Tag Archives: Mountainside Fitness

awards

Industry Leaders of Arizona take spotlight

Az Business magazine is proud to present the Industry Leaders of Arizona (ILoA) Awards, which recognize  the contributions and impact of Arizona‐based companies in five key industries — commercial real estate, education, entertainment, manufacturing and technology. The 30 finalists for this year’s ILoA Awards are profiled on the following pages. Winners will be recognized at the awards dinner that will be held Thursday, February 6 at The Ritz Carlton, Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks
Leadership: Derrick Hall, CEO; Tom Harris, CFO
Address: 401 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: dbacks.com
What they do: The Diamondbacks strive to provide industry-leading entertainment in a family-friendly environment while making a positive impact on its fans and civic partners.
How they lead: The team offers the lowest Fan Cost Index in Major League Baseball. In the community, the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation and the D-backs’ organization have surpassed the $33 million mark in charitable giving since their inception in 1998. The unique corporate culture of the D-backs led Yahoo! to deem the club as “the best workplace in sports.”

Arizona Summit Law School
Leadership: Scott Thompson, president; Shirley Mays, dean
Address: One N. Central Ave., Phoenix
Website: azsummitlaw.edu
What they do: The American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school offers traditional and non-traditional law students the opportunity to succeed through its student-focused curriculum and highly engaged faculty.
How they lead: The practice-ready curriculum equips graduates with the practical skills and ethical instruction, leadership, management and interpersonal skills necessary for career success. The school accommodates students’ diverse needs with options including full-time and part-time day and evening classes; trimester schedule for graduation in two years; and individualized bar-pass instruction through learning diagnostics and mentoring; and experiential learning opportunities via externships, internships and clinics.

Caliente Construction Inc
Leadership: Lorraine Bergman, CEO
Address: 242 S. El Dorado Circle, Mesa
Website: calienteconstruction.com
What they do: Caliente, founded in Arizona in 1991, is a female-owned commercial general contractor that provides construction management services tailored to meet the distinctive needs of its diverse clientele.
How they lead: By embracing the latest technology, Caliente is known as the contractor who can meet the challenge of any type of construction project. This has strengthened its industry position and given Caliente a competitive edge. Caliente has also shown continued growth.  In 2006, revenues were $23,500,000 with 30 employees. Today, revenues exceed $57,000,000 and Caliente employs 81.

Casino Del Sol Resort, Spa and Conference Center
Leadership: Jim Burns, CEO
Address: 5655 W. Valencia Rd., Tucson
Website: casinodelsol.com
What they do: Casino Del Sol Resort encompasses a spa, conference center, five award-winning restaurants, Sewailo Golf Course, Anselmo Valencia Tori Ampitheater, a 5,000-seat open-air concert venue and the Del Sol Marketplace, which includes a gas sttation, car wash, convenience store and smoke shop.
How they lead: In less than two years since opening its $100 million expansion, Casino Del Sol has earned a AAA Four Diamond designation and is the state’s only casino resort to earn the coveted Forbes Four-Star Award for its hotel and spa.

Entrepix, Inc.
Leadership: Tim Tobin, CEO; David Husband, CFO
Address: 4717 E. Hilton Ave., #200, Phoenix
Website: entrepix.com
What they do: Entrepix re-manufactures semiconductor fabrication equipment and develops products and services to significantly extend the lifespan of semiconductor manufacturing technology.
How they lead: Entrepix’ is defining a new class of supplier to the semiconductor industry —  a “technology renewal partner” — and has become the third-party leader in this space.  It launched the first ever foundry process center supporting remanufactured equipment.  The company was spotlighted for this on the cover of the industry’s largest publication, Semiconductor International, whose cover is normally occupied by game-changing innovations from companies such as Intel and Applied Materials.

FlipChip International
Leadership: David Wilkie, CEO; Gordon Parnell, CFO
Address: 3701 E. University Dr., Phoenix
Website: flipchip.com
What they do: FlipChip International is a leading supplier of wafer level packaging technologies to a diverse global customer base in the semiconductor industry.
How they lead: FlipChip was founded in 1996 by industry leaders in automotive technology and semiconductor integrated circuit assembly. Their strategy was primarily developing and licensing the technology. After new owners took over in 2004, manufacturing was expanded and new technologies were introduced. Today, FlipChip’s technologies can be found in a wide range of products in consumer, medical, industrial and automotive applications.

