Tag Archives: microchip technology

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip.

Microchip Acquires ISSC Technologies

Microchip Technology Incorporated, a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, and ISSC Technologies Corporation (ISSC) today announced that Microchip has signed a definitive agreement to acquire ISSC, a leading provider of low power Bluetooth and advanced wireless solutions for the Internet Of Things (IoT) market. ISSC is publicly traded on the GreTai Securities Market and is headquartered in Hsinchu, Taiwan (Hsinchu Science Park) with customer service or research activities in Shenzhen, China and Torrance, California. In calendar year 2013, ISSC had net sales of US$69.2 million and an operating margin of 18.9% based on their reported results under International Financial Reporting Standards.

Under the terms of the transaction, Microchip will commence a tender offer to acquire all of the outstanding shares of ISSC for New Taiwan (NT)$143 per share (approximately US$4.74 per share, based on an assumed exchange rate of NT$30.15 per US$) in cash, and acquire any remaining shares pursuant to a follow-on merger at NT$143 per share minus any dividends paid by ISSC prior to the close of the transaction. The transaction represents a total equity value of about NT$9.9 billion (approximately US$328.5 million), and a total enterprise value of about NT$8.9 billion (approximately US$294.3 million), after excluding ISSC’s cash and investments on its balance sheet of approximately NT$1 billion (approximately US$34.2 million). The acquisition is expected to be accretive to Microchip’s non-GAAP earnings per share in the first full quarter after completion of the tender offer at which time Microchip will own the majority of the outstanding shares of ISSC and consolidate its financial statements with Microchip’s.

The acquisition has been approved by the Boards of Directors of each company. The tender offer is expected to close in the third quarter of calendar 2014. The follow-on merger is expected to close in the fourth quarter of calendar 2014, subject to approval of the follow-on merger by ISSC stockholders,
regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. In connection with the transaction, Microchip has entered into an agreement with certain ISSC shareholders holding approximately 28 percent of the outstanding shares of ISSC pursuant to which such shareholders have committed to tender approximately 17 percent of the outstanding shares of ISSC, which represents all unrestricted ISSC shares owned by them.

“We are delighted to have ISSC join the Microchip team. ISSC’s deep domain knowledge in Bluetooth and wireless technologies, and strong position in the Consumer markets, complement many of Microchip’s initiatives in wireless and IoT areas. We believe that combining ISSC’s strengths in wireless products and technology with Microchip’s brand, channel and operational strengths will enable significant cross selling opportunities,” said Ganesh Moorthy, COO of Microchip Technology.

“We are pleased to join Microchip Technology, a premier company in the semiconductor industry. Microchip has demonstrated consistent profitability, technology leadership and growth in its core businesses. We believe that this acquisition provides the best vehicle for us to realize significant value for ISSC shareholders, as well as the opportunities from scale of the much stronger sales and manufacturing platforms of Microchip,” said Max Wu, Chairman of ISSC.

“This transaction represents the first major overseas acquisition by Microchip and the purchase will be funded with a portion of Microchip’s foreign cash and will not require any additional borrowings from our line of credit. We believe the combination of a very strategic transaction that provides low power Bluetooth technology, ISSC’s strengths and capabilities and our use of foreign cash makes this a compelling transaction for the shareholders of both companies,” said Steve Sanghi, Microchip’s President and CEO.

Arizona’s 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders

What would you do it you opened the pages of this magazine and saw Jerry Colangelo listed as one of the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona? You’d do a double take, but it’s not out of the realm of possibilities.

Consider this: Among 439,633 Arizonans under age 5 in 2012, this is how the Census broke down those numbers:

• Hispanic: 196,776 (44.8 percent)
• Non-Hispanic white: 171,888 (39.1 percent)
• American Indian and Alaska Native: 22,198 (5 percent)
• Black: 18,617 (4.2 percent)
• Asian: 11,311 (2.6 percent)
• Two or more races: 18,088 (4.1 percent)
• Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 755 (0.17).

If you combine numbers like that with the fact that 91.7 percent of the nation’s population growth between 2000 and 2010 was attributed to racial and ethnic minorities, with the largest segment of population growth occurring in the Hispanic community, lists like this — the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona of 2014 — could become obsolete in our lifetimes.

Until we get there and as our state’s minority population moves toward majority status, it’s important to notice that the state’s most dynmanic business leaders have helped fuel our economic recovery and growth … and many of them just happen to be minorities. And while the future looks bright, we still have work to in overcoming outdated perceptions. According to a 2012 Minority Business Enterprise Report commissioned by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Phoenix MBDA Business Center, a significant portion of minority-owned businesses in Arizona have had problems earning the trust of their customers, suppliers, peers and lenders and need support from within the business community to help break down some of these misconceptions and stigma.

The 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona, whom you will meet below, have changed that perception.


Benito AlmanzaBenito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Heritage: Mexican-American
A graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara, Almanza has been with Bank of America for 34 years. He is a member of the Teach for America Arizona Board.
His hope for professional legacy: “Working every day with great teammates to make our community better and surrounding myself with strong leaders and developing them to replace me.”

Glynis BryanGlynis Bryan
CFO
Insight Enterprises Inc.
Heritage: Jamaican
Bryan is responsible for setting the company’s financial strategies; ensuring the company has the appropriate financial and operating controls and systems in place to support future growth; and serving as a financial and business advisor to the leadership team.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Setting a standard of excellence in an organization and helping teammates reach their full potential.”

Debbie CottonDebbie Cotton
Director
Phoenix Convention Center
Heritage: African American
Cotton manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Throughout my career, I’d like to be remembered for adhering to high ethical standards and inspiring individuals to pursue careers within public service.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Heritage: Peruvian and Mexican
De la Melena, who directs the state’s leading advocate representing more than 60,000 Hispanic business enterprises, has 20 years of global brand management, business development and Latino marketing experience gained from conducting business in more than 30 countries.
His hope for professional legacy: “For helping the lifeblood of our economy, small businesses, prosper – especially minority-owned businesses, now one-fourth of Arizona’s total. Our future global competitiveness depends on it.”

Diane EnosDiane Enos
President
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community
Enos is the 23rd president of the Salt River Community and the second women elected to the office. Enos is the first member of the Community to become a lawyer and practiced in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office for 11 years.
Heritage: Onk Akimel O’Odham, or one of the River People otherwise known as Pima
Her hope for professional legacy: “The top qualities I’d like to be remembered for is someone who was unafraid to try something new and to do it with integrity for the good of my people.”

rufusRufus Glasper
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges
Heritage: African American
As the CEO of one of the nation’s largest systems of community colleges, he is leading MCCCD to address the community’s education and workforce training needs.
His hope for professional legacy: “An educator who focused on human rights and education for first-generation college students, quality healthcare, workforce and jobs, and re-framing an institution for the future.”

Deborah GriffinDeborah Griffin
President of the board of directors
Gila River Casinos
Heritage: Gila River Indian Community member and Mexican-American
Griffin leads Arizona’s largest minority-run business with more that 2,500 employees.
Her hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered for creating a legacy of self-sufficiency and volunteerism in my community. My Tribe needs only to seek within themselves and have confidence in the beauty of their abilities to continue this legacy.”

Edmundo HidalgoEdmundo Hidalgo
President and CEO
Chicanos Por La Causa
Heritage: Mexican-American
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the community. The Hispanic community is at a breakaway point because of our demographics and the opportunities we establish for our youth will have a tremendous impact on our state. As the Hispanic community goes, so will the State of Arizona. My focus has always been in support of education and ensuring that young people get the opportunities I received as I was beginning my career. I am blessed to have been mentored by many individuals who were willing to invest in me and I have the responsibility to do the same.”

leezieLeezie Kim
Partner
Quarles & Brady
Heritage: Korean-American
Kim returned to Quarles & Brady after four years of service as a White House appointee to the U. S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano.
Her hope for professional legacy: “As a trusted counselor to and partner with leaders in business, government and politics who found new ways to get things done that make life a little better for us all.”

david_kongDavid Kong
President and CEO
Best Western International
Since he was named president and CEO in 2004, Kong has guided Best Western International through a brand resurgence, winning numerous awards for training, social media and ecommerce initiatives. Brand Keys ranked Best Western No. 1 in customer loyalty for four consecutive years.
Heritage: Asian
His hope for professional legacy: “I’d like to be remembered for having made a positive difference – in Best Western, in the industry and the lives of all our associates and our hotel staff.”

paulPaul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”

steve_maciasSteve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias serves on the Governor’s Council on Small Business and is co-chair of the Supply Chain/Buy Arizona Committee, which is exploring ways government can help promote Arizona businesses.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “Someone who made a positive impact in promoting manufacturing as a worthwhile and valuable industry that provides quality jobs to the community.”

louis_manuelLouis J. Manuel, Jr.
Chairman
Ak-Chin Indian Community
Heritage: Tohono O’odham Nation and Ak-Chin Indian Community
Manuel has diversified his Community’s economy with Ak-Chin Farms, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, Santa Cruz Commerce Center and a partnership with the Super Bowl Host Committee.
His hope for professional legacy: “That my decision making gave value and sustainability in promoting a strong future and self-reliance for the people I serve.”

clarenceClarence McAllister
President and CEO
Fortis Networks
Heritage: Black Latino
McAllister was born in Panama and earned degrees in electrical engineering from ASU and an MBA from Nova Southeastern University. In 2000, he and his wife Reyna started Fortis, a certified 8a and HUBZone government contractor specialized in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an immigrant who came to this country in search of the American Dream, and built a business that employs more than 100 Americans.”

alfred_molinaAlfredo Molina
Chairman
Molina Jewelers
Heritage: Hispanic
Molina went from fleeing Cuba as a boy without a change of clothes to rocking the jewelry world by selling the Archduke Joseph diamond for $21.5 million, the most ever paid at auction for a colorless diamond.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference. I believe that every individual is a precious jewel and it is my commitment and social responsibility to ensure they become brilliant.”

rodolfo-pargaRodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
Heritage: Mexican
Parga has been named in multiple editions of Southwest Super Lawyers®, including in 2014. He also serves on the doard of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading nonprofit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as always trying my best to do the right thing, and being fair and loyal.”

