providing electric service to more than 990,000 customers.

Pieceful Solutions hires new COO

Mesa-based Pieceful Solutions, the first and fastest-growing K-12 school in Arizona for children with autism spectrum disorders, hired Robin Rollando as its Chief Operating Officer.

Robin Rollando

Robin Rollando

In her new role at Pieceful Solutions, Rollando will oversee business development, human resources, marketing, finance, information technology and overall business operations, among other duties.

Rollando is an operations veteran, having spent more than two decades helping businesses achieve substantial revenue growth in highly-competitive markets with companies such as Ambath/Rebath and Patterson Sports Ventures, LLC.

Rollando is a graduate of Arizona State University and resides in Ahwatukee. She is the proud mother of a child with autism, who was diagnosed at the age of two. Today he is now a successful young adult with a full-time job, drives and attends a community college.

Rob Martensen Transaction

Colliers completes $5.8M sale of flex industrial buildings

Colliers International in Greater Phoenix recently completed the sale of three showroom/flex industrial buildings in Mesa, Ariz. for $5.8 million, or $61.03 a square foot.

Rob Martensen, Colliers International

Rob Martensen, Colliers International

Tucson-based Holualoa Companies purchased the buildings, located at the Superstition Springs Commerce Center, from AEW Capital Management of Boston, Mass.

Rob Martensen, SIOR, CCIM, vice president of Colliers, served as the broker for the buyer and seller. Martensen is a member of the Society of Industrial and Office Realtors (SIOR) and is a Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) of the Commercial Real Estate Institute. Martensen specializes in industrial sales, leasing and land development.

The buildings, encompassing 95,035 square feet, were constructed in 2001.

“Holualoa hopes to capitalize on the recovering industrial market, specifically in the residential housing construction arena. There are few spaces available in close proximity to the new Eastmark community. Superstition Springs Commerce Center can accommodate contractors and suppliers of home-related products to supply this growing area,” Martensen said.

Flancer's Mesa

Flancer’s Café & Pizzeria serves prickly pear perfection

Flancers, Prickly Pear ChickenFlancer’s Café & Pizzeria has two locations in Gilbert and Mesa. The restaurant features salads, sandwiches and pizzas with unique flare. However, Flancer’s has become a local favorite because of its use of the prickly pear.

How did the prickly pear become a favorite among diners? Owner Jeff Flancer explains that the prickly pear items started 12 years ago with an order of prickly pear syrup for a catering job. The restaurant then needed to use the rest of the syrup after the event, so it ran a special on a prickly pear chicken sandwich. Now, the sandwich is the second most popular item on the menu.

The prickly pear items have extended from the popular sandwich to include a prickly pear caesar chicken salad and the Flancer’s spiked prickly pear lemonade. The restaurant also has made some desserts with prickly pear whipped cream and flavoring.

Flancer explains that the local customers love the prickly pear items and it brings a lot of repeat business. Some people get scared to try the different items, and sometimes even think it is undercooked because of its pink color, but overall the dish is a Flancers, Spiked Lemonadesuccess. They have entered the prickly pear sandwich into several competitions and even won a New Times contest with the best use of prickly pear.

Flancer’s also makes its own bread and green chile mayonnaise that customers love. The sweet and spicy creates a beautiful blend.

The restaurant participates in the community through charity work such as its annual pizza eating contest. It has raised $30,000 through its charity events and help of customers and sponsors.

Ultimately, Flancer says, that his restaurant is serious about the food yet has fun every day.

phoenix

GPEC Earns Economic Development honor

Cited as one of the Best to Invest Top U.S. Groups of 2013, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) has once again made Site Selection magazine’s annual ranking for top U.S. Economic Development Groups.

“This recognition is a reflection of our elected and business leaders working together to promote Greater Phoenix and Arizona as business friendly,” said Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. “The Arizona Competitiveness Package of 2011 and subsequent economic development policies have dramatically shifted our market’s competitive position towards advanced manufacturing and other high-tech industries.”

The ranking took into account four objective categories: new jobs, new jobs per 10,000 residents, new investment amount and new investment per 10,000 residents. “This year’s Best to Invest Top Groups in the U.S. all demonstrated an ability to reach new markets while reaping significant reinvestments from their existing industries,” said Ron Starner, general manager and executive vice president of Conway Data Inc. and Site Selection magazine.

The magazine also features a ranking for top North American deals of 2013, highlighting the Apple, Inc. locate to Mesa, Ariz. The collaboration included a partnership between GPEC, the Arizona Commerce Authority, the city of Mesa, DMB Associates, Maricopa County, and Salt River Project.

