Tag Archives: michael crow

Julie_Wrigley

Wrigley donates millions to ASU’s Global Institute of Sustainability

As climate change threatens the world’s eco-systems, conservationist and philanthropist Julie Ann Wrigley is on a mission.

Turning to higher education for solutions, Wrigley has made a new $25 million philanthropic investment in Arizona State University’s Global Institute of Sustainability, bringing her total commitment to sustainability research and programs at ASU to $50 million. Her most recent support will advance research on how current human activity impacts the Earth’s capacity to sustain populations of all species.

In recognition of her leadership, ASU is renaming the institute: the Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability.

“ASU and Julie Wrigley have been dedicated partners in building the nation’s most comprehensive program in sustainability teaching, learning and discovery, and we could not have done it without her generous investment and leadership,” says ASU President Michael M. Crow, a member of the steering committee of the American College & University President’s Climate Commitment.

“She recognized and trusted that our university is one of the rare places that can tackle issues of sustainability across disciplines and find real-world solutions. Julie shares our commitment to making the world a better place for future generations and, through her partnership with us, is helping to invent that future.”

Wrigley’s commitments have helped to transform ASU — a university known for innovation and risk-taking — into a global center of sustainability education and discovery. For example:

  • The first comprehensive degree program in the country. ASU School of Sustainability alumni are employed in fields such as government, business, education, nonprofits and NGOs, recycling and waste, energy and environmental design, food and farming, finance and more.
  • Use-inspired research, including work done through ASU LightWorks, which has led to the development of technologies such as high-power, low-cost, rechargeable zinc-air batteries for renewable energy storage; an energy-efficient electrochemical process to capture and store carbon dioxide from power plant emissions; ultra-thin silicon solar cells designed to increase the amount of electricity that can be produced through direct conversion of sunlight; and developing microbial systems that restore water purity and generate usable energy by capturing waste products from water.
  • Across four campuses, ASU invested $52 million in sustainability projects in fiscal year 2013, including energy efficiency, dining, transportation, renewable energy and other projects. The university’s waste sent to landfill is down 24 percent from 2007 despite the university adding 29 percent in space and 33 percent in enrollment through 2013. Greenhouse gas emissions are down 15 percent from 2007; and ASU has 23.5 MWdc of solar generating capacity, which is more than 43 percent of the university’s daytime peak load.

“Julie’s continued support is an affirmation that we’re going in the right direction, and a challenge to continually strive to do more,” says Rob Melnick, Wrigley Institute COO and executive director. “We have launched the nation’s first School of Sustainability, and we continue to grow enrollment and expand the degrees and programs we offer, so we can educate as many future leaders as possible. We have built a foundation for collaborating across academic disciplines and internal and external partnerships — and even institutional and international boundaries — to approach our sustainability research in innovative ways.”

“I spend as much time working on my world of sustainability as I spend on my other business endeavors,” says Wrigley, CEO of Wrigley Investments LLC, also has sat on the board of the World Wildlife Fund, Keep America Beautiful, the Nature Conservancy and the Peregrine Fund.

“And to me, that’s how you can make an impact.”

For more information: http://sustainability.asu.edu.

WPCarey-School-Sign

W. P. Carey School Dedicates New McCord Hall

One of the nation’s largest and highest-ranked business schools dedicated a brand new, state-of-the-art facility today. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University held a ceremony to mark the official opening of its 129,000-square-foot McCord Hall.

“We believe we’ve built the most advanced learning environment available for graduate business students,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Amy Hillman. “Every detail was designed to teach students in a way that makes them better contributors to today’s work environment. The building has an emphasis on collaboration, discussion-based learning and flexibility.”

The new building is being added to the school’s two existing structures, which were renovated during this project. Together, they will ease overcrowding for the 10,000-plus students who attend the W. P. Carey School. McCord Hall will be home to the school’s graduate and executive-education programs, including the Top 30 nationally ranked MBA programs.

The impressive facility features modern architecture, technologically advanced tiered and flat classrooms, a multipurpose event space, a new graduate-level career center, team rooms, study areas, outdoor assembly areas, a lounge for honors undergrads, and a health-conscious café. McCord Hall is also environmentally friendly, with less water and energy use than similar buildings and a solar array that returns power to the campus grid. The project totaled $57 million, and the return on investment is expected to be great.

“We estimate the project has already had an economic impact on the gross state product of $64 million and the creation of 880 jobs,” says Professor Dennis Hoffman, director of the L. William Seidman Research Institute at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Of course, the value of the construction does not include the added value that will accrue from the human capital produced in McCord Hall’s learning environment, allowing students to acquire knowledge and skills to compete in today’s economy.”

ASU President Michael Crow and Hillman presided over the dedication ceremony at the university’s Tempe campus. Philanthropist Sharon Dupont McCord and other building donors also took part. McCord and her late husband, Bob, are the major donors behind the facility’s name. More than $17 million in gifts and pledges from area companies and families, as well as other various sources, are helping to fund the building. Student support has been robust.

To learn more about the W. P. Carey School of Business, visit wpcarey.asu.edu. For more information about McCord Hall, go to http://building.wpcarey.asu.edu/. Donations to the building campaign can still be made at asufoundation.org/wpcbuilding. The W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA, evening MBA, online MBA and undergraduate business programs are all currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

118315706

GPEC announces Board of Directors for FY 2014

The Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) today announced the appointment of its Board of Directors for the 2014 fiscal year, as approved by the Executive Committee.

Alliance Bank of Arizona CEO James Lundy will continue to lead the Board of Directors as chairman.

“As the economy continues to improve, GPEC’s team of results-driven board directors will work to ensure the region not only maintains its trajectory but also pushes toward a more diversified and sustainable economy that is less dependent on growth industries like real estate and construction,” Lundy said. “I’m honored to work with this talented group of professionals and look forward to a productive year.”

Rounding out the Board’s leadership is SCF Arizona President and CEO Don Smith and Empire Southwest Executive Vice President Chris Zaharis as vice chairs, APS Vice President and Chief Customer Officer Tammy McLeod as secretary and Bryan Cave, LLP Partner R. Neil Irwin as treasurer.

New Board Directors include: Steve Banta, CEO of Valley Metro; the Honorable Denny Barney, District 1 Supervisor for the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors; Scott Bradley, Area Vice President for Waste Management; Mark Clatt, Area President for Republic Services; the Honorable Vincent Francia, Mayor of the Town of Cave Creek; Dr. Ann Weaver Hart, President of the University of Arizona; Bill Jabjiniak, Economic Development Director for the City of Mesa; the Honorable Michael LeVault, Mayor of the Town of Youngtown; Rich Marchant, Executive Vice President, Global Operations for Crescent Crown Distributing; Ryan Nouis, Co-Founder and President of Job Brokers; and Eric Orsborn, Councilmember for the Town of Buckeye.

“GPEC’s success is largely driven by its strong Board of Directors, all of whom reflect the region and state’s most accomplished professionals,” GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome said. “Every single one of them truly cares about our market’s success and serves as a community thought leader when it comes to competitiveness.”

Mayors from GPEC’s member communities and the organization’s Nominating Committee are responsible for nominating and appointing Board Directors. The one-year terms are approved during GPEC’s Annual Board meeting.

GPEC FY 2014 Board of Directors:

James Lundy – Chairman
CEO
Alliance Bank of Arizona

Don Smith – Vice Chair
President and CEO
SCF Arizona

Chris Zaharis – Vice Chair
Executive Vice President
Empire Southwest

Tammy McLeod – Secretary
Vice President and Chief Customer Officer
Arizona Public Service Company

R. Neil Irwin – Treasurer
Partner
Bryan Cave, LLP

William Pepicello, Ph.D. – Immediate Past Chair
President
University of Phoenix

Barry Broome
President and CEO
Greater Phoenix Economic Council

Richard C. Adkerson
President and CEO
Freeport McMoRan Copper & Gold

Jason Bagley
Government Affairs Manager
Intel

Ron Butler
Managing Partner
Ernst & Young LLP

Brian Campbell
Attorney
Campbell & Mahoney, Chartered

Michael Crow, Ph.D.
President
Arizona State University

Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Midwestern University

Derrick Hall
President and CEO
Arizona Diamondbacks

Sharon Harper
President and CEO
The Plaza Companies

Ann Weaver Hart, Ph.D.
President
University of Arizona

Don Kile
President, Master Planned Communities
The Ellman Companies

Paul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation

Rich Marchant
Executive Vice President, Global Operations
Crescent Crown Distributing

David Rousseau
President
Salt River Project

Joseph Stewart
Chairman and CEO
JPMorgan Chase Arizona

Hyman Sukiennik
Vice President
Cox Business

Karrin Kunasek Taylor
Executive Vice President and
Chief Entitlements Officer
DMB Associates, Inc.

