Tag Archives: monument valley

brand_vignette

Kiehl's Since 1851 Arrives in Scottsdale

The Store

Kiehl’s Since 1851, the venerable New York-based purveyor of fine quality skin and hair care preparations, opened its very first retail store in at Scottsdale Fashion Square. Kiehl’s is proud to offer visitors and the Scottsdale community the opportunity to discover the brand’s efficacious skin, hair and body care products, personalized customer service and 162-year-old heritage.

BB Cream_SPF 50“Scottsdale has long been on our wish list for a new store, and our new space at Scottsdale Fashion Square is the ideal location to fully introduce Kiehl’s to Arizona,” said Chris Salgardo, President, Kiehl’s USA. “Our new store allows us to bring Kiehl’s further into the Southwest and share our New York heritage with a whole new community. Each element of our new store, from the design of the fixtures explaining our skin, hair and body formulations, to the historical photographs, mementos and Kiehl’s icons, helps tell the extensive story of our unique company that began as an old-world apothecary at the corner of 13th Street and Third Avenue in New York’s East Village. From design, to customer service, to the high-performing natural ingredients that are the basis of our products, we did everything possible to bring a modern version of our original store to Scottsdale, and I look forward to introducing our new community to our skin care, our customer service and our story.”

Kiehl’s at Scottsdale Fashion Square mirrors the unique ambiance found in the company’s original New York Flagship, which began as a neighborhood apothecary in 1851. The new store brings a modern New York apothecary to Scottsdale, referencing the company’s original East Village roots and blending vintage and antique apothecary fixtures with a modern neon flare. The interior design advances Kiehl’s longtime commitment to the environment with the use of natural, sustainable materials and energy-efficient light fixtures, while enhancing the overall service experience for Kiehl’s patrons.

Kiehl’s at Scottsdale Fashion Square also utilizes natural, sustainable materials and energy efficient light fixtures – and encourages patrons to recycle Kiehl’s packaging with a specially designed recycling bin, promoted through Kiehl’s Recycle and Be Rewarded! program. The program offers customers the opportunity to return empty Kiehl’s jars, bottles and tubes to the store for recycling, in exchange for complimentary products.
Kiehl’s commitment to education through attentive service is accentuated through a dedicated personal consultation area. The enhanced space provides an opportunity for customer representatives and patrons to converse privately about products best suited for the customer’s individual needs. A separate men’s destination offers specialized educationActivatedSun_LotionSpray_SPF50 tailored to the specific concerns of male patrons.  All customers receive the kind of attentive service for which Kiehl’s is known around the world today. In addition, simple, no-frills packaging allows Kiehl’s to formulate its products with high quantities of the most efficacious natural ingredients available.

Generous sampling through Kiehl’s “try before you buy” program offers the complete Kiehl’s line of skin and hair care for men, women, children and babies with a generous offering of its traditional product samples. To assure its customers always find exactly what they need, Kiehl’s offers a 100% money back guarantee on all purchases, and guarantees that customers will see revitalized skin in 28 days or their money back.
Custom gifting 365 days a year allows customers to create personalized gifts year-round. A Kiehl’s Customer Representative will help the customer assemble a personalized, custom gift box, choosing items based on recipient, theme, ingredient or price, from any and all products in the store.

Design

  • A 6-ft table provides patrons a comfortable station for complimentary Healthy Skin Consultations by Kiehl’s Customer Representatives, which helps them determine the formulas best suited for their personal needs.
  • A  space for specialized shaving and grooming education and demonstrations is designed for men. Specially designed accents such as military-style lockers, black subway tile, and props to demonstrate the perfect shave, bring this relaxing stop to life for Kiehl’s male patrons.
  • Black Nero Marquina marble highlights the shop’s exterior façade, honoring the marble exterior of the original Kiehl’s New York Flagship.
  • Carrera marble tables, counters and trim provide a utilitarian, functional approach.
  • Natural, sustainable materials, such as tabletops made from paperstone, a waterproof material made from 100 % post-consumer recycled paper.
  • Energy-efficient LED lighting illuminates Kiehl’s products in an environmentally friendly way.
  • Reclaimed wood floors and exposed brick walls evoke the old-world quality of Kiehl’s East Village neighborhood.
  • A bronze and crystal chandelier is inspired by the crystal chandeliers that have adorned Kiehl’s Flagship store in NYC for years.
  • A custom-painted motorcycle, an icon of Kiehl’s heritage, will be on permanent display, evocative of the passions and adventurous spirit of Kiehl’s founding family.
  • Antique apothecary glassware and vintage props  reference the company’s early years as a neighborhood apothecary.
  • Vintage photographs and mementos – take customers on an exciting journey through Kiehl’s 162-year history.
  • Pop-art inspired graphics – the late Andy Warhol was a long-time Kiehl’s fan, purchasing Blue Astringent Herbal Lotion in bulk from the Flagship, and special graphics were created in his honor.

