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How can you raise financially savvy children?

With school out for the summer, there’s no better time to teach children about money and finances, experts say.

“By teaching children the importance of opportunity costs at a young age, we can better prepare them to become confident and successful members of our community once they enter the real world,” says Jim Lundy, CEO of Alliance Bank of Arizona.

No matter a child’s age, it’s never too early to prepare him or her for a successful future by building financial literacy skills today. Teachable money moments can happen with kids as young as 3 years old and the sooner parents begin to influence positive financial behaviors, the better the chance kids have to succeed in managing money.

“Kids learn a lot by watching what you do,” says Kelly Kaminskas, senior vice president at FirstBank. “I think a lot of parents make the mistake of sheltering kids from money conversations. It’s important to take them to the bank with you, show them how you save for long-term goals, or explain the difference between funding needs versus wants.  These learning opportunities can be extremely valuable as they get older.”

“With almost everything else, we teach our children by talking as we go about our day,” says Christina Burroughs, managing partner at Miller Russell Associates, “but or some reason, that’s not the case with money or financial issues.”

Burroughs says many people grew up in families where it was taboo to talk about money, others worry that children who know that come from well-off families will lose their motivation, while some parents are reticent talk about finances because they don’t want to burden their children with adult concerns.

“But there is a nice middle ground where parents can talk about concepts without burdening children,” Burroughs says. “It’s really helpful for families to talk about the idea behind economy — that people make things or provide services that other people want or need. Then, expand on the idea that when people buy things, it becomes economy and everyone has opportunity to grow and get better because of that. Parents will be thrilled to see how quickly kids become excited by these ideas.”

Burroughs says it’s safe for parents to start talking to children as early as 3 or 4, as long as the conversation is age appropriate.

“The best thing parents can do is simply talk to their kids about the importance of budgeting, saving, and managing credit,” says Joe Bleyle, senior vice president and director of commercial real estate for Enterprise Bank & Trust. “Specifically, kids can participate in developing the family’s budget and open a savings account with encouragement to save for larger purchases.”

With high-school age kids, experts say the conversations can expand into how to get a job, how to dress to impress in the professional world, how to build a business network and the basic principles of business and entrepreneurial thinking.

“The lessons children learn while they are young will shape how financially successful they will be as adults,” says Michael Lefever, senior vice president and business banking area manager for Wells Fargo. “Just as regular exercise and a good diet are essential for physical fitness, knowing the basics of saving, budgeting and planning are essential for financial fitness.”

In order to prepare children for financial success, Deborah Bateman, vice chairman of National Bank of Arizona, says it’s imperative to show them that money is just paper without a purpose or a goal.

“As parents, the most important lesson we can teach our kids is the value of money, and we can teach that lesson and help our kids create a healthy relationship with money by teaching them to give money ‘purpose,’” Bateman says. “We teach our kids to give money purpose  by teaching them to set goals. As soon as a child can articulate their goals, we should help them to monetize those goals. It is the purpose we give our money that makes it valuable and guides our kids to make confident money decisions.”

Summer school lessons for finances

Here are five money lessons that parents can teach their children at home this summer, according to financial experts at Alliance Bank of Arizona:

How to build a balanced budget: Vacation planning is the perfect time to teach kids about budgeting. Questions like, “Where will we go?”, “What will we do?” and “How much will we spend?” can guide children through the decision-making and conscious-spending process. First, start allocating funds to basics like hotel, food and gasoline. Then, discuss that fun activities and souvenirs can only be purchased if you budget the right amount of money.

How to make important buying decisions (wants vs. needs): Review your household budget or a sample budget with your kids. Help them understand what a balanced budget is and that the goal is to save more money than you spend. Explain that there are items we need like shelter and food. But, there are also things that we want, like new shoes, a cell phone and toys, which can wait until we have saved enough to purchase them.

The importance of interest: Say you’re in a store and your child points to a toy and says, “Can you buy that for me?” Instead of handing over the toy, offer to loan your child a small amount of money, provided that they pay you back the same amount within 30 days. Remind them often that if they can’t pay on time, you’ll add more money to what they owe until they pay the money back. One day past the deadline, add to the amount and explain why they owe more.

