Tag Archives: Michael Bidwill

football

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Announces Board

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces its Board of Directors for Super Bowl XLIX. The board of directors is comprised of business leaders that volunteer their time to drive the state’s efforts for Super Bowl XLIX.

The Host Committee is a private, non-profit Arizona corporation. The mandate of the Host Committee is to galvanize local stakeholders in a united approach to hosting the largest single-day sporting event by maximizing positive media exposure, fueling the economic engine of Arizona and leaving a lasting legacy long after the excitement of the Big Game. The board was assembled in 2013 to begin planning and to garner local corporate support and sponsors.

Board members include:
● Board Chair David Rousseau, president, SRP

● Brad Anderson, executive vice president, brokerage office services, CB Richard Ellis

● Michael Bidwill, president, Arizona Cardinals

● Jose Cardenas, senior vice president and general council, Arizona State University

● David Farca, president, ToH Design Studio

● Jim Grogan, chief operating officer, International Capital Investment Company

● Michael Haenel, executive vice president, Cassidy Turley

● Mike Kennedy, partner, Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A. (chairman, Super Bowl XLII Host Committee in 2008)

● Dan Lewis, senior vice president, Sovereign Finance

● Jeffrey Lowe, president, MidFirst Bank

● Mary Martuscelli, regional president for the private client reserve, U.S. Bank

● Andrew McCain, vice president and CFO, Hensley Beverage Company

● Patrick McGinley, vice president of property management, Vestar

● Steve Moore, president and CEO, Greater Phoenix CVB

● Jodi Noble, partner, Deloitte

● Jay Parry, president and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

● Earl Petznick Jr., president and CEO, Northside Hay Company

● Ken Van Winkle, managing partner, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

● KJ Wagner, president and CEO, Willis of Arizona, Inc.

● David Watson, co-founder and managing partner, mybody and president and managing partner, Revolution Tea

● John Zidich, CEO, Republic Media Publisher, The Arizona Republic

“We have an impressive group of business leaders working together to meet the fundraising goals for Super Bowl XLIX and to maximize the opportunity to build the Arizona brand in this unparalleled global spotlight,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee chairman. “We want to promote Arizona as an ideal destination for businesses and tourists well beyond Super Bowl XLIX.”

Super Bowl XLIX is scheduled to be played at University Of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years. In Super Bowl XLII at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

For more information on the Board of Directors, please visit http://azsuperbowl.com/about-us/meet-the-team/

From left: Stephen R. Lewis, Lieutenant Governor of Gila River Indian Community, David Rousseau, Chairman, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, Michael Bidwill, President of the Arizona Cardinals, Gregory Mendoza, Gila River Indian Community Governor, Jay Parry, President & CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and Christopher Mendoza, District 4 Councilman. Also attached is a photo of Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee mascot, SPIKE.

Super Bowl Committee teams up with Gila River Community

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announced its partnership with the Gila River Indian Community today during a press conference at the Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort and Spa in Chandler, Arizona. In attendance for today’s announcement were Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman David Rousseau, Gila River Indian Community Governor Gregory Mendoza, Arizona Cardinals President Michael Bidwill, and Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee mascot, SPIKE.

“We are proud to be partnering with The Gila River Indian Community and to work together to fuel the economic engine of Arizona,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Chairman. “Our partnership will have multiple elements with a major focus on education, health and fitness for the youth of the Gila River Indian Community.”

A key component of the partnership will be working together to promote Arizona as the ideal location for businesses of all industries and sizes and a premier tourism destination well beyond Super Bowl XLIX. As part of the partnership, The Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort and Spa will be an official team hotel. The partnership will also include various economic and community initiatives to build relationships among all of Arizona’s cultural groups.

“The Gila River Indian Community is thrilled to be a sponsor of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and to have the opportunity to help make the big game and all its associated events a success for Arizona. Our Community emphasizes partnership, economic opportunity and giving back to our neighbors in all we do and with every dollar we invest,” said Gila River Indian Community Governor, Gregory Mendoza. “So do the NFL and the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. That’s why we’re committed to joining forces and hosting quality events in association with the Super Bowl.”

