Tag Archives: Mesa

foodbank

Buck Truck Adds Substance to Food Drives

Tempe, nonprofit, crowd-funding, grocery stores, farmers, donate perishable food items, Buck Truck, Tempe Leadership, United Food Bank, Mesa, Ed Baker, Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Lisa Pino, Arizona

A Tempe-based nonprofit is utilizing the power of crowd-funding to enable grocery stores and farmers to donate perishable food items.

Buck Truck, a project of this year’s Tempe Leadership team, is accepting donations for refrigerated delivery trucks to the United Food Bank in Mesa.

The United Food Bank currently relies on donations from canned-food drives and retailers.  The donations from retailers are limited, however, as the United Food Bank lacks the ability to transport food that requires refrigeration for freshness.

“You want to provide the best food to those you’re trying to help,” said Ed Baker, a member of this year’s Tempe Leadership team. “The best foods for people to live a healthy life are fresh, perishable foods.”

The Tempe Leadership Program, a product of the Tempe Chamber of Commerce, has been around since 1985 and each year puts together a team of community-centric individuals for nine months to engage in a project that can cover a range of community services.

“When we sat down to decide what our project would be, it was brought up that United Food Bank has a difficult time accepting fresh food,” Baker said. “We thought, ‘If only we could get 10 or 15 people to donate for a refrigerated truck.’”

The final decision was the concept of Buck Truck, to which contributors are encouraged to donate $1, $10 or $15.

The goal is to raise $41,000 for trucks that can “deliver fresh vegetables and meats from local farmers, ranchers, suppliers and grocery stores” as opposed to non-perishable items typically collected by charities in canned-food drives.

The Buck Truck website states that the refrigerated food truck will allow 24,000 pounds of what previously would have been wasted food to be distributed monthly, which it notes equates to 20,000 fresh meals.

“Buck Truck is very important because it will allow us to provide fresh produce and lean protein to our 200 partners,” said Lisa Pino, president and CEO of United Food Bank. “It’s the food you need for a healthy, adequate diet.”

The importance of Buck Truck is not only to increase the quality of food being served to those in need, but also the quantity, as Arizona is currently scarce in resources to serve what she explained is one of the hungriest states in the country, said Pino.

“The Buck Truck is nimble and responsive to Arizona’s hunger needs,” she said.

Arizona is tied as the worst state for childhood hunger, and is fifth worst in food insecurity (limited access to adequate food sources), according to statistics cited on the United Food Bank website.

As well as helping absolve statewide hunger, Pino noted a collateral benefit of Buck Truck is also contributing to helping reduce food waste.

“A theme of sustainability is key for us,” Pino said. “We want to eliminate food waste and engage more young people on the issue.”

startup

Getting an angel to open the checkbook

Governor Jan Brewer touts her policies and business regulatory climate as the reason Arizona is growing new businesses. That may be a factor, but it’s not the major reason Arizona topped the Kaufman Foundation Index of Entrepreneurial Activity in 2012. If it were the case, Arizona would have been on top again in 2013—instead of plummeting to 20th nationally.

“Just because there are a lot of startups,” observes Barry Broome, CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, “doesn’t provide a measure of the economic growth in the Valley.” A startup can be someone opening a consultancy, a contractor or the next Apple. Self-employment is a form of startup. The challenge is nurturing a startup so it grows with high value jobs.

Local governments and the Arizona Commerce Authority see major value with growing Arizona startups into enterprises. Chris Mackay, economic development director in Chandler says, “There’s staying power when a business is local. It’s connected to the local community and if the economy falters, the owners are more willing to keep going locally as opposed to closing up shop.” That local staying power is one reason Mackay says Chandler makes big investments in growing future enterprises.

Planting the seeds

Arizona’s new economy needs startups to scale up into enterprises. Those growing small businesses become hiring employers offering high value jobs paying home-buying income. Government policy supporting businesses that can scale up is based on simple economics.

Businesses with more than 20 employees, says the Small Business Administration, generate two of three Arizona paychecks. Those same businesses cut checks for more than 70 percent of Arizona’s private payrolls. The value in 2012 was over $100 billion.

All new businesses are “startups,” but not all startup businesses will be entrepreneurial enterprises. “There is no relation between starting a business and starting a company,” says Dr. Daniel Isenberg, Professor of Entrepreneurship Practice and founding executive director of the Babson College Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Project in Boston. “Ninety percent of companies formed don’t grow high value jobs.”

Isenberg says that the difference between a start-up and enterprise is a matter of scale. He is an international advocate for scaling a business to grow as opposed to opening a business. An entrepreneur, he points out, is a business founder with a large company that just happens to be small right now.

Arizona State University, as the new American university, is at the cutting edge of helping turn ideas into enterprise. Recently, the college joined the elite ranks of schools offering a stand-alone degree in entrepreneurship. It’s on that list with Harvard Business School, Babson, and University of Texas. Its goal is getting new businesses that can grow into the market.

Locally grown

ASU says more than 70 percent of its W.P. Carey School of Business MBA graduates remain in Arizona. Keeping these graduates in state provides the human resources necessary to building new enterprises fueling the future economy.

“Starting a company — as opposed to just starting a business — is hard work,” says Isenberg. “An entrepreneur looks at the business and sees it growing. It’s a time of sleep deprivation, hard work, and endless pitches.” Few startups achieve quality growth—less than ten percent, he believes. “The golden triangle of a growing enterprise,” he continues, “is cash, customers and people.”

“An entrepreneurial endeavor isn’t limited to startups,” Isenberg emphasizes. “University research, family businesses, mature companies, all can be turned into a growing enterprise. Most startups tend to stay small.” The key to the economic contribution of startups in Arizona is scalability. He is adamant about it, “Ambition is not a dirty word. A business founder without ambition does not significantly contribute to overall economic growth.”

“There are a number of entrepreneurial success stories arising from a new direction for an existing, mature business,” Isenberg reports. Sometimes it takes a new owner with a vision; sometimes the existing management team finds a new direction. It can be a license from a university, a new product, or an innovative use of an existing product. Entrepreneurship can occur anywhere in a business’ lifecycle.”

