Tag Archives: mike haenel

8313 Latham, WEB

Ryan West Business Park sells for $14.59M

Cassidy Turley announced today that a subsidiary of Cohen Asset Management purchased Ryan West Business Park, a ±242,863 square foot warehouse distribution building at 8313 Latham in Tolleson for $14,591,460 from EG Properties, LLC. Ryan Companies US, Inc’s (Ryan) Real Estate Management group was the asset manager for the seller and will continue to serve as property manager for the buyer. Will Strong, Mike Haenel and Andy Markham, SIOR of Cassidy Turley procured the investment sale transaction, bringing the buyer, Cohen, and the seller together.

“Phoenix’s industrial market continues to attract capital searching for assets with credit tenancy, modern features and a history of being institutionally managed and maintained. Ryan West Business Park fits that description,” according to Will Strong, Vice President with Cassidy Turley’s Industrial Services Group. “Located less than one quarter mile south of I-10, this asset’s location is in the heart of the Southwest Phoenix distribution market and will continue to benefit from strong local labor, improving market fundamentals, and access to the Southwestern U.S.”

Built in 2001 by Ryan, the project was named Ryan West Business Park. Shortly after completion, Ryan was awarded the NAIOP Arizona Industrial Building of the Year for the development which features tilt panel construction, high performance reflective glass, a 30-foot clear height, 59 front-loaded fully-gated and -secured docks/truck wells, 150 feet of truck maneuverability, 17,836 square feet of refrigerator/freezer space and was designed to accommodate future two-story uses.

“Having a strong credit tenant like Circle K in a portion of the building, the ability to lease the remaining 61,713 square feet and projected rental rate growth in this segment made this a strategic acquisition for the buyer,” said Strong.

This is the second acquisition Cassidy Turley has secured for Cohen in 2014 and will be the fifth industrial building purchase in the last seven months by their firm. Cassidy Turley represented them in May for the $29 million purchase of a three-property industrial portfolio, totaling 174,644 square feet and 12.31-acres, from Alliance Commercial Properties.

Cassidy Turley will retain the leasing assignment for the remaining space at the Latham property.

3701 E  University Drive

Cohen purchases industrial portfolio for $29M

Cassidy Turley announced today that Cohen Asset Management purchased a three-property, high-tech industrial portfolio in Phoenix for $29 million from Alliance Commercial Partners (ACP). Will Strong, Mike Haenel and Andy Markham, SIOR of Cassidy Turley procured the investment sale transaction, bringing the buyer, Cohen, and the seller, ACP together.

The portfolio includes three 100% NNN leased state-of-the-art, single tenant high-tech industrial assets totaling ±174,644 square feet and 12.31 acres. The buildings are located at 3601 and 3701 E. University Dr. in Phoenix and 405 W. Geneva Dr. in Tempe, Ariz. Microsemi occupies the 73,729-square-foot building at 3601 E. University, and FlipChip International occupies the adjacent 52,027-square-foot building at 3701 E. University. The 48,908-square-foot Tempe property is occupied by MedPlast. The institutionally maintained and managed three property portfolio of buildings was built between 1996 and 1998.

“All three properties are highly functional, leased long term to quality tenants and are strategically located,” Strong said.

“The high-tech nature of the properties offers exceptional features that include heavy power, abundant parking and the ability for tenants to grow within them. In addition, these assets have a Class A image, are close to an abundance of retail amenities and benefit from an extensive labor pool.”

All three properties are located in mature, established industrial areas, with the two University buildings located in Southbank Business Park that has direct access to Sky Harbor International Airport, Interstate 10, Interstate 17 and Arizona SR-143. The Geneva property is located in the Broadway Industrial Park and has excellent access to I-10 and Arizona SR-143.

NAIOP Arizona's Developing Leaders - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

NAIOP Arizona’s Developing Leaders Pairs Veterans With Young Professionals

NAIOP Arizona’s Developing Leaders mentoring program designed to pair veteran and young CRE professionals to bolster the industry

For a group that has yet to commemorate its first class, NAIOP Arizona’s Developing Leaders mentoring program has some fairly heady goals.