Several factors contributed to determining the Top Deals of 2013, including: level of capital investment, degree of high-wage jobs, creativity in negotiations and incentives, regional economic impact, competition for the project and speed to market. “Trends among this elite group of projects include a penchant for free trade zones and an awareness that sometimes facility reuse is as good as brand new,” said Adam Bruns, managing editor of Site Selection.

Broome credits the successful consummation of the project to “years of work on infrastructure, permitting, and crafting performance-based incentives.” He also cited the ability to offer a “turnkey real estate option” as a key factor in sealing the deal.

ulterapy-treatment-gives-you-younger-looking-skin-video

Ulthera files for $86 million IPO

Ulthera, which sells ultrasound energy systems for the non-invasive lifting of eyebrows and skin around the neck, filed on Monday with the SEC to raise up to $86 million in an initial public offering.

The Mesa-based company, which was founded in 2004 and booked $82 million in sales for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2013, plans to list on the NASDAQ under the symbol ULTH. J.P. Morgan and Citi are the joint bookrunners on the deal. No pricing terms were disclosed. (1)

Ulthera, Inc. is a global medical device company focused on developing and commercializing technologies for aesthetic and medical applications. The company’s signature technology is the Ulthera® System, which is the first and only energy-based device that is FDA-cleared for use as an aesthetic treatment – the Ultherapy® procedure – that non-invasively lifts the eyebrow and skin on the neck and under the chin.

The company received its third FDA clearance in January of 2013 for its ultrasound platform device, the Ulthera System, has been cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to visualize the dermal and subdermal layers of tissue during the non-invasive lifting treatment, Ultherapy.

This third FDA clearance follows the first two – in Sept. 2009 and Oct. 2012 – which cleared the Ulthera System to non-invasively treat the face and neck with specific, first-and-only indications to lift skin on the neck, under the chin and above the brow.

Michael Phelps

Phelps will start comeback in Mesa

Michael Phelps is coming out of retirement, the first step toward possibly swimming at the 2016 Rio Olympics.

The 22-time Olympic medalist will compete for the first time since the 2012 London Games at a meet in Mesa on April 24-26.

Bob Bowman, the swimmer’s longtime coach, told The Associated Press on Monday that Phelps is entered in three events — the 50- and 100-meter freestyles and the 100 butterfly.

“I think he’s just going to test the waters a little bit and see how it goes,” Bowman said by phone from Baltimore. “I wouldn’t say it’s a full-fledged comeback.”

Phelps returned to training last fall and re-entered the U.S. drug-testing program. He has completed his six-month waiting period by the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency to be eligible for competition.

Bowman said Phelps is “pretty far” from being back in top form. He’s been training Monday through Friday with Bowman’s team at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club.

“He’s gotten back into good shape since September,” the coach said. “He can give a good effort and certainly not be embarrassed. He’s in enough shape to swim competitively.”

Besides Phelps, USA Swimming said Olympians Ryan Lochte and Katie Ledecky are among those expected to swim in the Arena Grand Prix at Skyline Aquatic Center.

Phelps turns 29 in June and is the winningest and most decorated athlete in Olympic history. He captured 18 gold medals and 22 medals overall at the last three Summer Games. He broke Mark Spitz’s record for a single Olympics by winning eight gold medals at Beijing in 2008.

Phelps had vowed that he wouldn’t swim into his 30s. Since retiring less than two years ago, he has stayed busy with a chain of swim schools, a foundation focused on water safety and appearances on behalf of his sponsors. He devoted lots of time to golf and participated in a reality show with famed coach Hank Haney.

His camp is being low-key about the comeback.

“I think he’s just really enjoying it,” Bowman said. “He enjoys the training and being physically fit. He just kind of wants to see where he’s at. It’s more really for fun. It’s been nice for me to see him swim just for the joy of it really.”

In Mesa, Phelps will swim 100 free and 100 fly preliminaries on the first day. Then, if he qualifies, he’ll decide which race to swim for the evening finals, Bowman said. He’ll swim the 50 free on the second day and might swim the 50 fly “just for fun,” the coach added.

87665813

New East Valley Women’s Professional Group Launches

The Phoenix-metro-based Women of Scottsdale and Central Phoenix Women groups proudly announce the launch of a third, localized chapter, East Valley Women being added to serve women business professionals who live or work in Tempe, Mesa, Gilbert, and Chandler. East Valley Women will meet on the third Tuesday of every month from 7:30am to 9am at the Hilton Phoenix/Mesa in Mesa, Ariz., beginning on Tax Day, Tuesday, April 15, 2014.

