Tag Archives: Mesa

volunteer

SRP Donates $94,500 to Nonprofit Agencies

Salt River Project employees are turning their volunteer hours into much-needed funds for the nonprofit organizations they assist through the SRP Dollars for Doers program.

The program contributes funds, ranging from $250 to $1,000, directly to community nonprofits based upon the number of volunteer hours donated during the 2012 calendar year by SRP employees. The grant program is designed to provide funding to nonprofit agencies that are also supported by the volunteer efforts of SRP employees.

“SRP has a distinct heritage built upon responding to the needs of our customers and the communities in which they live, and we recognize the value of providing support to organizations whose programs are improving the lives of our community,” said Jen Martyn who manages the SRP Volunteer Program.

SRP donated $94,500 to 106 nonprofit agencies in which 141 SRP employees donated more than 29,000 hours of their time and experience in cities throughout the Valley, including Avondale, Camp Verde, Casa Grande, Chandler, Douglas, El Mirage, Gilbert, Glendale, Higley, Litchfield Park, Mesa, Page, Peoria, Phoenix, Pine Top, Queen Creek, San Tan Valley, Scottsdale, St. Johns, Tempe and Tolleson and Tucson.

Employees contributed to their community in a number of ways, including:

· coaching youth football, baseball, soccer and swimming,
· providing children with special needs horse therapy rides,
· ushering during arts and cultural events,
· preparing meals for those in need,
· mentoring and providing leadership to youth and
· assisting schools through parent-teacher organizations and booster clubs.

Kitty_Plumbing_02

Maloney-Langmade becomes leader of men

There are not many people in the world who can say they are a licensed plumber, have an MBA in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management, and are a mother to three daughters, ages 7, 11 and 12.

Kathryn “Kitty” Maloney-Langmade can make those claims.

The president of W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling leads a vibrant plumbing contracting company in a male-dominated industry. Some of her company’s recent projects include the new Chicago Cubs spring training complex in Mesa, the Veteran’s Administration Southeast Healthcare Clinic in Gilbert, Phase IV of CityScape Phoenix, a major solar thermal project at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and the Sky Train Project at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Az Business magazine caught up with Maloney-Langmade — whose company won consecutive Best of the Best Awards for safety from SCF Arizona — for a Q&A.

How did you get into the plumbing business?
My father and mother started W.J. Maloney Plumbing in 1964.  I grew up in and around the business. My dad was always working in the field and my mother performed the bookkeeping. Upon returning from my honeymoon, I learned my mother’s secretary had left the company.  My mother asked me to come to the plumbing shop to help her out with payroll and I never left.

Are there any aspects of the industry that are made more difficult because you are a woman?
Growing up, I always heard and learned about construction but I was not in the field with my father.  Often times, I wish I had the mechanical, hands-on expertise and years of experience that my father had.  To carry on his tradition of quality workmanship, I have had to surround myself with key people who have the same mechanical skill that he possessed.

Are there any benefits to being a woman in a male-dominated industry?
My experience is that both men and women in construction go out of their way to be supportive, kind, courteous and helpful.  People want me to succeed.  They know construction is a tough road.  I am lucky to have received good advice and help.

What has been your biggest challenge?
Turning the company around during difficult times.  We were in a pattern of winning work and doing jobs, but were losing money. Meeting and listening to my key foremen who have been with the company for years, I was able to learn and understand changes that needed to happen. I was able to get the company moving in the right direction when I put together a solid leadership team.  We are now able to estimate, win and perform good work.  We have a great team in place now and the momentum continues to build and grow.

law

JacksonWhite Names First Female Shareholder

JacksonWhite P.C. announced that attorney Susan Court was made a shareholder of the firm.  Court joins 12 other attorneys at JacksonWhite who share the distinction of shareholder.

Court joined JacksonWhite in 2005 and focuses her practice on elder law, probate, guardianships, conservatorships, and estate planning. Court assists clients with end-of-life issues including incapacity, mental illness and the transfer of assets before or after death. She is a member of the Arizona Fiduciaries Association as well as the State Bar of Arizona. Court is a former Maricopa County prosecutor and taught Business Law at Mesa Community College and Chandler Gilbert Community College. She is also active on the MCC Development Board, the J. Reuben Clark Law Society, and the Mesa Chamber of Commerce.

Founded in 1983, JacksonWhite P.C. offers a full-range of services to assist individuals, families and businesses with their legal needs. Since its inception, the Mesa firm has grown steadily to include 22 highly experienced attorneys and over 40 paralegals, legal assistants and staff. At this size, the firm is large enough to offer the efficiency and technical expertise of larger firms, yet small enough to provide clients with individualized, personalized attention. JacksonWhite has three offices around the state of Arizona including a Mesa, Casa Grande and Peoria location. For more information on a specific attorney or area of practice, visit www.jacksonwhitelaw.com or www.arizonaseniorlaw.com.

volunteer

11 SRP Employees Honored for Volunteer Work

In recognition of the invaluable contribution of their time, efforts and expertise to their communities, 11 SRP employee volunteers were awarded the SRP Presidents’ Volunteer Spirit Awards. These dedicated employees have given countless hours of their time to help families put food on their tables; provide guidance to Latino youths as they prepare for college and give children with special needs horse therapy rides.

“Each year SRP recognizes inspiring employee volunteers who give of their time to helping Arizonans through a wide variety of community organizations,” said Rosemary Gannon, manager of SRP Community Outreach, who added that SRP employees and retirees, with help from their friends and families, donate thousands of volunteer hours a year to their communities. “Strong, thriving communities rely on the volunteer efforts of individuals like these recipients.”

This year, in addition to the SRP Presidents’ Volunteer Spirit Award, SRP employee Kyle Bridges was honored with the Karl F. Abel Volunteer Recognition Award for his sustained leadership role in addressing significant human service needs in his community. The late Karl F. Abel, a Glendale resident who served as president of SRP from 1972 to 1982, was a strong community advocate and  provided volunteer leadership to numerous organizations.