Bringing ideas to market

Arizona colleges are on that licensing bandwagon. Entrepreneurs complain that it takes years to license patents or transfer technology from most universities. In ASU’s Office of Knowledge and Enterprise Development, the Arizona Furnace Technology Transfer Accelerator — first project of its type in the world — slashes technology transfer time from years to months. The AZ Furnace is a joint venture of ASU, University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University and Dignity Health. Funding partners include the Arizona Commerce Authority, BioAccel, and additional support from Thunderbird School of Global Management.

“There are hundreds of patents sitting on shelves at universities that could be in the market earning money for creators, colleges and businesses,” enthuses Gordon McConnell, assistant vice president, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Group in OKED. “We started a program to get patents into the market quickly.” The startups selected for incubation in AZ Furnace are either entrepreneurs in search of an idea to market or idea-creators ready to market through a business entity. The fledgling enterprises are capital-ready in 12 months or less.

Enterprise starts with a leader and a vision. The scale of the vision is what makes the difference, says Isenberg. The vast majority of business owners are thinking of a model that gets them to the point that they’re putting money in the bank. He says, “Entrepreneurs are thinking of a model that finds smart people, willing customers and puts the cash to back into the enterprise.”

“Angels invest in businesses they understand or CEOs they respect,” says Broome. “There’s a need for more of that in the Valley. We’re just not seeing the next Apple or Google evolving here.”

Gaining visibility

“The biggest challenge about getting angel and venture money is visibility,” says Brandon Clark, region coordinator for Startup Arizona.  “If you’re a promising digital startup locally, it’s a little harder to get noticed nationally being from a region not known for its digital startups.  That’s starting to slowly shift.” National publications, FastCompany and Entrepreneur Magazine, have eyed Arizona as an emerging technology region.

The development opportunity for the small business is capital. Combine the “Broome Factor”—known businesses; known leaders—with the large number of startups, and there are too many funding requests heading towards too few checkbooks.

What makes early investors open pocketbooks to startup businesses is scalability. Businesses with potential to grow create the greatest return on investment for the angels. “It’s also makes a difference to the local economy,” says Isenberg. “Local policymakers need to change their focus from ‘startup’ to a ‘high value growth business’.”

Cities like helping scalable startups — and provide resources that build success. There’s a loyalty factor when the business grows; it typically remains in the hometown that helped it succeed. This is important to Chandler, Mesa, Peoria, Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Surprise. These five cities have specifically invested in incubators and accelerators to nurture and graduate businesses achieving market traction. Chandler, Phoenix and Tucson have involvement with collaborative workspaces — Gangplank and Co+Hoots — as well.

While an employee or two in a collaborative workspace works well for a while, the time comes when a move up is needed. Clairvoyant, an enterprise and analytics startup now in Chandler Innovations started with Gangplank. “We grew from four employees in March to 12 in April,” smiles Amber Anderson, a firm partner and its business developer. “We needed a place to meet with clients and work with a growing team.” Still self-funded, the growing entity plans to hit 20 employees by January.

Mackay explains, “We help a company like this grow and hope that as it expands it continues to locate in Chandler.” To that end, the city is working with landlords in its Price Corridor to offer “teenage” space that lets a business move from the heavily subsidized rents and back office support of the incubator into its own place—without too much sticker shock.

Support from cities

The difference by which startup is accepted into a city’s incubator is the ability to scale up from the garage to commercial space; from one employee to more than 20. Chandler and Mesa are looking for businesses with this capacity. Innovations gives lab and office space to businesses that have formed entities — LLCs, corporations, partnerships — and a business plan. Mesa’s new Technology Accelerator is planned with a similar focus, but is looking for businesses at an earlier stage. Surprise’s Arizona TechCelerator wants to shepherd a business to the angel investor stage.

In Surprise, scalability is one of the criteria to be accepted into Arizona’s oldest incubator. The TechCelerator is looking for businesses offering something outside the box or creating a new niche. “The company has to be started before we’ll consider them,” says Julie Neal, the economic development coordinator for the city’s enterprise. “They need a mentor, a plan and have to know where they are going.”

“Scaling up is difficult,” says Isenberg, “but doing it right defines the difference between the successful entrepreneur with a growth business and a startup that just stays small. Marketplaces are competitive. The startup has to acquire customers. That means overcoming inertia or changing buyer behavior. While established companies are cruising on their business platforms, the startup has to hire people, start a company, raise money, and all the while, it’s competing in the marketplace. That’s tough work.”

After incubation, the business must gain market traction. At this phase, the fledgling enterprise has product going out and customers paying for it. The kinks are being smoothed, and it’s time to move up to the next stage and grow. Isenberg says that the high growth criterion is simply 20 percent annual increases in sales or staff for five years.

Getting capital

To make this leap requires high levels of capital — the checks venture capitalists cut. The biggest challenge in Phoenix is that there are few sources for local venture capital. The venturists hang out in places like Silicon Valley, Boston, San Diego and Seattle. “There are even a couple of funds with deep ties to the Valley,” worries Clark, “but they have very little involvement in local startups.”

Clate Mask, CEO of Infusionsoft, had to travel out of town for his venture capital. “At one time, I was told that a fund wouldn’t cut a check for a firm in Phoenix because we didn’t have the workforce for success,” he says. “That’s no longer true; venture funds are seeing that there is a real climate for success in the Valley.”

Another resource for a growing business is the Arizona Commerce Authority’s “Growing Your Arizona Business” services. The quasi-public agency provides mentorship, regulatory assistance, access to incentive programs and site selection. It also works as a liaison connecting the growing business with other business resources. The agency mentors businesses in accessing federal procurement and grant opportunities as well as serving as an entrée to international trade.

Overall, the major resource in Arizona for start-up businesses is the universities. Anemic legislative funding for the schools causes their efforts to help to face the same struggles growing businesses face. Their efforts to improve Arizona’s long-term economy are stymied by a declining source of capital.

“ASU is underfunded,” complains Barry Broome. “The school has done an amazing job despite being financially crippled by budget cuts. It’s suffering from a lack of resources to take its programs to scale.” “Scalability” is applicable to the business-development programs at the universities and other public agencies just as it is for growing enterprises.

“Getting money for those programs is the top job for the next governor,” predicts Broome.
Opportunity in Arizona will come from the core of businesses growing today. They will create the jobs for the new economy and drive economic success for the next generation.