Dan PuenteDan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Heritage: Hispanic
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck and has built it into the largest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an individual who created a company that set industry standards, gave back to an industry generous with opportunity and helped people grow personally and professionally.”

terry_ramblerTerry Rambler
Chairman
Arizona Indian Gaming Association
Heritage: San Carlos Apache Tribe
In addition to his AIGA leadership role, Rambler is chariman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe and president of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “Strong vision, consistent oversight, yet humble leadership that helped build successful partnerships in economic development, cultural preservation, and the expansion of tribal sovereignty.”

Terence-RobertsTerence Roberts, M.D., J.D.
Radiation oncologist
Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center
Heritage: African-American
Roberts specializes in stereotactic radiosurgery and tumors of the brain, spine, and prostate. He also received a law degree from Stanford University and practiced corporate law in the Silicon Valley for start-up companies.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered professionally as compassionate, knowledgeable and having integrity. Also as someone who innovated in an era of health care reform.”

Steve SanghiSteve Sanghi
Chairman, CEO and president
Microchip Technology
Heritage: Indian
Sanghi, named president of Microchip in 1990, CEO in 1991 and chairman in 1993, is the author of “Driving Excellence: How The Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader.”
His hope for professional legacy: “For building Microchip Technology into one of the most successful semiconductor companies, which achieved an unprecedented 100 consecutive profitable quarters in a brutally competitive industry.”

roxanne_song_ongRoxanne K. Song Ong
Chief presiding judge
Phoenix Municipal Court
Heritage: Chinese American
Song Ong, who chair the Arizona Supreme Court Commission on Minorities, was the first Asian female judge in Arizona and first minority to be named as Phoenix chief judge.
Her hope for professional legacy: “It would be my great honor to be remembered for three primary things: (1) my work in judicial and civics education, (2) the promotion of cultural competency and diversity in the judicial and legal profession, and (3) promoting access to justice for all Arizonans through legal services and education.”

Charlie-ToucheCharlie Touché
Chairman and CEO
Lovitt & Touché, Inc.
In 2004, Touché became chairman and CEO of one of the largest insurance agencies in the United States, with nearly 200 employees in three offices and more than $300 million in total premiums.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “I’m proud to say that during this entire century, we’ve remained a client-driven, hands-on kind of company with people who will roll up their sleeves and jump in the trenches to help those we do business with.”

lisa_uriasLisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
Heritage: Mexican
Urias has built an award-winning advertising, marketing and public relations agency that specializes in the diverse markets of the American Southwest, particularly the Hispanic market.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Having a nationally-known agency that successfully connects corporations to multicultural markets through ad campaigns, public relations and community outreach for mutual benefit and respect.”

lonnie_williamsLonnie J. Williams, Jr.
Partner
Stinson Leonard Street LLP
Heritage: Black
The Yale graduate’s practice focuses on commercial business and employment-related matters. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in America.
His hope for professional legacy: “Martin Luther King said, ‘if it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.’ Professionally, I would like to be remembered like that street sweeper.”

kuldip_vermaKuldip Verma
CEO
Vermaland
Heritage: East Indian
Vermaland, founded by Verma, holds more than 24,000 acres of land in Arizona with a portfolio valued at $500 million. Nabha, the tiny Indian village Verma was born in, could fit many times into the acreage he now controls in the desert Southwest.
His hope for professional legacy: “I saw a dream and pursued it. Success without humility is a curse, but Success with your values intact is a blessing.”

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip.

Microchip Completes Acquisition of Supertex

Microchip Technology Incorporated and Supertex, Inc. announced that Microchip has completed its previously announced acquisition of Supertex following approval of the transaction by Supertex shareholders at Supertex’s special meeting of shareholders held today.

Approximately 98.4% of the Supertex shares that voted were voted in favor of the merger in which Supertex shareholders will receive $33.00 per share in cash. Overall, approximately 87.7% of the total outstanding Supertex shares were voted. Therefore, approximately 86.43% of the total outstanding Supertex shares were voted in favor of the acquisition transaction.

“We are very pleased to have completed our acquisition of Supertex,” said Steve Sanghi, President and CEO of Microchip. “I welcome the Supertex employees into the Microchip family and look forward to building a combined organization that will bring the capabilities of both organizations to bear in the marketplace.”

As a result of the completion of the transaction, trading in Supertex common stock on the NASDAQ will cease effective after the close of market today.

Microchip will share more information regarding the Supertex transaction during its Q4 and FY2014 financial results conference call scheduled for Tuesday, May 6, 2014.

awards

Industry Leaders of Arizona take spotlight

Az Business magazine is proud to present the Industry Leaders of Arizona (ILoA) Awards, which recognize  the contributions and impact of Arizona‐based companies in five key industries — commercial real estate, education, entertainment, manufacturing and technology. The 30 finalists for this year’s ILoA Awards are profiled on the following pages. Winners will be recognized at the awards dinner that will be held Thursday, February 6 at The Ritz Carlton, Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks
Leadership: Derrick Hall, CEO; Tom Harris, CFO
Address: 401 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: dbacks.com
What they do: The Diamondbacks strive to provide industry-leading entertainment in a family-friendly environment while making a positive impact on its fans and civic partners.
How they lead: The team offers the lowest Fan Cost Index in Major League Baseball. In the community, the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation and the D-backs’ organization have surpassed the $33 million mark in charitable giving since their inception in 1998. The unique corporate culture of the D-backs led Yahoo! to deem the club as “the best workplace in sports.”

Arizona Summit Law School
Leadership: Scott Thompson, president; Shirley Mays, dean
Address: One N. Central Ave., Phoenix
Website: azsummitlaw.edu
What they do: The American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school offers traditional and non-traditional law students the opportunity to succeed through its student-focused curriculum and highly engaged faculty.
How they lead: The practice-ready curriculum equips graduates with the practical skills and ethical instruction, leadership, management and interpersonal skills necessary for career success. The school accommodates students’ diverse needs with options including full-time and part-time day and evening classes; trimester schedule for graduation in two years; and individualized bar-pass instruction through learning diagnostics and mentoring; and experiential learning opportunities via externships, internships and clinics.

Caliente Construction Inc
Leadership: Lorraine Bergman, CEO
Address: 242 S. El Dorado Circle, Mesa
Website: calienteconstruction.com
What they do: Caliente, founded in Arizona in 1991, is a female-owned commercial general contractor that provides construction management services tailored to meet the distinctive needs of its diverse clientele.
How they lead: By embracing the latest technology, Caliente is known as the contractor who can meet the challenge of any type of construction project. This has strengthened its industry position and given Caliente a competitive edge. Caliente has also shown continued growth.  In 2006, revenues were $23,500,000 with 30 employees. Today, revenues exceed $57,000,000 and Caliente employs 81.

Casino Del Sol Resort, Spa and Conference Center
Leadership: Jim Burns, CEO
Address: 5655 W. Valencia Rd., Tucson
Website: casinodelsol.com
What they do: Casino Del Sol Resort encompasses a spa, conference center, five award-winning restaurants, Sewailo Golf Course, Anselmo Valencia Tori Ampitheater, a 5,000-seat open-air concert venue and the Del Sol Marketplace, which includes a gas sttation, car wash, convenience store and smoke shop.
How they lead: In less than two years since opening its $100 million expansion, Casino Del Sol has earned a AAA Four Diamond designation and is the state’s only casino resort to earn the coveted Forbes Four-Star Award for its hotel and spa.

Entrepix, Inc.
Leadership: Tim Tobin, CEO; David Husband, CFO
Address: 4717 E. Hilton Ave., #200, Phoenix
Website: entrepix.com
What they do: Entrepix re-manufactures semiconductor fabrication equipment and develops products and services to significantly extend the lifespan of semiconductor manufacturing technology.
How they lead: Entrepix’ is defining a new class of supplier to the semiconductor industry —  a “technology renewal partner” — and has become the third-party leader in this space.  It launched the first ever foundry process center supporting remanufactured equipment.  The company was spotlighted for this on the cover of the industry’s largest publication, Semiconductor International, whose cover is normally occupied by game-changing innovations from companies such as Intel and Applied Materials.