The correlation between learning and earning: Set up a sample budget based on what your kids want. Then, determine the average monthly income of a high school graduate, someone with post-secondary training, someone with a Bachelor’s degree, and someone with a Master’s degree. This shows how much money they need to earn to have the things they want and how that correlates with their level of education.

The importance of being a contributing member of their community: Chores that are tied to earning money are a great way to help kids learn about their role in a family unit and gives them a glimpse at what is required of community members. An effective tool is myjobchart.com which helps parents set up and track chores for their children, along with prompting discussions about saving, giving and spending.

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Super Bowl pumps $719 million into Arizona’s economy

Super Bowl XLIX scored big for Arizona’s economy.

A study completed by the Seidman Research Institute, W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, determined that Super Bowl XLIX, the 2015 Pro Bowl and related events produced a gross economic impact of $719.4 million in the region. The announcement was made today at The Governor’s Conference on Tourism at the JW Camelback Inn in Scottsdale.

“As a proud Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee sponsor and one of the leading Arizona companies to step up and support this major event, it is gratifying to learn that Super Bowl XLIX had the largest economic impact of any special event ever held in the state”, says National Bank of Arizona Executive Vice President Jathan Segur.  “The momentum created by the events surrounding the Super Bowl have been tremendous … In addition to the numbers announced today, we have witnessed an increased interest in long-term economic development and investing in the growth of our state.”

This is the largest economic impact of any special event ever held in the state of Arizona, as well as the highest for any Super Bowl for which publicly released figures are available. By comparison, Super Bowl XLII played at University of Phoenix Stadium in 2008 generated a gross economic impact of $500.6 million (2008 dollars) based on research also conducted by the W.P. Carey School of Business.

“This is tremendous news for our economy and a strong testament to the exceptional work of everyone involved,” said Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey. “The eyes of the world were on Arizona, and we delivered in a big way. I look forward to our state hosting many more successful championship games and major events in the future.”

Commissioned by the Arizona Commerce Authority in partnership with the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, the study focused on the nine-day period from January 24th through February 1, 2015 coinciding with the Pro Bowl and Super Bowl which were played at University of Phoenix Stadium on January 25 and February 1, respectively.

The gross economic impact is defined as the direct amount of spending by visitors and organizations arriving from outside the state to participate in or create events directly related to the Super Bowl, as well as the indirect and induced impacts of those expenditures, often described as “ripple effects.” Resident and local business spending was not included.

To gather data about spending and duration of stay from visitors, on-site surveys were conducted at events around the Valley over the nine day period by teams of trained individuals from the W. P. Carey School of Business. Data was collected from out-of-town visitors who stated that the main reason for their visit to the Phoenix Metropolitan area was for the Super Bowl, Pro Bowl and/or associated events. The data was collected across multiple days at multiple sites to sample diverse socio-economic and demographic groups. 

The indirect and induced economic impacts were calculated using an IMPLAN (IMpact analysis for PLANning) model originally developed by the University of Minnesota. This commercially licensed linear input-output model is widely used for economic assessment throughout the United States and is populated with local, regional and state data for Arizona.

Other findings from the Seidman Research Institute at W.P. Carey School of Business report:

• An estimated 121,775 visitors came to Arizona for Super Bowl XLIX and/or the 2015 Pro Bowl; those visitors stayed an average of 3.99 nights.

• An estimated 5,033 out-of-town media members came to Arizona and stayed an average of 7.1 nights (up from 4.1 nights for Super Bowl XLII in 2008).

• The $719.4 million economic impact for Super Bowl XLIX represents an increase of 30.8% over Super Bowl XLII in Arizona (adjusted using the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Price Index, or BLS CPI, inflation calculator which expressed that the 2008 economic impact dollars have the same buying power as $550.1 million in 2015).

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2015 Positively Powerful Women Awards on June 5

Nicole Stanton

Nicole Stanton

This year, the 8th Annual Positively Powerful Women Awards Luncheon celebration will be a part of the Positively Powerful Leadership Conference, a day filled with outstanding local and national speakers who will empower and inform participants in an exciting, dynamic and uplifting environment. The Positively Powerful Leadership Conference will be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday, June 5 at the Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix. The Awards Luncheon will begin at 11:30 a.m.