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ASU Polytechnic Students Take $2 Challenge

More than 30 students at Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa, located at 7001 E Williams Field Rd, will abstain from modern-day luxuries and challenge themselves to live on two dollars a day and in cardboard-box houses from Nov., 12-15, 2013.  Students will convene outside the Student Union and begin building their homes at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 12th.

The Two Dollar Challenge, a national experiential learning exercise and poverty action program, is designed to give students an opportunity to step out of their daily lives and more tangibly reflect upon the daily and prolonged challenges of living in poverty while raising awareness and funds to support economic development organizations.

This Challenge is distinct from your average charity drive for three reasons. First, it asks students to restrict their consumption and live by other rules designed to simulate poverty. This experience gives students a glimpse of how nearly half of the world’s population lives every day. Second, the Two Dollar Challenge participants will raise funds for the cause of their choice. Third, through the experience and accompanying discussion students are educated about the complexity of world poverty. Student groups can become immediate actors in the eradication of global poverty and gain the experience to become passionate leaders in the field for the future.

“This is our second year partnering with Esperança and our students are looking forward to the challenge,” said Mark Henderson, engineering professor and co-founder of GlobalResolve at ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation.  “During the three day Challenge, the students will clean dorm rooms, hold car washes and do other odd jobs to make money to purchase food and live.  It will be an eye-opening experience for them to see what poverty feels like.”

The students will also be holding a shoe drive to help fund Esperança’s programs.  Esperança is a nonprofit that improves health and provides hope for families in the poorest communities of the world through sustainable disease prevention, education and treatment.  The general public can drop off their gently used shoes at the Arizona State University’s Polytechnic campus in Mesa anytime during the three day challenge, Nov., 12-15, 2013.

“We’re excited to be a part of ASU’s Two Dollar Challenge,” said Tom Egan, executive director, Esperança.  “We offer programs and services in five countries and our volunteers are always surprised by the living conditions.  People in Bolivia and Nicaragua don’t always have access to clean water and food, they are disease stricken and don’t have stable homes to live in.  The Two Dollar Challenge is an opportunity for us to bring awareness to poverty locally, as well as nationally and internationally.”

pt

CORE Institute Opens 5th Physical Therapy Location

To support its growth and complement their orthopedic practice in the East Valley, The CORE Institute announced it has opened a new Physical Therapy location on the Banner Desert Medical Center campus at 1450 S. Dobson Rd. Suite A-302 in Mesa.

“The CORE Institute is excited to expand our physical therapy services to effectively serve our patient’s needs,” said Dan Neal, PT, MSPT, Vice President of Physical Therapy of The CORE Institute. “Expanding our physical therapy services will allow patients to receive a continuum of care from the clinic through the physical therapy, thus allowing us to track results and utilize best-in-class care to promote optimal outcomes for our patients.”

The CORE Institute has six clinic locations and five physical therapy locations across the Valley and accepts most insurance plans. Mesa Physical Therapy is open from 7 am to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. To make an appointment or for more information, call 1.866.974.2673 or visit www.thecoreinstitute.com.

Phil Schiller

Apple brings 700 jobs to Valley manufacturing plant

Apple Inc. says it will open a manufacturing plant in the Phoenix suburb of Mesa that will eventually employ 700 workers.

“Apple’s presence in the region will be a game-changer for the Greater Phoenix area, its innovation landscape and future ability to attract other high-tech companies,” said GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome. “Between their plans to hire 700 direct employees and run completely on renewable energy, I’m convinced Apple could not have chosen a better location than Mesa and Eastmark. This deal is the result of the cooperation and support of several parties, including Maricopa County Supervisor Steve Chucri, City of Mesa Mayor Scott Smith, DMB Associates, the ACA and SRP, whose infrastructure will enable more projects to move forward in the surrounding area.”

The Cupertino, Calif., maker of the iPhone confirmed Monday that it is expanding its U.S. manufacturing operations in a former First Solar plant in Mesa. The city southeast of Phoenix already hosts a long list of high-tech manufacturing firms.

About 1,300 construction jobs will also be created as the First Solar plant designed to make thin-film solar panels is converted. The company sold the plant last month.

Apple spokeswoman Kristen Huguet says the plant will be powered with renewable energy provided by local utility Salt River Project.

Gov. Jan Brewer said Apple’s decision to come to Arizona is a sign that the state’s efforts to provide a pro-business climate are paying off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Test

Nelson Appointed to Boys & Girls Clubs' board

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Kevin P. Nelson was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.  Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization. The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Michael Tiffany, Managing Partner and Shareholder of Tiffany & Bosco stated, “We are thankful that Kevin is such an active member in an organization that works with children to benefit our entire community. Kevin is a dedicated lawyer and committed to serving our community and his clients.”

Test

Nelson Appointed to Boys & Girls Clubs’ board

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Kevin P. Nelson was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.  Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization. The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Michael Tiffany, Managing Partner and Shareholder of Tiffany & Bosco stated, “We are thankful that Kevin is such an active member in an organization that works with children to benefit our entire community. Kevin is a dedicated lawyer and committed to serving our community and his clients.”

child.hospital

SRP Donates $50,000 Toward Ronald McDonald House

Salt River Project has approved a $50,000 donation toward construction of a new Ronald McDonald House on the campus of Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa.  The new House will be the first in the East Valley and the third in the Phoenix metropolitan area.

The new 12,600 square foot Ronald McDonald House will be located in a renovated former residential facility adjacent to the hospital.  The House will include 16 bedrooms, kitchen, common area, indoor dining room, two outdoor dining areas, work spaces and an outdoor play area.

The two operating Ronald McDonald Houses are located at 501 E. Roanoke Ave. and on the campus of Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

“For more than 100 years, water and power have been essential to SRP’s mission of building a strong Arizona. Equally important is our commitment to improving the communities where we work and live,” said SRP President David Rousseau.  “We are proud to support Banner’s Cardon Children’s Hospital, which provides the East Valley and Arizona with access to quality pediatric care, as well as the Ronald McDonald House Charities as it provides vital services and comfort to families in times of great stress and crisis.”