FlipChip International
Leadership: David Wilkie, CEO; Gordon Parnell, CFO
Address: 3701 E. University Dr., Phoenix
Website: flipchip.com
What they do: FlipChip International is a leading supplier of wafer level packaging technologies to a diverse global customer base in the semiconductor industry.
How they lead: FlipChip was founded in 1996 by industry leaders in automotive technology and semiconductor integrated circuit assembly. Their strategy was primarily developing and licensing the technology. After new owners took over in 2004, manufacturing was expanded and new technologies were introduced. Today, FlipChip’s technologies can be found in a wide range of products in consumer, medical, industrial and automotive applications.

FNF Construction, Inc.
Leadership: Jed S. Billings, CEO; David James, CFO
Address: 115 S. 48th St., Tempe
Website: fnfinc.com
What they do: FNF provides heavy-highway construction and general engineering work, both as a general contractor, subcontractor and manufacturer/producer of aggregate and asphalt rubber binder.
How they lead: FNF’s ability to self-perform much of the work on its contracts allows the company to better manage and support its subcontractors and keep projects on schedule.  FNF supports its personnel with state-of-the-art equipment and in-house technical support which keep its workers safe and guides and educates employees on FNF’s innovative construction methods.

GlobalTranz
Leadership: Andrew Leto, CEO; Greg Roeper, CFO
Address: 5415 E. High St., #460, Phoenix
Website: globaltranz.com
What they do: GlobalTranz is a privately held, Phoenix-based logistics company specializing in freight management services, including less-than-truckload shipping, full truckload, supply chain management and domestic air/expedited shipping.
How they lead: By focusing on innovative technology, GlobalTranz optimizes the flow and storage of merchandise as the goods move within and throughout the customers’ supply chain. GlobalTranz has been recongnized as one of the fastest-growing companies in the country with annual sales of over $200 million. Globaltranz has doubled its revenue every year since its inception in 2003.

Grand Canyon University
Leadership: Brian Mueller, president and CEO; Dan Bachus, CFO
Address: 3300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Website: gcu.edu
What they do: GCU is a private Christian university that has graduated some of the Southwest’s best-prepared teachers, nurses and fine arts professionals.
How they lead: What was once a small, struggling university has come into its own as a world-class liberal arts institution. When escalating tuition made higher education nearly impossible for some students, GCU built a financial model that made earning a degree attainable and affordable. The model does not rely on taxpayer subsidies, yet keeps costs about two-thirds less than most private universities and lower than many public schools.

Great Hearts Academies
Leadership: Daniel Scoggin, CEO; Ward Huseth, CFO
Address: 3102 N. 56th St., #300, Phoenix
Website: greatheartsaz.org
What they do: Great Hearts Academies is a non-profit network of public charter schools dedicated to improving education in the Phoenix metropolitan area by developing a network of excelling preparatory academies.
How they lead: Great Hearts Academies has a 95 percent college placement rate, including many prestigious colleges and universities around the country. Students have an average SAT score of 1836 and ACT score of 27.4, which is 20 percent above the national average and higher than many private schools.

IDentity Theft 911
Leadership: Matt Cullina, CEO; Sean Daly, CFO
Address: 7580 N. Dobson Rd., Scottsdale
Website: idt911.com
What they do: IDentity Theft 911 is a provider of identity management solutions, identity theft recovery services, breach services and data risk management solutions. The company works with insurance carriers to provide identity theft services to individual personal lines policyholders and crisis data-breach services for commercial insurance policyholders.
How they lead: Founded in 2003, IDentity Theft 911 is a premier consultative provider of identity and data risk management, resolution and education services. The company serves 17.5 million households across the country and provides fraud solutions for a range of organizations.

Integrate
Leadership: Hart Cunningham, CEO; David Tomizuka, CFO
Address: 4900 N. Scottsdale Rd., #4000, Scottsdale
Website: integrate.com
What they do: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology platform—combining ad-serving tech and analytics, a paid media marketplace and full suite of marketing services.
How they lead: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology provider to empower marketers and media buyers to plan, launch, analyze and optimize campaigns across performance, programmatic and traditional media. The Integrate AdHQ platform offers an end-to-end solution that supports the entire lifecycle of paid media campaigns in one intuitive dashboard.

Ipro Tech, Inc.
Leadership: Kim Taylor, president and COO; Bret Lawson, CFO
Address: 6811 E. Mayo Blvd., #350, Phoenix
Website: iprotech.com
What they do: Founded in 1989, Ipro is a global leader in the development of advanced software solutions used by legal professionals to streamline the electronic discovery process.
How they lead: Ipro pioneered the development of electronic discovery technology in 1989, when savings and loan scandals led to an abundance of paper documents needing immediate legal review. Ipro developed customized technology that greatly improved the process and speed in which litigation document collections could be produced and helped to establish the litigation technology industry as we know it today.

Jokake Construction Services, Inc.
Leadership: Casey Cartier, CEO; Dave Miller, CFO
Address: 5013 E. Washington St., #100, Phoenix
Website: jokake.com
What they do: Jokake is a full-service real estate solutions provider founded on delivering exceptional construction experiences through ground-up, renovation and tenant improvement construction for public and private clients.
How they lead: In June, Jokake launched its 30th anniversary celebration with a commitment to complete 30 community service projects in 12 months — one project for each year in business. Since the initial announcement, Jokake’s employees have advocated for great causes, most of which are with nonprofits that they have been personally invested in for many years.

Laser Options, LLC
Leadership: Jeffrey Masters, CEO
Address: 3758 E. Grove St., Phoenix
Website: laseroptions.com
What they do: Laser Options sells new and refurbished multi-function printers/copiers, provides managed print services to its clients and is a leading re-manufacturer of laser print cartridges.
How they lead: Since starting in 1993 as a re-manufacturer of laser printer cartridges and HP printer service, Laser Options has transformed itself into a full-service business technology organization. Since inception, Laser Options has put into place sustainability practices. Whether it is its manufacturing and recycling process, the cars it uses or the vendors it partners with, customers know they are “going green.”

MicroAge
Leadership: Jeff McKeever, CEO; Roger Rouse, CFO
Address: 8160 S. Hardy Dr., Tempe
Website: microage.com
What they do: MicroAge is a leading provider of technology products and services. They serve customers from the data center to the desktop with computer products from industry-leading manufacturers.
How they lead: MicroAge’s tech-savvy account executives are experts at assisting clients with selecting information technology solutions that best meet their unique requirements. MicroAge possesses a vast sourcing capability which enables us to deliver on the most challenging of procurement requests.  MicroAge continues to be a well-known name and a respected industry pioneer with a heritage of industry innovation spanning five decades.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
Leadership: Steve Sanghi, CEO; Eric Bjornholt , CFO
Address: 2355 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler
Website: microchip.com
What they do: Microchip Technology Inc. is a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions for thousands of diverse applications worldwide.
How they lead: Microchip is the semiconductor industry’s greatest Cinderella Story, having come a long way since its humble beginnings as a failing spinoff of General Instrument in 1989. Over that time, Microchip has had the most successful IPO of 1993, achieved the No. 1 ranking in 8-bit microcontrollers in 2002 and recorded its 91st consecutive quarter of profitability in June 2013.

Mountainside Fitness
Leadership: Tom Hatten, president; William Malkovich, CEO; Tracy Taylor, CFO
Address: 1230 W. Washington St., #111, Tempe
Website: mountainsidefitness.com
What they do: Mountainside Fitness is the largest locally owned health club in Arizona, striving to help its members incorporate exercise into their lifestyle.
How they lead: With 10 locations, including the newest location inside Chase Field, the fitness center provides more than 950 jobs. The company has experienced a 41 percent growth within the last three years, including employee growth of approximately 400. The expansion placed Mountainside among the recipients of the 2012 Inc. Hire Power Awards as one of the Top 10 private business job creators in the state of Arizona.

Phoenix Children’s Academy
Leadership: Doug MacKay, CEO; Paul Malek, CFO
Address: 8767 E. Via de Ventura, #240, Scottsdale
Website: pcafamilyofschools.com
What they do: Phoenix Children’s Academy operates a national network of 111 private schools, including preschools, elementary schools and middle schools in 15 states serving approximately 16,000 students.
How they lead: PCA is the sixth-largest company in its industry in the U.S. and the largest headquartered in Arizona. By developing centralized support functions to take the majority of the administrative burden away from its schools, PCA teachers and principals have more time to spend with children and parents. This has enabled PCA to tailor its educational services to the individual needs of the child.

Phoenix Suns
Leadership: Jason Rowley, president; Jim Pitman, CFO
Address: 201 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: suns.com
What they do: The Suns provide the finest in Arizona sports, entertainment and community leadership by striving to create sustained success on and off the court.
How they lead: Between offering a first-rate fan experience, giving back to Arizona children and families in need, and staying at the forefront of technology and innovation, the Suns have served as Arizona’s professional sports leader since our 1968 inception. Each year, Suns players and alumni make more than 1,000 community appearances and the Phoenix Suns Charities contributes more than $1 million annually to more than 125 local nonprofit organizations.