“The speakers that we have selected this year exhibit this year’s theme of collaboration,” said Dr. Joel P. Martin, international trainer, speaker, coach, and creator of the Positively Powerful Woman Awards Program. “These speakers will invigorate and inspire participants to take action on their goals and purpose. When you attend this conference, I know you will leave with business, personal, professional strategies and transformational tools that you can use immediately.”

MaryLynn Mack copy

MaryLynn Mack

This year’s Positively Powerful presenters are:

  • Deborah Bateman, coach, author and Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors for National Bank of Arizona, will present “The Journey to Success Begins Within.”
  • Rev. Dr. Helen Hunter, Pastor of The Great Koinonia and President of the East Valley NAACP, will speak on “Being A Positively Powerful Spirit-Filled Woman.”
  • Loretta Love Huff, author and Owner, Emerald Harvest Consulting, will present “Talking Business, Taking Action, Being Strategic.”
  • Kristi Lee, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, TruNorth Global and successful entrepreneur with Send Out Cards, will help “Turn Your Connections Into Collaborations & Contacts.”
  • Debbie Waitkus, author, business/golf networking consultant and President and Founder of Golf for a Cause, will talk about “How to Have It All As a Business Woman Without Losing It!”
    Dr. Duku Anokye

    Dr. Duku Anokye

    Joining the Positively Powerful presenters is the dynamic Suzan Hart, an inspirational speaker, author and master trainer. Hart has shared the stage with Jack Canfield, John Gray and Robert Allen and has trained on CDs with David Wood and Steven Covey. She is the founder of co-host of the “Fit is the New Sexy” blog talk radio show and will present “Branding and Marketing Sales Success!”

Closing the conference with “Reflections of the Day,” will be charismatic and inspiring Dr. George Fraser, Chief Executive Officer of FraserNet, Inc., Producer of the PowerNetworking Conference and author of five best-selling books. Upscale Magazine named him as one of the “Top 50 Power Brokers in Black America” and Black Enterprise Magazine called him “Black America’s #1 Networker.” He has received 350 awards and citations including induction into the Minority Business Hall of Fame and Museum.

Bonnie Lucas

Bonnie Lucas

During the 8th Annual Positively Powerful Woman Awards Luncheon, six extraordinary women will be honored for their professional accomplishments and their contributions to the community. This year’s honorees are:

  • Philanthropic Leadership Award: Nicole Stanton, Partner/Phoenix Office Managing Partner, Quarles & Brady LLP, First Lady, City of Phoenix and Founder, Stop Bullying AZ
  • Arts & Culture Leadership Award: Isola Jones, Internationally Recognized Mezzo-Soprano
  • Visionary Leadership Award: MaryLynn Mack, Deputy Director, Desert Botanical Garden
  • Entrepreneurial Leadership Award: Bonnie Lucas, President/CEO, Law Enforcement Specialists, Inc.
  • Educational Leadership Award: Dr. Duku Anokye, Director of International Initiatives for the ASU New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
  • Spiritual Leadership Award: Rev. Delphine Rodriquez, Minister and Educator
    Rev. Delphine Rodriquez

    Rev. Delphine Rodriquez

    Emceeing this year’s luncheon is Terri Ouellette (Terri O), co-host of ABC15’s Sonoran Living Live. The awards presentation will include a keynote address by Dr. Martin, followed by a luncheon favorite, the honoree panel discussion. Each year, a nonprofit organization is highlighted during the luncheon. The 2015 non-profit organization is Achieving My Purpose. The mission of Achieving My Purpose is to inform, inspire and empower women to achieve their purpose through exposure to successful role models, resources, personal discovery and creation of an authentic life plan.

    Tickets for the luncheon and conference may be purchased at http://positivelypowerful.com/womanawards/register/.

    For event information, visit the Positively Powerful website at www.positivelypowerful.com. Sponsorship information: http://positivelypowerful.com/womanawards/1194-2/.