Gerrit van Huisstede
Regional President Desert Mountain Region
Wells Fargo

Andy Warren
President
Maracay Homes

Richard B. West, III
President
Carefree Partners

John Zidich
Publisher & President
The Arizona Republic

Chuck Allen
Managing Director, Gov’t & Community Relations
US Airways

Steve Banta
CEO
Valley Metro

Denny Barney
County Supervisor-District 1
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

Jason Barney
Principal and Partner
Landmark Investments

The Honorable Robert Barrett
Mayor
City of Peoria

Timothy Bidwill
Vice President
Vermilion IDG

Scott Bradley
Area Vice President, Four Corners Area
Waste Management

Norman Butler
Market Executive
Bank of America Merrill Lynch

Mark Clatt
Area President
Republic Services

Jeff Crockett
Shareholder
Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

Wyatt Decker, M.D.
CEO
Mayo Clinic Arizona

George Forristall
Director of Project Development
Mortenson Construction

The Honorable Vincent Francia
Mayor
Town of Cave Creek

Rufus Glasper, Ph.D.
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges

Barry Halpern
Partner
Snell and Wilmer

G. Todd Hardy
Vice President of Assets
ASU Foundation

Lynne Herndon
Phoenix City President
BBVA Compass

Linda Hunt
Senior VP of Operations and President/CEO
Dignity Health Arizona

William Jabiiniak
Economic Development Director
City of Mesa

The Honorable Robert Jackson
Mayor
City of Casa Grande

The Honorable Linda Kavanagh
Mayor
Town of Fountain Hills

The Honorable Andy Kunasek
County Supervisor, District 3
Maricopa County Board of Supervisors

The Honorable Michael LeVault
Mayor
Town of Youngtown

The Honorable John Lewis
Mayor
Town of Gilbert

The Honorable Marie Lopez Rogers
Mayor
City of Avondale

The Honorable Georgia Lord
Mayor
City of Goodyear

Jeff Lowe
President
MidFirst Bank

Paul Magallanez
Economic Development Director
City of Tolleson

Kate Maracas
Vice President
Abengoa

The Honorable Mark Mitchell
Mayor
City of Tempe

Ryan Nouis
Co-Founder & President
Job Brokers

Ed Novak
Managing Partner
Polsinelli Shughart

Eric Osborn
Councilmember
Town of Buckeye

Rui Pereira
General Manager
Rancho de Los Caballeros

The Honorable Christian Price
Mayor
City of Maricopa

Craig Robb
Managing Director
Zions Energy Link

The Honorable Jeff Serdy
Councilmember
City of Apache Junction

Steven M. Shope, Ph.D.
President
Sandia Research Corporation

James T. Swanson
President and CEO
Kitchell Corporation

Richard J. Thompson
President and CEO
Power-One

Jay Tibshraeny
Mayor
City of Chandler

John Welch
Managing Partner
Squire Sanders

Dan Withers
President
D.L. Withers Construction

The Honorable Sharon Wolcott
Mayor
City of Surprise

GENERAL COUNSEL
Bryant Barber
Attorney at Law
Lewis and Roca

medical.research

Plans advance for Arizona Biomedical Corridor

Plans to establish a biomedical and advanced technology research and development campus in northeast Phoenix advanced this week as KUD International, a subsidiary of one of the world’s largest development, design and construction companies, announced its plans and submitted an application to acquire 225 acres for the project from the Arizona State Land Department.

The proposed campus is the cornerstone of the Arizona Biomedical Corridor, a collaboration between the City of Phoenix, Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic announced in 2012 to expand the state’s bioscience industry by clustering compatible organizations in the corridor, located in northeast Phoenix at 56th Street and Mayo Boulevard, just south of the Loop 101 freeway. The development lies adjacent to the Phoenix campus of Mayo Clinic.

Acquiring the land could take up to a year, KUD officials anticipate. In the meantime, KUD is moving forward on plans for the first building at the more than $1 billion research park, which upon completion could generate thousands of jobs in the region.

Wyatt Decker, Vice President, Mayo Clinic and CEO Mayo Clinic in Arizona, said the project aligns well with Mayo Clinic’s plans in Phoenix and will play an integral part in its vision to continue to provide innovative, patient-centered medical care, supported by robust programs in research and education.

“The Arizona Biomedical Corridor will further strengthen the region’s growth as a national and international destination for healthcare-related research, education and private sector interests,” Decker said. “Our work with the City of Phoenix and ASU led to our relationship with KUD, a firm we believe will successfully complement and support our vision.”

Arizona State University President Michael Crow agreed, saying, “The development of the area adjacent to the Mayo Clinic Hospital, with its focus on biomedical and advanced technology research and manufacturing, is well aligned with ASU’s partnership with Mayo Clinic to create new health education and research facilities. We are encouraged that KUD shares our collective vision.”

KUD International LLC specializes in developing public-private projects around the world. It has extensive experience with large-scale developments that are founded on research and education and supported with a complementary mix of uses. The company is constructing a research park in Israel in conjunction with Ben-Gurion University that is similar to the one proposed in northeast Phoenix.

KUD International President and CEO Marvin Suomi said the collaboration with Mayo Clinic presented KUD with a sound basis to make a significant investment in establishing a major biomedical research and healthcare complex in north Phoenix. “We consider this a mission-driven project in alliance with Mayo Clinic, and procuring the land is the first step in realizing its vision set long ago,” Suomi said.

Arizona Governor Jan Brewer added, “I’m pleased the Arizona Land Department has accepted and advanced an application for this proposal, paving the way for the development of a premier medical and research facility in north Phoenix. Not only will this project create thousands of high-quality jobs, it will strengthen and secure our position as a global leader in providing world-class medical care. With the involvement of partners like the Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, I know this project will be a point of pride for the entire state.”

Others involved with the project identify KUD’s relationship with Mayo Clinic, its expertise and its initiative in acquiring the state land as important factors that will help the Arizona Biomedical Corridor become a reality.

“I think this is another example of Arizona’s economic recovery and an indication of the growing strength of the Arizona real estate market,” said Arizona State Land Commissioner Vanessa Hickman. “This is a big win for State Trust Land beneficiaries and the result of careful negotiations between the Arizona State Land Department and the other collaborators.”

Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton said, “In January 2012, I announced a vision to grow more high-wage jobs in Phoenix by creating a second bioscience campus on a 1,000-acre corridor in Desert Ridge in Northeast Phoenix. Because we already have great partners like Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University, KUD’s investment plans are the key private interest we need to unlock the potential at this location for education and research and create a greater magnet to attract high-wage jobs to Phoenix.”

District 2 Councilman Jim Waring adds, “In February 2013, the City Council adopted a formal strategy to focus on high-wage, bioscience and technology uses within this corridor. I am very pleased to see that the private sector agrees and validates the City’s concept. The City of Phoenix will be a great partner in the project, focused on helping KUD start their development projects as quickly as possible.  Our business community tells us time and again that five-day site plan reviews and one-day construction permitting provides great value and we look forward to delivering this same great service to KUD.”

Tempe Town Lake July 4th Festival

Tempe lands state’s largest office development deal

The City of Tempe announced today that Ryan Companies US, Inc. and Sunbelt Holdings will develop a site owned by Arizona State University adjacent to Tempe Town Lake, subject to City Council approval of development agreement details in the coming month.

State Farm will lease office space and anchor the multi-use development.

“We are thrilled that Ryan Companies US, Inc. and Sunbelt Holdings have been selected to co-develop and construct the State Farm regional hub,” said John Strittmatter, President of Ryan Companies US, Inc., Southwest Division.

“With retail and recreational amenities on site for State Farm employees and the entire community to enjoy, Marina Heights will become an important icon of the Tempe Town Lake landscape and we are proud to be a part of it.”

The Marina Heights project in Tempe will be the largest office development deal in Arizona history, with more than 2 MSF to be constructed on more than 20 acres. Construction costs are estimated at $600M. Additionally, 40,000 SF to 60,000 SF of retail amenities will complement the transit-oriented development, including food service, coffee shops, restaurants, business services, and fitness facilities.

The site will also feature an approximately 10-acre lakeside plaza, which will be open to the public.

“This is a proud day for Tempe and everyone involved. We are tremendously excited about what the addition of State Farm will mean to our community over the decades to come,” said Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell. “These employees, buildings, and amenities will further contribute to and showcase the vibrancy of Tempe Town Lake, Mill Avenue, and Arizona State University, and serve as a catalyst for more high-quality development.”

“We are thrilled that State Farm will be expanding in Arizona,” said Gov. Jan Brewer. “The jobs that will be created to make this project a reality will be a tremendous boon to our economy. This is a great example of how our plan to build an Arizona that is attractive to high value employers is hitting the mark.”