The 2013 SRP Presidents’ Volunteer Spirit Award honorees and the nonprofits they assist are:

Chandler resident Holly Schaefer – AZ Happy Tails Animal Rescue
Holly Schaefer is a founding member of AZ Happy Tails Animal Rescue, which was established in 2009 to rescue and find loving homes for animals that are stray, abandoned or at risk of euthanasia. To date, AZ Happy Tails has rescued and found homes for more than 400 animals. Schaefer is responsible for all animal intake and adoption decisions, and she coordinates with foster homes to supply them with food and bedding and help with any other needs they may have.

Gilbert resident Barbara Sprungl – The Centers for Habilitation (TCH)
The Centers for Habilitation (TCH) provides promotes independence for Arizonans with developmental and physical disabilities. In 2010, Barbara Sprungl joined TCH’s board of directors, and she volunteers more than 20 hours a month. She chairs the Fund Development Committee and is vice chair of the Finance, Governance and Executive committee. She volunteers for fundraising events and helps with everything from setup and operation to planning. Sprungl implemented a new formal fundraising model and trained the rest of the board on the new approach. In 2012, she raised $12,500 for the Monster Mash Sponsorship Committee.

Glendale resident David Larson – Cactus High School Robotics Team
The Cactus High School Robotics Team is experienced in building, maintaining and operating robots. David Larson has been a mentor and coach since 2009 and volunteers an average of 67 hours a month. Because of his time investment, the robotics team has shown dramatic improvement. Larson readies the team for FIRST Robotics competition and this year they built a robot that plays basketball. Larson also holds workshops for welding, tube and wire soldering, painting, and many other skills. He also started a safety program, complete with a study guide and an exam for the program.

Mesa resident Kyle Tilghman – American Youth Soccer Organization — Region 1079
The American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO) provides soccer programs for children ages 4–19 and Region 1079 is the largest soccer program in the East Valley. The region is run completely by volunteer coaches and referees, and a number of volunteers dedicate a lot of time to securing soccer fields and marketing the organization. Kyle Tilghman has been a volunteer coach with AYSO’s Region 1079 since 2006. Six years ago, he was volunteering three hours a month, but over the years, he has taken on more responsibilities. In addition to coaching and refereeing, he serves as the coach administrator for the region.

Peoria resident John Buonagurio – Theater Works
Theater Works is a nonprofit performing arts organization that has been serving Peoria and the West Valley for more than 25 years. John Buonagurio is a volunteer of nearly three years and is chairman of the board. He also serves on the Governance, Development and Artistic committees. It has been a challenging time for Theater Works, like many other arts organizations, as support at all levels has waned because of the recession. Buonagurio’s leadership over the past few years has brought continuity to Theater Works during a time of change and challenges.

Peoria resident Mark Burkhart – St. Mary’s Food Bank  Alliance
St. Mary’s Food Bank alleviates hunger by gathering and distributing food to  two-thirds of Arizona’s 15 counties and is committed to volunteerism, building community relationships and improving the quality of life for Arizonans in need. Mark Burkhart has planned and managed a golf tournament that raises between $10,000 and $15,000 annually. Burkhart is dedicated to St. Mary’s and knows that every dollar he raises means seven meals for the hungry. In the 10 years he has been coordinating the golf tournament, he has helped St. Mary’s serve more than 900,000 meals.

Peoria resident Jim Custis – Joni and Friends Arizona
Joni and Friends Arizona works with local churches and organizations to form outreach programs for those who face the daily challenge of life with a disability. For the past six years, Jim Custis has been fundraising for the organization’s Family Retreat program, which provides a respite for families affected by disabilities. Custis and his family have raised more than $20,000 and spend about 15 hours a month volunteering with Joni and Friends and one week of vacation every summer serving families affected by disabilities.

Peoria resident Christopher Rodriguez – AGUILA Youth Leadership Institute
AGUILA Youth Leadership Institute prepares Latino/Latina youth, beginning as high school freshmen, for college admissions and graduation. Christopher Rodriguez fundraises, serves on the board of advisors and uses his bilingual skill to help Spanish-speaking parents understand the benefits of AGUILA and the importance of higher education for their children. He’s also a mentor, helping these students pursue their goals of higher education. Rodriguez is dedicated to this program because he knows many of the youth who attend AGUILA will be the first in their families to attend college.

Phoenix resident Shari Brady – Arizona FIRST Lego League
Arizona FIRST Lego League (FLL) is a robotics program for students ages 9–14 that promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) projects. Shari Brady began volunteering when she was an ASU student and continues to volunteer about 17 hours a week. She serves on the Advisory Committee, which plans regional tournaments and helps develop volunteer recruiting strategies. This year, the tournament was expanded to include remote northern Arizona teams, allowing a number of school teams from Native American communities to participate without long travel times to tournament venues.

San Tan Valley resident Kyle Bridges – Epic Food Mission
Epic Food Mission provides hope, help and support to families facing financial difficulty in the Queen Creek/San Tan Valley area. Every first and third Saturday of the month, Epic Food Mission provides food boxes, baby food and personal hygiene items for distribution to those in need. For five years, Kyle Bridges has volunteered with Epic Food Mission, serving as the organization’s distribution coordinator. He is responsible for organizing 50 volunteers and six team leaders to prepare hundreds of care packages for families. Bridges donates 50 hours of his time each month. For the past three years, he has also found time to volunteer with Compassion Connect, which helps unite and mobilize local churches, nonprofits, schools, and businesses to provide free dental and medical care for underserved populations.

San Tan Valley resident Marty Sonnenberg – Angel Acres Inc.
Angel Acres Inc. is a program created by Marty Sonnenberg in 2003, successfully combining her love of working with special-needs children with her love of working with horses. Every year from October through May, Sonnenberg and other volunteers teach grooming and horse therapy riding as part of a six-week program. During that time, Sonnenberg donates nearly 90 hours a month to keep program costs low and allow all the funds raised to go directly to the program. To date, the program has helped more than 446 children and given more than 2,680 therapy rides.