Rigid Industries LED Lighting
Leadership: Jason Christiansen, CEO; Seth Anderson, CFO
Address: 779 N. Colorado St., Gilbert
Website: rigidindustries.com
What they do: Rigid Industries’ patented Hybrid and Specter optics and forward projecting LED lighting and quality products are designed, engineered, and assembled in the United States.
How they lead: Rigid Industries recently ranked 150th on Inc. 500 magazines’ Fastest Growing Companies list for 2013. Additionally, Rigid leads the industry as the fastest-growing LED lighting manufacturer and the fifth-fastest-growing in overall manufacturing in the U.S., proving to be one of the most innovative companies of 2013. From 2009-2012, Rigid experienced an exponential growth rate of 2,528 percent.

Scottsdale Golf Group
Leadership: Shelby Futch, CEO
Address: 6210 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa
Website: scottsdalegolfgroup.com
What they do: Scottsdale Golf Group owns and manages four public and three private golf courses. Futch founded the John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies, with 12 locations across the USA and Canadian locations coming soon. John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies is one of the oldest continuous  golf schools in the U.S. with more than 500,000 students instructed.
How they lead: Scottsdale Golf Group’s state-of-the-art teaching facilities utilize the finest computerized swing analysis equipment. Under the guidance of golf industry expert Futch, Scottsdale Golf Group has grown from the undisputed leader in golf instruction to become a master of club operations, management, and consumer marketing services as well.

Speedie & Associates, Inc.
Leadership: Gregg A. Creaser, CEO; Brett P. Creaser, CFO
Address: 3331 E. Wood St., Phoenix
Website: speedie.net
What they do: Speedie & Associates is a consulting engineering firm that specializes in geotechnical, environmental and construction materials testing and special structural inspection services.
How they lead: From its inception 33 years ago, Speedie & Associates has embraced and maintained a philosophy of providing a superior level of customer service to every one of its clients. The firm believes that listening to its clients, hearing the essence of what they’re saying, and fully understanding their expectations are the most important first steps in providing a superior service experience.

STORE Capital
Leadership: Morton H. Fleischer, chairman; Christopher H. Volk, president and CEO; Catherine Long, CFO
Address: 8501 E Princess Dr, Scottsdale
Website: storecapital.com
What they do: STORE Capital (the name stands for Single Tenant Operational Real Estate) is a leading provider of real estate lease capital for real estate intensive middle-market companies.
How they lead: STORE acquires customers’ commercial real estate they use to generate their profits and lease it back to them in a sale/leaseback transaction.  A real estate lease is not just a debt financing substitute for customers, but it’s both a debt and equity substitute, while also offering reduced monthly payments. This makes them less bank-dependent and more entrepreneurial, creating more efficient capitalization.

Sun Orchard™ Juicery
Leadership: Marc Isaacs, CEO; Jeff Anthony, CFO
Address: 1198 W. Fairmont Dr., Tempe
Website: SunOrchard.com
What they do: Sun Orchard™ is a national craft juice company offering an unmatched selection of exceptional juice products to food service businesses of all shapes and sizes.
How they lead: Sun Orchard built its business on freshness, taste, quality, people and being one step ahead. Sun Orchard’s family of experts’ tree-to-table mastery allows it to quickly turn emerging trends into cutting-edge juice products, giving its customers a quick-to-menu advantage and back-of-house efficiencies. Sun Orchard continues to work closely with its customers to help grow their businesses.

Synergis Education, Inc.
Leadership: Norm Allgood, CEO; Scott Wenhold, CFO
Address: 1820 E Ray Rd., Chandler
Website: synergiseducation.com
What they do: Synergis Education is a premium, full-service provider of educational services designed for college and university leaders who are not satisfied with the status quo.
How they lead: Synergis Education assists its partner institutions in gaining regional prominence, enrollment growth, and overall sustainability through continual improvement and best practices. Synergis is unique among education services providers in that it is positioned to work with the entire adult higher education market, remaining agnostic as to the delivery methods (online, face-to-face, blended, etc.).

University of Advancing Technology
Leadership: Jason Pistillo, CEO; Erika Garney, CFO
Address: 2625 W. Baseline Rd., Tempe
Website: uat.edu
What they do: University of Advancing Technology (UAT) is the technophile’s college experience — a community uniquely suited to provide students passionate about technology an ideal place to live and grow.
How they lead: UAT students graduate to become technological mavens, cyber warriors, elite game designers and advanced computer scientists. The university’s commitment extends far beyond its student body. UAT hosts a myriad of on-campus events, including the annual Avnet Tech Games, The Leonardo da Vinci Society for the Study of Thinking and many other various user groups.

WebPT
Leadership: Brad Jannenga, chairman, president and CTO; Paul Winandy, CEO; Jacob Findlay, CFO
Address: 605 E. Grant St., #200, Phoenix
Website: webpt.com
What they do: WebPT is the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) and practice management solution for physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists.
How they lead: By creating an affordable, intuitive, and technologically sound cloud-based electronic EMR solution for rehabilitation therapists — practitioners excluded from the government’s meaningful use incentive under the HITECH Act — WebPT brought all the benefits of EMR to small, private therapy practices that would have otherwise fallen behind. WebPT has helped more than 24,000 therapists adopt EMR since 2008.

Wespac Construction, Inc.
Leadership: John Largay, CEO; Don Mann, CFO
Address: 9440 N. 26th St., #100, Phoenix
Website: wespacaz.com
What they do: Wespac is a commercial general contracting and construction management firm, offering a range of pre-construction and construction services in a variety of market sectors.
How they lead: Wespac has developed a specific system of project management tools to successfully complete the job. This comprehensive process is Wespac’s Systematic Building Approach™ (SBA™). The SBA™ is Wespac’s process to ensure constant communication, dedication, coordination and planning. Utilizing the SBA™, the team is able to ensure timely procurement of materials and equipment, keeping the build-out on track.

Wilson Electric Services Corp.
Leadership: Wes McClure, president; Todd Klimas, COO; Terry Oakes, CFO
Address: 600 E. Gilbert Dr., Tempe
Website: wilsonelectric.net
What they do: Wilson Electric is the Southwest’s leading, single-source provider of total facility solutions, including commercial construction, solar, and operations technology.
How they lead: Wilson Electric invests in each employee-owner’s success through a rigorous, in-depth corporate training program. The program begins with new hire orientation and continues throughout employment, blending in-house resources with industry experts. Topics range from effective project management and safety procedures to manufacturer certifications. Because of this, Wilson’s safety record is one of the best in the state.

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Microchip Technology Acquires EqcoLogic

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today announced the acquisition of EqcoLogic, an innovator in equalizer and coaxial transceiver products and technologies. EqcoLogic is a privately held, fabless semiconductor company based in Brussels, Belgium and a spin out of Vrije Universiteit Brussel. The terms of the acquisition are confidential and are expected to have no material impact on Microchip’s December quarter results.

“The advent of higher-speed automotive and industrial networks, such as MOST® and Ethernet, and the need to reliably transmit data over longer distances using standard coaxial cables is creating the demand for innovative equalizer and transceiver solutions,” said Ganesh Moorthy, Microchip’s COO.  “EqcoLogic’s solutions are tailor-made to address these needs for embedded applications, and broaden the range of solution options we offer customers to enable their end-product innovation.”

“We believe EqcoLogic’s solutions are well positioned to capitalize on a number of embedded markets, especially for automotive and industrial customers,” said Peter Helfet, EqcoLogic’s CEO.  “Microchip’s operational excellence, combined with their broad customer reach and extensive channel presence, will be key for the next stage of our growth.”

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Microchip Wins Prestigious Technology Awards

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, announced that it has been recognized by the following global electronics industry publications and organizations for product innovation and technology leadership.

After launching in November, Microchip won three prestigious awards for its MGC3130, which offers low-power, precise, fast and robust hand position tracking with free-space gesture recognition.  The MGC3130, featuring Microchip’s patented GestIC® technology, was handpicked by the editors of Electronic Design Magazine for their “2012 Best of Electronic Design Awards,” in the Digital category, for enabling the next dimension in intuitive, gesture-based, non-contact user interfaces for a broad range of end products.  EE Times China Magazine’s “2013 Annual Creativity in Electronics (ACE) Awards” selected the MGC3130 as a Product of the Year in the Microcontroller/Memory/Interface category.  EDN Magazine named the MGC3130 to their “2012 Hot 100” list, in the Microcontrollers & Processors category.

EE Times China also chose Microchip for two additional “ACE Products of the Year.”  The 70 MIPS dsPIC33E and PIC24E family of digital signal controllers and microcontrollers won in the Digital Processor/DSP/FPGA category, and the MPLAB® XC C compiler line won in the EDA/Tools category.