The five-building campus will be leased by State Farm and become a hub to include a combination of new hires and existing employees who will provide claims, service, and sales support to State Farm customers.

“State Farm selected Tempe because it has a growing population with skill sets that match our customers’ needs,” said Mary Crego, Senior Vice President, State Farm. “The site along Tempe Town Lake gives our employees access to nearby amenities as well as easy connections to public transportation.”

“We look forward to having State Farm as a neighbor and to working with the company on a variety of programs including employee recruitment and academic programs for their staff,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow.

“State Farm’s decision to lease the land owned by the university immediately adjacent to the ASU Athletic Facilities District is the first major step in the campaign to fund new and renovated sports facilities for the university. The Athletic Facilities District will be home to an exciting mixed-use development reflecting high quality and the best practices of sustainability. A high stature tenant such as State Farm will add to the luster of the district and validates its attractiveness.”

The project is being developed by Ryan Companies US, Inc. and Sunbelt Holdings. Tempe-based architectural firm DAVIS designed the project.

Tempe Town Lake July 4th Festival

Tempe lands state's largest office development deal

The City of Tempe announced today that Ryan Companies US, Inc. and Sunbelt Holdings will develop a site owned by Arizona State University adjacent to Tempe Town Lake, subject to City Council approval of development agreement details in the coming month.

State Farm will lease office space and anchor the multi-use development.

“We are thrilled that Ryan Companies US, Inc. and Sunbelt Holdings have been selected to co-develop and construct the State Farm regional hub,” said John Strittmatter, President of Ryan Companies US, Inc., Southwest Division.

“With retail and recreational amenities on site for State Farm employees and the entire community to enjoy, Marina Heights will become an important icon of the Tempe Town Lake landscape and we are proud to be a part of it.”

The Marina Heights project in Tempe will be the largest office development deal in Arizona history, with more than 2 MSF to be constructed on more than 20 acres. Construction costs are estimated at $600M. Additionally, 40,000 SF to 60,000 SF of retail amenities will complement the transit-oriented development, including food service, coffee shops, restaurants, business services, and fitness facilities.

The site will also feature an approximately 10-acre lakeside plaza, which will be open to the public.

“This is a proud day for Tempe and everyone involved. We are tremendously excited about what the addition of State Farm will mean to our community over the decades to come,” said Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell. “These employees, buildings, and amenities will further contribute to and showcase the vibrancy of Tempe Town Lake, Mill Avenue, and Arizona State University, and serve as a catalyst for more high-quality development.”

“We are thrilled that State Farm will be expanding in Arizona,” said Gov. Jan Brewer. “The jobs that will be created to make this project a reality will be a tremendous boon to our economy. This is a great example of how our plan to build an Arizona that is attractive to high value employers is hitting the mark.”

The five-building campus will be leased by State Farm and become a hub to include a combination of new hires and existing employees who will provide claims, service, and sales support to State Farm customers.

“State Farm selected Tempe because it has a growing population with skill sets that match our customers’ needs,” said Mary Crego, Senior Vice President, State Farm. “The site along Tempe Town Lake gives our employees access to nearby amenities as well as easy connections to public transportation.”

“We look forward to having State Farm as a neighbor and to working with the company on a variety of programs including employee recruitment and academic programs for their staff,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow.

“State Farm’s decision to lease the land owned by the university immediately adjacent to the ASU Athletic Facilities District is the first major step in the campaign to fund new and renovated sports facilities for the university. The Athletic Facilities District will be home to an exciting mixed-use development reflecting high quality and the best practices of sustainability. A high stature tenant such as State Farm will add to the luster of the district and validates its attractiveness.”

The project is being developed by Ryan Companies US, Inc. and Sunbelt Holdings. Tempe-based architectural firm DAVIS designed the project.

jon-kyl

ASU names Kyl Distinguished Fellow, Scholar

Former United States Senator Jon Kyl has accepted a part-time appointment at Arizona State University as Distinguished Fellow in Public Service in the ASU College of Public Programs and as O’Connor Distinguished Scholar of Law and Public Service in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at ASU.

The Senate’s former No. 2 Republican leader will work primarily in Washington, D.C. and will begin this new role with ASU immediately.   Recognized in 2010 as one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time magazine, Kyl was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1994 and retired at the end of his third term In January of this year.  Before serving the Senate, he was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1987 to 1995 and earlier worked as a lawyer and lobbyist in Phoenix.

Kyl, who received his bachelor’s degree and law degree from the University of Arizona, recently joined Covington & Burling, the largest law firm in the nation’s capitol.

“Jon Kyl has long been one of the nation’s most important political leaders,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow.  “He has taken a thoughtful approach to important issues and has been a statesman at time when statesmanship was sometimes lacking.  ASU students will benefit greatly from his experience and perspective.”

At ASU he will teach classes and convene discussion groups on a range of issues, including immigration reform, sequestration and the debt ceiling, tax and entitlement reform, and national security and foreign policy.  Other topics will involve internal Congressional issues such as the role of politics and compromise, party discipline, lobbying and why Congress is so contentious.

“ASU has made tremendous progress in the last decade,” said Kyl. ”I am excited to work in such a dynamic environment. Twenty six years in Congress taught me a lot, and much of it is not quite what the textbooks teach.  Hopefully, I can impart some ‘real life’ lessons about our national government and major policy issues to students at ASU.”

“We are delighted that Senator Kyl will be joining us as O’Connor Distinguished Scholar of Law and Public Service,” said Douglas Sylvester, dean of the O’Connor College of Law.  “He is one of Arizona’s most respected and experienced public servants, and we are looking forward to the invaluable perspective he will bring our students and our law school community through his years of distinguished leadership and government service.”

Added Dean Jonathan Koppell, dean of the College of Public Programs, “What a great opportunity for ASU to learn from a legislator who has been a key player on issues that affect every Arizonan.

“At a time when the political process is widely disparaged, ASU students who already are drawn to public service will get the chance to see how one person can make a difference by following the path to elective office.  Senator Kyl has shown himself equally passionate about opening students’ eyes to the realities of policy making in Washington and the substantive issues, like water policy and immigration, that will shape the future of Arizona.”

SS Reendering

SkySong sparks economic revitalization along McDowell Road Corridor

No one would guessed that a catalyst of innovation could rise from the ruins of a vacant shopping mall. And certainly no one could imagine that happening in the middle of a crippling economic downturn that affected the entire world.

But that’s what’s happened in Scottsdale.

“It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute,” said Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane. “SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

SkySong, the ASU Scottsdale Innovation Center, opened in 2007 at the location that was once the Los Arcos Mall and has become one of the biggest success stories in the world when it comes to incubator and technology centers.

The vision for SkySong is to create a mixed-use project of 1.2 million square feet that will draw entrepreneurs and innovators into the project, give them the resources they need to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off. The vision started with Arizona State University President Michael Crow, who wanted to create the kind of technological and innovation-minded environment that would attract companies and job creation to the metro Phoenix area.

In addition to becoming home to more than 50 companies from 10 countries around the world, SkySong has become the anchor to what economic developers are calling Scottsdale’s McDowell Road Corridor, a community where innovation, technology, business and retailers have converged to create tremendous economic opportunities. Scottsdale economic development officials said more than $200 million of new capital in being invested along the McDowell Road Corridor. And the economic impact of SkySong — which was estimated to be $10 billion over the course of the next 30 years — is only expected to grow with the addition of SkySong 3.

“The targeted opening date for SkySong 3 is in 2014,” said SkySong spokesman Tom Evans. “We anticipate a kick-off in construction activity in the second quarter of 2013. In the meantime, work is continuing on the new residential units that are part of the SkySong project. The $45 million, four-story project will include 325 residential units, and is being built by MT Builders. Todd & Associates is the architecture firm for the project. The first of those units will open for occupancy in October 2013.”

Evans said you can expect to see companies that will mirror the energy of the firms that filled SkySong 1 and 2 when SkySong 3 opens.

“The businesses at SkySong share the spirit of innovation and technology that is so critical to the vision of SkySong,” Evans said. “Companies such as Jobing.com, Channel Intelligence and Adaptive Curriculum will serve as models for the new companies coming into SkySong 3 and for the smaller companies in the ASU SkySong incubator space. The companies at SkySong 3 will also continue the positive impact the project is having on the McDowell Road Corridor, thanks to the success of SkySong 1 and 2 over the past few years.”

veterans

ASU President, Carter earn Veterans awards

Arizona State University President Michael Crow will receive the Arizona Veterans Hall of Fame Society’s highest award for his support of veterans through his leadership, actions and advocacy.