Test

Boys & Girls Clubs board appoints Bosco

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Mark S. Bosco was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.

Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization.

The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Steve Davidson, President and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale stated, “We are thrilled to have Mark join our team.  We know that his passion, commitment, and comprehension of the work done by our organization will help us grow and continue to serve more youth in our communities.  He is an outstanding addition to our organization.”

Test

Boys & Girls Clubs board appoints Bosco

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Mark S. Bosco was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.

Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization.

The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Steve Davidson, President and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale stated, “We are thrilled to have Mark join our team.  We know that his passion, commitment, and comprehension of the work done by our organization will help us grow and continue to serve more youth in our communities.  He is an outstanding addition to our organization.”

Narang Headshot

Narang named CEO of Banner Good Samaritan

Steve Narang, MD, chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Ariz., has been named chief executive officer at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, effective April 26. He will assume the role from current CEO Larry Volkmar, who will continue to serve as CEO until April 25.

Banner Health Arizona West Region President Kathy Bollinger said Dr. Narang will have the opportunity over the next several weeks to work closely with Volkmar to ensure a smooth hand-off of responsibilities. “The collaboration between these two Banner leaders will ensure a smooth transition,” she said.

Dr. Narang, a pediatric physician, has served as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s since June 2011. Prior to coming to Banner Health, Dr. Narang served in a variety of medical director and teaching positions in Louisiana, including medical director of graduate medical education and medical director of pediatric emergency services at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“I’m looking forward to working with an outstanding team at Banner Good Samaritan,” said Dr. Narang. “We will work together to take its distinguished history of excellent clinical care, teaching and research and create a distinct value proposition around the delivery of high-value and innovative academic medicine in one of the country’s highest performing health systems.”

Bollinger said that Dr. Narang distinguished himself during the interview process as a visionary leader that is highly driven to deliver results. She said Dr. Narang’s impressive relationship-building strengths will be focused on engaging employees, physicians and the community around the excellence that is the foundation of Banner Good Samaritan’s 100-year legacy. “These strengths, combined with Steve’s background as a practicing physician, will be particularly effective in Steve’s engagement with the graduate medical education program,” she said.

Bollinger said it makes her especially proud that Dr. Narang’s selection reflects Banner’s commitment to internal opportunities for growth, development and promotion.
“In his experience as a physician, teacher, medical director and, most recently, as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Dr. Narang has amply demonstrated leadership attributes that are critical to Banner’s future as a leading health system in the nation,” she said. “The future is indeed very bright.”

Dr. Narang received his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and completed his pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He has a master’s degree in health care management from Harvard University in Boston.

Michael Pollack - Real Estate Investments

Pollack donates $1 million to Goodwill

Austin Powers said it. Michael Pollack is doing it. One million dollars. When Pollack says he wants to put Arizonans back to work he is literally putting his money where his mouth is.  Once again this week one of the Valley’s most generous entrepreneurs has reached into his pocketbook donating $100,000 to Goodwill of Central Arizona. This puts Pollack’s lifetime of giving to Goodwill at more than a $1 million.

“Simply put, I believe in what Goodwill stands for and that is putting people back to work, especially during times like these,” said Michael Pollack, owner of Michael A. Pollack Real Estate Investments. “When you see the stories first hand like I have, people who are getting a chance to go back to work and feed their families and be productive members of society, it is very easy to continue giving to an organization that is truly making a major difference in our community.”

Goodwill of Central Arizona says Pollack’s $100,000 contribution this week is also its biggest cash contribution from an individual made to the organization so far in 2013. The organization says Pollack over the years has generously donated more than $1 million dollars between his cash donations, discounted/free rent and other in-kind contributions.

The biggest cash contribution came in 2010 when during the struggling economy Pollack wrote the organization a $250,000 check, the organization’s largest cash donation to date.

Pollack’s giving has not only come in the form of monetary donations, but the real estate entrepreneur has re-developed in-fill space that now houses Goodwill stores. Pollack Investments also uses Goodwill’s commercial services, like parking lot sweeping for about 60 shopping centers.

A year and a half ago – Goodwill honored Pollack with the Lifetime Achievement Award and this past October Pollack was honored with the 2012 Business Partner of the Year at Goodwill of Central Arizona’s 12th Annual Evening of Goodwill.

“We cannot express how grateful we are for Michael Pollack’s continued generosity and support of our organization.” said Jim Teter, president and CEO of Goodwill of Central Arizona. “We believe that through the power of work, every person, no matter their situation, can reach their fullest potential. And this recent donation will assist in our efforts to provide further job preparation services, at no cost, to our communities in central Arizona, Prescott and Yuma.”

boeing-phantom-ray

GPEC analyzes impact of potential defense cuts

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council today released findings and recommendations from its Aerospace and Defense Market Intelligence Program, a two-phase initiative that took an in-depth look at the region’s aerospace and defense companies to determine their strengths, weaknesses and readiness for the sequestration, federally-mandated automatic spending cuts scheduled to take place on March 1 unless Congress intervenes.

As a result of the sequestration, the Department of Defense (DoD) must cut $1 trillion from its budget. Arizona has the sixth largest share of DoD contracts, and stands to lose as much as $2.3 billion in annual revenue on account of sequestration-based cuts.  Until it happens, however, the size or effects of the cuts in Arizona remain ambiguous.

In anticipation of these massive cuts, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) – along with its Economic Development Directors Team and the Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce – last year undertook a major market intelligence initiative to determine the existing strengths and weaknesses of Arizona’s aerospace and defense companies. Based on this data snapshot, the analysis also sought to understand the potential impact of sequestration on our local companies, communities, workforce and innovation base.