A Guide to Applying for a Bank Loan

NB|AZ promotes Mark Young to president and CEO

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ), the state’s largest community bank announced today that Mark Young, Executive Director of Commercial Real Estate, has been appointed President and CEO of National Bank of Arizona, and a new member of Zions Bancorporation’s Executive Management Committee.

An experienced consumer, commercial and real estate banking professional, Young arrived in Arizona in 1982 and served in various leadership roles with Valley National Bank and Bank One.  Young joined NB|AZ parent company Zions Bancorporation in 1998 and has been a member of the NB|AZ Executive Committee since 2011.  He has a B.S. in Finance from the University of Southern California, and an M.B.A. from Arizona State University.

Young takes the reins from Keith Maio who has been named as the Chief Banking Officer for Zions Bancorporation and will remain as NB|AZ Chairman of the Board.

“I am proud to be entrusted with the leadership of Arizona’s premier relationship bank,” said Young.  “Over the last 23 years, Keith Maio has helped define the way we do business.  I am committed to upholding that vision and look forward to working with our 800+ employees across Arizona to expand our unique brand of banking.”

NB|AZ also announced the promotion of Curtis Hansen to the role of Chief Financial Officer.  Hansen joined NB|AZ in 1998 and has served as Executive Director of Wholesale Banking since 2010.  Prior to joining NB|AZ, Hansen was a Relationship Manager in Commercial and Industrial Lending at National City Bank and Bank One.  Curt has a B.S. in Finance from Indiana University, an M.B.A. from The Ohio State University and graduated with honors from the Pacific Coast Banking School in 2007, where he was awarded the Kermit O. Hanson Award of Excellence.

“National Bank of Arizona has a 30-year history of developing talented bankers and promoting them into leadership positions,” said Maio. “Both Mark and Curt embody our core values and are committed to the people and businesses of Arizona.  We believe our clients are best served when leadership is local and focused on the customers and communities we serve.”

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NB|AZ will air ‘Elevate AZ’ Super Bowl ad

In an effort to promote Arizona and the businesses that impact its communities and citizens, National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced the airing of its official “Elevate AZ” commercial during the broadcast of Super Bowl XLIX.

The commercial is a key portion of NB|AZ’s “Elevate AZ” campaign and will feature three Arizona businesses and two Arizona nonprofit organizations that exemplify what it means to “Elevate AZ.” Viewers will be invited to visit www.ElevateAZ.com to learn more about the organizations and how they have positively impacted the lives of many Arizonans.

NB|AZ is in a unique position to more clearly define Arizona and what it means to be an Arizonan while working to dispel some of the myths that many outside the state believe to be true.

“Too often Arizona is defined by those who do not live here and have no understanding of the strength of the people, communities and causes that drive this state,” Keith Maio, NB|AZ President and CEO, said. “The goal of the commercial is to elevate the conversation about Arizona on a national level and we feel our clients are leading that discussion.”

Through print, television and online channels NB|AZ will use “Elevate AZ” as the platform to discuss “What’s right with Arizona.”

The five Arizona businesses featured during the 30-second commercial will include K2 Adventure Foundation, Phoenix Group Metals, A Tumbling T Ranch, Ballet Arizona and Page Springs Cellars. Each business is a member of NB|AZ and has a unique impact on their patrons and communities on a daily basis.

A Guide to Applying for a Bank Loan

WVNB buys branch from NB|AZ

Candace Wiest, president and CEO of West Valley National Bank, announced WVNB has entered into an agreement with National Bank of Arizona to acquire all of the assets and deposits of the Gila Bend branch of NBA. The transaction is anticipated to increase WVNB’s asset size by 20 percent.

“As the West Valley’s only locally owned community Bank, we are delighted to be able to increase our asset size by increasing our footprint throughout the West Valley,” Wiest said. “We believe the small businesses, medical and dental professionals and retail clients in Gila Bend provide the Bank with an opportunity for loan and deposit growth. In return we are committed to providing the Gila Bend community the same great service and community leadership we have demonstrated in the West Valley communities and the metro area. I am also delighted to announce we intend to retain all of the existing stakeholders currently employed at NBA. “

This transaction is anticipated to close during the first quarter of 2015 subject to regulatory approval

 

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Super Bowl fans get ‘Grand Canyon Experience’

image009The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced The Grand Canyon Experience Presented by NB|AZ, a super-sized, one-of-a-kind rock wall climbing experience for revelers who will visit Verizon Super Bowl Central in Downtown Phoenix, the week leading up to Super Bowl XLIX.