The joint fundraising effort between Ronald McDonald House Charities and Banner Health Foundation has so far raised $1.22 million toward the $2.1 million goal and is expected to be completed by the end of the fourth quarter this year.

“Salt River Project is an important partner for the Ronald McDonald House in our effort to serve the East Valley, and we are incredibly grateful for this generous contribution to help meet our fund-raising goal,” said RMHC Executive Director Nancy Roach.

In 2012, more than 1,850 families stayed at the two Ronald McDonald Houses in Phoenix, nearly 90 percent from Arizona but also from 23 states and 11 countries.  The average length of stay was 15 days.

The new House will be the first serving the East Valley.  Families staying at Ronald McDonald Houses must live outside a 30-mile radius from the nearest House.

No one is ever turned away for not being able to pay the $15 nightly fee asked of families whose children are undergoing medical care in the Valley.

The cost for housing a family for one night is $51.  In 2012, only 12% of families staying at a Ronald McDonald House in Phoenix were able to pay all or part of the fee.  Community donations and contributions help cover the difference between the daily cost and the fee the House asks for those who can afford to pay.

For information about making a donation to the Ronald McDonald House capital campaign, contact Jerry Diaz, Director of Development, (602) 798-5092 or jdiaz@rmhcphoenix.com.  For more information about Ronald McDonald Charities of Phoenix, visit www.rmhcphoenix.com.

LosAlamos

Cassidy Turley Sells Los Alamos Center for $1.235M

Cassidy Turley recently announced the sale of the Los Alamos Center, a ± 22,050-square-foot industrial auto complex property at 3015 E. Main St. in Mesa, Ariz. WLA Investments, Inc. (Newport Beach, Calif.) purchased the property for $1,235,000 ($56.01/psf) from Los Alamos Center, LLC (Mesa). Senior Managing Directors Paul Boyle and Rick Danis with Cassidy Turley’s Capital Markets Group negotiated the transaction for the buyer while Adam Hansen of Metropolitan Realty Advisors represented the seller.

Built in 1987, Los Alamos Center is a one-story multi-tenant industrial complex featuring three buildings on 1.76 acres. The property is located near several corporate auto tenants including O’Reilly Auto Parts, Midas, Just Brakes, Napa Auto Parts and MAACO. WLA Investments, Inc. plans to hold the building as an investment property. The complex was 100 percent occupied at the time of sale.

TOY_AZ_Nancie_Lindblom

Wells Fargo Celebrates Arizona Teacher of the Year

Wells Fargo is honoring Arizona’s Teacher of the Year on its ATMs across the state.  For the month of September most of Wells Fargo’s 541 ATMs in Arizona will feature a screen congratulating 2013 Teacher of the Year, Nancie Lindblom. Wells Fargo’s ATM customers will see a picture of Lindblom and some details about her teaching achievements.

“Teachers are the backbone of our community and we believe it’s important to celebrate the great teachers who encourage, support and inspire great achievements from their students,” said Pam Conboy, lead regional president for Wells Fargo in Arizona. “We congratulate Nancie Lindblom and thank all of our Arizona teachers for their service. Our entire community benefits from their work, and we want to show our appreciation by honoring one of Arizona’s best.”

Lindblom teaches 11th and 12th grade American History and Government at Skyline High School in Mesa.  She has been an educator for 18 years.  Lindblom earned a bachelor’s degree in Social Studies Education from Northern Arizona University. She is currently pursuing a Master’s degree in American History and Government from Ashland University and will graduate in May 2014.

frequent flier miles - airline tickets to fulfill wishes

Mesa's TicketForce Celebrates 10 Years in Ticketing Technology

In 10 years of business, Lynne King Smith and Brad Smith, co-founders of TicketForce, have successfully helped thousands of venues and promoters drastically increase ticketing revenues and control their patron data. Since its incorporation in 2003, TicketForce, a leading provider of ticketing solutions in the U.S. and Canada, has serviced over 3,000 venues and promoters in 49 states and Canada.

In 2012 alone, TicketForce clients created more than $20 million in ticketing revenue utilizing the company’s solutions.

Lynne and her husband, Brad’s, passion for the industry and for providing real results to clients has resulted in major growth for their company; in fact, TicketForce has doubled its revenue every year for the first five years with private funding – and has increased revenue ever year since inception. Ticket sales in 2012 totaled $52 million.

“Brad and I both have non-profit experience, and love the live event market,” said Lynne. “As event planners and promoters in the 90’s, we were always streamlining processes and finding creative solutions for our clients. We still love finding solutions today!”

The company started with just two employees, Lynne and Brad, and a single client in their garage office in 2002. Today, the company has employed over 50 people. That first client, Extreme Faith Productions, is still a client today, 10 years later. In fact, the company retains 99 percent of its clients year after year.

TicketForce is known for its scalable, full suite of ticketing solutions, including private label, full-service, social and mobile ticketing options. Featuring a customer-centric buying experience, TicketForce’s ticketing solutions include event/client branding, video clips, social media sharing and more. The company offers its services at a much lower fee per ticket than its publically held competitors and delivers a more personal level of customer service.

“Our clients appreciate that they can pick up the phone and call us at any time,” said Lynne. “What’s more – they have access to myself and Brad, not just our employees. We take pride in that accessibility that clients have to us, and we make it a priority to get to know our clients face-to-face whenever possible. Many of them have become friends.”

The company is widely known as one of the most innovative ticketing solutions across multiple genres including performing arts, universities, arenas, civic venues, concert halls, casinos, racing, fairs, rodeos and festivals. So far in 2013, TicketForce has signed more than $500,000 in new business across many of those sectors.

Lynne says that TicketForce differentiates itself further by offering marketing tools to help its clients sell more tickets – a feature that many other companies promise to deliver but never actually execute.

“We offer free monthly social media webinars, toolkits, LinkedIn discussions, complete analytics and consulting to ensure that our clients have the know-how to utilize the latest marketing tools to truly sell more tickets,” said Lynne. “We have found that our investment in those resources generate real results for our clients, and in turn, for TicketForce.”

The company has become a true family business over the past decade. Brad’s mom was TicketForce’s first call center employee and all three of the pair’s daughters have worked for the company at some point over the past decade. Today, Lynne’s brother, Ron King, is one of TicketForce’s IT specialists and her oldest daughter, Joanna, has returned full-time as a business administrator.