The new East Valley Women group is a sister organization of the esteemed Women of Scottsdale, founded in 1998 and Central Phoenix Women, founded in 2006 by Linda Herold. Herold retired in December 2013, and named JoAnn Holland CEO of the groups. It is under her stewardship that the East Valley Women group has launched. The groups endeavor to support women beginning their professional career, business and professional leaders, women in government, women in education and those who have retired to create a deep and long-lasting community of mutual support.

The group has named community alumna Jodi Towns as the Inaugural Director of the new east valley group and she will serve a two-year term; promoting membership and business sponsorship for the new chapter, as well as acting as Master of Ceremonies at monthly meetings. As the new Inaugural Director, Towns intends to further the spirit of community support with a focus on communities east of Phoenix and Scottsdale. She will continue as the Director of Practice Management for LifeScape Premier, a Scottsdale-based concierge medical practice that has been actively involved in supporting and sponsoring Women of Scottsdale and Central Phoenix Women for several years, and is looking forward to launching the nascent East Valley group.

“I’m honored to uphold and extend the tradition and support that these fine groups provide business women in our communities,” says Towns. “With the new group serving the East Valley we’ll be able to reach, serve and bring more fantastic women into the fray.”

The groups’ CEO and founder is equally pleased with the chapter developments. “Jodi has been such a passionate advocate for our existing groups and we’re thrilled to have her leading the charge for the East Valley,” states JoAnn Holland. “We look forward to continued success under her direction with the new East Valley Women chapter.”

For more information about East Valley Women, please like them on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/eastvalleywomen

To sign up for the breakfast on April 15th please contact JoAnn Holland – CEO and Founder at ceo@eastvalleywomen.org or Anita Welsch – anita@eastvalleywomen.org or 480-567-8131

health

Mesa-based NextCare Expands in Oklahoma

Access Medical Centers of Oklahoma – a brand of Mesa-based NextCare Holdings, Inc., one of the nation’s leading providers of urgent care medicine and occupational medical services – announces the opening of a new center in the Oklahoma City metro area. This new clinic brings the total number of network locations throughout Oklahoma to 16.

“We are excited to be part of Moore’s close-knit community, and offer residents the highest standard for quality and service within the urgent care industry,” said John Julian, CEO of NextCare Holdings. “Access Medical Centers offer a well-connected network of urgent care clinics in Oklahoma. We are honored to provide exceptional health care to communities throughout the state.”

This new location also builds upon the alliance between Access Medical Centers and Integris Health. The two entities have formed an affiliation to ensure patients have a complete continuum of care.
Says Bruce Lawrence, President and CEO for INTEGRIS Health, “The Access Medical Centers urgent care affiliation offers a gateway to INTEGRIS quality care within metro Oklahoma City. This new location helps us better serve the needs of people in the community.”

The Moore clinic is open seven days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The clinic accepts most insurance plans, including SoonerCare, Blue Cross and Blue Shield, United Health Care, Medicare, Workers Compensation, and many others.

NextCare has an aggressive growth plan in new and existing markets, having opened 27 new clinics across the U.S. in 2013 alone. For more information, visit www.NextCare.com or call 888-381-4858.

baseball

Spring training attendance grows

Major League Baseball says spring training games drew a record average of 8,078 fans, up 7.3 percent from last year’s 7,527.

The previous mark of 7,793 had been set in 2008.

Overall attendance for 447 dates was 3,610,738, baseball’s fifth-highest total, the commissioner’s office said Tuesday.

The Chicago Cubs drew 213,815 fans and an average of 14,254 for the first season of Cubs Park in Mesa.

red-header-2014

RED AWARDS 2014: Best Multi-family Less Than 250KSF

On Feb. 26, AZRE hosted the 9th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2013 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and more than 100 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. Click here to view all 2014 RED Awards Winners.‎


Encore on First
Developer: Urban Development Partners & PacifiCap Development
Contractor: Okland Construction
Architect: SERA Architects
Size: 92,000 SF
Location: 25 W. 1st Ave., Mesa
Completed: Nov. 15, 2013

encore-on-firstEncore on First is one of downtown Mesa’s first private sector investments in nearly three decades, Squire Sanders reports. It is an 81-unit, transit-oriented apartment community for independent seniors who desire a walkable lifestyle. The site is all about location, which is benefited by several civic amenities such as a library, three museums and the Mesa Arts Center. The building mixes the urban landscape setting with metal wall panels, colored glass landscape panels and white steel elements with a more tranquil rural look with a pocket park and reflecting pool. The building is built to attract residents and to catalyze future developments on the building and the surrounding area. Some other sustainable resources include a 60 KW solar plant located on the roof that is tied into the City of Mesa’s downtown power grid, electric vehicle charging stations, LED lighting and high-performance windows and appliances.