That’s evident by its mission statement:

* To Improve the communities in which we develop, build, and broker commercial real estate;

* To Impact the careers of young real estate professionals through educational development, and exposure to pertinent topics;

* To Instill the knowledge, values, and expertise of today’s industry leaders in developing leaders;

* To Influence the professional growth of developing leaders by fostering valuable long-term relationships with industry peers.

NAIOP Arizona’s Developing Leaders mentoring program is relatively new to the Arizona chapter, although it’s been around for awhile nationally — where it has been successful.

“It was a natural evolution,” Clay Wells, a co-liaison on the NAIOP Arizona board of directors and director of business development at McShane Construction Company, says about implementing a mentoring program. “The first year we were involved with getting our feet wet. The second year we tried to make it grow by working on charitable events.”
Now in its third year, it’s time to get the ball rolling.

“The program will bring the best elements of the entire membership together,” says NAIOP Arizona president and CEO Tim Lawless. “It will create synergy with older more experienced people and younger up-and-coming members.”

The goal is for those in the commercial real estate industry to help provide protégés with insight on how to become successful, says Nate Goldfarb, an associate at CBRE and co-chair of the mentoring program.

The program will be comprised of 10 highly experienced industry professionals as mentors, each paired with two protégés who are existing developing leaders under the age of 35.

Other chapters have had mentoring programs for several years, with those in San Diego and Colorado boasting some of the strongest programs, according to Wells.  “We looked at other chapters and tried to steal the best details,” he says.

Lawless will be involved in the final mentor screening process and says he will be looking for the best and brightest people who are experts in their niche and would bring the most to the table.

Protégés will be selected based on application information and not on personality, says Wells, who is part of the selection committee that is made up of five to six board members.
Initially an email survey was sent out to all developing leader candidates to probe interest and to determine which industries members would like mentors from, Goldfarb says.

“There was a strong response from potential protégés and response from prospective mentors was phenomenal, particularly senior members,” Goldfarb says.

“We’re looking for an Icon,” says Lawless, adding that NAIOP Arizona’s membership has an excellent crop of mentor candidates such as Keith Earnest from RED Development and NAIOP chairman Mike Haenel of Cassidy Turley BRE Commercial.

When protégé and mentor are paired they will meet at least once a month for 10 months.
“There will be a lot of active listening to the mentor who has already walked the path,” Goldfarb says.

The inaugural class function will be held this fall and will be a black tie event, according to Goldfarb.

“We want to make events special for protégés so that they are impressed by the mentor, the program and the events.”

[stextbox id="grey"]For more information about the NAIOP Arizona’s Developing Leaders mentoring program, visit www.naiopaz.org/dl.[/stextbox]

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

Mike Haenel, Chairman, NAIOP - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

NAIOP-AZ Mike Haenel A Major Player In Future Of State's CRE Industry

NAIOP-AZ chairman Mike Haenel a major player in the organization and in the future of state’s CRE industry

For 26 years, Mike Haenel, executive vice president for Cassidy Turley/BRE Commercial Industrial Group, has been successful marketing industrial and back-office land and building space in Arizona.

In the early 1990s, he even did a brief stint in the development side of the business.
Since 2003, Haenel has completed 300-plus deals worth a combined $740M. He also has collected several industry awards along the way.

But Haenel said he couldn’t have achieved these significant accomplishments without his partner, Andy Markham, and the support of Cassidy Turley.

They have been able to close transactions during the good and bad times.

So for more than two decades, he has been an active member of NAIOP — the organization he considers a must for anyone hoping to be a major player in Arizona’s commercial real estate future.

Now as NAIOP Arizona chairman, Haenel gets to set the course for the organization.

It’s a challenging time to be at the helm.

Arizona’s commercial real estate industry, like that of much of the country, is adrift in turbulent waters.

In Arizona, the industrial segment has hit bottom and is slowly heading back into better times, Haenel said.