The Copper Sword award will be presented on Feb. 13 during the 2013 Copper Sword and Copper Shield Award Gala at Tempe Mission Palms Hotel in Tempe. This year’s Copper Shield award will be presented to ASU Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Clinical Associate Professor and Arizona State Representative Heather Carter, R- Cave Creek and North Phoenix, who has acted to help the state’s veterans, military service members, their families and survivors.

“It’s important to honor veterans’ service to their country with programs and services such as those we’ve instilled at ASU. We work to ensure that our returning servicemen and women have access to services that ease the transition into the civilian and academic environment,” Crow said.

ASU serves veterans through venues such as the Pat Tillman Veterans Center that opened in 2011 to provide a single point of contact for ASU veterans and their dependents, bringing together academic and student support services to promote a smooth transition from the military and provide assistance for veterans’ benefits, deployments, information and referrals. It also serves as a place where veterans can gather to study and socialize.

In addition, ASU was named a “Military Friendly School for 2013” by GI jobs magazine, the fourth consecutive year the university has earned the honor. ASU was named one of the top 30 “Best for Vets: Colleges 2010” by Military Times Edge magazine and the university was chosen as one of the first eight institutions to be part of the Veterans Affairs pilot program, VetSuccess on Campus. Two Veterans Affairs staff, a vocational rehabilitation counselor and a Vet Center outreach coordinator are assigned and located on ASU’s campus to assist veterans with services such as vocational testing, career counseling and readjustment counseling  to promote successful completion of educational and employment goals.

ASU was also chosen as a University Partner for the 2012-2013 academic year in support of the Tillman Military Scholars program, which provides scholarships for active and veteran service members as well as their spouses. The Pat Tillman Foundation established the Tillman Military Scholars program in 2008 that is dedicated to supporting educational opportunities for service members and their families by filling the financial gaps in the Post-9/11 G.I. Bill. The Tillman Military Scholars program covers not only direct study-related expenses such as tuition and fees, but also other needs, including housing and child care.

Carter will be recognized for initiatives such as introducing a bill in the Arizona legislature that provides for employment preference for veterans when calculating points for employment with the state, counties, cities and towns, as well as other political subdivisions in the state. She has worked on other veterans issues as well.

For more information on ASU’s programs and support services for veteran students, visit http://students.asu.edu/military. For information about the gala, go to www.avhof.org.

99270474

Commerce partners with ASU to encourage U.S.-Mexico border trade

Michael Camuñez, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Market Access and Compliance, and Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University (ASU), will co-host the Realizing the Economic Strength of our 21st Century Border Trade, Education and Jobs Conference, September 23-25, 2012, in Tempe.

The conference will focus on creating jobs, enhancing education in the United States and Mexico; identifying industry opportunities in renewable energy, aerospace, tourism, and logistics; exporting goods and services to the United States and Mexico; and attracting investment and enhancing local economic development.

The conference panels, which will feature major U.S. and Mexico corporations, U.S. Congressional Members, governors and mayors from both sides of the border, will focus on identifying regional solutions to border-related challenges and priorities such as workforce needs and educational development; trade facilitation and supply chain solutions for cross-border trade; border infrastructure needs and regional border planning; public/private partnership opportunities and new innovative technologies; and identifying cross-border economic development and job creation strategies.

A conference agenda is available at http://trade.gov/borderconference/

WHO: Senior U.S. and Mexico Government Officials

WHAT: Realizing the Economic Strength of Our 21st Century Border Trade, Education and Jobs

WHEN: September 23-25, 2012

WHERE: Fiesta Resort Conference Center, 2100 South Priest Dr., Tempe, Ariz. 85282

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AAED to Host Symposium on Conducting Business in Indian Country

 

The Arizona Association for Economic Development (AAED) will host a symposium, “Rising to New Heights: How to do Business in Indian Country,” Tuesday, Oct. 2, from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Phoenix Country Club,  2901 N. Seventh St.

Luncheon keynote speaker will be Jonodev Chaudhuri, counselor to the assistant secretary – Indian Affairs, U.S. Dept. of the Interior, who will address “Emerging Opportunities for Business Collaboration” between the federal government and tribal businesses and will highlight examples of successful partnerships among government and business partners.

The morning keynote speaker will be Diane Humetewa, special advisor to ASU President Michael Crow, special counsel, general counsel’s office & professor of practice, college of law.

A session titled “The University of Arizona and Arizona’s Native Nations: Providing Access to Opportunities,” is also scheduled. Presenters will be Maryilyn Robinson, associate director, Drachman Institute, office of the vice president for research, and Claudia E. Nelson, director, Native Peoples Technical Assistance Office

A mid-morning panel discussion on “Building Communities” will also be part of the programming. Panelists will be Vice Chairman Shan Lewis of the Fort Mojave Indian Tribe, Eddie Calnimptewa, project director, Moenkopi Development Corp., Hopi Tribe, and Levi Esquerra, program director at the Center for American Indian Economic Development at Northern Arizona University.

The cost is $65 for members, $75 for non-members and $90 for late registrants. Registration deadline is Friday, Sept. 28. Lunch is included. Please request vegetarian meal in advance. Call AAED with questions at 602-240-AAED (2233), or visit the AAED website, www.aaed.com.

AAED was originally founded in 1974 as the Arizona Association for Industrial Development (AAID). The organization, which was dedicated to expanding the industrial and economic base of Arizona, changed to its current name in 1991 to better reflect its broader mission.

 

asu skysong collaborates with Taiwan's ITRI

ASU SkySong & ITRI, Taiwan’s Largest Research Organization To Collaborate

ASU SkySong hosted an important meeting where a Statement of Collaboration was signed by Arizona State University President Michael Crow and Taiwan’s Industrial Technology Research Institute’s (ITRI) Chairman Ching-Yen Tsay. The agreement begins a collaborative relationship between ASU Skysong and ITRI, whose research interests and work in the areas of renewable energy, bio design, health care, climate change and intelligent information and communication technologies align strategically with the research of ASU. The goal of ASU’s collaboration with ITRI is to increase shared knowledge by propelling research in their joint interest areas, thereby increasing the commercialization of technologies from each institution.

“ASU is excited by the chance to partner with ITRI to advance meaningful, leading edge research in multiple areas in which society needs rapid innovation,” said ASU President Crow. “This agreement creates new discovery and commercialization opportunities that build on the shared strengths of our respective knowledge enterprises, and represents a promising chapter in ASU’s ongoing commitment to global engagement.”

ITRI is a nonprofit research and development organization engaged in applied research and technical services. Founded in 1973, ITRI has played a vital role in transforming Taiwan’s economy from a labor-intensive industry to a high-tech industry. ITRI focuses on six areas, including information and communications; electronics and optoelectronics; material, chemical and nanotechnology; medical device and biomedical; mechanical and systems engineering, and green energy and environment. ITRI has aggressively researched and developed countless next-generation technologies, including WIMAX wireless broadband, solar cells, radio frequency identification, light electric vehicles, flexible displays, 3-D integrated circuits and tele-care technologies.

“With ASU and ITRI both agreeing on institution-to-institution collaboration,” said Chairman Tsay, “ITRI hopes that both parties will work together and leverage each other’s core competence and regional advantages to advance innovative research, entrepreneurship and commercialization. We enjoyed our visit to ASU, and hope that President Crow can visit ITRI and Taiwan in the near future to further build up the collaboration framework and initiate the first projects that were discussed on our recent visit.”

Iveda Solutions Inc., Mesa, Ariz., is an additional strategic partner for this collaboration, working with ASU SkySong and ITRI in the area of cloud computing and services. With a subsidiary in Taiwan (MEGAsys), Iveda has a working understanding of research in Arizona and in Taiwan. Iveda is heavily focused on developing innovations in cloud computing and real world applications for bringing cloud computing down to earth. The company develops and markets enterprise-class video hosting, real-time remote surveillance and global video positioning and mapping services.

“If we don’t continue to innovate for real-world applications, the buzz around cloud-based video surveillance technology will remain just that,” said David Ly, president and CEO of Iveda Solutions. “Our alliance with ASU and ITRI will inspire academic direction towards cloud-technology innovations to bring to market products and services that will have a positive impact in communities around the world. This collaboration will help turn technology possibilities into beneficial tools for making our communities safer, more secure and more efficient.”

For more information on ASU SkySongs and ITRI, visit ASU SkySong’s website at skysong.asu.edu and ITRI’s website at www.itri.org.tw/eng/index.aspx

international leadership

ASU Becomes Home To McCain Institute For International Leadership

Arizona State University announced that it has established the McCain Institute for International Leadership.

The new Institute is initially supported by a $9 million gift from the McCain Institute Foundation, a charitable trust funded by Arizona Senator John McCain. Arizona State University will build the nonpartisan and nonprofit education and research center, based in Washington, D.C., and with a physical presence in Tempe. Full establishment of the McCain Institute is planned for early 2013.