Armstrong, Keri 2014

Wells Fargo Names Armstrong Business Banking Manager

Wells Fargo today announced that Keri Armstrong has been named Business Banking manager overseeing Wells Fargo Business Banking in the Mesa and Yuma and Arizona Agricultural Banking. Todd Gerber, Area Business Banking manager for Arizona announced the appointment.

“As the nation’s leading business lender, Wells Fargo is committed to satisfying all of the financial services needs of business customers and helping them succeed financially,” Gerber said. “During her career, Keri has excelled at providing outstanding service to our customers. Her strong skills, years of experience, and commitment to helping our business customers reach their goals, make him tremendous asset for our Business Banking team.”

Armstrong joined Wells Fargo in 1996 and most recently served as a Credit Management Group loan adjustment manager in Mesa where she was responsible for managing an assigned portfolio of assets for the Arizona and California markets. She has also held positions of senior business relationship manager, credit analyst, business sales associate, customer service representative and teller. Armstrong earned her bachelor’s degree in Accounting and Masters in Business Administration from the University of Phoenix.

Wells Fargo Business Banking delivers customized solutions and tailored business packages to help our business customers grow and prosper. These include loans and lines of credit, treasury management, payroll, merchant card services, foreign exchange, employee benefit plans, real estate lending, online banking and bill payment, business and personal insurance, investments, trusts, wealth management, business valuation and retirement planning.

foodbank

Buck Truck Adds Substance to Food Drives

Tempe, nonprofit, crowd-funding, grocery stores, farmers, donate perishable food items, Buck Truck, Tempe Leadership, United Food Bank, Mesa, Ed Baker, Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Lisa Pino, Arizona

A Tempe-based nonprofit is utilizing the power of crowd-funding to enable grocery stores and farmers to donate perishable food items.

Buck Truck, a project of this year’s Tempe Leadership team, is accepting donations for refrigerated delivery trucks to the United Food Bank in Mesa.

The United Food Bank currently relies on donations from canned-food drives and retailers.  The donations from retailers are limited, however, as the United Food Bank lacks the ability to transport food that requires refrigeration for freshness.

“You want to provide the best food to those you’re trying to help,” said Ed Baker, a member of this year’s Tempe Leadership team. “The best foods for people to live a healthy life are fresh, perishable foods.”

The Tempe Leadership Program, a product of the Tempe Chamber of Commerce, has been around since 1985 and each year puts together a team of community-centric individuals for nine months to engage in a project that can cover a range of community services.

“When we sat down to decide what our project would be, it was brought up that United Food Bank has a difficult time accepting fresh food,” Baker said. “We thought, ‘If only we could get 10 or 15 people to donate for a refrigerated truck.’”

The final decision was the concept of Buck Truck, to which contributors are encouraged to donate $1, $10 or $15.

The goal is to raise $41,000 for trucks that can “deliver fresh vegetables and meats from local farmers, ranchers, suppliers and grocery stores” as opposed to non-perishable items typically collected by charities in canned-food drives.

The Buck Truck website states that the refrigerated food truck will allow 24,000 pounds of what previously would have been wasted food to be distributed monthly, which it notes equates to 20,000 fresh meals.

“Buck Truck is very important because it will allow us to provide fresh produce and lean protein to our 200 partners,” said Lisa Pino, president and CEO of United Food Bank. “It’s the food you need for a healthy, adequate diet.”

The importance of Buck Truck is not only to increase the quality of food being served to those in need, but also the quantity, as Arizona is currently scarce in resources to serve what she explained is one of the hungriest states in the country, said Pino.

“The Buck Truck is nimble and responsive to Arizona’s hunger needs,” she said.

Arizona is tied as the worst state for childhood hunger, and is fifth worst in food insecurity (limited access to adequate food sources), according to statistics cited on the United Food Bank website.

As well as helping absolve statewide hunger, Pino noted a collateral benefit of Buck Truck is also contributing to helping reduce food waste.

“A theme of sustainability is key for us,” Pino said. “We want to eliminate food waste and engage more young people on the issue.”

startup

Getting an angel to open the checkbook

Governor Jan Brewer touts her policies and business regulatory climate as the reason Arizona is growing new businesses. That may be a factor, but it’s not the major reason Arizona topped the Kaufman Foundation Index of Entrepreneurial Activity in 2012. If it were the case, Arizona would have been on top again in 2013—instead of plummeting to 20th nationally.

“Just because there are a lot of startups,” observes Barry Broome, CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, “doesn’t provide a measure of the economic growth in the Valley.” A startup can be someone opening a consultancy, a contractor or the next Apple. Self-employment is a form of startup. The challenge is nurturing a startup so it grows with high value jobs.