To officially kick off the partnership, Arizona Cardinals alumni Kwamie Lassiter and Frank Sanders, along with SPIKE, hosted a football clinic for 25 kids of the Gila River Indian Community. The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee will continue to support the efforts of the Gila River Indian Community to promote education, health, and fitness to its youth.

“The partnership between the Cardinals and Gila River Indian Community dates back to the opening of University of Phoenix Stadium in 2006,” said Cardinals President Michael Bidwill. “Like us, they believed that it would be a game-changer not only for our team but the entire community. Super Bowl XLIX is another critically important event for our state and it’s no surprise that Gila River is stepping up to help provide the considerable community support required to make it a success.”

Future community initiatives and events will be announced leading up to Super Bowl XLIX.

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

D'BacksBrass

Cover Story – The Business of Sports

The Business of Sports

The economic reach of the Valley’s pro sports teams extends beyond the games

By Tom Gibbons

 

It’s a little past noon on a football Sunday, and there’s a wait at Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville restaurant in the Westgate City Center in Glendale, giving a visitor a few minutes to check out the seaside décor. Painted on the ceiling is a huge, fanciful nautical map that shows Los Angeles as an island, most of southern California under water and the shores of the Pacific lapping up against Glendale. Glendale would not be on the map, of course, if the eatery wasn’t located there.
And it’s likely there would be no map and no Margaritaville in Glendale if it weren’t for a couple of neighbors — the homes of the National Hockey League Phoenix Coyotes and the National Football League Arizona Cardinals.

business_sports

The presence of the pro sports franchises has allowed specialty retail and an entertainment district to pop up in what six years ago were dusty fields by the Loop 101 freeway.
The Phoenix area is home to four major professional sports teams, one of 13 markets with all four. In addition, the Valley is one of just two markets in which no major teams share a venue. All four sports buildings have been built since 1992, with taxpayers footing most of the bill to the tune of more than $700 million.

The Valley of the Sun’s sports building boom mirrors a national trend that began in the early 1990s. Over the years, the projects here and around the country have come under increasing criticism. The costs are easy to tally, but what of the benefits to anyone besides the private businessmen who own the teams and the millionaire athletes they employ?

“That’s the price of admission,’’ says Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. “Without pro sports, you’re not a top tier city.’’

Ray Artigue, executive director of the MBA Sports Business program at Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business, believes the benefits to the state and local economy are numerous, such as exposure for the area, branding and the tourist dollars that are brought in by pro sports. One of the strongest examples of pro sports’ economic impact is the Westgate City Center.

“Would something like that exist in Glendale without the sports teams?’’ Artigue asks. “I don’t think it would.”

To be sure, some development would have surfaced anyway in Glendale; after all, it’s flat land with freeway access. In the fall of 2000, when the final leg to Loop 101 was completed on the city’s West Side, Glendale was determined to get the right kind of development, something other than residential or generic big box stores.

Enter Steve Ellman, a developer who owned a money-losing hockey franchise and was trying to build an arena and entertainment venue. Ellman had been fighting with city leaders in Scottsdale to OK a deal to front him money that would be recaptured through sales tax in order to build his arena on the site of a defunct shopping mall. Ellman had twice won voter approval for his project, but it was obvious the Scottsdale City Council was going to make him go through a third election.

Ellman, chairman and CEO of the Ellman Companies, approached Glendale and worked out a deal in which the city committed $180 million for the arena and Ellman promised to build a retail, entertainment and residential district — Westgate City Center.

“There was substantial risk,’’ says Glendale Mayor Elaine Scruggs.

The hockey arena and the planned entertainment district paid off quickly, making Glendale a player in the race to land the site for the Cardinals’ new stadium.

“We could have bid before, but we didn’t have the amenities they were looking for,’’ Scruggs says.

Glendale won out. Jobing.com Arena and the University of Phoenix Stadium made Westgate more attractive to other businesses, such as outdoor equipment giant Cabela’s and Margaritaville, which is one of only six Margaritavilles in the country.