“As part of GPEC’s program, I personally sat down with several aerospace and defense companies located in Phoenix. The message I heard from them was resoundingly clear – the uncertainty over the timing and severity of these cuts has many of them paralyzed, and they want guidance,” said Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton. “With 49,000 Arizona aerospace and defense jobs at stake, it’s critical that our federal leaders work together to avert this crisis or at least provide a strategic direction for where we go on March 2 and beyond.”

“Sequestration is a bad way to budget. Local companies and individuals get caught up in a political game that does little to solve our nation’s long-term financial challenges,” Mesa Mayor Scott Smith said. “Washington should follow the example of cities and make smart cuts to fix the budget rather than making arbitrary cuts that do more harm than good.”

The program consisted of two main components. The first developed an in-depth profile and analysis of 114 local companies identified by GPEC using data from the Office of Management and Budget. The second was an extensive door-to-door outreach effort to these companies, conducted by mayors, local chambers of commerce, GPEC Ambassadors (volunteers from GEC’s member companies) and municipal economic development directors and their teams.

“As a top-ranked defense state, Arizona has much to lose with the budget cuts associated with the 2011 Budget Control Act. The West Valley, proud home to Luke Air Force Base, has worked tirelessly to protect the mission of the base and to secure the F-35 aircraft,” Avondale Mayor Marie Lopez Rogers said. “Sequestration and the drastic budget cuts to defense and aerospace will undermine the efforts of the communities in the West Valley and negatively impact our local economy, which is tied closely to Luke Air Force Base and the defense-related industry.”

It’s also important to note that nearly 75 percent of the state’s research and development expenditures are housed within Arizona’s corporate infrastructure – companies like Intel, Boeing, Raytheon and Honeywell. As such, drastic reductions in their DoD contracts could result in losses in some of the state’s most significant research programs, which affect Arizona’s science position, its universities, and opportunities for increased investments and exports.

“These looming cuts represent a crossroads for our region,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “The region’s corporate, science, civic and government partners must convene to not only mitigate job loss but also to support and protect the region’s physical assets, workforce talent and innovation from being moved out of the market.”

The findings represent a snapshot of the Greater Phoenix region’s aerospace and defense industry for a specific period of time, from May through December 2012 when the data was collected. During this time period, sequestration was considered more of a threat and less of a reality.

Top-line analysis revealed that 76 percent of the companies reported to be either stable (52 percent) or expanding (24 percent). Twenty-six percent reported that their businesses were contracting – primarily companies and operations where DoD contracts represent the largest share of their revenue base. Those that were expanding focused on diversification, including commercial and international markets, or DoD growth areas like intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, cyber technology, space technology and counterterrorism.

Because 2,000 companies throughout Arizona were awarded $13 billion in defense contacts in 2012 – and the industry represents 43,000 direct jobs – even a 25 percent contraction could be detrimental to one of the state’s major employment bases. For larger, Tier 1 companies, the short-term outlook is more stable as many have expanded products and services in anticipation of the cuts. However, Tier 2 companies that generally represent the industry’s supply chain are less likely to withstand the cuts due to their reliance on Tier 1 companies for contracts and subcontracts. Some of these companies have neither the access to capital or the working capital to wait it out – meaning they could be forced to lay off workers or cease operations.

Based on the program’s findings, GPEC’s five recommendations include:

1. A federal-level strategy from Arizona’s congressional leadership to either fully reverse sequestration or provide a “go forward” strategy to ensure Arizona’s aerospace and defense assets – including R&D and skilled workforce – are retained and redeployed.
2. Public and bilateral support for Governor Brewer and the Arizona Commerce Authority in their efforts to secure an FAA-designated test site.
3. A major commitment to science and technology to ensure the aerospace and defense industry’s existing knowledge and technology assets are leveraged to generate new and higher-value economic growth opportunities for our existing workforce talent while also attracting new, skill ed workers to Greater Phoenix.
4. Increased support for regional export opportunities from state and regional leaders.
5. An ongoing commitment to business retention and expansion, particularly with regards to sequestration.

To view the Aerospace and Defense Market Intelligence Report in its entirety, as well as all five recommendations, please visit http://www.gpec.org/aerospace.

BASIS_MESA_View_24

BASIS Selects Eastmark for Its Next East Valley School

The nationally renowned charter school BASIS has selected Eastmark for its next East Valley campus. Construction on BASIS Mesa at Eastmark commences in March 2013.  The new school is set to open fall 2013.

“BASIS is our first 5-12 educational partner and a perfect fit for this community.  Eastmark’s central location in the East Valley will give hundreds of children more opportunities to earn a world-class education, which is a tremendous value for kids, their families and our region’s future workforce,” said Dea McDonald, Senior Vice President of DMB Associates and General Manager of Eastmark.

“Every DMB community features education and lifelong learning among its Community Life pillars, which are empowered by partnerships that extend far beyond the classroom.  We’re delighted to bring to future residents and neighbors this charter school option in the early phase of Eastmark,” added McDonald.

The new BASIS Mesa at Eastmark will complement the East Valley BASIS programs.  Because of the strong interest by parents and students, the BASIS Board of Directors agreed there was enough demand to develop another school in the East Valley, explained Craig Barrett, retired Chairman/CEO of Intel Corporation and Chairman of the Board for BASIS Schools Inc.

“Our BASIS Chandler School has had a waiting list since we opened.  DMB brought us the opportunity to develop in their new community, in an early phase of the development, where we could be a true partner.  Its location, easy access to transportation and vision for the future made Eastmark the right choice for us.  We’re eager to grow another top performing school for the region,” Barrett said.

The BASIS Mesa at Eastmark will open with grades 5-10, adding grade 11 by 2014 and grade 12 by 2015. BASIS Mesa may also add K through 4thgrades in ensuing years.  The design and size of the new school will be similar to its Chandler and Phoenix campuses. The campus will be located adjacent to the Eastmark Great Park situated on approximately 4.5 acres. DMB is advancing the development and construction of Eastmark Parkway to meet the timelines of the opening of the charter school.