Local governments and the Arizona Commerce Authority see major value with growing Arizona startups into enterprises. Chris Mackay, economic development director in Chandler says, “There’s staying power when a business is local. It’s connected to the local community and if the economy falters, the owners are more willing to keep going locally as opposed to closing up shop.” That local staying power is one reason Mackay says Chandler makes big investments in growing future enterprises.

Planting the seeds

Arizona’s new economy needs startups to scale up into enterprises. Those growing small businesses become hiring employers offering high value jobs paying home-buying income. Government policy supporting businesses that can scale up is based on simple economics.

Businesses with more than 20 employees, says the Small Business Administration, generate two of three Arizona paychecks. Those same businesses cut checks for more than 70 percent of Arizona’s private payrolls. The value in 2012 was over $100 billion.

All new businesses are “startups,” but not all startup businesses will be entrepreneurial enterprises. “There is no relation between starting a business and starting a company,” says Dr. Daniel Isenberg, Professor of Entrepreneurship Practice and founding executive director of the Babson College Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Project in Boston. “Ninety percent of companies formed don’t grow high value jobs.”

Isenberg says that the difference between a start-up and enterprise is a matter of scale. He is an international advocate for scaling a business to grow as opposed to opening a business. An entrepreneur, he points out, is a business founder with a large company that just happens to be small right now.

Arizona State University, as the new American university, is at the cutting edge of helping turn ideas into enterprise. Recently, the college joined the elite ranks of schools offering a stand-alone degree in entrepreneurship. It’s on that list with Harvard Business School, Babson, and University of Texas. Its goal is getting new businesses that can grow into the market.

Locally grown

ASU says more than 70 percent of its W.P. Carey School of Business MBA graduates remain in Arizona. Keeping these graduates in state provides the human resources necessary to building new enterprises fueling the future economy.

“Starting a company — as opposed to just starting a business — is hard work,” says Isenberg. “An entrepreneur looks at the business and sees it growing. It’s a time of sleep deprivation, hard work, and endless pitches.” Few startups achieve quality growth—less than ten percent, he believes. “The golden triangle of a growing enterprise,” he continues, “is cash, customers and people.”

“An entrepreneurial endeavor isn’t limited to startups,” Isenberg emphasizes. “University research, family businesses, mature companies, all can be turned into a growing enterprise. Most startups tend to stay small.” The key to the economic contribution of startups in Arizona is scalability. He is adamant about it, “Ambition is not a dirty word. A business founder without ambition does not significantly contribute to overall economic growth.”

“There are a number of entrepreneurial success stories arising from a new direction for an existing, mature business,” Isenberg reports. Sometimes it takes a new owner with a vision; sometimes the existing management team finds a new direction. It can be a license from a university, a new product, or an innovative use of an existing product. Entrepreneurship can occur anywhere in a business’ lifecycle.”

Bringing ideas to market

Arizona colleges are on that licensing bandwagon. Entrepreneurs complain that it takes years to license patents or transfer technology from most universities. In ASU’s Office of Knowledge and Enterprise Development, the Arizona Furnace Technology Transfer Accelerator — first project of its type in the world — slashes technology transfer time from years to months. The AZ Furnace is a joint venture of ASU, University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University and Dignity Health. Funding partners include the Arizona Commerce Authority, BioAccel, and additional support from Thunderbird School of Global Management.

“There are hundreds of patents sitting on shelves at universities that could be in the market earning money for creators, colleges and businesses,” enthuses Gordon McConnell, assistant vice president, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Group in OKED. “We started a program to get patents into the market quickly.” The startups selected for incubation in AZ Furnace are either entrepreneurs in search of an idea to market or idea-creators ready to market through a business entity. The fledgling enterprises are capital-ready in 12 months or less.

Enterprise starts with a leader and a vision. The scale of the vision is what makes the difference, says Isenberg. The vast majority of business owners are thinking of a model that gets them to the point that they’re putting money in the bank. He says, “Entrepreneurs are thinking of a model that finds smart people, willing customers and puts the cash to back into the enterprise.”

“Angels invest in businesses they understand or CEOs they respect,” says Broome. “There’s a need for more of that in the Valley. We’re just not seeing the next Apple or Google evolving here.”

Gaining visibility

“The biggest challenge about getting angel and venture money is visibility,” says Brandon Clark, region coordinator for Startup Arizona.  “If you’re a promising digital startup locally, it’s a little harder to get noticed nationally being from a region not known for its digital startups.  That’s starting to slowly shift.” National publications, FastCompany and Entrepreneur Magazine, have eyed Arizona as an emerging technology region.

The development opportunity for the small business is capital. Combine the “Broome Factor”—known businesses; known leaders—with the large number of startups, and there are too many funding requests heading towards too few checkbooks.