About Kiehl’s Since 1851: Kiehl’s was founded as an old-world apothecary in New York’s East Village neighborhood. After years as an ambitious apprentice, John Kiehl purchased the business and began operating under the Kiehl name, serving the burgeoning New York community with unique herbal remedies. In 1921, John Kiehl’s apprentice, Mr. Irving “Doc” Morse, purchased the business and expanded it to a full-service pharmacy, stocking medicines, tinctures, and the first Kiehl’s-branded products. Doc Morse, a pharmacist and herbologist, passed the business on to his son, Aaron, himself a chemist and avid motorcyclist and aviator. Aaron’s daughter, Jami, was raised at Kiehl’s amongst the “family” of employees, who together fostered a tradition of attentive, personalized service for every patron. Over the generations, the Morse family committed Kiehl’s to serving the community uniquely efficacious skin and hair formulations made with the finest natural ingredients in the apothecary tradition.

Store hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.  For more information about Kiehl’s, please visit www.kiehls.com.

168786407

10 Top Arizona Landmarks And Sights

Despite the typical images of a colorless and dry land that the word “desert” brings up in our minds, Arizona has a lot more to offer than varying shades of brown. Arizona landscapes and sights are unique and often breathtaking. They show the long, rich history of Arizona before buildings and people. Here are the 10 top Arizona landmarks and sights that are most eye-catching and jaw-dropping.

Meteor Crater, Winslow

10.

Meteor Crater

It is the world’s best preserved meteor crater, located near Winslow. It is nearly a mile across, 2.4 miles in circumference and over 550 feet deep. The crater was formed approximately 50,000 years ago when a piece of an asteroid traveling at 26,000 miles per hour collided with the Earth.

Grand Canyon

9.

Grand Canyon

Tourists come from around the world to see the magnificent sights of the Grand Canyon. It is one of the natural wonders of the world and proves that with its great size and history. The Grand Canyon spans 277 river miles and is up to 18 miles wide and a mile deep.

Canyon de Chelly

8.

Canyon de Chelly

It is the longest continuously inhabited landscape in North America and provides unique sights to anyone who visits. Besides the visual appeal, this area holds a lot of spiritual and cultural significance. There is architecture, artifacts and rock imagery from the past peoples that will amaze anyone.

Flickr: BethinAZ

7.

Oak Creek Canyon

Located near Flagstaff, Oak Creek Canyon offers spectacular scenes with its colorful rocks and unique formations. It is smaller than the Grand Canyon with a length of 88 miles but is no less breathtaking.

Cathedral Rocks, Sedona

6.

Cathedral Rocks

Cathedral Rocks is located in Sedona, an area known for its unique and often awe-worthy sights. The best view of this sight is along the Red Rock Crossing, where visitors and residents like to hike and enjoy the outdoors. Sedona, and particularly the areas where hiking is most popular, is also known for what people refer to as vortexes that give off a soothing and healing energy.

Monument Valley

5.

Monument Valley

Monument Valley borders northern Arizona and southern Utah in the Navajo Nation’s Monument Valley Park. Its large sandstone buttes are the main attraction of this sight, and they are one of the most photographed landscapes in the world.

North Coyote Butte

4.

The Wave

This amazing sight is located near the Arizona-Utah border in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. A permit from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is required to visit the Wave, but it is well worth it to see this unique Navajo Sandstone in person.

Papago Park

3.