FNF Construction, Inc.
Leadership: Jed S. Billings, CEO; David James, CFO
Address: 115 S. 48th St., Tempe
Website: fnfinc.com
What they do: FNF provides heavy-highway construction and general engineering work, both as a general contractor, subcontractor and manufacturer/producer of aggregate and asphalt rubber binder.
How they lead: FNF’s ability to self-perform much of the work on its contracts allows the company to better manage and support its subcontractors and keep projects on schedule.  FNF supports its personnel with state-of-the-art equipment and in-house technical support which keep its workers safe and guides and educates employees on FNF’s innovative construction methods.

GlobalTranz
Leadership: Andrew Leto, CEO; Greg Roeper, CFO
Address: 5415 E. High St., #460, Phoenix
Website: globaltranz.com
What they do: GlobalTranz is a privately held, Phoenix-based logistics company specializing in freight management services, including less-than-truckload shipping, full truckload, supply chain management and domestic air/expedited shipping.
How they lead: By focusing on innovative technology, GlobalTranz optimizes the flow and storage of merchandise as the goods move within and throughout the customers’ supply chain. GlobalTranz has been recongnized as one of the fastest-growing companies in the country with annual sales of over $200 million. Globaltranz has doubled its revenue every year since its inception in 2003.

Grand Canyon University
Leadership: Brian Mueller, president and CEO; Dan Bachus, CFO
Address: 3300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Website: gcu.edu
What they do: GCU is a private Christian university that has graduated some of the Southwest’s best-prepared teachers, nurses and fine arts professionals.
How they lead: What was once a small, struggling university has come into its own as a world-class liberal arts institution. When escalating tuition made higher education nearly impossible for some students, GCU built a financial model that made earning a degree attainable and affordable. The model does not rely on taxpayer subsidies, yet keeps costs about two-thirds less than most private universities and lower than many public schools.

Great Hearts Academies
Leadership: Daniel Scoggin, CEO; Ward Huseth, CFO
Address: 3102 N. 56th St., #300, Phoenix
Website: greatheartsaz.org
What they do: Great Hearts Academies is a non-profit network of public charter schools dedicated to improving education in the Phoenix metropolitan area by developing a network of excelling preparatory academies.
How they lead: Great Hearts Academies has a 95 percent college placement rate, including many prestigious colleges and universities around the country. Students have an average SAT score of 1836 and ACT score of 27.4, which is 20 percent above the national average and higher than many private schools.

IDentity Theft 911
Leadership: Matt Cullina, CEO; Sean Daly, CFO
Address: 7580 N. Dobson Rd., Scottsdale
Website: idt911.com
What they do: IDentity Theft 911 is a provider of identity management solutions, identity theft recovery services, breach services and data risk management solutions. The company works with insurance carriers to provide identity theft services to individual personal lines policyholders and crisis data-breach services for commercial insurance policyholders.
How they lead: Founded in 2003, IDentity Theft 911 is a premier consultative provider of identity and data risk management, resolution and education services. The company serves 17.5 million households across the country and provides fraud solutions for a range of organizations.

Integrate
Leadership: Hart Cunningham, CEO; David Tomizuka, CFO
Address: 4900 N. Scottsdale Rd., #4000, Scottsdale
Website: integrate.com
What they do: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology platform—combining ad-serving tech and analytics, a paid media marketplace and full suite of marketing services.
How they lead: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology provider to empower marketers and media buyers to plan, launch, analyze and optimize campaigns across performance, programmatic and traditional media. The Integrate AdHQ platform offers an end-to-end solution that supports the entire lifecycle of paid media campaigns in one intuitive dashboard.

Ipro Tech, Inc.
Leadership: Kim Taylor, president and COO; Bret Lawson, CFO
Address: 6811 E. Mayo Blvd., #350, Phoenix
Website: iprotech.com
What they do: Founded in 1989, Ipro is a global leader in the development of advanced software solutions used by legal professionals to streamline the electronic discovery process.
How they lead: Ipro pioneered the development of electronic discovery technology in 1989, when savings and loan scandals led to an abundance of paper documents needing immediate legal review. Ipro developed customized technology that greatly improved the process and speed in which litigation document collections could be produced and helped to establish the litigation technology industry as we know it today.