“Our employees are like family – we take trips, have monthly lunches, and have an atmosphere of collaboration and acceptance,” said Lynne. “You’ll never find them throwing each other under the bus – it’s a tight group. And that’s what brings me to work every day. Tickets are secondary to creating a fantastic place to work.”

For more information about TicketForce, visit www.ticketforce.com.

frequent flier miles - airline tickets to fulfill wishes

Mesa’s TicketForce Celebrates 10 Years in Ticketing Technology

In 10 years of business, Lynne King Smith and Brad Smith, co-founders of TicketForce, have successfully helped thousands of venues and promoters drastically increase ticketing revenues and control their patron data. Since its incorporation in 2003, TicketForce, a leading provider of ticketing solutions in the U.S. and Canada, has serviced over 3,000 venues and promoters in 49 states and Canada.

In 2012 alone, TicketForce clients created more than $20 million in ticketing revenue utilizing the company’s solutions.

Lynne and her husband, Brad’s, passion for the industry and for providing real results to clients has resulted in major growth for their company; in fact, TicketForce has doubled its revenue every year for the first five years with private funding – and has increased revenue ever year since inception. Ticket sales in 2012 totaled $52 million.

“Brad and I both have non-profit experience, and love the live event market,” said Lynne. “As event planners and promoters in the 90’s, we were always streamlining processes and finding creative solutions for our clients. We still love finding solutions today!”

The company started with just two employees, Lynne and Brad, and a single client in their garage office in 2002. Today, the company has employed over 50 people. That first client, Extreme Faith Productions, is still a client today, 10 years later. In fact, the company retains 99 percent of its clients year after year.

TicketForce is known for its scalable, full suite of ticketing solutions, including private label, full-service, social and mobile ticketing options. Featuring a customer-centric buying experience, TicketForce’s ticketing solutions include event/client branding, video clips, social media sharing and more. The company offers its services at a much lower fee per ticket than its publically held competitors and delivers a more personal level of customer service.

“Our clients appreciate that they can pick up the phone and call us at any time,” said Lynne. “What’s more – they have access to myself and Brad, not just our employees. We take pride in that accessibility that clients have to us, and we make it a priority to get to know our clients face-to-face whenever possible. Many of them have become friends.”

The company is widely known as one of the most innovative ticketing solutions across multiple genres including performing arts, universities, arenas, civic venues, concert halls, casinos, racing, fairs, rodeos and festivals. So far in 2013, TicketForce has signed more than $500,000 in new business across many of those sectors.

Lynne says that TicketForce differentiates itself further by offering marketing tools to help its clients sell more tickets – a feature that many other companies promise to deliver but never actually execute.

“We offer free monthly social media webinars, toolkits, LinkedIn discussions, complete analytics and consulting to ensure that our clients have the know-how to utilize the latest marketing tools to truly sell more tickets,” said Lynne. “We have found that our investment in those resources generate real results for our clients, and in turn, for TicketForce.”

The company has become a true family business over the past decade. Brad’s mom was TicketForce’s first call center employee and all three of the pair’s daughters have worked for the company at some point over the past decade. Today, Lynne’s brother, Ron King, is one of TicketForce’s IT specialists and her oldest daughter, Joanna, has returned full-time as a business administrator.

“Our employees are like family – we take trips, have monthly lunches, and have an atmosphere of collaboration and acceptance,” said Lynne. “You’ll never find them throwing each other under the bus – it’s a tight group. And that’s what brings me to work every day. Tickets are secondary to creating a fantastic place to work.”

For more information about TicketForce, visit www.ticketforce.com.

GCU Campus

Mesa, Eastmark land new GCU campus

Grand Canyon University today officially selected DMB Associates’ newest community, Eastmark in Mesa, as the site for its new, $150M satellite campus.

The university will be given the right to purchase 100 acres at Eastmark with an option to add up to 60 adjacent acres for future expansion. Other sites considered for the new GCU campus were Chandler, Gilbert, Queen Creek and Tempe.

“In selecting the Eastmark site, we were especially impressed with the integrated community concept DMB is creating,” said Brian Mueller, president and CEO of GCU.

“This environment will give our students, faculty and staff an exciting place to learn, work and play while being an integral part of the East Valley community. We believe our presence will benefit the entire region by providing the option of a low-cost, high-quality Christian education to all its residents,” Mueller said.

DMB’s Eastmark community will be situated on 3,200 acres in the center of the Gateway region in Mesa, just minutes from the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

“We are thrilled to be the future home of GCU, its faculty, students and staff,” said Charley Freericks, president of DMB. “DMB communities feature a focus on lifelong learning and GCU’s unique model for post-secondary education will bring a wealth of learning opportunities to Eastmark and to all of the East Valley.”

Construction of the new campus is expected to begin in 2014, with a prospective opening date in 2015. The university’s plan is to purchase up to 160 acres located east of Ellsworth Rd. and Point 22 Blvd. The 7-year build-out of the campus will include offices and administration space, classrooms, labs, library, a student union, student dorms, recreational fields and parking.

“The East Valley, and specifically Mesa’s Gateway area, is emerging as a destination for high-quality higher education. We are honored to welcome Grand Canyon University to Mesa, Arizona’s newest college town,” said Mesa Mayor Scott Smith.

Until the opening of the new campus, the GCU team will have a space in Eastmark’s visitors and community center this coming year for prospective students to come and learn more about the school as well as the new campus.

So that they can begin offering classes in the fall of 2014, the university is looking into leasing space in the Eastmark area. When the campus opens in 2015, those students would then transfer to the new location.

Laura Robertson

Laura Robertson – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Laura Robertson – CEO, Banner Baywood Medical Center and Banner Heart Hospital

Robertson began her nursing career at Banner Health in 1988 at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center. A cardiac nurse with nearly 20 years experience, she has served in a variety of staff and management positions, including Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit director. In 2010, she was named CEO of Banner Baywood and in 2012, she was named CEO of Banner Heart Hospital, which is on the same campus of Banner Baywood.

Surprising fact: “Exercise is my stress reliever and it provides me balance. I run six miles a day every morning.”