Families can sign up for the BASIS Mesa at Eastmark interest list at www.basislink.org.

The first phase of Eastmark’s residential development is in the Queen Creek School District.  The district does not have plans to build another campus in Eastmark in the immediate future.

Eastmark will host its grand opening on June 1, 2013 with seven builders offering homes in the first phase of residential development.

BASIS is the top performing school in Arizona with BASIS students ranked highest in Stanford 10 national test scores in both math and reading in 2012.
All BASIS schools are “A” rated by the Arizona Department of Education (“AZEd”).

Approximately 5,000 students attend BASIS schools with campuses in Tucson, Oro Valley, Scottsdale, Chandler, Flagstaff, Peoria and Washington, D.C.  BASIS is also opening new schools in Ahwatukee, San Antonio, and a new K-4 program in Tucson.

Sun Health

Banner Simulation Medical Center Earns Worldwide Accreditation

Banner Health’s systemwide simulation education program has been accredited by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) in five areas of expertise, becoming one of three worldwide organizations to achieve accreditation in all areas.

The Society for Simulation in Healthcare is the largest simulation organization in the world focused on improving patient care and patient outcomes. Institutions can apply for accreditation in one or more of the five areas of expertise: core, assessment, research, teaching and system integration. To date, there are only 27 institutions worldwide that have been certified by SHH and only two others organizations have been accredited in all five areas – the U.S. Army Medical Department, Madigan Healthcare System and University of Pittsburg and UPMC The WISER Institute.

With the vision of transforming health care delivery through simulation, learning and research, Banner Health’s extensive simulation program is available to physicians and nurses in seven states. The program boasts a 55,000-square-foot simulation medical center located in Mesa, one of the largest centers of its kind in the world. The “virtual hospital” places caregivers in real-time situations using the latest technology in electronic medical records and innovative care.

“Putting caregivers into environments where they become familiar with the multiple demands in a real-time situation allows them to gain confidence in their ability to deal with patients in real life situations. This is an excellent education technique and Banner Health is very fortunate to have access to this center and the educators that are there,” said Carol Cheney, Banner Health’s senior director of clinical education.

Another important element of the program is the simulation-education network, a network that was modeled after the aviation industry recognized for their safety rating.

“Our simulation education has decreased the time needed for new nurses to get oriented to Banner facilities and policies; increased our retention rate of new nurses, which ultimately reduces errors in patient care,” said John Hensing, MD, Banner’s executive vice president/chief medical officer. “Our research program is also leading the field of simulation learning into the future.”

In 2012, the program was accredited by the American College of Surgeons, becoming the first program that is has accredited across an entire health system. Banner Health has been recognized by Thomson Reuters as a Top Five Large Health System in the nation and as a Top Leadership Team/Large System by HealthLeaders magazine.

Ginger Lopez Head Shot

Clean Air Cab Hires New Vice President

Since its launch in 2009, Clean Air Cab has been a family owned and operated business. The local cab company continues to brand itself that way with their recent hire. Ginger Lopez, the wife of owner Steve Lopez, has joined the company full time last month as the new Vice President.

Ginger brings years of experience in the transportation industry to the business. Her role at Clean Air Cab will involve decision-making and community outreach.

“We are always looking for new ways to be innovative at Clean Air Cab,” said Lopez about her new role. “We also like to brainstorm and find new ways to partner within the community and learn ways of becoming a more sustainable company.”

Ginger has been involved with Clean Air Cab since the beginning, as her husband of seven years, Steve Lopez, remains the president and CEO. Ginger has been a stay-at-home mom raising their three kids all under the age of six. In her free time, she enjoys volunteering, traveling, reading and spending time with her family.

Clean Air Cab is Arizona’s first carbon neutral taxicab service. They provide safe transportation that betters the quality of the environment, making it affordable and convenient for the community to support the growth of alternative energy. For more information on Clean Air Cab, visit www.cleanaircab.com  or call (480) 777-9777.

technology

GPEC puts together a science and technology strategy

Even when the state was known for copper, cattle and citrus, Arizona has relied on being an innovator to drive its economy.

“Arizona’s economic position has historically been defined by science and technology,” says Steven M. Shope, president of Mesa-based Sandia Research Corporation, “especially if you look back to the 1940s and 1950s, when the state put a wealth of resources into attracting new technologies.”

Those efforts, Shope says, paid off and made Arizona a leader in the electronics, semiconductor, aerospace and defense industries.

“Now, we need more science and technology to transform Arizona into a knowledge economy and lift our productivity and export growth from below national average,” Shope says.

To help make that happen, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) has directed its Innovation Council — which is co chaired by Shope and Todd Hardy, associate vice president of economic affairs for Arizona State University — to study the community’s high-potential assets, look for commercialization opportunities and put together and science and technology strategy that will help drive a knowledge-based economy in Arizona. The backbone of that strategy will be building on the state’s existing strengths.

According to Sethuraman Panchanathan, senior vice president at ASU’s Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development, those strengths include the state’s world-class research universities, research centers and institutes, a large highly trained workforce, a vibrant entrepreneurship ecosystem, a concerted effort on improving business climate in the cities and the state, plans for rapid growth by existing science and technology businesses, and an enhanced quality of life.

“Our best strengths come from the companies already here — established businesses like Intel, Avnet, Boeing and Honeywell,” Shope says. “Arizona also has lower workforce costs and good transportation connectivity to other markets, both of which are attractive for science- or technology-based businesses.”

So how does Arizona tranlate those assets into further expansion and enhancement of the science and technology sectors?

“We’re already world leaders in solar research and development and manufacturing and there is still strong potential for innovation within our aerospace and electronics industries, as well as in healthcare and personalized medicine,” Shope says. “However, we need to fill in the gaps with regards to access to capital, markets and talent in order to realize that potential. GPEC’s Innovation Council is working to develop a strategy that leverages these resources, harnesses new ones and further diversifies our economy into these areas.”