What makes early investors open pocketbooks to startup businesses is scalability. Businesses with potential to grow create the greatest return on investment for the angels. “It’s also makes a difference to the local economy,” says Isenberg. “Local policymakers need to change their focus from ‘startup’ to a ‘high value growth business’.”

Cities like helping scalable startups — and provide resources that build success. There’s a loyalty factor when the business grows; it typically remains in the hometown that helped it succeed. This is important to Chandler, Mesa, Peoria, Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Surprise. These five cities have specifically invested in incubators and accelerators to nurture and graduate businesses achieving market traction. Chandler, Phoenix and Tucson have involvement with collaborative workspaces — Gangplank and Co+Hoots — as well.

While an employee or two in a collaborative workspace works well for a while, the time comes when a move up is needed. Clairvoyant, an enterprise and analytics startup now in Chandler Innovations started with Gangplank. “We grew from four employees in March to 12 in April,” smiles Amber Anderson, a firm partner and its business developer. “We needed a place to meet with clients and work with a growing team.” Still self-funded, the growing entity plans to hit 20 employees by January.

Mackay explains, “We help a company like this grow and hope that as it expands it continues to locate in Chandler.” To that end, the city is working with landlords in its Price Corridor to offer “teenage” space that lets a business move from the heavily subsidized rents and back office support of the incubator into its own place—without too much sticker shock.

Support from cities

The difference by which startup is accepted into a city’s incubator is the ability to scale up from the garage to commercial space; from one employee to more than 20. Chandler and Mesa are looking for businesses with this capacity. Innovations gives lab and office space to businesses that have formed entities — LLCs, corporations, partnerships — and a business plan. Mesa’s new Technology Accelerator is planned with a similar focus, but is looking for businesses at an earlier stage. Surprise’s Arizona TechCelerator wants to shepherd a business to the angel investor stage.

In Surprise, scalability is one of the criteria to be accepted into Arizona’s oldest incubator. The TechCelerator is looking for businesses offering something outside the box or creating a new niche. “The company has to be started before we’ll consider them,” says Julie Neal, the economic development coordinator for the city’s enterprise. “They need a mentor, a plan and have to know where they are going.”

“Scaling up is difficult,” says Isenberg, “but doing it right defines the difference between the successful entrepreneur with a growth business and a startup that just stays small. Marketplaces are competitive. The startup has to acquire customers. That means overcoming inertia or changing buyer behavior. While established companies are cruising on their business platforms, the startup has to hire people, start a company, raise money, and all the while, it’s competing in the marketplace. That’s tough work.”

After incubation, the business must gain market traction. At this phase, the fledgling enterprise has product going out and customers paying for it. The kinks are being smoothed, and it’s time to move up to the next stage and grow. Isenberg says that the high growth criterion is simply 20 percent annual increases in sales or staff for five years.

Getting capital

To make this leap requires high levels of capital — the checks venture capitalists cut. The biggest challenge in Phoenix is that there are few sources for local venture capital. The venturists hang out in places like Silicon Valley, Boston, San Diego and Seattle. “There are even a couple of funds with deep ties to the Valley,” worries Clark, “but they have very little involvement in local startups.”

Clate Mask, CEO of Infusionsoft, had to travel out of town for his venture capital. “At one time, I was told that a fund wouldn’t cut a check for a firm in Phoenix because we didn’t have the workforce for success,” he says. “That’s no longer true; venture funds are seeing that there is a real climate for success in the Valley.”

Another resource for a growing business is the Arizona Commerce Authority’s “Growing Your Arizona Business” services. The quasi-public agency provides mentorship, regulatory assistance, access to incentive programs and site selection. It also works as a liaison connecting the growing business with other business resources. The agency mentors businesses in accessing federal procurement and grant opportunities as well as serving as an entrée to international trade.

Overall, the major resource in Arizona for start-up businesses is the universities. Anemic legislative funding for the schools causes their efforts to help to face the same struggles growing businesses face. Their efforts to improve Arizona’s long-term economy are stymied by a declining source of capital.

“ASU is underfunded,” complains Barry Broome. “The school has done an amazing job despite being financially crippled by budget cuts. It’s suffering from a lack of resources to take its programs to scale.” “Scalability” is applicable to the business-development programs at the universities and other public agencies just as it is for growing enterprises.

“Getting money for those programs is the top job for the next governor,” predicts Broome.
Opportunity in Arizona will come from the core of businesses growing today. They will create the jobs for the new economy and drive economic success for the next generation.