Jokake Construction Services, Inc.
Leadership: Casey Cartier, CEO; Dave Miller, CFO
Address: 5013 E. Washington St., #100, Phoenix
Website: jokake.com
What they do: Jokake is a full-service real estate solutions provider founded on delivering exceptional construction experiences through ground-up, renovation and tenant improvement construction for public and private clients.
How they lead: In June, Jokake launched its 30th anniversary celebration with a commitment to complete 30 community service projects in 12 months — one project for each year in business. Since the initial announcement, Jokake’s employees have advocated for great causes, most of which are with nonprofits that they have been personally invested in for many years.

Laser Options, LLC
Leadership: Jeffrey Masters, CEO
Address: 3758 E. Grove St., Phoenix
Website: laseroptions.com
What they do: Laser Options sells new and refurbished multi-function printers/copiers, provides managed print services to its clients and is a leading re-manufacturer of laser print cartridges.
How they lead: Since starting in 1993 as a re-manufacturer of laser printer cartridges and HP printer service, Laser Options has transformed itself into a full-service business technology organization. Since inception, Laser Options has put into place sustainability practices. Whether it is its manufacturing and recycling process, the cars it uses or the vendors it partners with, customers know they are “going green.”

MicroAge
Leadership: Jeff McKeever, CEO; Roger Rouse, CFO
Address: 8160 S. Hardy Dr., Tempe
Website: microage.com
What they do: MicroAge is a leading provider of technology products and services. They serve customers from the data center to the desktop with computer products from industry-leading manufacturers.
How they lead: MicroAge’s tech-savvy account executives are experts at assisting clients with selecting information technology solutions that best meet their unique requirements. MicroAge possesses a vast sourcing capability which enables us to deliver on the most challenging of procurement requests.  MicroAge continues to be a well-known name and a respected industry pioneer with a heritage of industry innovation spanning five decades.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
Leadership: Steve Sanghi, CEO; Eric Bjornholt , CFO
Address: 2355 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler
Website: microchip.com
What they do: Microchip Technology Inc. is a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions for thousands of diverse applications worldwide.
How they lead: Microchip is the semiconductor industry’s greatest Cinderella Story, having come a long way since its humble beginnings as a failing spinoff of General Instrument in 1989. Over that time, Microchip has had the most successful IPO of 1993, achieved the No. 1 ranking in 8-bit microcontrollers in 2002 and recorded its 91st consecutive quarter of profitability in June 2013.

Mountainside Fitness
Leadership: Tom Hatten, president; William Malkovich, CEO; Tracy Taylor, CFO
Address: 1230 W. Washington St., #111, Tempe
Website: mountainsidefitness.com
What they do: Mountainside Fitness is the largest locally owned health club in Arizona, striving to help its members incorporate exercise into their lifestyle.
How they lead: With 10 locations, including the newest location inside Chase Field, the fitness center provides more than 950 jobs. The company has experienced a 41 percent growth within the last three years, including employee growth of approximately 400. The expansion placed Mountainside among the recipients of the 2012 Inc. Hire Power Awards as one of the Top 10 private business job creators in the state of Arizona.

Phoenix Children’s Academy
Leadership: Doug MacKay, CEO; Paul Malek, CFO
Address: 8767 E. Via de Ventura, #240, Scottsdale
Website: pcafamilyofschools.com
What they do: Phoenix Children’s Academy operates a national network of 111 private schools, including preschools, elementary schools and middle schools in 15 states serving approximately 16,000 students.
How they lead: PCA is the sixth-largest company in its industry in the U.S. and the largest headquartered in Arizona. By developing centralized support functions to take the majority of the administrative burden away from its schools, PCA teachers and principals have more time to spend with children and parents. This has enabled PCA to tailor its educational services to the individual needs of the child.

Phoenix Suns
Leadership: Jason Rowley, president; Jim Pitman, CFO
Address: 201 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: suns.com
What they do: The Suns provide the finest in Arizona sports, entertainment and community leadership by striving to create sustained success on and off the court.
How they lead: Between offering a first-rate fan experience, giving back to Arizona children and families in need, and staying at the forefront of technology and innovation, the Suns have served as Arizona’s professional sports leader since our 1968 inception. Each year, Suns players and alumni make more than 1,000 community appearances and the Phoenix Suns Charities contributes more than $1 million annually to more than 125 local nonprofit organizations.