Panchanathan says the key to creating a successful strategy will be, “Convergence of purpose between the various economic development entities in Arizona, securing investments that can be deployed to attract new businesses to Arizona, and creating incentives for attracting local and global businesses to Arizona.”

Already driving Arizona’s electronics sector is Intel, with its recent $5 billion expansion, and companies like Boeing and Honeywell are fueling the aerospace sector. Those three companies are driving innovation within our communities and their local supply chains, Shope points out.

Top develop its science and technology strategy, Shope says says GPEC’s Innovation Council is conducting a deep market analysis to identify long-term opportunities in science and technology, and learning how to target growth from initiatives in other regions. GPEC is building the business case among private leaders to establish focus and build resources around a few select initiatives.

“A well thought-out strategy should include building up each community’s unique assets and driving growth into new markets by establishing centers of excellence around emerging products and technologies,” Shope says. “Increasing funding to the universities for R&D is also critical, as is developing funding and resources for entrepreneurs. Educating the entrepreneur is also an important goal. In particular, R&D funding from federal sources, such as (Small Business Innovation Research) SBIR and (Small Business Technology Transfer Program) STTR, is an ideal mechanism for launching new technologies. However, this funding is becoming increasingly competitive. We need to be sure that Arizona small businesses can be highly competitive in these funding programs.”

gokart

Octane Raceway will open in Scottsdale

The Valley leader in active entertainment, Octane Raceway, announced the opening of their new kart racing and entertainment venue in Scottsdale. Opening this spring, Octane Raceway will move their current Phoenix facility to a new location in the Pavilions at Talking Stick. The new Scottsdale location will be conveniently located just off the 101 freeway and Indian Bend Road. The venue is designed with a one-third mile racetrack and a unique layout where each lap begins indoors then winds through an outdoor section of the course covered by a permanent steel canopy. This is the only full-time indoor and outdoor racetrack in the United States.

“The new location in the Pavilions is a fresh and more upscale version of Octane Raceway’s proven karting entertainment concept,” says President Scott Sanders on why Octane is moving to Scottsdale. “The new, central location makes Octane Raceway more accessible to many people in the Valley, particularly providing easy access to our existing customer base in Tempe, Mesa, Chandler and Phoenix as well as puts us in the heart of Scottsdale just minutes from the Scottsdale Airpark and North Phoenix business districts.”

Adding to the allure of the new space are state-of-the-art high-speed electric karts that travel up to 45 miles per hour.

The first track in the United States to offer this model, the Sodi RTX electric kart is exclusively available at Octane Raceway at The Pavilions. Focused on delivering a great racing experience, before switching from gas to electric karts, Sanders traveled to Sodi headquarters in France to personally review and test the prototype RTX’s advanced technology and handling characteristics. Impressed with the kart’s technological advancements, Sanders confidently selected the model for the new Octane racetrack. Drivers of all sizes can expect a comfortable driving experience with fully adjustable pedals, seats and tilt steering wheels. An added emphasis on sustainability, the new karts will deliver a high performance ride with zero emissions.

The sprawling new facility covers 65,000 square feet allowing Octane to effectively host corporate clientele and social groups of up to 500 people. The novel 20,000 square feet of outdoor track and patio space gives groups flexibility to further customize their events. Corporate clientele can leverage Octane’s new flexible meeting spaces, the Indy and Daytona Rooms, to conduct meetings and presentations taking advantage of the venue’s full audiovisual capabilities. The spaces also can easily transform into the perfect setting for “lunch & learn meetings” or fully catered dinner parties.

Octane Raceway at The Pavilions boasts additional casual gathering spaces including the Billiards Room, the Trackside Bar & Grill and Victory Lounge. The Billiards Room comfortably accommodates groups of up to 50 people and includes billiards tables, foosball and a number of flat screen televisions. The on-property restaurant, Trackside Bar & Grill, serves up classic American fare including hamburgers, pizza and sandwiches with a full upscale catering menu available for group events. Domestic and imported beer and wine are available with a strict two-drink maximum enforced for kart racers.

Besides heart-pounding racing, many other activities await Octane guests. One of the most popular events at Octane Raceway is the Phoenix International Raceway Pit Crew Challenge, which is available as an additional enhancement to any of the group or team building experience packages where guests complete a full pit stop on a real NASCAR. The Segway Performance Course at Octane tests participant’s balance as they race against the clock with either an indoor or outdoor set up increasing both the challenge and fun. An interactive arcade is adjacent to the Trackside Grill for added fun for all ages.

A seamless transition is planned from the current location into the new Pavilions facility. The Phoenix location will be fully operational through March with the new location opening this spring.

gokart

Octane Raceway will open in Scottsdale

The Valley leader in active entertainment, Octane Raceway, announced the opening of their new kart racing and entertainment venue in Scottsdale. Opening this spring, Octane Raceway will move their current Phoenix facility to a new location in the Pavilions at Talking Stick. The new Scottsdale location will be conveniently located just off the 101 freeway and Indian Bend Road. The venue is designed with a one-third mile racetrack and a unique layout where each lap begins indoors then winds through an outdoor section of the course covered by a permanent steel canopy. This is the only full-time indoor and outdoor racetrack in the United States.

“The new location in the Pavilions is a fresh and more upscale version of Octane Raceway’s proven karting entertainment concept,” says President Scott Sanders on why Octane is moving to Scottsdale. “The new, central location makes Octane Raceway more accessible to many people in the Valley, particularly providing easy access to our existing customer base in Tempe, Mesa, Chandler and Phoenix as well as puts us in the heart of Scottsdale just minutes from the Scottsdale Airpark and North Phoenix business districts.”

Adding to the allure of the new space are state-of-the-art high-speed electric karts that travel up to 45 miles per hour.