Biggest challenge: “Balancing a family and a career. I stay focused and make each a priority.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Banner Good Samaritan

E.V. residents can preview Banner Health Center

East Valley residents and visitors can be among the first to see the new Banner Health Center at a free “Community Preview” from 8 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 3, at the center located at 1435 S. Alma Road, south of the Loop 202 between West Pecos and West Germann Roads.

Participants can hear the opening remarks and join in the dedication at 8:30 a.m., followed by a celebration including healthy snacks, giveaways, children’s activities and information about Banner Health facilities and services. Community members are invited to meet the center’s primary care physicians and staff, tour the new center, and even make an appointment to see a physician.

Banner Health Center in Chandler will open for patient care on Wednesday, Aug. 7 starting at 7 a.m. Staff physicians will include two pediatricians, three family medicine physicians and one internal medicine physician with plans to increase in the future. Along with 18 exam rooms, basic imaging and laboratory services are also available on site for added patient convenience.

Banner Health Centers accept most insurance plans. The center will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, and 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday with same day and next day appointments available. Concierge staff answers the phones one hour before and one hour after center hours. To schedule an appointment or for more information, call (480) 668-1600.

The center will offer a wide range of services including:
·         Well-child checkups and immunizations
·         Adult physcials
·         Care for chronic conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure and asthma
·         Treatment for ear aches, sore throats and infections
·         Sports injury and fracture care
·         Minor skin irritation treatment
·         Cuts and suture removal

The Banner Health Center in Chandler is the third of four in the East Valley to open after a shared groundbreaking on Oct. 25, 2012. Banner Health Center in Queen Creek opened May 1; a center in Gilbert opened May 22 and another will open in East Mesa in early September. An additional Banner Health Center opened in Goodyear within the planned community of Estrella on July 10, joining the existing Banner Health Centers in Peoria/Sun City West, Surprise, Buckeye in the Verrado Community, Maricopa, and South Loveland, CO.

97995886

Arizona law on picking judges challenged

A lawsuit filed on behalf of members of a state judicial nominating commission challenges a new state law changing how Arizona selects judges for its appellate courts.

The Arizona Republic reports that the lawsuit filed Friday says the law is unconstitutional because it effectively would change part of the Arizona Constitution without submitting a proposed amendment to voters.

The law being challenged increases the minimum number of nominees for each vacancy to five from three, the current constitutional requirement.

The Legislature approved the legislation in April, and Gov. Jan Brewer signed it into law.

Republican Rep. Justin Piece of Mesa sponsored the legislation. He says it is constitutional because the commission still can nominate fewer than five candidates to the governor if there’s a two-thirds vote to do that.

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Mesa mayor leads US Conference of Mayors

Mesa Mayor Scott Smith has been sworn in as 71st president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

The outgoing USCM president is Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter.

Nutter appointed Smith as head of the nonpartisan organization during its 81st annual meeting Monday in Las Vegas.

More than 200 mayors met to discuss a broad range of policy issues impacting the nation’s cities including the economic health, immigration, school safety, energy efficiency, housing and help for returning military veterans.

As conference president, Smith will set the organization’s agenda, appoint committee and task force chairs and serve as the national spokesperson for the term that runs through next June.

Smith was the organization’s vice president over the past year.

volunteer

SRP Donates $94,500 to Nonprofit Agencies

Salt River Project employees are turning their volunteer hours into much-needed funds for the nonprofit organizations they assist through the SRP Dollars for Doers program.

The program contributes funds, ranging from $250 to $1,000, directly to community nonprofits based upon the number of volunteer hours donated during the 2012 calendar year by SRP employees. The grant program is designed to provide funding to nonprofit agencies that are also supported by the volunteer efforts of SRP employees.

“SRP has a distinct heritage built upon responding to the needs of our customers and the communities in which they live, and we recognize the value of providing support to organizations whose programs are improving the lives of our community,” said Jen Martyn who manages the SRP Volunteer Program.

SRP donated $94,500 to 106 nonprofit agencies in which 141 SRP employees donated more than 29,000 hours of their time and experience in cities throughout the Valley, including Avondale, Camp Verde, Casa Grande, Chandler, Douglas, El Mirage, Gilbert, Glendale, Higley, Litchfield Park, Mesa, Page, Peoria, Phoenix, Pine Top, Queen Creek, San Tan Valley, Scottsdale, St. Johns, Tempe and Tolleson and Tucson.

Employees contributed to their community in a number of ways, including:

· coaching youth football, baseball, soccer and swimming,
· providing children with special needs horse therapy rides,
· ushering during arts and cultural events,
· preparing meals for those in need,
· mentoring and providing leadership to youth and
· assisting schools through parent-teacher organizations and booster clubs.

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Maloney-Langmade becomes leader of men

There are not many people in the world who can say they are a licensed plumber, have an MBA in International Management from the Thunderbird School of Global Management, and are a mother to three daughters, ages 7, 11 and 12.

Kathryn “Kitty” Maloney-Langmade can make those claims.

The president of W.J. Maloney Plumbing, Heating & Cooling leads a vibrant plumbing contracting company in a male-dominated industry. Some of her company’s recent projects include the new Chicago Cubs spring training complex in Mesa, the Veteran’s Administration Southeast Healthcare Clinic in Gilbert, Phase IV of CityScape Phoenix, a major solar thermal project at the University of Arizona in Tucson, and the Sky Train Project at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport.

Az Business magazine caught up with Maloney-Langmade — whose company won consecutive Best of the Best Awards for safety from SCF Arizona — for a Q&A.

How did you get into the plumbing business?
My father and mother started W.J. Maloney Plumbing in 1964.  I grew up in and around the business. My dad was always working in the field and my mother performed the bookkeeping. Upon returning from my honeymoon, I learned my mother’s secretary had left the company.  My mother asked me to come to the plumbing shop to help her out with payroll and I never left.

Are there any aspects of the industry that are made more difficult because you are a woman?
Growing up, I always heard and learned about construction but I was not in the field with my father.  Often times, I wish I had the mechanical, hands-on expertise and years of experience that my father had.  To carry on his tradition of quality workmanship, I have had to surround myself with key people who have the same mechanical skill that he possessed.