Already deep in the planning stages, the McCain Institute for International Leadership will focus on promoting character-driven leadership, as well as research and decision-making in the areas of humanitarian work, human rights and national security. It also will seek to promote rigorous debate, in the best American tradition of open inquiry, spirited discussion and practical action.

The myriad challenges and opportunities facing America and the world – including humanitarian crises and economic competition; democratic uprisings in the Middle East and cartel-driven violence and drug-trade along the U.S.-Mexico border; a rising China and global competition for resources – all demonstrate the continuing need for character-driven leadership, and rigorous analysis and decision-making. Through its policy research, events, fellows programs and other activities, the Institute aims to inform, convene and assist policymakers, and to train future leaders from the United States and abroad.

“The charge of the McCain Institute for International Leadership fits in perfectly with Arizona State University’s core mission of having a significant positive impact on the larger community, and we are grateful to Senator McCain for his support of this important university endeavor,” ASU President Michael Crow said. “It will be guided by the values that have animated the career of Senator McCain – a commitment to sustaining America’s global leadership role, promoting freedom, democracy and human rights, as well as maintaining a strong, smart national defense.”

As a university that has pioneered a new model for an American research university, Arizona State brings substantial capacities to the table unmatched by traditional Washington think tanks. The university’s renowned faculty, its numerous schools and centers, and its unique “Decision Theater” capability offer a scholarly resource base that can help develop recommendations for improved decision-making.

The McCain Institute’s Washington location also offers new opportunities for ASU, including possibilities for student internships, research fellowships, and eventually a “Washington Semester” for ASU students.  The Institute will contribute to Arizona State University’s critical thinking and research missions by expanding its profile and access to policy-making in Washington, D.C.

Former U.S. Ambassador to NATO Kurt Volker has been named Executive Director of the Institute. Until recently, Volker served as a senior follow and managing director of the Center on Transatlantic Relations at John Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He also serves as a senior advisor at the Atlantic Council of the United States and is a member of its Strategic Advisory Group.

“The McCain Institute has a real opportunity to fill some gaps in Washington – first, by building future international leadership through a Fellows program, and second, by engaging directly with senior decision-makers in developing, analyzing, testing, and promoting the implementation of innovative policies,” said Volker.

Senator Mark Udall (D-Colo.) said he is “pleased that Senator McCain and Arizona State University are joining forces to create the McCain Institute…”  “When I first came to the Senate in 2009, John befriended me, just as my father had befriended him years ago. We have worked together in the same nonpartisan approach that the McCain Institute will bring to international affairs – one based on shared values and common interests, not ideology.”

“Washington is not a town short of ideas, it is a town short of leadership,” said Senator Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.). “Policy proposals without leadership and values behind them, or people who are courageous enough to fight for them, will not stand up to the international challenges we face. I believe that the McCain Institute will be a center of gravity, a meeting place where we can robustly debate the great issues of our time and come away with a sense of purpose and a passion for character-driven leadership.”

At this stage, the Institute is focusing on three early tasks: (a) creating institutional capacity, including physical space, personnel, partnerships, and linkages to ASU’s existing faculty and resources; (b) launching initial work to design the Fellows program and to engage with policymakers and partners to strengthen policies against trafficking in persons; and (c) reaching out to develop a long-term network of supporters and contributors.

The Institute’s “Cornerstone Meeting,” held April 27-29, 2012, in Sedona, Ariz., brought together leading policymakers such as CIA Director David Petraeus and Senators Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.), Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) and Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.) to discuss the central issues facing our world.  The Cornerstone Meeting helped to sharpen the McCain Institute’s vision as a unique institution in Washington and to build lasting commitment from a wide community of supporters.

As explained in the Institute’s mission statement, four central objectives guide the institute’s work:

  • Provide decision recommendations for leaders through open debate and rigorous analysis, by convening experts, publishing policy-relevant research, and holding decision-making training events using cutting-edge technology. This includes convening policymakers, academics, journalists and other experts to discuss and debate important national security issues, as well as hosting exercises, war games and “red team” exercises centered on key national security issues that will likely emerge on the mid-term horizon. ASU’s innovative Decision Theater will be one of the venues utilized.
  • Identify and train new national security leaders, both American and foreign, in public service and private enterprise, as well as military spheres. This includes establishing an internship program for undergraduate and graduate students, a McCain Leadership Fellows Program, and a class of Next Generation McCain Fellows composed of rising national security professionals.
  • Play a unique role in a crowded intellectual space by serving as Washington’s preeminent “decision tank.” This includes sponsoring the Sedona Forum, an international gathering of top government officials, private sector leaders and issues experts in Sedona, Arizona, focused on the nation’s and the world’s most pressing issues, as well as the McCain Debates, a speaking series in Washington that provides an arena for experts and policy makers to debate key issues.
  • Promote and preserve the McCain family spirit of character-driven leadership and national service, including hosting the McCain family archives. This includes partnering with foreign and domestic organizations to convene discussion on issues of regional and global importance, as well as hosting an electronic document repository to serve as a center of research and information for historians, academics, students and others.

For more information on the McCain Institute for International Leadership, visit ASU’s website at asu.edu.

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Future of Technology In Arizona: Where Do We Go From Here?

The future of technology: Science and engineering turned Arizona’s first 100 years upside down, so where do we go from here?


Think about the achievements in technology that came during Arizona’s first 100 years.

  • The first transcontinental telephone service between New York and San Francisco (1915).
  • The world’s first radio broadcasting station goes on the air  (1920).
  • Television has its first successful demonstration in the United States (1927).
  • James Watson and Francis Crick at Cambridge University describe the structure of the DNA molecule (1953).
  • The microchip is invented (1959).
  • The first test-tube baby is born (1978).
  • IBM introduces its first personal computer (1981).
  • Cellular telephones are introduced to consumers (1982).
  • Development of the World Wide Web begins (1989).
  • Dolly the sheep becomes the first mammal cloned from an adult cell (1996).
  • Apple introduces the iPod (2001).
  • Facebook is launched (2004).
  • Scientists discover how to use human skin cells to create embryonic stem cells (2007).

They are all innovations that have changes the way we lives our lives and do business.

Where will technology take us as Arizona enters its second century? How will it affect our lives? Here are technologies and scenarios that some of Arizona’s best and brightest minds see playing out in the state’s next 100 years.


The Future of Technology In Arizona


Future of TechnologyMark Bonsall
General manager and CEO
SRP

If I had to pick one technology with the potential to truly revolutionize the industry it would be finding affordable ways to store energy on a very large scale.  This would increase the value of intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar and could transform electricity into a more common commodity.  It isn’t clear that this is possible, but with the growing focus on electric vehicles and other storage technologies, it is certain there will be significant gains over the next century.


Future of TechnologyMark Edwards
Vice president of corporate development and marketing
Algae Biosciences, Inc.

Algae-based food, fiber, feed, fertilizer, fuels, and advanced medicines will transform those industries, as we know them today. The current serious problems of waste and pollution will be solved with sustainable algae-based production that recycles and reuses nutrients, water, and energy while regenerating air, water and soils. Our children’s children will have sufficient natural resources to produce the food, energy and transportation they will need.

Algae Biosciences is Scottsdale-based and focused on discovering and unlocking the powers of algae to resolve critical human issues – nutrition, health, energy and environment.


Future of TechnologySteve Sanghi
President and CEO
Microchip Technology Inc.

If I had to pick one (technology that will have biggest impact on Arizona’s next 100 years) it would be the renewable-energy complex of technologies. For Arizona, the primary renewable-energy opportunities can be broken into three categories—measurement, conservation and harvesting.  The world’s oil supply will eventually run out, and Arizona has more days of sun than most areas.  We must continue working to tap into this ever-present energy source.  At the same time, we must focus on developing the technologies that will enable individuals and companies to both measure and conserve their energy usage.  For example, Arizona has the potential to play a key role in developing the technologies that will be employed at the home, industrial and utility levels to make the burgeoning “smart grid” work.


Future of TechnologyJohn Lefebvre
President
Suntech America

The amount of energy generated through renewable sources like solar power has the potential to surpass that derived from fossil fuels in the next 50 years. We’ve already seen remarkable technological innovations in the solar field to increase efficiency, develop solutions for energy storage, and further reduce costs, with further improvements on the horizon. With over 300 days of sunshine, Arizona is naturally poised to take advantage of these advancements and its abundant resource by generating clean electricity without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.


Future of TechnologyDiane Brossart
President
Valley Forward Association

The biggest issues facing Arizona over the next 100 years are managing a finite water supply and transitioning to a clean energy economy. Green technology and innovation will create economic and environmentally sound solutions, making Arizona the leading destination for living wisely and sustainably in a desert.