Likewise, EDN Magazine named a total of six Microchip products to its annual “Hot 100” list, which their editors selected from “the many thousands of products announced during the past year.”  In the Analog category, Microchip’s MCP47A1 digital-to-analog converter was honored; and the 23A1024/23LC1024, 23A512/23LC512, 23LCV51/23LCV1024 serial SRAM family, which includes a battery-backed non-volatile option, was chosen in the Memory & Storage category. Two products were selected in the Boards & Development Tools category, including the MPLAB XC C compiler line, which represents Microchip’s simplified and integrated compiler strategy, as well as the RN-131 and RN-171 PICtail™/PICtail Plus Wi-Fi® development boards with the TCP/IP stack integrated on the module, enabling wireless connectivity for any microcontroller via a serial interface. Finally, the PIC12LF1840T48A, which integrates an 8-bit microcontroller with an RF transmitter for secure-access applications, was chosen for EDN’s RF/Microwave category.

The venerable 8-bit PIC® microcontroller was also named a finalist in Design News Magazine’s “2012 Golden Mousetrap Awards.”  Specifically, the PIC10F(LF)32X and PIC1XF(LF)150X MCUs with integrated configurable logic in 6- to 20-pin packages got the nod in their Electronics & Test: Embedded Computing/Processing category.

Microchip’s JukeBlox® 3.1 Wireless Audio Platform, based on technology from its recent SMSC acquisition, won a 2012 “Readers’ Choice Tech Award” from ECN Magazine in the Boards and Modules category.  Winners were named by the editors of ECN, based on their assessment of readers’ newsletter clicks, Web traffic and social-media engagement for each of the many products they covered during the year.

In addition to the three EE Times China ACE Awards, China’s trade press bestowed three other annual product awards on Microchip.  The MCP6N11 Instrumentation Amplifier won two honors, one from EDN China’s “Innovation Awards” in the Leading Product category, and the other from EEPW Magazine’s “Power Supply Products Awards” in the Best Application: Power Devices category.  From their separate “Editors’ Choice Awards,” EEPW named Microchip’s AR1100 mTouch™ Analog Resistive Touch Screen Controller their Best Touch Panel Solution.

In the area of technology leadership, The Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium (EEMBC) honored Microchip for significantly contributing to the development of its next-generation industry benchmarks. Specifically, Microchip was recognized for determining fair and reliable cross-platform accuracy requirements for EEMBC’s FPBench™ benchmark, which is critical to the evaluation of floating-point performance.  Additionally, Microchip evaluated and recommended math function libraries for software-only reference implementations, and tested and ported multiple libraries to make FPBench safe for 16-bit microcontrollers.

“It is a testament to Microchip’s continuous-improvement culture that we have received this recognition from an esteemed organization such as EEMBC, as well as product awards from some of the most influential global publications in our industry,” said Steve Sanghi, Microchip’s president and CEO.  “The breadth of these product awards across the diverse categories of human interface, microcontrollers, DSP, wireless networking, audio, analog, memory and development tools illustrates the continued investments we are making—both in R&D and strategic acquisitions—to enable our customers’ innovation.”

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

microchip technology

Microchip Technology Acquires SMSC

Microchip Technology Incorporated, a leading provider of microcontroller, analog and Flash-IP solutions, and Standard Microsystems Corporation announced that Microchip has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Standard Microsystems Corporation (“SMSC”) for $37.00 per share in cash, which represents a total equity value of about $939 million, and a total enterprise value of about $766 million, after excluding SMSC’s cash and investments on its balance sheet of approximately $173 million. The acquisition has been approved by the Boards of Directors of each company and is expected to close in the third quarter of calendar 2012, subject to approval by SMSC stockholders, regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions.

“We believe SMSC’s smart mixed-signal connectivity solutions aimed at embedded applications are an ideal complement to Microchip’s embedded control business,” said Steve Sanghi, Microchip’s President and CEO.  “This acquisition will expand Microchip’s range of solutions as SMSC contributes exciting new products and capabilities in the automotive, industrial, computing, consumer and wireless audio markets, significantly extending our served available market.”

“We are excited by the strategic possibilities presented by this acquisition,” continued Sanghi.  “SMSC in its most recent fiscal year ending February 29, 2012 reported net sales of $412 million, non-GAAP gross margin of 54.4% of sales, and non-GAAP operating profit of 12% of sales.  We expect this acquisition will be accretive to Microchip’s non-GAAP earnings in the first full quarter after completion of the acquisition.  We look forward to completing this transaction in the third calendar quarter of 2012.”

“This transaction represents a compelling opportunity for SMSC employees, customers and stockholders by combining the leading market position and world class operational excellence of Microchip Technology with the world class smart mixed-signal connectivity solutions from SMSC,” said Christine King, President and CEO of SMSC.  “We are pleased to become part of Microchip Technology, a premier company in the semiconductor industry.”

For more information on Microchip Technology, visit Microchip Technology’s website at microchip.com. Also Visit SMSC at www.smsc.com

roving networks

Microchip Technology Acquires Roving Networks

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, analog and Flash-IP solutions, announced the acquisition of Roving Networks, an innovator in low-power embedded Wi-Fi and Bluetooth solutions based in Los Gatos, Calif. Roving Networks is a privately held, fabless semiconductor developer of Wi-Fi certified transceivers and FCC certified Wi-Fi and Bluetooth modules. The terms of the deal are confidential, and the transaction is expected to be immediately accretive on a non-GAAP basis.

“The ubiquity of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity is fueling a growing number of embedded applications that take advantage of this rapidly expanding wireless infrastructure,” said Ganesh Moorthy, Microchip’s COO. “Roving Networks’ easy-to-use solutions are tailor made for such embedded applications, and broaden the range of wireless connectivity options we offer customers to enable their end-product innovation.”

“Roving Networks’ wireless solutions are well positioned to capitalize on a number of embedded markets, including the market for smartphone accessories,” said Mike Conrad, Roving Networks’ CEO. “Microchip’s operational excellence combined with their broad customer reach and extensive channel presence will be key for the next stage of our growth.”

The Roving Networks team, headed by Mike Conrad, will continue to operate out of its Los Gatos office.

[stextbox id=”info” bwidth=”0″]microchip.com
rovingnetworks.com[/stextbox]

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Steve Sanghi, Microchip Technology Inc.

Steve Sanghi, talks about his experience as President and CEO of Microchip Technology, Inc. and the role technology plays in Arizona’s future.

Title: Chairman of the Board, President and CEO

Company: Microchip Technology, Inc.


How is being CEO of a technology company different from being CEO of a more traditional manufacturing company?
I used to think it was very different, but I’m not sure I believe that anymore. I understand the technology of a project, why our technology is better than the competition’s and why it is not. I think that makes me more effective. But it can also make CEOs with a technology background more biased; they do not rely on the team as much as they should.

Video by Duane Darling

What has been your most significant challenge as CEO of Microchip?
The first challenge was taking the company and turning it around. We were in so much trouble financially. We had no cash to go forward. Our technology was outmoded. Our employees lacked morale. Our factories were inefficient. So we took all those elements and developed what we call the “aggregate system,” a big-picture approach where we took all the elements of the business and created a better workplace and management culture that allowed us to succeed.

Any plans to expand your product lines?
I call my acquisition strategy “elbow out.” Our products need products from other companies around them to make them work. So we look at companies that make products that we do not make ourselves, then we look at acquiring them so we can “elbow out” the competition.

How does technology fit into Arizona’s economic future?
If you look at the state’s first 75 years, the four Cs that drove the economy were copper, cattle, citrus and climate. If you look at the last 25 years, technology, construction, retail and hospitality have taken a more prominent role. As we look forward, technology is going to play a more dominant role in Arizona’s economy as the world keeps moving toward a knowledge economy. So the four Cs that are driving Arizona today are computers, communications, consumer electronics and climate.

How is Arizona as a place to do business?
We have more than 400 people working here. Our business has grown from a $70 million company into a $1.5 billion company, so it has worked well for us. But there are pros and cons. Many times, to get the right talent, we have to go to other technology centers — California, Oregon, Texas, Colorado. If we had the talent here, it would make things easier. A benefit of being in Arizona is that we have a lower cost of living, the cost of doing business is lower, and our turnover rate is much lower than other tech centers. We have always been proud to call Arizona home.

What three things would make Arizona more tech-business friendly?
No. 1 is to improve the schools. Arizona high schools are near the bottom and if we don’t improve them soon, it’s really going to impact the future. No. 2 is getting a handle on the immigration problem and controlling it. No. 3 is that Arizona has historically lacked risk capital. Having more risk capital available is crucial so entrepreneurs can build companies here instead of having to look elsewhere.

Your biggest accomplishment as CEO?
Taking a company that was hemorrhaging money in 1990 and leading it to 84 consecutive quarters of profitability is something that I could not have imagined and is something that no other semiconductor company has been able to achieve. Right now, we are shipping about a billion units a year. So to see how far we have come and how well our products are accepted makes me very proud. You can only see so far in the future, but when you get there, you can see farther.