The Phoenix metro area absorbed 3 MSF of industrial space in 2010, and, with the new Amazon warehouse deal, already surpassed 4 MSF by mid-year 2011.

“There are several large build-to-suits looking in the marketplace, and we expect to exceed 5.5 million square feet (absorbed by year-end),” he says.

But the office market, NAIOP’s other purview, is still foundering with too-high vacancy rates and too low rents.

Still, Haenel offers tempered optimism for that segment going forward.

Office rental rates “showed some stabilization” in second quarter, he says, and that is a hopeful sign.

“If we continue to absorb industrial space as we have for the last 18 months, I see speculative development again within the next three years,” Haenel says. “Clearly, office would be longer.”

NAIOP will be essential for charting a clear course through the still-choppy seas ahead, he adds.

Industry professionals banding together, exercising their combined clout and sharing knowledge and experience, helps them survive the difficult times and prosper when the storm clouds dissipate, Haenel says.

“NAIOP is such a great networking organization,” Haenel says. “It shows how important relationships are especially in a period like this. The relationships you create, nurture and foster help as the market recovers, but help (especially) when the market is as tough as it’s been.”

Haenel said while it’s a rough time for Arizona’s commercial real estate industry, it’s really not so bad sitting in NAIOP’s pilot seat.

The previous chairman, Todd Holzer of Ryan Companies US, and NAIOP Arizona president Tim Lawless, have set so many fruitful programs in motion, Haenel just has to hold the wheel steady, he says.

“I am grateful for the past chairmen and current/past board members who have built the organization to what it is today,” Haenel says.

But he has his own pet programs, too.

Member education, developing the industry’s future leaders and fostering positive public policy, are top focuses for the new chairman. He sees them as the keys not just for his organization, but for the future of Arizona’s commercial real estate industry.

Providing networking events, information sessions, and education opportunities for more than 540 members is so important for fostering relationships and keeping industry pros abreast of issues and concerns that impact their business, he says.

The Arizona chapter’s Market Leader Series, quarterly events that feature small panels of experts on such important local topics as job growth, distressed real estate and the like, has garnered standing- room-only attendance, he says.

This year, local members also get to share with their peers from around the country and showcase their own state’s attributes as Phoenix hosts NAIOP’s annual meeting in October.

Other key strategies for Haenel as he steers the NAIOP ship forward are mentoring and encouraging the next generation of local commercial real estate leaders to ensure the industry remains vital for the short- and long-term future.

“As we continue to get older, we are blessed to have some great young people coming up in the ranks,” he says. And Haenel is determined to indoctrinate them with the importance of his “build relationships” mantra.

He is a big backer of NAIOP’s Developing Leaders program, aimed at the under-35 up-and-comers, and the Arizona chapter’s DL Mentor Program, a new initiative that has been a year in development and has just launched.

Along with continuing education for all members and developing and nurturing the young members, the third leg of Haenel’s stool of NAIOP initiatives aimed at nursing the state’s commercial real estate industry back to health, is influencing public policy.

The group lobbied hard for HB2001, dubbed “the jobs bill,” which has several elements including tax incentives and the new Arizona Commerce Authority to proffer those enticements to businesses looking to expand or relocate. Haenel hopes the new legislation will reinforce Arizona’s image as business-friendly and provide a big lure for new or growing businesses and their commercial real estate needs.

Haenel says NAIOP will continue to pressure the legislature on issues that the organization feels could make Arizona more competitive for any type of businesses, and to educate members on the legal ramifications of any new or proposed bills and clarify why they should care.

His assessment of the local commercial real estate industry’s short-term future is that Arizona has all the right elements to take advantage of the recovery as it gains ground, and, long-term, to grow and prosper.

“Arizona is considered a top-tier commercial real estate community,” Haenel says. “We are so lucky to have the quality of professionals in Arizona to create and develop first-class commercial real estate projects. And that allows us to attract, compete and win high quality jobs.”NAIOP-AZ Chairman Mike Haenel

For more information about NAIOP-AZ and chairman Mike Haenel, visit www.naiop-az.org.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

Commercial Real Estate Industry - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

How Legal Issues Will Affect The Commercial Real Estate Industry Recovery, 2012

How Legal Issues Will Affect The Commercial Real Estate Industry Recovery, 2012

Arizona legislators packed the recent regular session with 357 new bills covering everything from food stamps to firearms.