472dollar7915_10150756067230821_684500435_o

ASU Polytechnic Students Take $2 Challenge

More than 30 students at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa, located at 7001 E Williams Field Rd, will abstain from modern-day luxuries and challenge themselves to live on two dollars a day and in cardboard-box houses from Nov., 12-15, 2013.  Students will convene outside the Student Union and begin building their homes at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 12th.

The Two Dollar Challenge, a national experiential learning exercise and poverty action program, is designed to give students an opportunity to step out of their daily lives and more tangibly reflect upon the daily and prolonged challenges of living in poverty while raising awareness and funds to support economic development organizations.

This Challenge is distinct from your average charity drive for three reasons. First, it asks students to restrict their consumption and live by other rules designed to simulate poverty. This experience gives students a glimpse of how nearly half of the world’s population lives every day. Second, the Two Dollar Challenge participants will raise funds for the cause of their choice. Third, through the experience and accompanying discussion students are educated about the complexity of world poverty. Student groups can become immediate actors in the eradication of global poverty and gain the experience to become passionate leaders in the field for the future.

“This is our second year partnering with Esperança and our students are looking forward to the challenge,” said Mark Henderson, engineering professor and co-founder of GlobalResolve at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation.  “During the three day Challenge, the students will clean dorm rooms, hold car washes and do other odd jobs to make money to purchase food and live.  It will be an eye-opening experience for them to see what poverty feels like.”

The students will also be holding a shoe drive to help fund Esperança’s programs.  Esperança is a nonprofit that improves health and provides hope for families in the poorest communities of the world through sustainable disease prevention, education and treatment.  The general public can drop off their gently used shoes at the Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa anytime during the three day challenge, Nov., 12-15, 2013.

“We’re excited to be a part of ASU’s Two Dollar Challenge,” said Tom Egan, executive director, Esperança.  “We offer programs and services in five countries and our volunteers are always surprised by the living conditions.  People in Bolivia and Nicaragua don’t always have access to clean water and food, they are disease stricken and don’t have stable homes to live in.  The Two Dollar Challenge is an opportunity for us to bring awareness to poverty locally, as well as nationally and internationally.”

pt

CORE Institute Opens 5th Physical Therapy Location

To support its growth and complement their orthopedic practice in the East Valley, The CORE Institute announced it has opened a new Physical Therapy location on the Banner Desert Medical Center campus at 1450 S. Dobson Rd. Suite A-302 in Mesa.

“The CORE Institute is excited to expand our physical therapy services to effectively serve our patient’s needs,” said Dan Neal, PT, MSPT, Vice President of Physical Therapy of The CORE Institute. “Expanding our physical therapy services will allow patients to receive a continuum of care from the clinic through the physical therapy, thus allowing us to track results and utilize best-in-class care to promote optimal outcomes for our patients.”

The CORE Institute has six clinic locations and five physical therapy locations across the Valley and accepts most insurance plans. Mesa Physical Therapy is open from 7 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. To make an appointment or for more information, call 1.866.974.2673 or visit www.thecoreinstitute.com.

Phil Schiller

Apple brings 700 jobs to Valley manufacturing plant

Apple Inc. says it will open a manufacturing plant in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa that will eventually employ 700 workers.

“Apple’s presence in the region will be a game-changer for the Greater Phoenix area, its innovation landscape and future ability to attract other high-tech companies,” said GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome. “Between their plans to hire 700 direct employees and run completely on renewable energy, I’m convinced Apple could not have chosen a better location than Mesa and Eastmark. This deal is the result of the cooperation and support of several parties, including Maricopa County Supervisor Steve Chucri, City of Mesa Mayor Scott Smith, DMB Associates, the ACA and SRP, whose infrastructure will enable more projects to move forward in the surrounding area.”

The Cupertino, Calif., maker of the iPhone confirmed Monday that it is expanding its U.S. manufacturing operations in a former First Solar plant in Mesa. The city southeast of Phoenix already hosts a long list of high-tech manufacturing firms.

About 1,300 construction jobs will also be created as the First Solar plant designed to make thin-film solar panels is converted. The company sold the plant last month.

Apple spokeswoman Kristen Huguet says the plant will be powered with renewable energy provided by local utility Salt River Project.

Gov. Jan Brewer said Apple’s decision to come to Arizona is a sign that the state’s efforts to provide a pro-business climate are paying off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Test

Nelson Appointed to Boys & Girls Clubs' board

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Kevin P. Nelson was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.  Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization. The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Michael Tiffany, Managing Partner and Shareholder of Tiffany & Bosco stated, “We are thankful that Kevin is such an active member in an organization that works with children to benefit our entire community. Kevin is a dedicated lawyer and committed to serving our community and his clients.”