Papago Park’s Hole-in-the-Rock

This unique sight is closer to home for many Phoenix area residents and far more accessible. Climbing up into one of the series of holes in this hill of red, arkosic conglomerate sandstone gives you a wonderful view of the park and surrounding area.

Corkscrew Canyon

2.

Corkscrew Canyon

This incredible sight is hidden away, just outside of Page, AZ. The only way to get to it is to take one of the tour shuttles that leaves from Page, but once you’re there you know the trip was worth it. You’re surrounded by winding sandstone as soon as you enter, and when the sunlight shines through just right, this sight is very breathtaking.

Flickr: Coconino National Forest

1.

Bell Rock Pathway

Along the Bell Rock Pathway — a hiking trail in Sedona — is an amazing view of the landscape which includes Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte. At the right time of the year, you can see just how green Arizona can get and the remarkable contrast of the red soil, as shown above.

Top 5: Arizona Parks & Monuments, Experience AZ, Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Arizona Parks & Monuments (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Arizona Parks & Monuments — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Montezuma Castle National Monument

P.O. Box 219,
Camp Verde, AZ 86322
(928) 567-3322
nps.gov/moca
An enduring legacy of the prehistoric Sinagua. The 20-room stone, timber and adobe dwelling is 80 percent intact, making it one of the best-preserved cliff dwellings in the United States.


Petrified Forest National Park

1 Park Rd.,
Petrified Forest, AZ 86028
(928) 524-6228
nps.gov/pefo
History speaks volumes as you take in the spectacular scenery in the land where the surroundings have aged for 225 million years, turning wood into stone. The park is located in northeast Arizona, and features one of the world’s largest and most colorful concentrations of petrified wood.


Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

10 Organ Pipe Dr.,
Ajo, AZ 85321
(520) 387-6849
nps.gov/orpi
The monument exhibits an extraordinary collection of plants of the Sonoran Desert, including the organ pipe cactus, a large cactus rarely found in the U.S.


Saguaro National Park East

3693 S. Old Spanish Tr.,
Tucson, AZ 85743
(520) 733-5158
nps.gov/sagu
With districts skirting the east and west boundaries of Tucson, this national park is home to the most recognizable cactus in the world — the saguaro.


Monument Valley

Bldg. 36A E. Hwy. 264 at Rt. 12,
Window Rock, AZ 86515
navajonationparks.org
This great valley boasts sandstone masterpieces that tower at heights of 400 to 1,000 feet, framed by scenic clouds casting shadows that graciously roam the desert floor. The angle of the sun accents these
graceful formations, providing scenery that is simply spellbinding.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

Top 5 Arizona Monuments & Parks (Spring-Summer 2012)

Top 5: Arizona Monuments & Parks (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Arizona Monuments & Parks — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Montezuma Castle National Monument

P.O. Box 219,
Camp Verde, AZ 86322
928-567-3322
nps.gov/moca
An enduring legacy of the prehistoric Sinagua. The 20-room stone, timber and adobe dwelling is 80 percent intact, making it one of the best preserved cliff dwellings in the U.S.


Monument Valley

Bldg. 36A E. Hwy. 264 at Route 12
Window Rock, AZ 86515
navajonationparks.org/htm/monumentvalley.htm
This great valley boasts sandstone masterpieces that tower at heights of 400 to 1,000 feet, framed by scenic clouds casting shadows that graciously roam the desert floor. The angle of the sun accents these graceful formations, providing scenery that is simply spellbinding.


Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument

10 Organ Pipe Dr.,
Ajo, AZ 85321
520-387-6849
The monument exhibits an extraordinary collection of plants of the Sonoran Desert, including the organ pipe cactus, a large cactus rarely found in the U.S.


Petrified Forest National Park

1 Park Rd.,
Petrified Forest, AZ 86028
928-524-6228
nps.gov/pefo
History speaks volumes as you take in the spectacular scenery in the land where the surroundings have aged for 225 million years, turning wood into stone. The park is located in Northeast Arizona, and features one of the world’s largest and most colorful concentrations of petrified wood.


Saguaro National Park East

3693 S. Old Spanish Tr.,
Tucson, AZ 85743
520-733-5158
nps.gov/sagu
With districts skirting the east and west boundaries of Tucson, this national park is home to the most recognizable cactus in the world — the saguaro.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012

Monument valley, four corners, az utah

Monument Valley

Countless photographs, paintings and movies filmed in this area have made the towering sandstone buttes of Monument Valley a universally recognized symbol of the majestic natural beauty of the American West.