Are there any benefits to being a woman in a male-dominated industry?
My experience is that both men and women in construction go out of their way to be supportive, kind, courteous and helpful.  People want me to succeed.  They know construction is a tough road.  I am lucky to have received good advice and help.

What has been your biggest challenge?
Turning the company around during difficult times.  We were in a pattern of winning work and doing jobs, but were losing money. Meeting and listening to my key foremen who have been with the company for years, I was able to learn and understand changes that needed to happen. I was able to get the company moving in the right direction when I put together a solid leadership team.  We are now able to estimate, win and perform good work.  We have a great team in place now and the momentum continues to build and grow.

law

JacksonWhite Names First Female Shareholder

JacksonWhite P.C. announced that attorney Susan Court was made a shareholder of the firm.  Court joins 12 other attorneys at JacksonWhite who share the distinction of shareholder.

Court joined JacksonWhite in 2005 and focuses her practice on elder law, probate, guardianships, conservatorships, and estate planning. Court assists clients with end-of-life issues including incapacity, mental illness and the transfer of assets before or after death. She is a member of the Arizona Fiduciaries Association as well as the State Bar of Arizona. Court is a former Maricopa County prosecutor and taught Business Law at Mesa Community College and Chandler Gilbert Community College. She is also active on the MCC Development Board, the J. Reuben Clark Law Society, and the Mesa Chamber of Commerce.

Founded in 1983, JacksonWhite P.C. offers a full-range of services to assist individuals, families and businesses with their legal needs. Since its inception, the Mesa firm has grown steadily to include 22 highly experienced attorneys and over 40 paralegals, legal assistants and staff. At this size, the firm is large enough to offer the efficiency and technical expertise of larger firms, yet small enough to provide clients with individualized, personalized attention. JacksonWhite has three offices around the state of Arizona including a Mesa, Casa Grande and Peoria location. For more information on a specific attorney or area of practice, visit www.jacksonwhitelaw.com or www.arizonaseniorlaw.com.

volunteer

11 SRP Employees Honored for Volunteer Work

In recognition of the invaluable contribution of their time, efforts and expertise to their communities, 11 SRP employee volunteers were awarded the SRP Presidents’ Volunteer Spirit Awards. These dedicated employees have given countless hours of their time to help families put food on their tables; provide guidance to Latino youths as they prepare for college and give children with special needs horse therapy rides.

“Each year SRP recognizes inspiring employee volunteers who give of their time to helping Arizonans through a wide variety of community organizations,” said Rosemary Gannon, manager of SRP Community Outreach, who added that SRP employees and retirees, with help from their friends and families, donate thousands of volunteer hours a year to their communities. “Strong, thriving communities rely on the volunteer efforts of individuals like these recipients.”

This year, in addition to the SRP Presidents’ Volunteer Spirit Award, SRP employee Kyle Bridges was honored with the Karl F. Abel Volunteer Recognition Award for his sustained leadership role in addressing significant human service needs in his community. The late Karl F. Abel, a Glendale resident who served as president of SRP from 1972 to 1982, was a strong community advocate and  provided volunteer leadership to numerous organizations.

The 2013 SRP Presidents’ Volunteer Spirit Award honorees and the nonprofits they assist are:

Chandler resident Holly Schaefer – AZ Happy Tails Animal Rescue
Holly Schaefer is a founding member of AZ Happy Tails Animal Rescue, which was established in 2009 to rescue and find loving homes for animals that are stray, abandoned or at risk of euthanasia. To date, AZ Happy Tails has rescued and found homes for more than 400 animals. Schaefer is responsible for all animal intake and adoption decisions, and she coordinates with foster homes to supply them with food and bedding and help with any other needs they may have.

Gilbert resident Barbara Sprungl – The Centers for Habilitation (TCH)
The Centers for Habilitation (TCH) provides promotes independence for Arizonans with developmental and physical disabilities. In 2010, Barbara Sprungl joined TCH’s board of directors, and she volunteers more than 20 hours a month. She chairs the Fund Development Committee and is vice chair of the Finance, Governance and Executive committee. She volunteers for fundraising events and helps with everything from setup and operation to planning. Sprungl implemented a new formal fundraising model and trained the rest of the board on the new approach. In 2012, she raised $12,500 for the Monster Mash Sponsorship Committee.

Glendale resident David Larson – Cactus High School Robotics Team
The Cactus High School Robotics Team is experienced in building, maintaining and operating robots. David Larson has been a mentor and coach since 2009 and volunteers an average of 67 hours a month. Because of his time investment, the robotics team has shown dramatic improvement. Larson readies the team for FIRST Robotics competition and this year they built a robot that plays basketball. Larson also holds workshops for welding, tube and wire soldering, painting, and many other skills. He also started a safety program, complete with a study guide and an exam for the program.

Mesa resident Kyle Tilghman – American Youth Soccer Organization — Region 1079
The American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO) provides soccer programs for children ages 4–19 and Region 1079 is the largest soccer program in the East Valley. The region is run completely by volunteer coaches and referees, and a number of volunteers dedicate a lot of time to securing soccer fields and marketing the organization. Kyle Tilghman has been a volunteer coach with AYSO’s Region 1079 since 2006. Six years ago, he was volunteering three hours a month, but over the years, he has taken on more responsibilities. In addition to coaching and refereeing, he serves as the coach administrator for the region.

Peoria resident John Buonagurio – Theater Works
Theater Works is a nonprofit performing arts organization that has been serving Peoria and the West Valley for more than 25 years. John Buonagurio is a volunteer of nearly three years and is chairman of the board. He also serves on the Governance, Development and Artistic committees. It has been a challenging time for Theater Works, like many other arts organizations, as support at all levels has waned because of the recession. Buonagurio’s leadership over the past few years has brought continuity to Theater Works during a time of change and challenges.

Peoria resident Mark Burkhart – St. Mary’s Food Bank  Alliance
St. Mary’s Food Bank alleviates hunger by gathering and distributing food to  two-thirds of Arizona’s 15 counties and is committed to volunteerism, building community relationships and improving the quality of life for Arizonans in need. Mark Burkhart has planned and managed a golf tournament that raises between $10,000 and $15,000 annually. Burkhart is dedicated to St. Mary’s and knows that every dollar he raises means seven meals for the hungry. In the 10 years he has been coordinating the golf tournament, he has helped St. Mary’s serve more than 900,000 meals.