Test

Nelson Appointed to Boys & Girls Clubs’ board

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Kevin P. Nelson was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.  Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization. The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Michael Tiffany, Managing Partner and Shareholder of Tiffany & Bosco stated, “We are thankful that Kevin is such an active member in an organization that works with children to benefit our entire community. Kevin is a dedicated lawyer and committed to serving our community and his clients.”

child.hospital

SRP Donates $50,000 Toward Ronald McDonald House

Salt River Project has approved a $50,000 donation toward construction of a new Ronald McDonald House on the campus of Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa.  The new House will be the first in the East Valley and the third in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

The new 12,600 square foot Ronald McDonald House will be located in a renovated former residential facility adjacent to the hospital.  The House will include 16 bedrooms, kitchen, common area, indoor dining room, two outdoor dining areas, work spaces and an outdoor play area.

The two operating Ronald McDonald Houses are located at 501 E. Roanoke Ave. and on the campus of Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

“For more than 100 years, water and power have been essential to SRP’s mission of building a strong Arizona. Equally important is our commitment to improving the communities where we work and live,” said SRP President David Rousseau.  “We are proud to support Banner’s Cardon Children’s Hospital, which provides the East Valley and Arizona with access to quality pediatric care, as well as the Ronald McDonald House Charities as it provides vital services and comfort to families in times of great stress and crisis.”

The joint fundraising effort between Ronald McDonald House Charities and Banner Health Foundation has so far raised $1.22 million toward the $2.1 million goal and is expected to be completed by the end of the fourth quarter this year.

“Salt River Project is an important partner for the Ronald McDonald House in our effort to serve the East Valley, and we are incredibly grateful for this generous contribution to help meet our fund-raising goal,” said RMHC Executive Director Nancy Roach.

In 2012, more than 1,850 families stayed at the two Ronald McDonald Houses in Phoenix, nearly 90 percent from Arizona but also from 23 states and 11 countries.  The average length of stay was 15 days.

The new House will be the first serving the East Valley.  Families staying at Ronald McDonald Houses must live outside a 30-mile radius from the nearest House.

No one is ever turned away for not being able to pay the $15 nightly fee asked of families whose children are undergoing medical care in the Valley.

The cost for housing a family for one night is $51.  In 2012, only 12% of families staying at a Ronald McDonald House in Phoenix were able to pay all or part of the fee.  Community donations and contributions help cover the difference between the daily cost and the fee the House asks for those who can afford to pay.

For information about making a donation to the Ronald McDonald House capital campaign, contact Jerry Diaz, Director of Development, (602) 798-5092 or jdiaz@rmhcphoenix.com.  For more information about Ronald McDonald Charities of Phoenix, visit www.rmhcphoenix.com.

LosAlamos

Cassidy Turley Sells Los Alamos Center for $1.235M

Cassidy Turley recently announced the sale of the Los Alamos Center, a ± 22,050-square-foot industrial auto complex property at 3015 E. Main St. in Mesa, Ariz. WLA Investments, Inc. (Newport Beach, Calif.) purchased the property for $1,235,000 ($56.01/psf) from Los Alamos Center, LLC (Mesa). Senior Managing Directors Paul Boyle and Rick Danis with Cassidy Turley’s Capital Markets Group negotiated the transaction for the buyer while Adam Hansen of Metropolitan Realty Advisors represented the seller.

Built in 1987, Los Alamos Center is a one-story multi-tenant industrial complex featuring three buildings on 1.76 acres. The property is located near several corporate auto tenants including O’Reilly Auto Parts, Midas, Just Brakes, Napa Auto Parts and MAACO. WLA Investments, Inc. plans to hold the building as an investment property. The complex was 100 percent occupied at the time of sale.

TOY_AZ_Nancie_Lindblom

Wells Fargo Celebrates Arizona Teacher of the Year

Wells Fargo is honoring Arizona’s Teacher of the Year on its ATMs across the state.  For the month of September most of Wells Fargo’s 541 ATMs in Arizona will feature a screen congratulating 2013 Teacher of the Year, Nancie Lindblom. Wells Fargo’s ATM customers will see a picture of Lindblom and some details about her teaching achievements.

“Teachers are the backbone of our community and we believe it’s important to celebrate the great teachers who encourage, support and inspire great achievements from their students,” said Pam Conboy, lead regional president for Wells Fargo in Arizona. “We congratulate Nancie Lindblom and thank all of our Arizona teachers for their service. Our entire community benefits from their work, and we want to show our appreciation by honoring one of Arizona’s best.”

Lindblom teaches 11th and 12th grade American History and Government at Skyline High School in Mesa.  She has been an educator for 18 years.  Lindblom earned a bachelor’s degree in Social Studies Education from Northern Arizona University. She is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in American History and Government from Ashland University and will graduate in May 2014.