Valley Forward Association promotes cooperative efforts to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities.


Future of TechnologyKelly Mott Lacroix
Graduate research associate
Water Resources Research Center in Tucson

We do not have a silver bullet to solve our water supply and demand challenges The state and its water issues are too diverse.  Rather, there are many smaller pieces from the simple and small scale, such as rainwater harvesting, to the large and complex, such as increased reclaimed water use, that when taken together will constitute a solution.


Future of TechnologyBill Hubert
President and founder
Cology, Inc.

Universal, personal-application based technology in general, and highly-sophisticated, profile-driven applications that help consumers (students and parents in our industry) not only gain access to a broader spectrum of programs and services available – but an interactive relationship with providers that will help both sides of the “economic equation” benefit from the transaction.

Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc. is a leading provider of end-to-end private student loan origination and repayment servicing solutions for lenders.


Future of TechnologyCR Herro
Vice president of environmental affairs
Meritage Homes

In the next century, climate will take the lead role in transforming Arizona and its buildings into energy-producing solar collectors. Arizona has the ability to become the largest producer of renewable, clean energy nationwide. In residential construction, that has already started.  The first cost-effective solar communities debuted in Arizona. Meritage Homes introduced the nation’s first net-zero homes in Arizona, saving owners both energy and money. And Arizona utilities lead the country in sponsoring energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.  Arizona is shaping up to be a state powered by the sun in every way imaginable.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Niemiec
President
Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

Technology will be used to not only focus on the tiny gene, but to see the bigger picture of the bio-energetic field of the body. Not unlike what you would see in a Star Trek movie, technology would be used to assess and heal both the body and mind, taking into account the bio-electric system. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine has been focused on individualized medicine for thousands of years, with each treatment and formula specifically adapted to an individual, changing as the person changes and moves toward health. Thus, this dynamic medicine is the forefather of modern “individualized medicine” and can work well to make modern biotechnology more effective.


Future of TechnologyDanny Murphy
Airport director
Sky Harbor International Airport

With the explosion of mobile devices, coupled with high speed wireless networks, there is a new generation that will live their lives on mobile technology, using smartphones, touchpads and other mobile devices.
In the past we used to print so many information pieces about the airport. And while we still provide printed materials to an extent, our focus is on providing information via the web and for mobile units.


Future of TechnologyDr. Grace Caputo
Director
Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

Moving to a system where we utilize electronic medical records will really give us the ability to shape and improve health care across the board. Pediatric healthcare will be heavily impacted as we have just started to unravel genetic bases diseases. In the future, we hope to understand the genetic process of diseases so we can treat them and ultimately prevent diseases with wellness and lifestyle changes.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Anaya
Anchor
CBS 5 News

I think the internet technology we currently use to help in our news gathering will become a bigger factor in how we do things. Smart phones  (or whatever replaces them in the next 100 years) will replace cameras and studios creating more intimacy and accessibility. That accessibility will make it much easier to hold those in power more accountable for their actions which I hope will have a positive impact on how the state’s laws are created, shaped and enforced.


Future of TechnologyMahesh Seetharam, M.D.
Medical oncologist and hematologist
Arizona Oncology

Personalized medicine through whole genome sequencing (genomics), proteomics and noninvasive imaging will pave the way for the future.  Current research to evaluate for circulating cancer cells, and evaluation for cancer in urine samples are already being studied, and holds promise for the future.


Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D.
Radiation oncologist
Arizona Oncology

Immensely precise and conformal radiation treatments in the form of stereotactic radiation, high dose-rate radiation and molecularly targeted radiation will allow radiation oncologists surgical precision in assisting the people of Arizona to improve cancer cure and control. Just as the technological advances in the past have allowed women diagnosed with breast cancer to pursue breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and have allowed men to preserve erectile function with prostate cancer, future advances will allow more Arizonans diagnosed with cancer to enjoy a better quality of life along with improved cure rates.


Michael Crow
President
Arizona State University

The biggest single technology to impact the future of Arizona will be individualized learning technologies that allow individuals to master subjects in ways customized to their particular types of intelligence and learning modalities.  This technology will allow people to learn more quickly and more deeply and more broadly. Those places, hopefully like Arizona, that enable and empower this kind of learning will see tremendous positive impacts from this technological development.


Where to invest in technology

Patricia Ternes, a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Scottsdale says these are the four technology sectors to invest in going into Arizona’s next century:

1. Water 
Growing imbalances in global water supply and demand are well documented. Within that heading, the companies involved with water fall into four categories: (1) activities and technologies that increase supply; (2) the building of the necessary water structure; (3) processes that help reduce demand; and (4) water management.

2. Agriculture
When you look at the growth of the world’s population companies that are involved in agriculture and food production will continue to be attractive and important.

3. Health
Another important sector will be health care services and life sciences tools and services that provide better quality of life for the aging population.

4. The unknown
The fourth sector doesn’t exist yet.  Advances are happening so fast that something new will be created that will change our lives.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Sustainability Leadership Graduate Certificate

ASU Offers Sustainability Leadership Graduate Certificate To Soldiers

Online certificate — the Sustainability Leadership Graduate Certificate — custom-designed to meet US Army, Army National Guard, Army Reserve readiness objectives

The design and establishment of an online graduate certificate in sustainability leadership at Arizona State University for soldiers and civilians in the U.S. Army, Army National Guard and Army Reserve was inaugurated Jan. 6 during a signing ceremony.

Participating in the event at the Army National Guard Bureau headquarters in Arlington, Va., were ASU President Michael M. Crow; Brig. Gen. Daniel J. Nelan, assistant to the director, Army National Guard; and Richard G. Kidd IV, deputy assistant secretary of the Army for energy and sustainability.

“This graduate-level certificate program introduces soldiers and civilians in the United States Army, Army National Guard and Army Reserve to major principles in sustainability science,” said ASU’s Crow. “The men and women who participate in this program will learn to apply sustainability tools, techniques and concepts to meet standards for operational efficiencies, energy and water conservation, use of renewable energy sources, and waste minimization, all of which will enhance mission readiness and cost effectiveness.”

The Sustainability Leadership Graduate Certificate at ASU is a custom-developed program featuring contemporary examples of sustainability challenges and opportunities relevant to missions and operations of the Army, Army National Guard and Army Reserve. It was specifically designed to assist soldiers and civilians in furthering their education while moving the Army, Army National Guard and Army Reserve closer to their goals to be sustainable organizations.

The five-course online program is offered through ASU’s School of Sustainability, which is the first in the nation to offer comprehensive undergraduate and graduate degree programs in sustainability science. The courses in the program may also be applied toward a master’s degree in sustainability.

“The Army National Guard today faces unprecedented demands on its soldiers, communities, natural resources and various other assets. Our readiness relies on the actions we take now,” said Nelan. “We will meet these obligations by becoming a more sustainable organization, starting with ensuring our soldiers and civilians receive the highest quality training and education in sustainable practices and principals. This education program is a significant milestone for the Army Guard.”

The Army National Guard (ARNG) approached ASU with an idea to partner on the development of a sustainability program that will prepare soldiers to achieve future readiness requirements amid a changing military and increasingly limited resources. The ARNG provided a team of trainers, energy managers, logisticians and environmental specialists to work with ASU’s School of Sustainability faculty in developing the specialized, Army-centric curriculum.

“One of the courses – Sustainable Military Acquisition and Logistics – will provide practical approaches to applying sustainability principles to procurement and acquisition, transportation, and material,” said Rob Melnick, executive dean with ASU’s School of Sustainability.

Melnick, who oversees the program at ASU, noted that another course – Energy and the Built Environment – “will provide practical approaches to applying sustainability principles and practices to public works activities, housing, facilities operations and management, military construction, master planning, and energy management.”

“Sustainability is key to the Army’s future, and Net Zero strategies are the centerpiece of the Army sustainability initiative,” said Kidd. “As supply lines change due to operational vulnerabilities in Afghanistan, our fuel expenses increased significantly. Sustainability factors into everything we do, and that’s why this new education program is so important.”

This sustainability leadership program aligns with key sustainability initiatives set by the Obama Administration, including a 2009 executive order regarding federal leadership in environmental, energy and economic performance; the Army’s sustainability campaign plan of 2010; and the Army National Guard’s Readiness Center Sustainability Operations Order of 2011. This partnership exemplifies ASU’s unwavering commitment to help create a sustainable future at local, national and global levels through education, use-inspired research and outreach.

The Graduate Certificate in Sustainability Leadership builds on ASU’s established track record with the U.S. military, which encompasses a robust and long-standing ROTC program (founded in 1935) and innovative research collaborations including the establishment of the Flexible Display Center that brings together academia, industry and government to develop revolutionary flexible information portals. G.I. Jobs magazine recently cited ASU among the most “military friendly” universities in the United States for a third consecutive year.