Rigid Industries LED Lighting
Leadership: Jason Christiansen, CEO; Seth Anderson, CFO
Address: 779 N. Colorado St., Gilbert
Website: rigidindustries.com
What they do: Rigid Industries’ patented Hybrid and Specter optics and forward projecting LED lighting and quality products are designed, engineered, and assembled in the United States.
How they lead: Rigid Industries recently ranked 150th on Inc. 500 magazines’ Fastest Growing Companies list for 2013. Additionally, Rigid leads the industry as the fastest-growing LED lighting manufacturer and the fifth-fastest-growing in overall manufacturing in the U.S., proving to be one of the most innovative companies of 2013. From 2009-2012, Rigid experienced an exponential growth rate of 2,528 percent.

Scottsdale Golf Group
Leadership: Shelby Futch, CEO
Address: 6210 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa
Website: scottsdalegolfgroup.com
What they do: Scottsdale Golf Group owns and manages four public and three private golf courses. Futch founded the John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies, with 12 locations across the USA and Canadian locations coming soon. John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies is one of the oldest continuous  golf schools in the U.S. with more than 500,000 students instructed.
How they lead: Scottsdale Golf Group’s state-of-the-art teaching facilities utilize the finest computerized swing analysis equipment. Under the guidance of golf industry expert Futch, Scottsdale Golf Group has grown from the undisputed leader in golf instruction to become a master of club operations, management, and consumer marketing services as well.

Speedie & Associates, Inc.
Leadership: Gregg A. Creaser, CEO; Brett P. Creaser, CFO
Address: 3331 E. Wood St., Phoenix
Website: speedie.net
What they do: Speedie & Associates is a consulting engineering firm that specializes in geotechnical, environmental and construction materials testing and special structural inspection services.
How they lead: From its inception 33 years ago, Speedie & Associates has embraced and maintained a philosophy of providing a superior level of customer service to every one of its clients. The firm believes that listening to its clients, hearing the essence of what they’re saying, and fully understanding their expectations are the most important first steps in providing a superior service experience.

STORE Capital
Leadership: Morton H. Fleischer, chairman; Christopher H. Volk, president and CEO; Catherine Long, CFO
Address: 8501 E Princess Dr, Scottsdale
Website: storecapital.com
What they do: STORE Capital (the name stands for Single Tenant Operational Real Estate) is a leading provider of real estate lease capital for real estate intensive middle-market companies.
How they lead: STORE acquires customers’ commercial real estate they use to generate their profits and lease it back to them in a sale/leaseback transaction.  A real estate lease is not just a debt financing substitute for customers, but it’s both a debt and equity substitute, while also offering reduced monthly payments. This makes them less bank-dependent and more entrepreneurial, creating more efficient capitalization.

Sun Orchard™ Juicery
Leadership: Marc Isaacs, CEO; Jeff Anthony, CFO
Address: 1198 W. Fairmont Dr., Tempe
Website: SunOrchard.com
What they do: Sun Orchard™ is a national craft juice company offering an unmatched selection of exceptional juice products to food service businesses of all shapes and sizes.
How they lead: Sun Orchard built its business on freshness, taste, quality, people and being one step ahead. Sun Orchard’s family of experts’ tree-to-table mastery allows it to quickly turn emerging trends into cutting-edge juice products, giving its customers a quick-to-menu advantage and back-of-house efficiencies. Sun Orchard continues to work closely with its customers to help grow their businesses.

Synergis Education, Inc.
Leadership: Norm Allgood, CEO; Scott Wenhold, CFO
Address: 1820 E Ray Rd., Chandler
Website: synergiseducation.com
What they do: Synergis Education is a premium, full-service provider of educational services designed for college and university leaders who are not satisfied with the status quo.
How they lead: Synergis Education assists its partner institutions in gaining regional prominence, enrollment growth, and overall sustainability through continual improvement and best practices. Synergis is unique among education services providers in that it is positioned to work with the entire adult higher education market, remaining agnostic as to the delivery methods (online, face-to-face, blended, etc.).

University of Advancing Technology
Leadership: Jason Pistillo, CEO; Erika Garney, CFO
Address: 2625 W. Baseline Rd., Tempe
Website: uat.edu
What they do: University of Advancing Technology (UAT) is the technophile’s college experience — a community uniquely suited to provide students passionate about technology an ideal place to live and grow.
How they lead: UAT students graduate to become technological mavens, cyber warriors, elite game designers and advanced computer scientists. The university’s commitment extends far beyond its student body. UAT hosts a myriad of on-campus events, including the annual Avnet Tech Games, The Leonardo da Vinci Society for the Study of Thinking and many other various user groups.