The interactive experience, set to open January 28th, will be the largest attraction inside Verizon Super Bowl Central and will feature 20 climbing positions and a breathtaking 18-ft. waterfall flowing down the center of the attraction, much like the Colorado River runs through the Grand Canyon. It will measure 30 feet tall by 100 feet wide, and will feature an 18-ft. video screen at the summit.

“Arizona is the Grand Canyon State and there is no better way to pay tribute to Arizona’s unique warmth, natural beauty and plentiful resources than to recreate a piece of our iconic natural wonder in the heart of Verizon Super Bowl Central for all our fans to enjoy. We are thankful to our partner, National Bank of Arizona, for their support in bringing this true Arizona experience to life,” said Jay Parry, president and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee.

The monument, designed to resemble the Grand Canyon and its unique formations, is being constructed with authentic rock texture to emulate the canyon’s terrain. Twenty climbers can ascend the wall at one time with climbing difficulty ranging from kid-friendly to professional.

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee commissioned Rockwerx, a leading builder of commercial and recreational climbing walls, to construct the monument. Due to its distinctive attributes, it had to be manufactured and built from scratch.

“As Arizona’s largest community bank, National Bank of Arizona is proud to bring The Grand Canyon Experience to everyone visiting our great state during Super Bowl XLIX,” said Keith Maio, president and CEO of NB|AZ.

The Grand Canyon Experience Presented by NB|AZ will be located on the corner of 1st St. and Jefferson. Fans, ages six and up, are invited to take on The Grand Canyon Experience Presented by NB|AZ starting on Wednesday, January 28th at 2 p.m. Tickets will be $5 and available to purchase at www.azsuperbowl.com in advance to secure an appointment to climb. Tickets also will be available onsite at Verizon Super Bowl Central. All proceeds from ticket sales will be donated to the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Legacy Grant Foundation. Funds are distributed to non-profit organizations in Arizona.

For information about Super Bowl XLIX happenings, visit www.azsuperbowl.com or follow @azsuperbowl or @azsuperbowl_es on Twitter, #SBcentral, #sb49, and www.facebook.com/azsuperbowl or www.facebook/azsuperbowles.

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NB|AZ partners with Super Bowl Host Committee

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces a new partnership with National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ). The partnership is a fully integrated program providing Official Sponsor designation, a custom media plan with traditional, digital and social elements, business development assets, as well as Presenting Partner status of the CEO Forum.

The recently announced CEO Forum is designed to directly foster Arizona economic growth, which correlates to the business and community goals of NB|AZ. The program leverages Super Bowl XLIX to host more than 50 business leaders from around the world and introduce them to the pro-business environment to encourage them to move or expand business operations in Arizona for a lasting economic impact.

“NB|AZ has a long tradition of supporting and leading economic development efforts across our state,” said CEO Keith Maio. “This partnership provides us with a platform to do what we do best, bring people together to talk about the great opportunities that exist in Arizona to grow business.”

The CEO Forum is unique to the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee and started in 2008, which resulted in more than 1,000 jobs and over $400 million invested in the state.

“There has been tremendous interest and support in the CEO Forum by Arizona-based companies and CEOs. They see the value and recognize that hosting Super Bowl XLIX is about much more than football,” stated David Rousseau, chairman of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee. “As an Arizona-based company with storied leadership and community support, NB|AZ is a natural fit to support programs that accelerate economic development.”

NB|AZ is also a founding sponsor of the Arizona Leadership Forum. This year, Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals and Host Committee board member, along with Jay Parry, president and CEO of the Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee, spoke at the 2014 Arizona Leadership Forum regarding the overall economic impact of hosting Super Bowl XLIX and the 2015 Pro Bowl.