But barely a handful will directly impact the state’s commercial real estate industry in 2012, and even those not significantly, says Greg Harris of Lewis and Roca LLP.

Still, that doesn’t mean the recent doings of Arizona’s state government, whether dictated by seemingly non-real estate focused laws or budget issues, won’t make a difference to the industry in the coming year, Harris and other local legal experts predict.

The few commercial real estate-related bills which did make it through the recent session were aimed at easing or clarifying municipal regulations and procedures that otherwise could hamper new development, Harris says.

SB1525, which was the latest of a series of laws aimed at limiting development impact fees, and SB1598, which attempts to provide some uniformity in permitting procedures among municipalities, are examples he cited.

Snell & Wilmer partner Ron Messerly adds a few more. SB1166 creates a tax exemption for certain commercial lease structures, and SB1474 has the effect of restructuring insurance requirements on multi-housing projects, Messerly says.

But any or all of those are unlikely to make much of an impact, the lawyers said.

Nor is anything monumental blowing in the wind for the next legislative session.

“There is nothing bright and shiny on the horizon that will have a significant impact on the commercial real estate industry,” Messerly says.

And that is good news, adds David Kreutzberg of Squire, Sanders & Dempsey.

“The legislature was so absorbed with budget problems, it took energy from other issues,” he says.

Kreutzberg, who specializes in hotel real estate, says he was especially pleased that certain  laws which were proposed didn’t pass during the previous session.

He noted a chunk of immigration-related bills that were rejected by the legislature or vetoed by the governor.

“SB1070 was a disaster for the hospitality industry,” Kreutzberg says. “I think the legislature got the message that they were doing injury to the state.”

On another positive note, the legislature’s continued efforts to reform the business property tax structure is a hopeful sign, and the abolishment of the Commerce Department and establishment of the new Arizona Commerce Authority is “promising,” he says.

NAIOP Arizona chairman Mike Haenel echoed Kreutzberg’s concern about revising the tax structure to make Arizona attractive to potential new or expanding businesses.

Haenel says job generators will fuel the future of Arizona’s commercial real estate industry, and HB2001 may have more of an impact on the industry in the coming years than any of the actual real estate-focused bills passed during the recent legislative session.

All those legal issues help establish Arizona’s attractiveness as a place for businesses that might be looking to expand or establish new offices in the state, he said.

A legislative negative, however, is state budget cuts for public schools, Kreutzberg says.

“We’re losing our competitive edge. It’s one of the things that is holding Arizona back,” he says. “The governor and the legislature need to face the fact that it’s a big issue.”

And not all legal issues impacting Arizona’s business growth, and therefore it’s commercial real estate industry, are spawned by the lawmakers.

Harris is concerned less about what the legislature did than what local advocacy groups did or may do to restrict development.

Examples include recent litigation and unfavorable rulings on Phoenix’s incentives for upscale mixed use complex City North, and Glendale’s proposals for saving the Phoenix Coyotes, the centerpiece of the city’s vast commerce cluster.

“Even if you have a project that most think is a good idea, advocacy groups challenging (incentives) may have a chilling effect on investors moving forward,” Harris says.

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For more information about the real estate industry and the firms mentioned in this story, visit the following links:

www.lrlaw.com
www.swlaw.com
www.ssd.com

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AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

NAIOP Roundtable 2011 - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

NAIOP Roundtable 2011

NAIOP Roundtable 2011

The commercial real estate industry is clearly recovering. Companies are absorbing vacant space, build-to-suit development is active and abundant capital is pursuing core real estate. The key question remains, however, how do we compare with the other major markets when it comes to job and population growth?
In short, when will the market justify new development and how will the state and our local commercial real estate industry assist in this effort? To be sure, the future remains bright in Arizona but the recovery will last longer before the next boom.