For more information about the Sustainability Leadership Graduate Certificate at ASU visit sustainabilityonline.asu.edu/sustainable-army.

W.P. Carey

ASU Business School Community Mourns The Loss Of W.P. Carey

The Arizona State University and Phoenix business communities are mourning the loss of a great benefactor, philanthropist and businessman. William Polk Carey, one of the nation’s most prominent real estate investors and the major donor behind the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU, has passed away at the age of 81.

“The ASU family mourns the loss of our benefactor and friend Bill Carey,” says ASU President Michael M. Crow. “Bill Carey was not only a great business leader and philanthropist, but also a visionary. He knew that metropolitan Phoenix needed a first-rate business school to advance in the 21st century and saw in ASU the potential to develop that school. Through his generous investment in ASU almost a decade ago, the school that bears his name has become world-class and will continue to educate future business leaders for many generations to come.”

The New York-based banker, founder and chairman of W. P. Carey & Co. LLC donated $50 million from his educational and philanthropic W. P. Carey Foundation to ASU in 2003. In recognition of his extraordinary support, ASU renamed the university’s business school in his honor, and the gift has been instrumental in helping the W. P. Carey School to become one of the world’s top business schools. U.S. News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times all now rank W. P. Carey School programs among the Top 30 nationwide.

At the time, Carey’s generous donation was the second-largest gift ever to a U.S. business school. Carey’s family has deep connections to Arizona State University. His grandfather introduced legislation that created the university in 1886. Carey also had an honorary Doctor of Science degree from ASU.

Carey has said of his gift to the business school, “The key to future economic growth is quality education, and this school will be dedicated to producing our country’s next generation of business leaders.”

The school’s leadership agrees.

“Bill gave us the ability to dramatically advance the quality and status of the school much more rapidly than would have been possible otherwise,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “He was a philanthropist who believed a primary way to advance our country was through education, and he helped a number of schools, including ours. He was also a student of economics and a great admirer of top-tier economists.”

Mittelstaedt also says Carey was a smart businessman who pioneered a way for smaller investors to participate in large real estate projects with consistent top-tier returns. Carey had an incredible 60-plus-year career in the finance industry and will be remembered as a visionary leader with fierce loyalty and abundant generosity.

For more information about the W.P. Carey School of Business, visit wpcarey.asu.edu.

Mayo Medical Schools Expands to Arizona

Mayo Medical School Expands To Arizona With New Campus

Mayo Clinic has announced the expansion of its Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minn., to a new campus in Arizona. The new expansion, in addition to being a symbol of Mayo’s commitment to leadership in patient-centered academic excellence, will allow Mayo to continue redefining the field of medical education.

The new Mayo Medical School – Arizona Campus will include a collaboration with Arizona State University. At this new branch, students will complete a specialized master’s degree in the Science of Health Care Delivery granted by ASU concurrently with their medical degree from Mayo Medical School.

Regarding the new expansion, John Noseworthy, M.D., the president and CEO of Mayo Clinic, says, “This is one of the most important and exciting initiatives we can undertake. For Mayo Clinic, this new branch of Mayo Medical School is firmly aligned with Mayo’s commitment to patient-centered academic excellence and redefining the field of medical education. Together with ASU, we will create the health care workforce of the future.”

ASU President Michael Crow was also excited about the new campus.

“Mayo Medical School is believed to be the first medical school in the U.S. to offer an embedded master’s degree in the science of health care delivery,” Crow says. “ASU is proud to partner with Mayo in this innovative approach to providing future physicians with the complementary competencies needed to deliver high-value care.”

Even Arizona governor Jan Brewer had a few words on the expansion: “This is very good news for all of Arizona. It’s a great example of how Mayo Clinic and ASU are working together to continue to raise Arizona’s profile as a national and international hub for innovation in medical education and health care delivery.”

The new branch of Mayo Medical School will be based on Mayo’s Scottsdale campus in buildings to be remodeled and retrofitted just for it. The campus faculty will be drawn from both Mayo’s instructional resources and experts from ASU, providing a wide range of educational experience.

The specialized Science of Health Care Delivery degree will address the changing needs of 21st century health care delivery, and will include components like social and behavioral determinants of health, health care policy, health economics, management science, biomedical informatics, systems engineering and value principles of health care.

For additional information on the new Mayo Medical School expansion, visit: dev.newsblog.mayoclinic.org or asunews.asu.edu.

 

Sustainable Living - AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

Six Ways The Valley's Redefining Sustainable Living

The Sustainable Six: Redefining Sustainable Living in the Valley

It’s been a little more than a year since representatives from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Housing and Urban Development and Department of Transportation announced they were teaming up to bolster community and economic development nationwide.

Like a band of caped crusaders, members of the Partnership for Sustainable Communities (now the Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities) pledged to help create greener, more sustainable communities through six guiding “livability principles” used to coordinate federal transportation, environmental protection and housing investments at their respective agencies.

At the time, EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said, “It’s important that the separate agencies working to improve livability in our neighborhoods are all pointed in the same direction. We’re leading the way toward communities that are cleaner, healthier, more affordable and great destinations for businesses and jobs.”

Indeed, that sentiment, and the pot of federal money the Obama Administration has made available — including $1.5B in Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants and $100M released in June for regional integrated planning initiatives — is proof the suburban landscape is changing.

While there is still much work to do, several Valley municipalities, along with organizations such as the Arizona State University Stardust Center for Affordable Homes and the Family, the Maricopa Association of Governments (MAG) and the newly formed Livable Communities Coalition, are taking steps toward improving the livability of communities statewide, as defined by these guidelines. Here’s a look at the six principles and how Metro Phoenix stacks up:

1. Provide more transportation choices

While the Valley still has miles to go before we wean ourselves from our auto addiction, light-rail construction is a step in the right direction. Next, stop chasing federal highway dollars and, instead, use light rail as the bait to snare funding to create additional transportation options.

2. Promote equitable, affordable housing

This principle aims to broaden the spectrum and expand location- and energy-efficient housing choices for people of all ages, incomes, races and ethnicities to increase mobility and lower the combined cost of housing and transportation.

3. Enhance economic competitiveness

In a January Arizona Republic editorial, ASU President Michael Crow outlined an economic-competitiveness strategy designed to “address long-term priorities, not just the current cycle.” Among other tactics, he called for an aggressive, coordinated strategy to tap out-of-state investment funding from a variety of sources for research, infrastructure and health and welfare. “Not competing to get the tax dollars we send to Washington each year simply makes no sense,” he wrote.

4. Support existing communities

Conventional financing and zoning code issues have become the bane of transit-oriented, mixed-use development and redevelopment efforts Valleywide. However, many municipalities are working to honor historic neighborhoods and update building and zoning codes to encourage adaptive reuse and infill projects. That action will contribute to community revitalization.

5. Coordinate policies and leverage investment

Regional planning and interconnectivity are more important than ever. Valley cities must think regionally, especially if they hope to snare federal dollars.

6. Value communities and neighborhoods

Valley cities such as Phoenix, Scottsdale and Chandler were beginning to create more livable, walkable communities before the housing market crashed. Now more than ever, development at the people scale, rather than large, single-use tracts, is needed to promote a sense of community.

Livability ranks high on the wish lists of companies looking to relocate. As the federal tide shifts in favor of sustainable living, we need to change with it. Even a place known for its Wild West sensibilities and love of private property rights can learn to adapt.

For more information about the Office of Sustainable Housing and Communities and sustainable living, visit portal.hud.gov.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

Arizona State University

Arizona State University Makes The Green Honor Roll

“Go Green” indeed! Arizona State University has been named one of the nation’s “greenest” universities by the Princeton Review. For the second year in a row, ASU has made the 2010 Green Rating Honor Roll rating of environmentally-friendly institutions. And we’re among some pretty elite neighbors: Harvard, Berkeley and Yale to name a few.

The Princeton Review began its Green Ratings last year with the help of ecoAmerica, a nonprofit environmental organization that participates in the project. The schools are measured on a scale of 60 to 99 and the schools that made the 2010 Green Rating Honor Roll (go ASU!) received the highest possible score of a 99.