The first track in the United States to offer this model, the Sodi RTX electric kart is exclusively available at Octane Raceway at The Pavilions. Focused on delivering a great racing experience, before switching from gas to electric karts, Sanders traveled to Sodi headquarters in France to personally review and test the prototype RTX’s advanced technology and handling characteristics. Impressed with the kart’s technological advancements, Sanders confidently selected the model for the new Octane racetrack. Drivers of all sizes can expect a comfortable driving experience with fully adjustable pedals, seats and tilt steering wheels. An added emphasis on sustainability, the new karts will deliver a high performance ride with zero emissions.

The sprawling new facility covers 65,000 square feet allowing Octane to effectively host corporate clientele and social groups of up to 500 people. The novel 20,000 square feet of outdoor track and patio space gives groups flexibility to further customize their events. Corporate clientele can leverage Octane’s new flexible meeting spaces, the Indy and Daytona Rooms, to conduct meetings and presentations taking advantage of the venue’s full audiovisual capabilities. The spaces also can easily transform into the perfect setting for “lunch & learn meetings” or fully catered dinner parties.

Octane Raceway at The Pavilions boasts additional casual gathering spaces including the Billiards Room, the Trackside Bar & Grill and Victory Lounge. The Billiards Room comfortably accommodates groups of up to 50 people and includes billiards tables, foosball and a number of flat screen televisions. The on-property restaurant, Trackside Bar & Grill, serves up classic American fare including hamburgers, pizza and sandwiches with a full upscale catering menu available for group events. Domestic and imported beer and wine are available with a strict two-drink maximum enforced for kart racers.

Besides heart-pounding racing, many other activities await Octane guests. One of the most popular events at Octane Raceway is the Phoenix International Raceway Pit Crew Challenge, which is available as an additional enhancement to any of the group or team building experience packages where guests complete a full pit stop on a real NASCAR. The Segway Performance Course at Octane tests participant’s balance as they race against the clock with either an indoor or outdoor set up increasing both the challenge and fun. An interactive arcade is adjacent to the Trackside Grill for added fun for all ages.

A seamless transition is planned from the current location into the new Pavilions facility. The Phoenix location will be fully operational through March with the new location opening this spring.

jerry3

Ronald McDonald House Charities hires Diaz

Geronimo “Jerry” Diaz, who spent the past three years handling executive responsibilities with Learning Ally (formerly Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic) and the previous 16 years with the Muscular Dystrophy Association in Phoenix and Pleasanton, CA, has been named Development Director for the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix (RMHC).

Diaz will manage fund-raising and community outreach for RMHC, which recently announced plans to build a third Ronald McDonald House in the Valley on the campus of Banner Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa.

“Jerry brings an important depth of experience which will be vital in our fund-raising efforts for both the new Ronald McDonald House and for our ongoing mission to serve families whose children are undergoing medical care in the Valley at the two existing Houses in the Valley,” said Ronald McDonald House Executive Director Nancy Roach.  “We’re thrilled to have him on our team.”

Most recently, Diaz, a Tempe resident, was Vice President at Learning Ally where he developed new systems and processes, including a board-relations plan supporting 16 boards across the nation.  Previously, he had been Regional Executive Director for the organization.

At the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA), Diaz served as Regional Director from 2005 to 2009.  Among his accomplishments during his tenure was to negotiate more than 10 television telethon contracts.  Before his promotion to Regional Director, Diaz served as Regional Coordinator in both Pleasanton and Phoenix from 1997 to 2005 and he was District Director of the Las Vegas MDA for two years.

Diaz earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Justice Studies from Arizona State University.

For more information about the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix, visit www.rmhcphoenix.com.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor's Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor’s Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

Grand-Canyon-University

Grand Canyon University looks to expand

Administrators at Grand Canyon University say they’re seeking bids from Tempe, Gilbert, Mesa, Queen Creek and Chandler for another campus.

The Arizona Republic reports that GCU also may build elsewhere in the southwest such as Las Vegas and Albuquerque, N.M.

Officials with the private Christian college say a growing number of students from the Mesa area attend GCU’s main campus in west Phoenix, but most find the commute too difficult.

The 63-year-old university went public with stock traded on Nasdaq in 2008 and has been expanding its campus since then.

A deal that would have allowed GCU to move into a vacant campus in Massachusetts earlier this year fell through because the land was too remote and underdeveloped.

healthcare

East Valley Pediatrics joins Banner Medical Group

Banner Health announced that East Valley Pediatrics, with 18 physicians and three nurse practitioners serving patients in 11 east Valley locations, has joined Banner Medical Group (BMG). BMG, a part of Banner Health, will continue operating these East Valley Pediatric clinics in Apache Junction, Casa Grande, Chandler, Gilbert, Mesa and Queen Creek. Two sites in Mesa and Gilbert will continue to provide after-hours services, as well.

“We are excited and honored that this high quality physician organization is joining Banner Medical Group,” said BMG CEO Jim Brannon. “East Valley Pediatrics has been serving families with outstanding care since 1998, and it’s our privilege to help continue this legacy of excellence.”

In addition to the 18 pediatricians and three nurse practitioners, 75 other health professionals will transition into BMG. The complete transition of East Valley Pediatrics into BMG is anticipated to be complete by Feb. 1, 2013.

“This is a wonderful complement to our overall development of Banner Children’s services,” said Brannon. “These services are across the Valley and include both outpatient settings like these clinics and inpatient facilities like Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa and the Banner Thunderbird Children’s Center in Glendale,” Brannon added.

allegiant_air_md-80

Allegiant offers Provo-Phoenix flight

Allegiant announced new, nonstop jet service between Provo, Utah and Phoenix/Mesa beginning Feb. 15, 2013. The company, known for its exceptional travel deals, will introduce the new service with fares as low as $49.99 one way.

“We are pleased to announce a new, affordable and convenient travel option for residents of Provo,” said Andrew C. Levy, Allegiant Travel Company President. “We are confident area residents will appreciate the convenience of flying nonstop to Phoenix and the value of bundling their air, hotel and car rental reservation together.”