[stextbox id=”alert” bcolor=”ffffff” bgcolor=”eaeaea” image=”null”]Vital Stats: Steve Sanghi

  • Named president of Microchip in August 1990, chief executive officer in October 1991, and chairman of the board of directors in October 1993.
  • Author of the book “Driving Excellence: How the Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader (Wiley).”
  • Member of the board of directors of Xyratex Ltd., member of the national board of directors of FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics, and a member of the Board of Trustees of Kettering University.
  • In 2010, Mr. Sanghi was named EE Times’ — a leading electronics-industry publication — “Executive of the Year.”
  • Under Sanghi, Microchip’s returns have increased 4,476% since the Company’s IPO in 1993.
  • Honored with the Arizona Technology Council’s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Future of Technology In Arizona: Where Do We Go From Here?

The future of technology: Science and engineering turned Arizona’s first 100 years upside down, so where do we go from here?


Think about the achievements in technology that came during Arizona’s first 100 years.

  • The first transcontinental telephone service between New York and San Francisco (1915).
  • The world’s first radio broadcasting station goes on the air  (1920).
  • Television has its first successful demonstration in the United States (1927).
  • James Watson and Francis Crick at Cambridge University describe the structure of the DNA molecule (1953).
  • The microchip is invented (1959).
  • The first test-tube baby is born (1978).
  • IBM introduces its first personal computer (1981).
  • Cellular telephones are introduced to consumers (1982).
  • Development of the World Wide Web begins (1989).
  • Dolly the sheep becomes the first mammal cloned from an adult cell (1996).
  • Apple introduces the iPod (2001).
  • Facebook is launched (2004).
  • Scientists discover how to use human skin cells to create embryonic stem cells (2007).

They are all innovations that have changes the way we lives our lives and do business.

Where will technology take us as Arizona enters its second century? How will it affect our lives? Here are technologies and scenarios that some of Arizona’s best and brightest minds see playing out in the state’s next 100 years.


The Future of Technology In Arizona


Future of TechnologyMark Bonsall
General manager and CEO
SRP

If I had to pick one technology with the potential to truly revolutionize the industry it would be finding affordable ways to store energy on a very large scale.  This would increase the value of intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar and could transform electricity into a more common commodity.  It isn’t clear that this is possible, but with the growing focus on electric vehicles and other storage technologies, it is certain there will be significant gains over the next century.


Future of TechnologyMark Edwards
Vice president of corporate development and marketing
Algae Biosciences, Inc.

Algae-based food, fiber, feed, fertilizer, fuels, and advanced medicines will transform those industries, as we know them today. The current serious problems of waste and pollution will be solved with sustainable algae-based production that recycles and reuses nutrients, water, and energy while regenerating air, water and soils. Our children’s children will have sufficient natural resources to produce the food, energy and transportation they will need.

Algae Biosciences is Scottsdale-based and focused on discovering and unlocking the powers of algae to resolve critical human issues – nutrition, health, energy and environment.


Future of TechnologySteve Sanghi
President and CEO
Microchip Technology Inc.

If I had to pick one (technology that will have biggest impact on Arizona’s next 100 years) it would be the renewable-energy complex of technologies. For Arizona, the primary renewable-energy opportunities can be broken into three categories—measurement, conservation and harvesting.  The world’s oil supply will eventually run out, and Arizona has more days of sun than most areas.  We must continue working to tap into this ever-present energy source.  At the same time, we must focus on developing the technologies that will enable individuals and companies to both measure and conserve their energy usage.  For example, Arizona has the potential to play a key role in developing the technologies that will be employed at the home, industrial and utility levels to make the burgeoning “smart grid” work.


Future of TechnologyJohn Lefebvre
President
Suntech America

The amount of energy generated through renewable sources like solar power has the potential to surpass that derived from fossil fuels in the next 50 years. We’ve already seen remarkable technological innovations in the solar field to increase efficiency, develop solutions for energy storage, and further reduce costs, with further improvements on the horizon. With over 300 days of sunshine, Arizona is naturally poised to take advantage of these advancements and its abundant resource by generating clean electricity without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.


Future of TechnologyDiane Brossart
President
Valley Forward Association

The biggest issues facing Arizona over the next 100 years are managing a finite water supply and transitioning to a clean energy economy. Green technology and innovation will create economic and environmentally sound solutions, making Arizona the leading destination for living wisely and sustainably in a desert.

Valley Forward Association promotes cooperative efforts to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities.


Future of TechnologyKelly Mott Lacroix
Graduate research associate
Water Resources Research Center in Tucson

We do not have a silver bullet to solve our water supply and demand challenges The state and its water issues are too diverse.  Rather, there are many smaller pieces from the simple and small scale, such as rainwater harvesting, to the large and complex, such as increased reclaimed water use, that when taken together will constitute a solution.


Future of TechnologyBill Hubert
President and founder
Cology, Inc.

Universal, personal-application based technology in general, and highly-sophisticated, profile-driven applications that help consumers (students and parents in our industry) not only gain access to a broader spectrum of programs and services available – but an interactive relationship with providers that will help both sides of the “economic equation” benefit from the transaction.

Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc. is a leading provider of end-to-end private student loan origination and repayment servicing solutions for lenders.


Future of TechnologyCR Herro
Vice president of environmental affairs
Meritage Homes

In the next century, climate will take the lead role in transforming Arizona and its buildings into energy-producing solar collectors. Arizona has the ability to become the largest producer of renewable, clean energy nationwide. In residential construction, that has already started.  The first cost-effective solar communities debuted in Arizona. Meritage Homes introduced the nation’s first net-zero homes in Arizona, saving owners both energy and money. And Arizona utilities lead the country in sponsoring energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.  Arizona is shaping up to be a state powered by the sun in every way imaginable.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Niemiec
President
Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

Technology will be used to not only focus on the tiny gene, but to see the bigger picture of the bio-energetic field of the body. Not unlike what you would see in a Star Trek movie, technology would be used to assess and heal both the body and mind, taking into account the bio-electric system. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine has been focused on individualized medicine for thousands of years, with each treatment and formula specifically adapted to an individual, changing as the person changes and moves toward health. Thus, this dynamic medicine is the forefather of modern “individualized medicine” and can work well to make modern biotechnology more effective.


Future of TechnologyDanny Murphy
Airport director
Sky Harbor International Airport

With the explosion of mobile devices, coupled with high speed wireless networks, there is a new generation that will live their lives on mobile technology, using smartphones, touchpads and other mobile devices.
In the past we used to print so many information pieces about the airport. And while we still provide printed materials to an extent, our focus is on providing information via the web and for mobile units.


Future of TechnologyDr. Grace Caputo
Director
Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

Moving to a system where we utilize electronic medical records will really give us the ability to shape and improve health care across the board. Pediatric healthcare will be heavily impacted as we have just started to unravel genetic bases diseases. In the future, we hope to understand the genetic process of diseases so we can treat them and ultimately prevent diseases with wellness and lifestyle changes.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Anaya
Anchor
CBS 5 News

I think the internet technology we currently use to help in our news gathering will become a bigger factor in how we do things. Smart phones  (or whatever replaces them in the next 100 years) will replace cameras and studios creating more intimacy and accessibility. That accessibility will make it much easier to hold those in power more accountable for their actions which I hope will have a positive impact on how the state’s laws are created, shaped and enforced.


Future of TechnologyMahesh Seetharam, M.D.
Medical oncologist and hematologist
Arizona Oncology

Personalized medicine through whole genome sequencing (genomics), proteomics and noninvasive imaging will pave the way for the future.  Current research to evaluate for circulating cancer cells, and evaluation for cancer in urine samples are already being studied, and holds promise for the future.


Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D.
Radiation oncologist
Arizona Oncology

Immensely precise and conformal radiation treatments in the form of stereotactic radiation, high dose-rate radiation and molecularly targeted radiation will allow radiation oncologists surgical precision in assisting the people of Arizona to improve cancer cure and control. Just as the technological advances in the past have allowed women diagnosed with breast cancer to pursue breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and have allowed men to preserve erectile function with prostate cancer, future advances will allow more Arizonans diagnosed with cancer to enjoy a better quality of life along with improved cure rates.


Michael Crow
President
Arizona State University

The biggest single technology to impact the future of Arizona will be individualized learning technologies that allow individuals to master subjects in ways customized to their particular types of intelligence and learning modalities.  This technology will allow people to learn more quickly and more deeply and more broadly. Those places, hopefully like Arizona, that enable and empower this kind of learning will see tremendous positive impacts from this technological development.


Where to invest in technology

Patricia Ternes, a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Scottsdale says these are the four technology sectors to invest in going into Arizona’s next century:

1. Water 
Growing imbalances in global water supply and demand are well documented. Within that heading, the companies involved with water fall into four categories: (1) activities and technologies that increase supply; (2) the building of the necessary water structure; (3) processes that help reduce demand; and (4) water management.

2. Agriculture
When you look at the growth of the world’s population companies that are involved in agriculture and food production will continue to be attractive and important.

3. Health
Another important sector will be health care services and life sciences tools and services that provide better quality of life for the aging population.