WebPT
Leadership: Brad Jannenga, chairman, president and CTO; Paul Winandy, CEO; Jacob Findlay, CFO
Address: 605 E. Grant St., #200, Phoenix
Website: webpt.com
What they do: WebPT is the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) and practice management solution for physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists.
How they lead: By creating an affordable, intuitive, and technologically sound cloud-based electronic EMR solution for rehabilitation therapists — practitioners excluded from the government’s meaningful use incentive under the HITECH Act — WebPT brought all the benefits of EMR to small, private therapy practices that would have otherwise fallen behind. WebPT has helped more than 24,000 therapists adopt EMR since 2008.

Wespac Construction, Inc.
Leadership: John Largay, CEO; Don Mann, CFO
Address: 9440 N. 26th St., #100, Phoenix
Website: wespacaz.com
What they do: Wespac is a commercial general contracting and construction management firm, offering a range of pre-construction and construction services in a variety of market sectors.
How they lead: Wespac has developed a specific system of project management tools to successfully complete the job. This comprehensive process is Wespac’s Systematic Building Approach™ (SBA™). The SBA™ is Wespac’s process to ensure constant communication, dedication, coordination and planning. Utilizing the SBA™, the team is able to ensure timely procurement of materials and equipment, keeping the build-out on track.

Wilson Electric Services Corp.
Leadership: Wes McClure, president; Todd Klimas, COO; Terry Oakes, CFO
Address: 600 E. Gilbert Dr., Tempe
Website: wilsonelectric.net
What they do: Wilson Electric is the Southwest’s leading, single-source provider of total facility solutions, including commercial construction, solar, and operations technology.
How they lead: Wilson Electric invests in each employee-owner’s success through a rigorous, in-depth corporate training program. The program begins with new hire orientation and continues throughout employment, blending in-house resources with industry experts. Topics range from effective project management and safety procedures to manufacturer certifications. Because of this, Wilson’s safety record is one of the best in the state.

Justine-Bayless

Generation Next: CEOs

Justin Bayless always planned to be CEO of his father’s healthcare company. He just wasn’t prepared to take charge so soon.

“The plan was for me to become CEO at age 30,” Bayless says, “but that was fast-tracked when my father had a nearly fatal heart attack.”

In 2010, at the tender age of 26, Bayless assumed leadership of Bayless Healthcare Group, the integrated healthcare company that his father, Dr. Michael Brad Bayless, founded in 1982, before its current CEO was even born.

“That succession plan that was supposed to be worked on and put together was fast tracked,” Bayless says.

That was nothing new for Bayless, who has always been of the fast track. He started his professional career by accompanying his father to work from the time he was 9 years old. He attended Morehouse College on a presidential academic scholarship and went to work after college as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley in New York City, where developed capital market solutions to mitigate strategic, operational, credit, and market risks. Bayless helped raise more than $1.7 billion dollars in equity financing for Einstein Noah, Fresh Del Monte, Burger King, Hanes Brand, Range Fuels, and many other companies.

He returned to work at Bayless Healthcare in 2008 as vice president and CFO before his father’s health crisis forced him to step into the role of CEO.

“I lead by example,” Bayless says. “I was mentored by someone who taught me that perception is often reality. So even though I come at healthcare from the business side, I have learned to understand what goes on in our healthcare workers’ world and how to speak their clinical language so I can foster those relationships, which has helped our clinicians understand the business side.”

While unifying the fragmented worlds of business and healthcare workers and getting them on the same page is a major accomplishment, Bayless has a greater goal.

“I want to help people understand how integrated health benefits patients and clinicians,” he says. “All of our innovation is done for one thing: to improve value for patient and providers. Most companies have their mission statements hanging on the wall. We try to live ours.”
Lubna Ahmad, 29
President and CEO
Invoy Technologies
Ahmad has spent nearly a decade innovating and developing medical devices with an emphasis on biosensor technologies. In 2008, she founded Invoy, which is engaged in the development and commercialization of breath analysis devices for a broad range of applications. Invoy plans to offer patients the ability to monitor their health with a prescription-based breath analysis device.

Billy Malkovich, 34
CEO
Mountainside Fitness
mountainsidefitness.com
Over the course of 12 years, Malkovich has worked his way up from front desk attendant and personal trainer at Mountainside to CEO. He helped lead the company through the economic downturn to where it stands today at $30 million in revenue, 10 locations and nearly 1,000 people employed in Arizona.