Peoria resident Jim Custis – Joni and Friends Arizona
Joni and Friends Arizona works with local churches and organizations to form outreach programs for those who face the daily challenge of life with a disability. For the past six years, Jim Custis has been fundraising for the organization’s Family Retreat program, which provides a respite for families affected by disabilities. Custis and his family have raised more than $20,000 and spend about 15 hours a month volunteering with Joni and Friends and one week of vacation every summer serving families affected by disabilities.

Peoria resident Christopher Rodriguez – AGUILA Youth Leadership Institute
AGUILA Youth Leadership Institute prepares Latino/Latina youth, beginning as high school freshmen, for college admissions and graduation. Christopher Rodriguez fundraises, serves on the board of advisors and uses his bilingual skill to help Spanish-speaking parents understand the benefits of AGUILA and the importance of higher education for their children. He’s also a mentor, helping these students pursue their goals of higher education. Rodriguez is dedicated to this program because he knows many of the youth who attend AGUILA will be the first in their families to attend college.

Phoenix resident Shari Brady – Arizona FIRST Lego League
Arizona FIRST Lego League (FLL) is a robotics program for students ages 9–14 that promotes science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) projects. Shari Brady began volunteering when she was an ASU student and continues to volunteer about 17 hours a week. She serves on the Advisory Committee, which plans regional tournaments and helps develop volunteer recruiting strategies. This year, the tournament was expanded to include remote northern Arizona teams, allowing a number of school teams from Native American communities to participate without long travel times to tournament venues.

San Tan Valley resident Kyle Bridges – Epic Food Mission
Epic Food Mission provides hope, help and support to families facing financial difficulty in the Queen Creek/San Tan Valley area. Every first and third Saturday of the month, Epic Food Mission provides food boxes, baby food and personal hygiene items for distribution to those in need. For five years, Kyle Bridges has volunteered with Epic Food Mission, serving as the organization’s distribution coordinator. He is responsible for organizing 50 volunteers and six team leaders to prepare hundreds of care packages for families. Bridges donates 50 hours of his time each month. For the past three years, he has also found time to volunteer with Compassion Connect, which helps unite and mobilize local churches, nonprofits, schools, and businesses to provide free dental and medical care for underserved populations.

San Tan Valley resident Marty Sonnenberg – Angel Acres Inc.
Angel Acres Inc. is a program created by Marty Sonnenberg in 2003, successfully combining her love of working with special-needs children with her love of working with horses. Every year from October through May, Sonnenberg and other volunteers teach grooming and horse therapy riding as part of a six-week program. During that time, Sonnenberg donates nearly 90 hours a month to keep program costs low and allow all the funds raised to go directly to the program. To date, the program has helped more than 446 children and given more than 2,680 therapy rides.

Test

Boys & Girls Clubs board appoints Bosco

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Mark S. Bosco was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.

Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization.

The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Steve Davidson, President and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale stated, “We are thrilled to have Mark join our team.  We know that his passion, commitment, and comprehension of the work done by our organization will help us grow and continue to serve more youth in our communities.  He is an outstanding addition to our organization.”

Test

Boys & Girls Clubs board appoints Bosco

The law firm of Tiffany & Bosco P.A. announced that attorney and shareholder Mark S. Bosco was appointed as a Member of the Board of Governors to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.

Board members serve a minimum of one term (three years) and are responsible for serving on standing and special event committees, fiduciary oversight and providing resources to fulfill the mission of the organization.

The non-profit organization provides 17,700 Valley children and teenagers with a positive, supervised and fun environment to help reach their full potential. The Clubs offer more than 100 youth development programs at the organization’s nine branches and 12 outreach sites located in Scottsdale, Phoenix, Mesa, Fountain Hills and the Salt River Pima-Maricopa and Hualapai Indian Communities. Their programs help promote healthy lifestyles, good character and academic success.

Steve Davidson, President and CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale stated, “We are thrilled to have Mark join our team.  We know that his passion, commitment, and comprehension of the work done by our organization will help us grow and continue to serve more youth in our communities.  He is an outstanding addition to our organization.”

Narang Headshot

Narang named CEO of Banner Good Samaritan

Steve Narang, MD, chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Ariz., has been named chief executive officer at Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, effective April 26. He will assume the role from current CEO Larry Volkmar, who will continue to serve as CEO until April 25.

Banner Health Arizona West Region President Kathy Bollinger said Dr. Narang will have the opportunity over the next several weeks to work closely with Volkmar to ensure a smooth hand-off of responsibilities. “The collaboration between these two Banner leaders will ensure a smooth transition,” she said.

Dr. Narang, a pediatric physician, has served as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s since June 2011. Prior to coming to Banner Health, Dr. Narang served in a variety of medical director and teaching positions in Louisiana, including medical director of graduate medical education and medical director of pediatric emergency services at Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

“I’m looking forward to working with an outstanding team at Banner Good Samaritan,” said Dr. Narang. “We will work together to take its distinguished history of excellent clinical care, teaching and research and create a distinct value proposition around the delivery of high-value and innovative academic medicine in one of the country’s highest performing health systems.”

Bollinger said that Dr. Narang distinguished himself during the interview process as a visionary leader that is highly driven to deliver results. She said Dr. Narang’s impressive relationship-building strengths will be focused on engaging employees, physicians and the community around the excellence that is the foundation of Banner Good Samaritan’s 100-year legacy. “These strengths, combined with Steve’s background as a practicing physician, will be particularly effective in Steve’s engagement with the graduate medical education program,” she said.

Bollinger said it makes her especially proud that Dr. Narang’s selection reflects Banner’s commitment to internal opportunities for growth, development and promotion.
“In his experience as a physician, teacher, medical director and, most recently, as chief medical officer at Cardon Children’s Medical Center, Dr. Narang has amply demonstrated leadership attributes that are critical to Banner’s future as a leading health system in the nation,” she said. “The future is indeed very bright.”

Dr. Narang received his medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago and completed his pediatrics residency at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He has a master’s degree in health care management from Harvard University in Boston.