4. The unknown
The fourth sector doesn’t exist yet.  Advances are happening so fast that something new will be created that will change our lives.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Centennial Series - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Centennial Series: Looking Ahead At The State’s Next Century

Arizona Centennial — Forward thinking: Algae, solar, personalized medicine or none of the above? Some of Arizona’s greatest minds look ahead at the state’s next century

A century ago, Arizonans with an entrepreneurial spirit ventured deep into the deserts and mountains in search of gold and copper. Today, as Arizona celebrates its 100th birthday, their counterparts are exploring the unknown frontiers of biotechnology and renewable energy.

“Imagine the technologies of 100 years ago,” says Steven Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “Now, think about how far we have come. Only a very few science fiction writers even envisioned the technologies that are now a part of our everyday lives. It is very likely that (100 years from now), the mix of industries and companies will be very different. There will be subsectors that don’t even exist yet. One thing is sure, there will be more technology than ever to drive our economy and improve our quality of life.”

So with 100 years in the history books, what’s in store for Arizona’s next century? One expert says algae will be Arizona’s 21st-century gold rush. Will Arizona’s yet-to-be-written history prove him to be right?

As part of the Arizona Centennial Series, Arizona Business Magazine asks some of the state’s greatest minds how they see Arizona taking shape over the next decade and beyond.


Economy

Lee McPheters, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University

The next 5 years will be a period of agonizingly slow recovery from the Great Recession. Arizona employment will return to post-recession levels within two to three years, but new, more frugal spending habits will put a damper on growth. The next 25 years has the potential to be a period of strong growth. Under historical growth assumptions, Arizona’s population will almost double within 25 years, as the state grows to more than 10 million residents.  Phoenix will have a population between 7 and 8 million, larger than the entire state today.  Immigration will exceed 125,000 every year by 2030.  Over the next 25 years, to accommodate growth, more than 1 million single-family homes will be needed, a seemingly impossible pace of building compared to conditions today.In the next 100 years, the gap between those with education, training and skills and those without will grow even greater as technology will benefit those who develop, control and use it.

Lee Vikre, senior vice president, organizational development and consulting, BestCompaniesAZ, LLC

In the next 10 years, the Arizona workforce will be more diverse than ever before, with wide spans in age ranges of workers and greater cultural diversity. White males may become the minority. Entrepreneurship will be ingrained in workers of all ages who were affected by the recession. This entrepreneurial, independent atmosphere will continue to define Arizona. Homegrown, innovative businesses in the fields of technology, manufacturing, healthcare, and sustainable energy will prosper. The movement towards creating great workplaces will move from a novelty to mainstream as both workers and management discover the competitive advantage of a culture of trust.

Patricia Ternes, financial advisor, RBC Wealth Management, Scottsdale

For the next 100 years, we need to address the concept that the world is flat.  Right now, we have multiple currencies and multiple stock markets. The financial services industry needs to better integrate the products and services we offer our clients worldwide. In 100 years, there will probably be huge, world-wide investment markets that are available to everyone 24/7.  This will increase the complexity of planning one’s financial future.


Technology

Steven Zylstra, president and CEO, Arizona Technology Council

In the next 10 years, the biosciences and renewable energy (and even the broader clean tech) sectors will become significant components of our economy.  Aerospace and defense, semiconductor and electronics, ITC, and optics will continue to grow.  The technology sector will be an ever-increasing component of our economic landscape, leading to more diversity.

Mark Edwards, PhD., vice president of corporate development and marketing, Algae Biosciences, Inc., Scottsdale

Arizona has the critical elements for algae production including lots of sunshine, waste and brine water for nutrients, CO2, and cheap land.  The state has a competitive advantage for algae production and will become the algae capital world. Arizona will go from two firms producing algae in 2011 to 200 algae firms in 2020. Arizona producers will cultivate algae for food, feed, fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, cosmeceuticals, nutraceuticals, functional foods, medicines and advance compounds. In the next 100 years, Algae will become the leading industry in Arizona, eclipsing tourism; more than 80 percent of all medicines, vaccines and pharmaceuticals will be made predominately from advanced compounds derived from algae; our fossil-based transportation system will transform to a sustainable algae-based transportation system.

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO, Microchip Technology Inc., Chandler

Given this expansion and the number of semiconductor players that have operations in Arizona, the semiconductor industry is likely to have a significant impact in this state over the next 10 years. This expansion will lead to a sharp increase in the growth of well-paying, high-tech jobs in our state. Take the case of medical advancements.  Over the next 10 years, we will see a significant expansion in the use of semiconductors for surgical and analysis equipment; in portable, wearable and implantable medical devices; and in the cost-cutting use of remote medicine, where patients will be monitored by medical professionals in lower-cost regions.

I will, however, add one cautionary note to the optimistic picture I have just painted.  The formation of new start-up companies is driven by the availability of venture-capital funding. Arizona continues to be plagued by a scarcity of risk capital, as most venture-capital firms are located in California, Texas and Massachusetts. The result is that those states continue to attract the bulk of VC-backed startups.  While Arizona has been a technology hotbed in recent years, we must fix this problem if we are to remain the “Silicon Desert.”


Environment

Diane Brossart, president, Valley Forward Association

In the next 10 years, Arizona will diversify its economy through green jobs and technology. Renewable energy sectors will proliferate with solar leading the way. In the next 100 years, we will become the solar capitol of the world. Light rail connects Valley cities. Commuter rail takes us across the nation. Arizona is a burgeoning hub of economic activity. Parks and open space dot the landscape. Innovation and technology abound. Our legislature is enlightened and the green revolution leads to new water sources in our vibrant desert oasis, now free of particulate pollution.

Kelly Mott Lacroix, graduate research associate, Water Resources Research Center, Tucson

Over the next 100 years, our water management will need to be flexible and progressive enough to allow us to prosper in the face of supply uncertainty from changes in climate and the continuing growth of our economy.  Arizonans will have to make decisions about what we value most about this state and those decisions will dictate how the water issue changes Arizona.

Larry Howell, CEO and president of KEBAWK Response Technologies, a Scottsdale-based engineering company that responds immediately to hazardous or catastrophic disasters

Environmentally-conscious companies like KEBAWK are going to continue to grow and have a much more pivotal role in growing the economy in the next 10 years as businesses strive to be as sustainable as possible. What was once a trendy, cottage industry is now a must for businesses.


Health

Dr. Grace Caputo, director, Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

I see medical education as a dominant force in Arizona, especially with the growth of the University of Arizona campus downtown. Innovative pediatric care will continue to be a highlight at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, but healthcare overall will continue to improve our community as birth to age 5 is the fastest growing population in Arizona.

Catherine Niemiec, president, Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

In the future, acupuncture and oriental medicine (AOM) will fill the gaps created by high insurance rates, fewer primary care physicians, and seemingly incurable or chronic conditions. Acupuncture can be available for the same cost as a co-payment, supporting the need of those who have no insurance or who need to seek different care beyond what their insurance will cover. A report on “Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States” cites widespread use of CAM, with more future visits to CAM providers than to primary care physicians (with most of these visits paid out-of-pocket).

Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D., radiation oncologist, Arizona Oncology

Long-term changes for the use of radiation in cancer care will involve a combination of treatment directed at the molecular level and immense precision with external radiation. Targeting cancer with radiation at the molecular level has been developed for only a handful of cancers to date. The struggle to find and develop cures at the molecular level will be one of the determining factors in how the people of Arizona will receive cancer treatment for the next hundred years.

Mahesh Seetharam, M.D., medical oncologist and hematologist, Arizona Oncology

In the next decade, electronic medical records will continue to evolve to help coordinate care between the various providers to optimize outcomes. It is very difficult to predict given the current labile healthcare environment.  The concept of universal healthcare is very possible, but with that comes the need for additional providers and resources to provide the necessary care.  Personalized medicine could be a reality in the next decade or two, and this will certainly improve outcomes.


Banking

Lynn Crane, executive vice president, bank operations and services, Mutual of Omaha Bank in Arizona

Mobile devices will replace plastic cards.  This will completely change the “check out” experience at retailers. Arizona shoppers will be able to scan merchandise as they pick it up off the shelf and make payment without stopping at a checkout counter when they leave the store. On the negative side, this transition to non-traditional delivery channels will make bank branches less relevant. Online financial consultants will replace branch employees and a trip to the bank will become a thing of the past for Arizonans. Some branches will close and the industry will require a smaller workforce. The future value of currency will not rely on paper, but on digital data, so heightened security concerns and demand for data protection will prevail.  As a trusted source of security, banks will play a much larger role in helping Arizonans secure their valuables and their future.

Craig Doyle, Arizona market president, Comerica Bank

Some of the industry segments critical to our future are aerospace and defense, semi-conductor manufacturing, business services technology, health care and renewable energy.  Effectively supporting their growth requires a deep understanding of supply chains and related capital markets.  It will take time, but the Arizona banking industry should help facilitate the appropriate capital markets so that Arizona is competitive with other major economic regions in helping companies, form, grow and mature.