“At Arizona State University, sustainability is a fundamental precept underlying its teaching, learning, research and business missions. ASU President Michael Crow is co-chair of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment. The Tempe campus has the largest collection of energy-providing solar panels on a single U.S. university campus.
Established in 2007, ASU’s School of Sustainability, the first of its kind in the U.S., offers transdisciplinary degree programs that advance practical solutions to environmental, economic and social challenges. The school has over 60 faculty representing over 40 disciplines and offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs along with a professional certificate. ASU subsidizes bus and light rail passes for all students and employees and offers car-sharing and a carpool program with special parking privileges. A student-run bicycle co-op offers low- or no-cost bike repairs and free bike rentals.”— The Princeton Review

The Princeton Review names these areas as the criteria for the ratings:

  • Whether the school’s students have a campus quality of life that is healthy and sustainable.
  • How well the school is preparing its students for employment and citizenship in a world defined by environmental challenges.
  • The school’s overall commitment to environmental issues.  The institutional survey for the rating included ten questions on everything from energy use, recycling, food, buildings, and transportation to academic offerings (availability of environmental studies degrees and courses) and action plans and goals concerning greenhouse gas emission reductions.

And there’s more good news. The publisher of the Princeton Review said that this year there was a 30 percent increase in the number of colleges participating in the Green Rating survey. The Princeton Review has also dedicated a special resource area on its Web site for students that are serious about the environment and are interested in learning more about attending a green college.

As an alumni of ASU I couldn’t be prouder of this achievement. The School of Sustainability is already making a huge step forward and this accomplishment only adds to the school’s ongoing commitment to greener living. This also brings the issue of the environment to the forefront and grabs the attention of a younger audience that will hopefully be motivated to do something about it. Dedication to sustainability is no easy task, but such sizable schools as ASU can certainly make a positive impact on the movement.

Criteria for The Princeton Review Green Rating of Colleges


The Princeton Review tallied the Green Rating scores based on institutional data it obtained from the colleges during the 2008-2009 academic year in response to ten survey questions that asked:

1) The percentage of food expenditures that goes toward local, organic or otherwise environmentally preferable food.

2) Whether the school offers programs including free bus passes, universal access transit passes, bike sharing/renting, car sharing, carpool parking, vanpooling or guaranteed rides home to encourage alternatives to single-passenger automobile use for students.

3) Whether the school has a formal committee with participation from students that is devoted to advancing sustainability on campus.

4) Whether new buildings are required to be LEED (environmental certification of equipment/appliances) Silver certified or comparable.

5) The school’s overall waste diversion rate.

6) Whether the school has an environmental studies major, minor or concentration.

7) Whether the school has an “environmental literacy” requirement.

8) Whether the school has produced a publicly available greenhouse gas emissions inventory and adopted a climate action plan consistent with 80 percent greenhouse gas reductions by 2050 targets.

9) What percentage of the school’s energy consumption, including heading/cooling and electrical, is derived from renewable sources (this definition included “green tags” but not nuclear or large-scale hydropower).

10) Whether the school employs a dedicated full-time (or full-time equivalent) sustainability officer.

*Source: The Princeton Review

asunews.asu.edu
www.princetonreview.com/green-honor-roll
www.princetonreview.com/green/
www.ecoamerica.net

International business - AZ Business Magazine April 2008

International Business Opportunities Increase In Arizona

Arizona leaders are pushing the state’s businesses to the international forefront

When principals from United Kingdom-based txtNation, a technology solutions provider, wanted to spread their global wings they turned to Arizona to set up a U.S. location. Similarly, when the German firm Ubidyne, a wireless technology developer, was looking to establish its first U.S. global footprint, it zeroed in on Scottsdale and SkySong, the Arizona State University Scottsdale Innovation Center, to make an imprint. Ditto for Sebit, a Turkish e-learning company. Somehow, the Grand Canyon State is on the international radar these days.

Obviously, Arizona’s expansive blue skies and mountain vistas are appealing to these international companies. But the strategy behind such international business in Arizona hasn’t occurred by accident — it has been clearly mapped out by statewide economic development officials keen on building Arizona’s economy far beyond tourism, real estate and retirement mainstays.

Today, Arizona is playing on the global business stage and it is not a bit part. In 2007, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce, Arizona exported $19.18 billion worth of goods to a collection of countries around the globe — up from $18.28 billion in 2006.

The bulk of Arizona’s exports came from the Valley. According to 2006 figures from the U.S. Census Bureau, the metro Phoenix area logged almost $11 billion in exports, placing it in the top 20 metro areas nationwide. Tucson exported more than $3.2 billion worth of goods in 2006.

Based on the 2006 figures, Arizona’s increase in exports outpaced that of Texas and California. In addition, Arizona’s per capita exports in 2006 were at $2,966, besting Utah, New Mexico and Colorado.

Along with increasing exports, economic leaders’ are also working to bring more international businesses and foreign direct investment to the state.

“We strive to put Arizona on the international map,” says Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council and one of a handful of statewide economic experts pushing for Arizona’s global business success, in large part with his role in an economic statewide partnership called the Arizona Global Network (AGN). “Arizona is emerging as an incubator for international firms expanding in the U.S.”

The AGN includes economic brainpower from Flagstaff to Tucson to Yuma and everywhere in between. All have partnered with the goal to put Arizona’s business on the international scene. This stepped-up spotlight can be attributed to a number of factors. But for txtNation Director Michael Whelan, the decision for his firm came down to the fact that Arizona is a state on the ascension in the international business community.

“TxtNation chose Greater Phoenix due to its location, being a West Coast city on the rise,” he says, adding there is a global sense that Arizona is becoming an international “entrepreneurial hotbed” and that it also played a role in the expansion process.

Northern and Southern Exposure

Of course, Arizona has long counted its brother and sister to the North and South — Mexico and Canada — as global business family partners. These efforts continue today.

Glenn Williamson has experienced success in the international business market. He’s founded, sold and run various enterprises, but today he’s gunning for Arizona to build successful partnerships and business relationships with Canada. Much like Canada’s wide-open lands, the opportunities are vast.

“Our primary goal is to push bilateral trade between Canada and Arizona to the $5 billion mark by the end of 2008,” says Williamson, founder and CEO of the Canada Arizona Business Council (CABC). “We are well on our way to achieving that goal.”
Canada is Arizona’s No. 2 global trading partner behind Mexico. In 2006, according to U.S. Department of Commerce numbers, Arizona exported more than $5.3 billion worth of goods to Mexico compared to just more than $1.8 billion to Canada.

Williamson says the CABC has several primary goals. First, besides significantly increasing the trade between the two countries, the CABC is seeking a direct flight between Montreal and Phoenix, while also upgrading the seasonal flights between various Canadian cities and Arizona. Then, there is fostering the huge impact of Canadian residents who are interested in, or already are, doing business in Arizona.

“Gov. Janet Napolitano gets international business, the tourism folks get it, Tucson gets it and the Arizona Department of Commerce gets it,” Williamson says. “Now, we have to convince everyone else.”

Williamson is quick to praise statewide efforts such as AGN and calls statewide leaders, including ASU President Michael Crow, key catalysts to pushing Arizona onto the international business stage.

“ASU is huge in these efforts,” he adds. “We need their brainpower to make this successful. Everything is pointing in the right direction, but we need to put the pedal to the metal.”

International EDU

Besides Crow’s intensity at ASU and the hotbed of activity at SkySong, which Julie Rosen, ASU’s assistant vice president for economic affairs, touts as an atmosphere of “unparalleled opportunity,” other educational institutions in Arizona are aiming for the international business beacon.
Consistently ranking in the top echelon of international business schools, the Thunderbird School of Global Management has operations in Latin America, Asia, Europe and Russia. The school has forged public sector partnerships like those with ASU to better compete in the international education arena. Over the past two years, Thunderbird has pioneered significant relations with ASU, especially ASU’s West campus and the School of Global Management and Leadership (SGML).

In addition, the Arizona Department of Commerce has foreign trade offices in London, Mexico and Japan, as well as investment offices in Ireland, Japan and Hong Kong.

“Broadly, business executives and community leaders recognize that attracting out-of-state and foreign direct investment and business, as well as increasing trade, should receive significantly more emphasis to secure Arizona’s growth and provide good, well-paying jobs,” notes Gary Waissi, dean of the ASU SGML. “There are several organizations with advanced initiatives working aggressively on these areas.”

ASU, GPEC, AGN and others are continually pushing for increased international business opportunities in Arizona. But, as Arizona Department of Commerce Director Jan Lesher points out, while exports and international business opportunities continue to increase in the state, there is a baseline that needs to be established before Arizona can truly “go global” now and into the future.

“Arizona companies need to establish first a solid domestic market, and then consider expanding to national markets,” she says. “International customers can be ideal for Arizona-based businesses; however, this is a decision that needs to be done carefully — international means a company must have the resources, market know-how and commitment to stick with it.”

It’s a point not lost on those who, like Lesher, are continually working to cultivate these relationships.

“It is all about recognizing that in today’s world, business is truly global,” Waissi says. “And at the same time knowing there is a need to strategically diversify in select industries.

For more information visit the following websites:

azcommerce.com
gpec.org
commerce.gov