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NB|AZ hosts 8th Annual Taste of the Biltmore

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced its eighth annual Taste of the Biltmore event, which is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 2 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the NB|AZ Biltmore Corporate Center. This highly anticipated kick-off to the fall social season will bring the best of the Biltmore community together to enjoy unlimited food and wine tasting from more than 20 local restaurants.

Participating restaurants include some of the Valley’s most recognized names: Donovan’s Steak & Chop House, The Capital Grille, Season’s 52, True Food Kitchen, Zinburger, The Adobe, amongst many others.

“NB|AZ Taste of the Biltmore is the perfect way to bring the community together to enjoy delicious cuisine, while giving back to the community,” said Jathan Segur, executive vice president and director of wealth strategies for NB|AZ. “Each year the attendance grows, allowing us to offer tremendous support to our designated beneficiary. This year we are pleased to contribute to Act One for a second year in a row.”

All proceeds from the event will benefit Act One, an organization that opens the doors to Arizona’s performing arts and cultural destinations through two special programs, field trips and Culture Passes. Through its field trip program, Act One provides transportation and resources to underserved public school children, enabling them to experience art and culture within their communities. The Act One Culture Pass program offers library cardholders complimentary admission or tickets for two people to a participating arts and culture venues.

“We are thrilled National Bank of Arizona has once again selected Act One as its beneficiary for Taste of the Biltmore,” said Megan Jefferies, executive director of Act One. “Thanks to NB|AZ, Act One will be able to provide arts education and experiences to students in the community who otherwise wouldn’t have access.”

Tickets are $45 per person or $350 for a group of 10 when purchased in advance online. Tickets also will be available for purchase for $60 each at the door. To purchase tickets or to learn more about the event, including a full list of participating restaurants, please visit www.tasteofthebiltmore.com. For more information about Act One, visit www.act1az.org

The NB|AZ Corporate Headquarters is located at 6001 N. 24th St. in Phoenix. Admission includes complimentary valet parking.

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Leadership Forum: ‘Eyes of the world will be on Arizona’

The partnership between Starbucks and Arizona State University stirs up the way people can pay for college, have a family, and work at the same time.

Today, the 2014 Arizona Leadership Forum started off with the main message of, “We need you to lead us,” specifically speaking to attending business leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs. For quite some time, people have had the wrong impression of Arizona, but that’s about to change.

“Soon the eyes of the world will be on Arizona,” said Jathan Segur, executive vice president of National Bank of Arizona, referring to the 2015 Super Bowl, which will be played at University of Phoenix Stadium. “We will have the chance to talk about what’s right about Arizona.”

Segur’s speech set the tone of hope and optimism for the Leadership Forum.

Among those messages of hope, was one about the American dream to receive a high-quality college education. Unfortunately, it seems an unreachable dream for most. College tuition costs have risen 80 percent in the past 10 years. Therefore, only a select few can afford to go to college, and even fewer get to finish.

The Starbucks College Achievement Plan is the first of its kind, where a national company is taking the initiative to partner with an educational institution to give employees a second chance to live out their American dream. Due to the increasing college expenses, less than 50 percent of college students complete their degree.

“We employ a generation hit hard by our recession,” said Dervala Manley, vice president of global strategy at Starbucks Coffee Company.

Starbucks part-time and full-time employees from around the globe can now apply to receive funding towards their degree from Arizona State University. Freshman and sophomores attending ASU will be given a partial scholarship, accompanied with financial aid depending on their needs. Juniors and seniors will be given full tuition reimbursement with each year they continue to finish their studies. Students will have no obligation to stay at Starbucks after graduation.

Philip Regier, executive vice provost and dean of ASU online and extended campuses emphasized on how ASU wants to give everyone, no mater what their background, an equal chance to get a high-quality education. ASU has all 40 majors online as well as in person, making it more convenient for the working class.

“We did it [partnership] because we had a set of shared values,” Regier said.

This partnership between ASU and Starbucks is a leading example for an innovative state of mind in Arizona. Through the voices of the people, partnerships can form to benefit this generation. This partnership has created a way for aspiring college students to reach their highest potential in life.
“The face of Starbucks is not Howard Schultz, it’s the barista,” Hanley said.