Wind and water carved away most of a vast layer of rock that once covered this area of northern Arizona and southern Utah, leaving massive vertical slabs of rock as testaments to the vast power of erosion.

A close look at the buttes reveals three layers of different rock, a record of the area’s geologic history. Shale forms the base, followed by sandstone in the middle and another stratum of shale on top. The landscape owes its rich, red color to the iron oxide in the rock and soil.

Aside from natural beauty, Monument Valley offers a cultural experience as well. The rocks are host to pueblos and rock art created centuries ago by the Anasazi people.

First-time visitors will likely feel as though they have been to this landscape before — a small wonder given its major presence in American media.

John Ford shot many of his Westerns here, even ones not set in Arizona or Utah. Forrest Gump ended his cross-country tour here on U.S. Route 163, and Marlboro used the area in advertisements as the home of their Marlboro Man.

You can get close enough to the buttes for a stunning panorama just by taking U.S. Route 163, the only major road leading to the area. For a small fee, one can travel the smaller dirt roads that lead to the rest of the valley.

One should also keep in mind that the site is on land owned by the Navajo Nation and is therefore under the jurisdiction of that reservation.

For more information on visiting, please call the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park at (435) 727-5874 or visit www.navajonationparks.org.

centennial top10

10 Top Arizona Landmarks And Sights

10 Top Arizona Landmarks And Sights

Despite the typical images of a colorless and dry land that the word “desert” brings up in our minds, Arizona has a lot more to offer than varying shades of brown. Arizona landscapes and sights are unique and often breathtaking. They show the long, rich history of Arizona before buildings and people. Here are the 10 top Arizona landmarks and sights that are most eye-catching and jaw-dropping.

Meteor Crater, Winslow

10.

Meteor Crater

It is the world’s best preserved meteor crater, located near Winslow. It is nearly a mile across, 2.4 miles in circumference and over 550 feet deep. The crater was formed approximately 50,000 years ago when a piece of an asteroid traveling at 26,000 miles per hour collided with the Earth.

Grand Canyon

9.

Grand Canyon

Tourists come from around the world to see the magnificent sights of the Grand Canyon. It is one of the natural wonders of the world and proves that with its great size and history. The Grand Canyon spans 277 river miles and is up to 18 miles wide and a mile deep.

Canyon de Chelly

8.

Canyon de Chelly

It is the longest continuously inhabited landscape in North America and provides unique sights to anyone who visits. Besides the visual appeal, this area holds a lot of spiritual and cultural significance. There is architecture, artifacts and rock imagery from the past peoples that will amaze anyone.

Flickr: BethinAZ

7.

Oak Creek Canyon

Located near Flagstaff, Oak Creek Canyon offers spectacular scenes with its colorful rocks and unique formations. It is smaller than the Grand Canyon with a length of 88 miles but is no less breathtaking.

Cathedral Rocks, Sedona

6.

Cathedral Rocks

Cathedral Rocks is located in Sedona, an area known for its unique and often awe-worthy sights. The best view of this sight is along the Red Rock Crossing, where visitors and residents like to hike and enjoy the outdoors. Sedona, and particularly the areas where hiking is most popular, is also known for what people refer to as vortexes that give off a soothing and healing energy.

Monument Valley

5.

Monument Valley

Monument Valley borders northern Arizona and southern Utah in the Navajo Nation’s Monument Valley Park. Its large sandstone buttes are the main attraction of this sight, and they are one of the most photographed landscapes in the world.

North Coyote Butte

4.

The Wave

This amazing sight is located near the Arizona-Utah border in the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. A permit from the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is required to visit the Wave, but it is well worth it to see this unique Navajo Sandstone in person.

Papago Park

3.

Papago Park’s Hole-in-the-Rock

This unique sight is closer to home for many Phoenix area residents and far more accessible. Climbing up into one of the series of holes in this hill of red, arkosic conglomerate sandstone gives you a wonderful view of the park and surrounding area.

Corkscrew Canyon

2.