— Mike Haenel


NAIOP Roundtable Participants KeyNAIOP Roundtable - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

Roundtable Participants

 

1 — SB: Scott Bjerk
President
Bjerk Builders, Inc.

2 — MC: Megan Creecy
Leasing and Development Manager
EJM Development Co.

8 — JD: John DiVall
Senior VP
Liberty Property Trust

MH: Mike Haenel
Executive VP, Industrial Group
Cassidy Turley BRE Commercial
Chairman Profile

6 — TH: Todd Holzer
VP of Development
Ryan Companies US

5 — KM: Keaton Merrell
Principal
Legacy Capital Advisors

7 — BM: Bob Mulhern
Managing Director Greater Phoenix
Colliers International

3 — DW: Deron Webb
Managing Principal
Wentworth Webb & Postal

4 — CW: Clay Wells
Director, Business Development
McShane Construction Co.


Q: What is different in July 2011 in our local commercial real estate industry than a year ago?

BM: The short answer is that the market is stronger, but still burdened by vacancy rates that are high by historical standards, despite being lower than recent peaks. What is decidedly different, however, is that the outlook is considerably brighter than it was a year ago.

Last year at this time, uncertainty was the overriding theme and it plagued the market. The industrial market had posted just one quarter of positive absorption, and it was unclear whether that was a one-time burst in activity or a sign that tenants were more optimistic and the industrial market was beginning to turn a corner. Now we can see that tenant demand for industrial space has been sustained for more than a year, vacancy is tightening, and rents are stabilizing. We are also seeing headline-making announcements from companies such as Amazon and First Solar that not only improve the numbers, but also renew confidence in the market as a whole.

The office market has been slower to bounce back, but it is far more stable today than it was a year ago. A year ago, we were averaging negative net absorption of more than 500,000 SF per quarter, and the vacancy rate was shooting higher. While absorption has been mixed in recent quarters — up one quarter, down the next — the overall vacancy trend is essentially flat. The market hasn’t necessarily started to improve, but it’s no longer in free fall. We’re forecasting slightly positive absorption in the second half of 2011 and then positive absorption of nearly 1 MSF in 2012. We think rents will likely tick lower through the remainder of this year, because the high availability of space will continue to create competition in the marketplace.

MC: Activity is up, but it is still the quintessential “tale of two tenants.” National companies with 200,000 SF+ warehouse requirements are in the market. And, there are definitely more of those types of requirements (including build-to-suits) in the market today than there were last year at this time.

When looking, however, at say deals in the 5,000 SF to 20,000 SF range, there has been an increase in activity, but the regional and local tenants who comprise a large portion of that market segment are still facing a lot of challenges, such as difficulty obtaining financing, and economic uncertainty. These challenges result in a constraint on their ability to expand and the lack of confidence needed to make long term real estate decisions, which is why we are still seeing a number of these tenants in the smaller size ranges wanting only short-term extensions in their current spaces.

TH: I sense that we are now a local real estate industry made up of survivors. The attrition of firms is over for the most part. Those remaining have right sized for this “new normal” that we find ourselves in. Companies in our business have had to make changes in their business plans and doing activities that they did not anticipate 4 to 5 years ago. I think that this transformation has completed where a year ago it was still finding itself.

Q: How would you compare our Metro Phoenix commercial real state market to other major markets throughout the Western U.S.?

BM: At present, the characteristic that best describes the Phoenix commercial real estate market is the vacancy rate, which is among the highest, if not the highest of the major markets in the Western U.S. In the period immediately preceding the recession, development in Phoenix was fairly active, and when the economy cratered and companies slashed payrolls, there was a significant supply/demand imbalance.

The difference between Phoenix and the major California markets — where employment losses were nearly as dramatic as losses here — is that those markets didn’t have nearly as much speculative construction in the pipeline. As a result, vacancies rose in California, but not to the heights that they rose in Phoenix.