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Az Business honors Most Admired Companies

BestCompaniesAZ and Az Business magazine honored 40 companies at the 2014 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies award reception on September 11, 2014 at the Westin Kierland Resort.

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Arizona’s Most Admired Companies are selected based on how a company has performed in the following areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, corporate and social responsibility, customer opinion and innovation. Five companies were recognized with a “spotlight” award for each of the five categories.

CONGRATUALTIONS!

The five spotlight awards winners are:

Customer Opinion: Cresa
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Quality Leadership: Kitchell
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Social Responsibility: Vanguard
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Innovation: Laser Spine Institute
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Workplace Culture: GoDaddy
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“This is the most comprehensive and prestigious corporate awards program in Arizona because it recognizes the contributions and impact these ‘most admired companies’ bring to our state,’” says Denise Gredler, co-founder of the Most Admired Companies Program.

“These companies truly exemplify what it means to be a good corporate citizen,” says Cheryl Green, publisher of Arizona Business Magazine. “MAC winners consistently show strong leadership, a commitment to the communities in which they operate and concern for their employees and customers.”

This year’s presenting sponsors included Dignity Health of Arizona, National Bank of Arizona and Thunderbird International School of Global Management. Additional Event Sponsors include Charles Schwab, Progrexion, Ryan and Shutterfly.

The 40 companies named Most Admired Companies for 2014 were:

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Alliance Residential Company
American Express
Arizona Diamondbacks
AXA Advisors
Banner Casa Grande Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America
CBRE, Inc.
Charles Schwab
Cresa Phoenix
Desert Diamond Casinos and Entertainment
DIRTT Environmental Solutions
Fennemore Craig
GoDaddy
Goodmans Interior Structurs
Grant Thornton
Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort
Homeowners Financial Group
Hyatt Regency Phoenix
Infusionsoft
International Cruise & Excursions, Inc.
Kitchell
LaneTerralever
Laser Spine Institute
Mayo Clinic
Miller Russell Associates
National Bank of Arizona
Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Quarles & Brady
Rider Levett Bucknall
Ryan, LLC
Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network
Shutterfly, Inc.
Sonora Quest Laboratories
Sundt Construction
The CORE Institute
Telesphere
UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
University of Advancing Technology
Vanguard

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

The Land Advisors Organization reports recent deals

CANYONS AT WHETSTONE | Benson, Arizona

Offering: 795.69 acres
Location: East side of Highway 90, south of Interstate 10 in Benson, Cochise County, Arizona
Sales Price: not disclosed
Seller: National Bank of Arizona
Buyer: El Dorado Benson, LLC
Agents: Greg Vogel, Will White, Waseem Hamadeh and John Carroll
801 NORTH ARIZONA AVENUE | Chandler, Arizona

Offering: ±2,660 sq. ft. retail building on ±0.41 acres
Location: 801 N. Arizona Avenue, in Chandler, Arizona
Sales Price: $312,000
Seller: Bear Family Trust
Buyer: Matthew Mooneyham
Agents: Randolph C. Titzck and Chad Russell
901 EAST ROSSER | Prescott, Arizona

Offering: 5.48 acres
Location: 901 East Rosser, Prescott, Arizona
Sales Price: $800,000
Seller: Brady Revocable Trust
Buyer: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints
Agent: Capri Barney
RANCHO CORAN | Las Vegas, Nevada

Offering: 22.06 acres
Location: 1792 N. Ranch Drive, Las Vegas, Nevada
Sales Price: $2,300,000
Seller: MB REO-NV Land
Buyer: Precedent Properties
Agent: Rick Hildreth
WHETSTONE RANCH | Benson, Arizona

Offering: 11,650 acres
Location: State Route 90 in Benson, Arizona; beginning +/-1.5 miles south of Interstate 10
Sales Price: not disclosed
Seller: Whetstone Partners, Whetstone Development, Graves
Buyer: El Dorado Partners, III
Agent: Greg Vogel, Will White, Waseem Hamadeh and John Carroll

mary_collum

Mary Collum – Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Mary CollumSenior Vice President, National Bank of Arizona
Collum is a senior vice president and director of private banking at National Bank of Arizona, with more than 20 years of experience in the financial services industry.