Jamie Fletcher, 30
CEO
Mach 1 Global Services
mach1air.com
After graduating from ASU, Fletcher founded Mach 1 Global Services, an international and domestic freight forwarder that offers a full portfolio of transportation, logistics and supply chain services via air, ocean and ground. Mach 1 has more than 30 offices located in the US, Mexico and Asia along with best in class strategic partnerships around the globe.

2012 Employee Appreciation Dinner

Mountainside Fitness Opens Nation's 1st Club Inside a Pro Sports Venue

 

Mountainside Fitness, the largest locally owned chain of fitness centers in Arizona,  opened a 2-story, 13,000 SF Platinum Fitness Center inside Chase Field today.

The facility is the nation’s first fitness club to be placed inside of a professional sporting venue. A.R. Mays Construction was the general contractor and Saemisch-DiBella Architects provided the design work for $1.6M project.

The ground floor of the club is located along the main concourse level of Chase Field and includes a cycle studio with windows that look out onto the interior of the ballpark. Mountainside Fitness’ center also occupies a mezzanine level that features a group fitness room and cardio studio.

Open 363 days a year, the club offers a variety of other amenities, including personal training, a tanning room, a steam room, café, laundry service and a members-only parking lot for ease of access.

When not in use by the Arizona Diamondbacks, Mountainside Fitness members will also be permitted to utilize other areas of the stadium for participating in group classes and activities unique to the ballpark, such as a run up and down the stadium stairs.

“With the opening of our fitness center inside of Chase Field, we have not only acquired one of Arizona’s most unique pieces of real estate but we have also created a place to serve our growing urban membership base,” said Billy Malkovich, CEO of Mountainside Fitness.

“In addition, we recognize that many of our members across the Valley daily commute downtown for work as well and this provides the opportunity for them to conveniently workout before work, during lunch or after work. We have options to fit everyone’s schedules.”

Mountainside Fitness also plans to implement a dedicated shuttle service that will transport Mountainside members to and from their places of business downtown. The Chase Field Mountainside Fitness club expects to serve approximately 2,500 members.

 

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

Fit Over 40, Scottsdale Living Magazine Summer 2012

Fit Over 40: Lifestyle Adjustments For A Healthier You

Fit Over 40: Lifestyle adjustments can give you the beach body of a 20-something.


Being buff is tough, especially after you turn 40. But a few adjustments to your exercise and nutrition habits will help you rock it like Rihanna at the beach this summer.

“Many people at 40 disqualify themselves from so much because of their age,” explains Adam Petropolis, district fitness manager at Mountainside Fitness. “There is not a certain age where everything is automatically downhill from there. The body can and will adapt and evolve regardless of your age. Obviously younger individuals have a different hormonal make-up than somebody turning 40, but that doesn’t mean 40-year-olds can’t achieve the best physiques of their lives.”

But before the first crunch, squat or spinning class, 40-somethings need to start at the dinner table.

“For 40-year-olds, I preach that which I have been following for years – a healthy diet,” says Dr. Burt Faibisoff, a surgeon with Four Peaks Plastic Surgery in Tempe. “It’s one of the best things you can do for yourself to look and feel better.”

One of the reasons 40-year-olds fall into unhealthy nutritional habits is lifestyle changes.

“Usually, income is rising, which causes more meals to be eaten out of home,” says Kevin Shepard, certified personal trainer and nutritionist at DC Ranch Village Health Club. “This causes an increase in calorie intake. With rising income there might be more travel. Any travel usually causes an increase in calorie intake. For some, life is accelerating. With this life acceleration, people tend to place healthy eating on the back burner. This leads to increased calorie intake. Basically, people at this age eat too much, and they are not exercising enough or have enough muscle mass to burn the calories.”

To control how much you eat, Shepard suggests buying a food scale.

“Learn correct eating portion size,” he says. “There really is not one food choice that should be excluded, just don’t each as much of it. You have to learn to eat less of everything.”

With the food scale, Shepard suggests buying a body weight scale and — not obsessing over your weight — but checking your weight weekly or bi-weekly.

“You’ll gain 10 pounds before you gain 15 pounds, and if you monitor your weight regularly you will know this,” he says. “Usually weight gain after age 40 is fat weight due to muscle mass loss. Eat quality protein food choices, fruits, salads, and vegetables.”

Once 40-somethings have their food consumption in order and are ready to get their bodies back into belly-baring condition, many are turning to cosmetic surgeons to give them a jump start.