The new flights will operate twice weekly between Provo International Airport (PVU) and Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (IWA) beginning Feb. 15, 2013.

“The people around here love the Provo airport and are ready to embrace this new service,” said Provo Mayor John R. Curtis. “We look forward to a long, successful partnership with Allegiant.”

Provo travelers can take advantage of everyday low fares and save even more when they book air, hotel, car and activity and attraction reservations together. For flight schedules and reservations, visit allegiant.com.

With breathtaking scenery, endless sun, unmatched resorts and miles of world-class golf courses, Phoenix/Mesa is a gateway to all that Arizona has to offer, including the Grand Canyon, Scottsdale, Tempe and Sedona. Not only is the area considered “The Golf Capital of the World,” but also the “Resort Capital of the World,” with numerous four- and five-diamond resorts. These premier resort communities feature shopping, dining, spa, activities and luxury accommodations for the perfect getaway to Arizona’s unique Southwestern hospitality.

eye

Southwestern Eye Center Offers Blade-Free LASIK Technology

Valley residents now have the latest 100 percent blade-free LASIK technology available to them thanks to Southwestern Eye Center, which recently expanded its technology suite to include the IntraLase iFS (femtosecond) laser. The iFS laser is the only FDA-cleared femtosecond laser proven with more than 10 years of clinical research improving both the safety and precision of LASIK.

The iFS laser offers a highly sophisticated way to prepare the eye for LASIK without a blade ever touching it. The IntraLase Method with the iFS laser makes it possible for the corneal flap to be 100 percent laser-created, allowing for flap customization and an individualized treatment. Doctors of Southwestern Eye Center specify flap diameter, depth, hinge location and width, and side-cut architecture to meet the patient’s individual needs.

Historically, the use of an oscillating metal blade, called a microkeratome, in the first step of LASIK caused the majority of LASIK complications. In addition to customization of the flap, the iFS laser creates a distinctive beveled-edge that allows for precise repositioning, alignment and seating of the LASIK flap for maximum stability – three times that of a blade-created flap.

Nearly four million LASIK procedures have been performed worldwide employing the IntraLase Method, which is now used in an estimated 61.1 percent of all U.S. LASIK procedures. The IntraLase Method has been among the fastest growing refractive surgical techniques worldwide, as traditional microkeratome LASIK procedures continue to decline.

Patients considering LASIK and are qualified for the surgery can now utilize this new technology at Southwestern Eye Center’s practices across the Valley. Most patients who choose the blade-free IntraLase method see better immediately, with recovery typically lasting a few hours, followed by a few days of mild eye irritation. For more information, visit www.sweye.com or call 602-787-9100.

 

eyes.care

Southwestern Eye Center expands in New Mexico

Southwestern Eye Center is expanding its services across New Mexico with the acquisition of a well-established eye care business. The Mesa-based eye care center acquired Southwest Eye Clinics in Las Cruces and Santa Teresa, New Mexico. Southwestern Eye Center currently has one location in Deming which opened in June 2011.

Just as the names Southwestern Eye Center and Southwest Eye Clinic are very similar, changes in the day to day operations will also be very subtle. Southwest Eye Clinic is owned by Robert Villalobos, M.D. who has been helping patients for more than 20 years. Doctor Villalobos and Paul Gomez, O.D., will both stay with the practice and join L. Lothaire Bluth, M.D., a leading cataract surgeon in the Southwest, in providing medical eye care across New Mexico.

As the founder of Southwestern Eye Center, Dr. Bluth has developed one of the largest and most respected ophthalmology practices in the United States, celebrating 30 years in business. He has performed over 20 thousand cataract surgeries and is a strong believer that the best patient care occurs when the patient’s doctors are involved in every aspect of their health. Dr. Bluth accompanies Dr. Villalobos in being fluent in Spanish, which will help individuals of those areas that only speak that language.

With offices in Las Cruces, Santa Teresa and Deming, Southwestern Eye Center will provide more convenience for patients in need of cataract surgery and other areas of medical eye care in New Mexico. The Las Cruces office is located at 2030 South Solano Drive and the Santa Teresa location is at 1245 Country Club Road. Southwestern Eye Center has 23 additional locations in Arizona and is continuing to grow statewide with new practices and physicians. For more information about Southwestern Eye Center and its new practices, visit www.sweye.com or call (480) 892-8400.

solar

Shea Homes partners with Sunrun

Shea Homes is proud to announce a partnership with Sunrun, the nation’s largest home solar company, to help homeowners go solar without the high cost and hassle of owning and maintaining a solar system.

Through this partnership, homeowners can opt to have affordable solar preinstalled on their new homes.  The solar is lower in cost than typical solar installations because Sunrun owns, maintains and insures the systems.  Homeowners pay a low amount upfront for the solar power, taking control of their electric bills for 20 years.  Sunrun works with top local installation company American Solar to design and install the systems.

“Offering solar is in alignment with our overall goal to continually build homes that are highly energy efficient for our customers,” said Ken Peterson, VP of Sales and Marketing for Shea Homes. “Having this partnership with Sunrun is an added benefit to provide solar solutions to our customers which will ultimately reduce the monthly investment of operating their homes.”

“Sunrun invented solar service so that homeowners don’t have to choose between the planet and their wallets, and now it’s becoming a standard option for new homes,” said Sunrun Co-CEO Lynn Jurich.  “As solar adoption continues to grow, solar will be as common a consideration as countertop finish or flooring material.”

The Sunrun solar power service program will be available at Vista Montaña, Ridgeview and Hideaway at Johnson Ranch, Lantana at Power Ranch and SPACES at Evans Ranch. Homeowners can choose between three different system sizes, and systems will be custom-designed according to the square footage and orientation of the home. Check out a video about the new partnership here.

For specific pricing details, contact Shea Homes at 1-866-696-7432 or visit http://www.sheahomes.com/arizona.