The other state that makes for an interesting comparison is Texas, where development has historically been quite active — just like Phoenix. The primary difference between Phoenix and the major Texas markets in the recession and thus far in the recovery is that the Texas markets weren’t hit nearly as hard by job losses during the downturn and the state has led the way with job gains during the recovery.

Looking ahead, the picture brightens significantly. Most forecasts call for Phoenix to rebound favorably once the economic recovery really gains traction nationally. Long-term forecasts call for annual population and employment gains in the 2.5% range, which should be similar to the major Texas markets and far outpace the California markets. This anticipated expansion is the primary source of optimism in the Phoenix market — now we’re just waiting for it to happen.

CW: The Metro Phoenix commercial real estate market has actually fared no worse or better than the other major Western U.S. markets. Retail and office continue to struggle in most markets while industrial vacancies for building over 500,000 SF have started to decrease. Recently a 500,000 SF speculative building broke ground in the Inland Empire and I believe if the economy stays as is we will see a speculative industrial building in Phoenix breaking ground by 3Q 2012. Where the Phoenix market differs from the rest of the Western U.S., with the exception of Las Vegas, is the residential real estate market. Metro Phoenix was too dependent on the residential construction market for creating jobs.

The reason this is so important until we create new jobs to replace these lost jobs, the retail and office sectors will continue to be slow to recover. People have to have a job, which allows them to have diposable income to spend at stores creating a need for new retailers. The same can be said for the office market. Until new companies locate to Metro Phoenix or are created here the need for office space will remain depressed. Most activity we are seeing in the office market are new investors coming to Metro Phoenix and buying distressed properties at a discount. This allows them to quote reduced rents forcing a downward pressure on existing landlords, who must rent space at a loss or lose a tenant. Office markets in some cities that have a more diverse economic base are recovering at a better pace than Metro Phoenix.

MC: While there has been increased activity across the Western U.S., the divergence is in the stage of recovery in primary markets such as the Inland Empire, vs. secondary markets like Phoenix.

The Inland Empire, for example, is one of the strongest industrial markets in the country with vacancy at 6.3%, which is the lowest vacancy rate in 14 quarters. By comparison, Phoenix’s Q2 2011 industrial vacancy rate was 13.9%, which was our 5th consecutive quarterly decline. But, I would say that the steady decline in vacancy we are experiencing here in Phoenix is a positive indicator, and it is only a matter of time before our recovery picks up speed.

NAIOP, AZRE Magazine September/October 2010

NAIOP Roundtable 2010: Q&A With Members of NAIOP

NAIOP Roundtable 2010: Q&A With Members of NAIOP

Members of NAIOP-AZ sat down with AZRE magazine in a roundtable discussion, discussing the state of the local commercial real estate industry.


NAIOP Roundtable 2010NAIOP Roundtable 2010 Participants

NAIOP Roundtable 2010 Participants:

1 — DW: Deron Webb, Managing Principal, Wentworth Webb & Postal5 — BM: Bob Mulhern, Managing Director Greater Phoenix, Colliers International

2 — JB: Jodi Bailey, VP Property Management Services, Transwestern

6 — KR: Kurt Rosene, Senior VP, The Alter Group
3 — WS: William L. Spart, Senior VP & Manager, Middle Market Real Estate, Wells Fargo Bank7 — TH: Todd Holzer, VP of Development, Ryan Companies US
4 — MH: Mike Haenel, Executive VP, Industrial Group, Cassidy Turley/BRE Commercial8 — JD: John DiVall, Senior VP, Liberty Property Trust

Economy

TH: We are more than two years into the so-called “Great Recession.” How much longer will it last? Will Arizona pull out the same time as the rest of the nation? Since the commercial real estate industry is closely tied to the job market, it’s been a bumpy ride.

Q: What is different in July 2010 in our local commercial real estate industry than a year ago?

MH: The two biggest differences today compared to a year ago, are that tenant demand is on the rise and there are limited distressed industrial real estate opportunities available for sale. It’s important to note that, because we have not seen the oversupply of distressed real estate hit the market, values are higher than we thought they would be given the overall market conditions. This has translated into a significant and noticeable increase in tenant demand.