Corkscrew Canyon

This incredible sight is hidden away, just outside of Page, AZ. The only way to get to it is to take one of the tour shuttles that leaves from Page, but once you’re there you know the trip was worth it. You’re surrounded by winding sandstone as soon as you enter, and when the sunlight shines through just right, this sight is very breathtaking.

Flickr: Coconino National Forest

1.

Bell Rock Pathway

Along the Bell Rock Pathway — a hiking trail in Sedona — is an amazing view of the landscape which includes Bell Rock and Courthouse Butte. At the right time of the year, you can see just how green Arizona can get and the remarkable contrast of the red soil, as shown above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A doctor in New York City writes an article for the Youngstown Vindicator about how climate may affect health. Those diagnosed with illnesses such as tuberculosis, began migrating to Arizona in the 1900’s and it has since been known as the ideal climate for many illnesses and conditions.

Monument Valley in Arizona, part of the Arizona Office of Tourism's new marketing campaign - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Arizona Launches Innovative Media Campaign To Bring Back Tourists

Arizona has gotten a bad rap as of late, with the added national backlash from the passage of SB 1070 making it even tougher for the state to climb out of the recession. But the Arizona Office of Tourism is fighting back, and it has only one word for you — monumental.

It’s part of the Arizona Office of Tourism’s “In One Word — Arizona” marketing campaign that launched Nov. 8. The campaign couples iconic images of Arizona with one word describing the image. Bet you can guess which image is paired with “grand.”

The campaign’s eight images, ranging from the Grand Canyon and Monument Valley to Sedona and Flagstaff’s distinctive terrains, will run from November 2010 to May 2011 primarily in Chicago and Los Angeles, the two major markets for Arizona tourism.

This campaign features traditional print, TV and radio ads, but also includes innovative strategies, such as video-on-demand, “wallscapes” on buildings in Chicago and Los Angeles, and versions of the ads appearing on the print-out boarding passes of eight major airlines.

The advertising is “layered to continue to drive home the wonders and the diversity of Arizona,” says Sherry Henry, director of the Arizona Office of Tourism.

Spreading the message of Arizona’s allure is not limited to the Hollywood Hills and Chicago’s Magnificent Mile. An extensive digital media campaign also will run in San Francisco, Denver, New York City and other major markets, as well as Mexico and Canada.

But the biggest accomplishment of AOT’s new campaign is the fact that despite intense budget cuts that practically erased the marketing budget, the campaign is forging ahead, focused on bringing in much-needed tourism to the state.

The state Legislature removed revenue from the tourism formula from AOT’s budget and placed it in the general fund. Because of this shift, the AOT will receive approximately $14 million less in the 2011 fiscal year than it received in the 2010 fiscal year.

“We have this budget, and we are going to make this budget stand like it is 10 times what we have,” Henry says, adding that AOT’s mission is “to use the dollars we do have to drive as much revenue as we can.”

The budget stress isn’t the only issue facing Arizona’s tourism industry. The recession, which caused the budget decrease, is the No. 1 issue, Henry says. The swine flu epidemic of 2009 hurt, as well as the “AIG effect,” in which big businesses cut down on holding corporate meetings at resorts. Then, boycotts from the passage of SB 1070 gave a further beating to an already crippled industry.

However, Henry says Arizona’s tourism is going to surge back because of the state’s well-established image and the strong partnerships within the tourism industry.

“The branding of Arizona hasn’t changed,” Henry says. “There are some misconceptions of what’s happening here, but it hasn’t really affected the Arizona we all know and love.”

AOT has partnered with local convention and visitor bureaus and the Arizona Tourism Alliance to reach the group-and-meeting tourism market. The relationships between all sectors of Arizona’s tourism industry are “stronger than any other state we know of,” Henry says.

Although 2009 saw a 10.2 percent decrease in travel expenditures and a 2.1 million decrease in overnight visitors, 35.3 million visitors still made Arizona their destination of choice.

Statistics show that in 2010, top-of-the-line leisure traveler numbers are up, Henry says. AOT identifies leisure travelers as Arizona’s target visitor.

“We’re finally beginning to see it creep up again,” Henry says of visitor numbers.




Arizona Office of Tourism's new campaign

Images courtesy of the Arizona Office of Tourism




AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011