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centennial top 10

10 Top Intriguing News In Arizona’s Medical World

10 Top Intriguing News Pieces In Arizona’s Medical World

Arizona has had a long, rich history since its established statehood in 1912. People travel here for the sun, the weather, for a change of scenery and for their health. Health, especially, has made Arizona a unique place to live.  Here are our top news pieces that made Arizona that much more intriguing or helped put this state in the limelight.

10.

December 9, 1921 – Climate and Your Health

A doctor in New York City writes an article for the Youngstown Vindicator about how climate may affect health. Those diagnosed with illnesses such as tuberculosis began migrating to Arizona in the 1900’s, and it has since been known as the ideal climate for many illnesses and conditions.

arizona map

9.

December 21, 2010 – St. Joseph’s Hospital Stripped of Catholic Status

After a case at the hospital involving the termination of a pregnancy Catholic bishop Olmsted declared the procedure an abortion, which is barred by Catholic teaching. St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center was then told that they would no longer be able to call themselves a Catholic hospital. The hospital says that this will not hinder their patient care.

8.

April, 2009, Phoenix – Swine Flu

The first Arizona swine flu case was confirmed in Phoenix, Ariz. An 8-year-old boy attending Moon Mountain Elementary School in northwest Phoenix was the first person confirmed in the state to have contracted the virus.

swine flu

7.

November 28, 1993, Scottsdale – Arizona Golfer’s Cancer Struggle

The professional golfer Heather Farr passed away in a Scottsdale hospital after a four-and-a-half-year battle with cancer. She was 28 and an inspiration to many in her professional life and personal struggles.

6.

October 31, 1939, Phoenix – “The Trunk Murderess” Escapes from Asylum

Winnie Ruth Judd, also known as “The Trunk Murderess” after being found guilty for the murders of two young women who’s bodies were hacked up and stuffed into shipping trunks, was placed once again in the Arizona State Hospital for the insane after six days of freedom. Judd and the victims were all employed at the Grunow Medical Clinic before the incident.

Grunow Medical Clinic

5.

June, 2003, Flagstaff – Rare Disease

A woman named Ginger Harvey undergoes surgery for what is expected to be a hernia, only for the doctors to discover a, while not cancerous, harmful growth on her left kidney. Later it is discovered to be a rare condition called Dercum’s Disease after a man with very similar symptoms is seen on television.

4.

October, 2002 – Amoeba Water Scare

Phoenix gets a water scare after two healthy 5-year-olds die within hours of each other of an undetermined type of meningitis. Amoeba was discovered to be the culprit, which causes symptoms of meningitis once it travels up the nose and into the brain and spinal column via water.

water

3.

June, 1993, Window Rock, AZ – Mysterious Illness

11 people on or near Navajo lands, the majority of them under the age of 40, die of a mysterious illness. The land extends into New Mexico and Utah from Arizona, but far from cities and main roads, making the situation isolated even while baffling investigators.

2.

May 2, 1967, Winslow – Two-Pound Baby

A 3 year old by the name of Dianne Proctor, living with her adoptive parents in Winslow had a strange genetic condition that stunted her growth significantly. At birth she weighed slightly more than two pounds and after three years she weighed as much as an average two-month-old child.

Baby Hand

1.

September, 1985, Tucson – Three Hearts for One Man

Michael Drummond  had a total of three hearts within 10 days. The 25-year-old Arizonan goes from receiving a mechanical heart on August 29th to finally a real heart after complications from the mechanical one caused strokes.


















A doctor in New York City writes an article for the Youngstown Vindicator about how climate may affect health. Those diagnosed with illnesses such as tuberculosis, began migrating to Arizona in the 1900’s and it has since been known as the ideal climate for many illnesses and conditions.