JD: It is marginally better. As part of the Arizona NAIOP, I wish I could say substantially better, but it’s not. There is more activity, but rates are still depressed, and we are now in the summer doldrums. We are clearly experiencing a jobless recovery. With no new construction on the horizon, we should gradually absorb space and improve.

WS: There are more lenders jumping into the market. We are seeing conduit, CMBS, life and other banks. A year ago we did not see much activity.

Q: How would you compare our Metro Phoenix commercial real estate market to other major markets throughout the Western U.S.?

BM: Phoenix’s metro commercial real estate market has been hit harder than most Western cities, with Las Vegas being the exception. At the end of the second quarter Phoenix vacancies for office (29 MSF/22.5%), industrial (41 MSF/17.7%) and retail (28 MSF/13.3%) were all in historically high ranges, and they remain significantly higher than other Western cities such as Denver (6.7% industrial/14.8% office), San Diego (8.7% industrial/16.2% office), and Los Angeles (not including Orange County and the Inland Empire — 5.0% industrial/12.7% office). Most of the basic fundamentals that draw people to the Valley are still in place, but the lack of job growth, coupled with the depressed residential housing market, are continuing to act as detriments to a commercial real estate rebound. Recognizing these realities, it should be noted that multi-family sales, for which purchase financing is available, are very strong, and that foreign investors, especially from Canada, are entering the market and helping create some velocity in the private client sales market.

JB: Phoenix is a very dynamic commercial real estate market with a highly skilled labor force, an abundance of labor because we are a right-to-work state with competitive wages, and reliable, lower cost energy sources for large users. Ultimately, this means that we attract a wide variety of users from semiconductor manufacturers, biotech/life science laboratories, aerospace and Department of Defense manufacturing, as well as back office and data center occupiers of space. Each building occupier has their reasons for choosing Phoenix over other markets, but we find ourselves to be very competitive as compared to other regional markets.

TH: Phoenix is in the infamous Bermuda Triangle of both residential and commercial real estate, which also includes Las Vegas and the Inland Empire of California. Because of the housing market dive, cities in this area went into recession mode before the rest ofthe nation, and the drop in our economy has been greater than most. Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle keep their economy above water due to Pacific Rim trade. Denver has energy and high tech, and Salt Lake City was not overbuilt. Texas has fared well due to energy and the George W. Bush presidency. It will be a long and difficult struggle for Metro Phoenix to pull out of the tough times it finds itself in.

Q: How are the boycotts and state public policies affecting our industry?

BM: I have not heard one comment about the boycott in our offices or from any of our clients, which is an indication to me that the boycotts, though serious issues, do not rank high in the commercial real estate priorities of concern. Shrinking rents and occupancies are a much bigger issue these days.

Regarding public policy, the inability of the federal and state governments to implement policies and programs to stimulate job growth is prolonging our recession. There will not be a jobless recovery so, until jobs are created, our industry is continuing to experience high levels of tumult.

Public policy toward banks is also prolonging our recession as the de-leveraging process is being allowed to be spread over time, preventing the painful, but inevitable total market reset necessary to stabilize the real estate market and allow it to begin to create some positive momentum.

TH: The boycotts are affecting the convention and tourist sector, but I do not believe that they have affected the office and industrial markets here in Arizona. Companies choose to come here due to the ease of doing business and quality of life, not due to our state’s policy on immigration. That being said, our state needs to make job creation and business attraction a primary focus. We need the Legislature and the governor’s office to make jobs our No. 1 priority. I suggest a formal jobs bill from our legislative leadership should come forward that includes a lower tax burden on hiring businesses and commercial property owners.

DW: After the initial national “knee jerk” reaction of higher deficit spending and dubious stimulus policy, leaders underestimated the outcry and we did not do a good job of getting the message out nationally. Projects have been stalled and some major players are taking a wait-and-see attitude. Any time there is substantial disturbance, those active in the market cool.