“The goal for many patients is to maintain the slender and fit look,” Faibisoff says. For women (in their 40s), it’s breast enlargements and lifts, plus liposuction. Men want to get rid of the belt of fat around their mid-section, particularly the area below the belly button and love handles.”

When it comes to getting fit or staying fit, Petropolis stresses the importance of learning from experts.

“Exercise is a science, and it’s ever-evolving as new research comes out,” he points out. “This can be especially dangerous with men who remember the exercises they did for high school football and try to jump right back into those. The ego can get the best of men in this scenario.”

Petropolis says that if exercise is not your area of expertise, it’s wise to invest in a personal trainer to get you started.

“If you want the latest and most up-to-date methods, work with somebody whose job it is to be educated in such things,” he says. “Once you finish with a package, you should have a much greater understanding of exercise and specifically strength training.”


Fit Over 40

Mai Ling Chan, 40, is the mother of two boys, ages 16 and 13. To stay fit, she does strength training at Mountainside Fitness. “Working out three times a week is part of my life now,” she says. “I love how strong my heart is and how much my body can do. And my kids are so very supportive of me. They even help to make dinner on the nights I am a little later at the gym.”


For more information about staying fit over 40:

Mountainside Fitness
11611 E. Sahuaro Dr., Scottsdale
(480) 889-8889
mountainsidefitness.com

Four Peaks Plastic Surgery
1492 S. Mill Ave., #201, Tempe
(480) 968-2945
fourpeaksplasticsurgery.com

DC Ranch Village Health Club
18501 N. Thompson Peak Pkwy., Scottsdale
(480) 502-8844
villageclubs.com

Scottsdale Living Magazine Summer 2012

Date Night: Scottsdale Living Magazine

Date Night: SOL Cocina, ZuZu Lounge And More

Looking for a date that goes beyond the basic dinner and a movie?

Here are five ways to create a date night to remember:

Last-chance workout

Sometimes a workout is just what you need to boost your confidence before date night. Mountainside Fitness offers more than 80 group fitness classes each week, stadium-style cardio equipment with personal TVs, certified personal trainers for personalized butt kicking, and Mountainside even offers “Parents Night Out” because parents need date nights, too.

N.E. corner of 116th St. and Shea Blvd.
E. Sahuaro Dr.
(480) 889-8889
mountainsidefitness.com


Date Night: Make MeaningShow your creative side

Make Meaning, which recently opened at the Shops at Scottsdale Quarter, offers visitors the opportunity to get their art on with opportunities to create and customize soap, candles, jewelry, design glassware, and even decorate cakes. Make Meaning also offers “Make It After Dark,” a schedule of programs and specials exclusively for adults. It’s the perfect unconventional date or after work happy hour with a twist.

15257 N. Scottsdale Rd.
(480) 845-0000
makemeaning.com


Date Night: SOL CocinaGet your Baja on

SOL Cocina bring authentic Baja California cuisine — which originated from the fishing families and ranchers who came from mainland Mexico — to Scottsdale. Look for staples like beer-battered mushroom tacos ($6), peanut-crusted goat cheese in chipotle syrup ($11.50), fish pibil ($25.50), build-your-own guacamole with a add-ins like bacon, pineapple, strawberry, tequila, chicharrón, sugar walnuts and cheese ($12-plus).

15279 N. Scottsdale Rd.
(480) 245-6708
solcocina.com


Cheers!

Date Night: ZuZu Lounge

If you’ve got a mid-week date to plan, ZuZu Lounge offers its Ho Wine Experience every Wednesday from 5-7 p.m. Sip wine, meet representatives from top wineries, and learn about how the wine is made. If it’s a weekend date, ZuZu offers sHOwdown from  5-7p.m. on Saturday nights. A different drink is featured each night, all created by ZuZu’s expert mixologists. The featured wines and drinks also remain on special all night.

6850 E. Main St.
(480) 421-7997
hotelvalleyho.com


Scottsdale Living Magazine Spring 2012

Club SAR, Benefits of Boxing - Scottsdale Living Magazine Fall 2011

Club SAR, Mountainside Fitness Instructors Discuss Benefits Of Boxing

Club SAR, Mountainside Fitness Discuss Benefits Of Boxing

Road rage, workplace stress and a slow recovering economy are fueling hooks and uppercuts at boxing gyms across Scottsdale. Men and women of all ages are lacing up their gloves and reaping the sport’s payoffs in mental and physical health.