“This is a one of kind. There probably won’t be another one in Arizona,” Scruggs says, adding that businesses such as Margaritaville help make Glendale a destination.

“We’re very proud to have been the first team out here and an anchor for all the development that followed,’’ says Jeff Holbrook, the Coyotes executive vice president and chief communications officer.

Retired chairman and CEO of Swift Transportation, Jerry Moyes, is now the principal owner of the Coyotes and was a key investor when the team decided to set up shop in Glendale. He is also a longtime West Valley resident.

The Cardinals are taking a page out of the Coyotes’ development play book. The Bidwill family, which owns the Cardinals, has a development project in the works called cbd 101, which is on 77 acres just south of the University of Phoenix Stadium. The plans include a 35-story tower with residential, office and hotel space.

“This would be a signature feature for Glendale,’’ says Michael Bidwill, president of the Cardinals (see full story on p. 10).

The National Basketball Association’s Phoenix Suns with US Airways, and Major League Baseball’s Diamondbacks with Chase Field, have a similar effect on Downtown Phoenix, slowly transforming the area from a ghost town after 5 p.m. into a 24/7 hot spot that city leaders envisioned.

The Diamondbacks play 81 games a season downtown and the Suns play 41, plus playoffs.

“There are also the Mercury and the Rattlers,’’ ASU’s Artigue says, referring to the women’s pro basketball team and the Arena Football League franchise.

Pro sports events also provide a place for deals to get done.

“The Suns have pretty much become a must-go place for business deals,’’ Broome says.

The Suns have the AOT club for anyone who buys a floor-level seat. The 510 floor-level seats are all sold out at prices ranging from $400 to $1,700 a seat.

Suns President and Chief Operating Officer Rick Welts says the fans often wanted to meet other floor-level ticket-holders and discuss business. The AOT Club was created to give them a chance to meet and greet before and after the game.

“We have created the best business-to-business social network in the Valley, without question,’’ Welts says. “That’s the single most frequent comment I get from those people.”

The pro teams also bring in tourist dollars.

The Diamondbacks, for instance, drew 16 percent of their parties from outside of Maricopa County, according to a 2001 Maricopa County Stadium Commission study.

Then there’s the mega event of all — the Super Bowl.

“You’re looking at $400 million to $500 million in economic impact from one week,’’ Artigue says. “Of course, that’s an extreme example.”

And the teams give back to the community. The Diamondbacks, for example, gave $3 million through their foundation.

The teams are privately held and do not release financial information; however, it’s generally believed the Coyotes have been consistently unprofitable. With the smallest venue, the team also has the smallest attendance of the major Arizona pro teams, but its following is a devoted one. For many transplants from colder climates, a Coyotes game is a taste of home.

“Hockey is a game that sort of becomes ingrained in you,’’ says Holbrook, who came here from Buffalo, N.Y. “Hockey has really loyal fans.”

The Suns have been break-even or profitable. The Cardinals were believed profitable except for their last few years playing in Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, when they drew around half the league average.

Arizona Business Magazine March 2008The Diamondbacks, who were brought to Phoenix by the Suns’ legendary former owner Jerry Colangelo, were winners on the field in their early years, taking the 2001 World Series, but they ran up massive finasncial losses. In 2004, after a series of clashes with the Diamondbacks’ four majority owners, Colangelo was ousted from the CEO chair. Under current managing general partner Ken Kendrick and general partner and CEO Jeff Moorad, the Diamondbacks have been profitable for the past three years, the executives say. Last year, the Diamondbacks were winners on the field as well. They led the National League in victories with 90 and went to the league championship series.

Moorad stressed that the team’s ownership sees running the baseball team as sort of a stewardship.

“Ownership hasn’t taken a penny out of this team,’’ he says, prompting Kendrick to add with a laugh, “Of course, for the first seven years, there wasn’t anything to take.’’

 

AZ Business Magazine March 2008 | Next: The Ground Game