Education

Michael M. Crow, president, Arizona State University

Within 10 years, ASU will be America’s finest example of a widely accessible research intensive public university and in this mode it will be capable of operating at a very rapid and large scale for educational competitiveness for Arizona.  In this mode, the university will have deployed its assets to maximize the competitive position of Arizona through its role as a comprehensive knowledge enterprise producing fantastic graduates, ideas and new technologies. ASU will be a critical asset for Arizona going forward over the next 100 years as the knowledge based economy or at least knowledge driven adaptation and innovation to the uncertainties and the complexities that lie ahead in the areas of global finance, economic competitiveness, environmental sustainability and so forth will be such that what universities like ASU do will be more important than ever.  This is true specifically for ASU in the context of Arizona as Arizona in the next 100 years grows and matures into America’s preeminent example of a free enterprise driven innovation catalyzed state.

Bill Hubert, president and founder of Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc., which helps lenders enter the student loan market

At some point, the cost of education is going to have to “normalize” within the overall economy.  For decades, cost of attendance, whether private or public, traditional or trade-based, has increased at much higher than normal rate.  Our business of providing financial services that connect students and families with a broad spectrum of relationship based funding sources will certainly help increase access and drive down overall costs – of program administration, funding sources, and even institutional administrative costs.

Deanna Salazar, senior vice president and general counsel of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

I believe that by supporting community outreach efforts similar to the Green Schoolhouse Series, which makes schools healthy and green “inside and out” through the development of an integrated health and wellness curriculum and green gardens to promote nutrition and wellness in disadvantaged schools, BCBSAZ will continue to be positioned as a leader who is genuinely taking care of the health of Arizonans, in both traditional and non-traditional ways that create a better future for all. For years to come, it’s BCBSAZ’s hope for the green gardens to teach children about healthy eating and physical activity by allowing them to use and maintain the garden.


Marketing

Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president, general manager, Cramer-Krasselt

As I look into a crystal ball, the marketing world as we know it will change dramatically in the next 100 years. It will be forever changed even in the next 10 years. However, brands will not go away. In fact, they will be even more valuable both in the next decade and in the next century if they can evolve as we evolve, as our technology evolves. Those brands that increase in value over time will have very different ways of communicating with consumers. Everything will be personalized. Everything will happen in real time. There’s a good chance that 100 years from now, as far as commercial messaging and targeting goes, “Minority Report” will be seen as an amazingly accurate forward-looking documentary rather than a work of fiction.

Rob Davidson, co-owner of Phoenix-based Advertising firm Davidson & Belluso

Think of how social media has drastically impacted communications with customers and prospects in recent years. Marketing and advertising will keep changing at an even faster rate as new technology becomes available. Smart phones and tablets have already become standard channels of any marketing plan. Companies who stay on top of the latest marketing tools and learn about their customers changing behaviors are the ones who will be successful in reaching their target markets.


Energy

Mark Bonsall, general manager and CEO, SRP

In the next decade, the growth in wind and solar will continue to be strong, but will still provide a relatively small portion of the needed energy just because the scale of what is needed is so large. It is likely most of the new baseload resources will be fueled by natural gas.  New drilling and recovery technology is providing access to vast quantities of natural gas within the U.S. at relatively low costs, at least so far.  This provides a good bridge to develop systems that can improve the efficiency of solar systems, address the intermittent nature of most renewable resources, find safe and more cost-effective ways to deploy nuclear power, and provide the time for innovative new ideas we aren’t even aware of now.

John Lefebvre, president, Suntech America

With supportive policies, the solar industry will continue to grow and flourish, creating a major employment sector for the state. Additionally, every year the cost of solar is driven down, getting closer and closer to achieving grid parity in the U.S. As solar becomes a market-driven industry, Arizona is poised to be a major global solar industry hub, particularly with the continued development of large-scale solar projects. Ultimately, I hope to see energy generated from solar grow to a significant percent of the U.S. energy supply portfolio and eliminate our dependence on foreign oil, providing a low-cost solution to power our homes and cars. With solar, the sky’s the limit.


Housing

Rachel Lang and Marcy Briggs, loan officers for the Briggs-Lang team of Cobalt Mortgage

The rental market will continue to strengthen with long-term renters. We also see a stabilization within the Arizona real estate market due to the mortgage underwriting guidelines remaining more conservative than they were five years ago, and slightly less conservative five years from now.

Alan Boughton, director of commercial operations, W.J. Maloney Plumbing

As the population in the West increases and the demand for water intensifies by a seemingly unpredictable water supply and snow pack, innovation in low-flow plumbing fixtures could be our industry’s greatest impact on Arizona as more people are forced to live with less water.

CR Herro, vice president, environmental affairs, Meritage Homes

Homes will be built to work better, use fewer resources, be healthier, and adjust to the needs of owners. On the fringe of the market today are homes that can adjust the transparency of windows, extend and retract solar shades, turn on lights, change thermostat settings over a smart phone, and achieve net-zero energy demand. These changes allow homes to adapt to the unique needs of its occupants, offer more control, and waste less energy and resources (money) in their operation.


Transportation

Danny Murphy, Airport director, Sky Harbor International Airport

The biggest evolution our industry will experience is a transformation of the entire national air transportation system to avoid gridlock in air travel, called “NextGen.” This means moving from ground-based technologies to a new and more dynamic satellite-based technology.  While airport delays are minimal in Arizona, our passengers are impacted most when traveling to and from other locations and this technology will greatly improve that. Over the next 100 years, continental investment and enhancements to the state’s main airports will be critical to serve the needs of Arizona’s growing population.


Entertainment

Brad Casper, president, Phoenix Suns

In continuing to operate at the forefront of innovation, the Suns will offer fans the most technologically advanced atmosphere in professional sports, while emerging as the most winning franchise in NBA history. Through strategic partnerships, the Suns will act as a catalyst towards creating a sustainable entertainment and business environment, unmatched by any NBA/WNBA organization.

Catherine Anaya, chief journalist, KPHO CBS 5 News

I think in the next 100 years the marriage between television and computers will be such that we will be doing everything we do on a computer. There will still be a place for television news. However, I don’t think we’ll see it in the studio format we’ve been accustomed to seeing. I think we’ll end up shooting and broadcasting our news via our smart phones or whatever those evolve into in time. As a result, I think it will create more intimacy and interaction among Arizonans. That may or may not be a good thing as familiarity lines will get blurred.

Teri Agosta, general manager, Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort

The hospitality industry will continue to drive revenue into the Arizona market through increased travelers, due to the aging demographic, who will have more leisure time and money to spend. Also business travel will continue to grow as corporations realize people need direct contact with team members and clients to build a successful business, and webinars and teleconferencing do not meet these needs.  Also, our consistent weather will become more valuable to travelers, who will scrutinize their travel spending even more.

Melody Hudson, public relations manager, Gila River Gaming Enterprises

The opportunity for new job creation will become more prevalent than ever before with potential capital expansion opportunities which could result in not only new construction positions, but new positions within the Enterprises’ casinos as well. This potential growth could also result in an increase of revenues for both local and national businesses that supply goods and services to the Enterprise. Additionally, potential growth from not only Gila River Gaming  Enterprises, but the gaming industry in general in Arizona,  would result in larger amounts of funding going to the state for education, tourism, wildlife conservation and emergency services.

Carey Pena, co-anchor, 3TV News at 10 p.m.

There is a generally accepted theory of human knowledge that says:  today, we know 5 percent of what we will know in 50 years. In other words, in 50 years, 95 percent of what we will know will have been discovered in the past 50 years.  That makes it hard to imagine what 100 years will look like.

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

 

Microchip's PIC Microcontroller

Microchip Ships Its Ten Billionth PIC Microcontroller

Today, Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, analog and Flash-IP solutions, announced the delivery of its ten billionth PIC microcontroller to Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, in less than a year after delivering its nine billionth.

“The shipment of our ten billionth PIC microcontroller is a remarkable achievement, and shipping it to a giant in the electronics industry like Samsung makes it even more satisfying,” said Microchip President and CEO Steve Sanghi.

This shipment is a “significant accomplishment” because it proves the industry’s acceptance of Microchip’s microcontrollers as high-performance, low power, and cost-effective, as the company continues to gain worldwide market share.

According to Sang Kim, vice president of R&D, Samsung Electronics, Digital Imaging Division, Samsung is “honored to be the recipient of Microchip’s 10 billionth PIC microcontroller.” Samsung has been a Microchip customer for many years, and is “quite pleased with the high performance” by its 32-bit PIC32 microcontroller portfolio.

Sanghi gives the credit for the company selling one billion in less than a year to its “PIC microcontroller portfolio, MPLAB development systems, direct sales and sales-channel partners” because they “provide maximum benefits for customers to reach their design goals.”

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About Microchip Technology Inc.

Headquartered in Chandler, Microchip Technology Inc. provides low-risk product development, lower total system cost and faster time to market for customer applications worldwide. Providing technical support and dependable delivery and quality, the company serves more than 70,000 customers in more than 65 countries.

The company has shipped 1.15 million development tools and partners with more than 130 global third-party tool manufactures, and it is the only company to support all of its microcontrollers and digital signal controllers under a single integrated development environment known as MPLAB X IDE, which is a free, open source that enables cross-platform development.

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For more information about Microchip Technology’s PIC microcontroller, visit www.microchip.com.