With a one-hour class burning approximately 400 to 800 calories, those who hit the boxing gyms are slimming down, building muscle and strengthening their minds and hearts.

“Boxing provides total body conditioning that includes strength, endurance and flexibility without having to focus on any one particular area,” says Tabitha Citro, athletic director at Mountainside Fitness, which offers boxing and kickboxing classes in Scottsdale. “It becomes a total package, an all-in-one sport.”

Dating back to 688 B.C. in ancient Greece, boxing has served as an outlet for those with combative tendencies. But for those who would prefer to not be hit, boxing conditioning can be accomplished without sparing.

“Some people are looking for the cardio benefits,” says Diedra Nietz, instructor at Club SAR in Scottsdale. “They don’t want to fight in the ring, but want to learn about self-defense and get in great shape. Many of our classes have people working at their own pace, on their own bag.”

Boxing conditioning classes often involve learning basic punches like jabs, hooks, uppercuts and footwork. Conditioning classes also include training to increase speed and strength using sprints, push-ups, sit-ups, squats and other grueling exercises that work the shoulders, core and legs.

The Great De-Stressor

Andrea Mijak, a school psychologist, started boxing to improve her performance in mixed martial arts. She fell in love with the sport and found that it helped reduced stress.

“When you are stressed, boxing can become a release,” Mijak says. “If you channel it, after the workout, the aggression is gone.”

Mijak says boxing has the ability take the negative energy that stress or anger creates and transforms it into something positive.

“Many of the boxers I’ve talked to say that boxing helped them to channel their aggression in a more positive way,” Mijak says. “It also empowers people. For some women, they might come in more timid, but after they get into it, they find they enjoy throwing a punch.”

Instructors say boxing is a workout that evolves into a skill set of fighting moves with increased coordination, confidence and strength. For those bored with going to the gym, boxing provides a workout with purpose, says Jonathan Couvdos, Club SAR instructor and former amateur boxer.

“It’s fun to work out when you have a goal,” Couvdos says. “At the end of it, you’re learning a technique and a sport. You forget you’re working out. Instead of running on a treadmill, when you do boxing conditioning, you’re getting a better workout, and it’s interesting.”

The Sweet Science

One of the great skills that boxing develops is the ability to respond to the unexpected. Boxers have to decide in split seconds on how to counter an opponent’s tactics.

Thomas Harrison, Club SAR manager/instructor and former amateur boxer, says boxing is called “the sweet science because it’s somewhat of a chess game. Yes, it is a fight, but there is thought involved. There is a method to fighting, such as counter-punching. You want to use your opponent’s moves against him. Hit without being hit. Accomplishing that requires a lot of study and practice.”

Learning to leverage one’s body to deliver heavy-hitting punches while maintaining balance and speedy responses also gives the brain a good workout.

“You’re working on your coordination, so it keeps you sharp,” Nietz says.  “You’re focusing on movements and what you do next. It teaches you to be quick on your feet.”

Self-Defense for Beginners

For people wanting to learn how to box for self-defense, boxing offers some basic building blocks. While it gives people confidence in throwing punches and taking hits, Citro says it’s just the beginning of learning to protect yourself.

“It provides a foundation for self-defense movements that could be applied to potentially dangerous situations,” Citro says. “It prepares the body to take a defensive mode in unexpected dangerous circumstances. But boxing should not be considered a substitute for a complete self-defense program. However, it provides great fundamental skills.”

Out of the Ring

Learning a sport and consistently exercising can also benefit your career. A study from the University of Bristol in England showed that 79 percent of people who exercised on days that they worked improved their professional performance.

“I think employers like the fact that people know a sport well,” Harrison says. “They know how to work hard, be regimented, disciplined and put themselves on the line to accomplish goals. All of that can be used in the corporate world.”

But for those who just want to punch something after a day at the office, taking it into the ring will serve as a stress-reliever and a big calorie-burning fitness program.

“(Boxing is) for people with different athletic abilities, from (those who weigh) 300 pounds to professional athletes who want to stay in shape during the off-season,“ Couvdos says. “It’s for anyone who wants to be challenged.”

For more information about Club SAR and Mountainside Fitness:

Club SAR
8055 E. Camelback Rd.
(480) 312-2669
scottsdaleaz.gov/parks/SAR

Mountainside Fitness
11611 E. Sahuaro Dr.
(480) 889-8889
mountainsidefitness.com

Scottsdale Living Magazine Fall 2011