Greatest accomplishment: “Creating the Private Bank from scratch was my most challenging and rewarding professional accomplishment.”

Surprising fact: “I am one of four women since 1899 to be appointed to the Phoenix Country Club’s board.”

Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue, Az Business Magazine celebrates the amazing women who make an impact on Arizona business.

Click here to see all of the 2014 Most Influential Women.

investing

Most people don’t have financial plans

Most of us put more effort into planning a vacation than planning our financial future.

According to a study issued by BMO Harris Financial Advisors, only 38 percent of Arizonans have a financial plan, yet a majority admit a financial plan plays a critical role in achieving key life goals, such as saving for a home and being comfortable in retirement.

“There’s an obvious disparity when it comes to financial plans – most people know they need one, but they don’t have one,” says Larry Skolnik, regional sales manager, BMO Harris Financial Advisors. “No matter your income level, a financial plan can be an essential component to achieving your financial goals and ensuring the fiscal security of you and your family.”

Experts say a financial plan helps people work towards their short and long-term goals, providing a roadmap that outlines the path from where they are today to where they want to be in the future.

“Everyone should have some type of financial plan,” says Jason Miller, vice president and director of financial planning – Western U.S., BMO Private Bank. “Whether you are just starting out in your working years or nearing retirement, a solid plan is crucial to reaching your goals and protecting yourself and your loved ones.”

One crucial mistake people is assuming that they cannot afford to create a financial plan and will do so when they are making more money in the future, says Lisa S. Jackson, a certified public accountant and financial advisor with Whitman & Jackson CPAs.

“There is no better time to start than immediately,” she says.

Miller says the goal of a financial plan is to understand exactly where you are today and where you want to be in the future and then determine the necessary steps to get from point A to point B. A financial plan should include an analysis of where you currently are and what risks and/or challenges you currently face, as well as an analysis of how likely you are to reach your financial goals. Common areas included in a financial plan may be:

  • Budgeting and cash flow management
  • Asset allocation and investment management
  • Retirement planning
  • Risk management (e.g. life insurance coverage, disability insurance coverage, long-term care, creditor protection, etc.)
  • Estate planning

“When establishing goals it is recommended to include dollar and time specific targets in order to regularly measure the plan with clarity,” says Mary Collum,  senior vice president and director of private banking, National Bank of Arizona.

“Staying true to the vision is very important and will take discipline on both the planner and individuals’ part. Circumstances such as consistent injections of savings for the future, coupled with a plan to enjoy life today and live within one’s means, will weigh in on how successful the plan is.”

One of the most important elements to consider is making sure your financial plan is comprehensive and takes into account various possible outcomes, experts say.

“One of the most important elements of a plan is to make sure you are testing the outcome of your goals based on various economic environments such as rising interest rates, inflation, economic expansion or deflation and unforeseen events,” says Curtis L. Smith, registered investment advisor and wealth advisor for Raymond James Financial Services.

Smith’s list of things to consider when establishing your financial plan include:

  • Asset and investment allocation
  • Retirement accumulation and retirement income forecasts
  • Risk management items (liability coverage, life, disability, long-term care and health insurance)
  • Estate and philanthropy planning
  • Your economic and lifestyle goals (retirement needs,  savings goals, housing goals, vacations, etc.)
  • Family legacy goals

Another mistake people make when establishing the goals for their financial plan is not looking at all their investment options.

“People can get too focused on one investment strategy and forget to look at all options,” says Erik Pedersen, vice president of AXA Advisors. “The one they are focused on might not be the most suitable to reach their goals.”

Once your goals and plan are established, experts say you must remember to keep your financial plan organic and revisit the plan often.

“Be sure to revisit the plan when your goals have changed or events have happened in your life such as marriage, divorce, loss of job, inheritance or children going off to college,” Pedersen says. “But, there is truly never a bad time to revisit your financial plan.”

Once established, it’s been proven that financial plans will keep you financially responsible and healthy. According to the BMO Harris Financial Advisors study, 85 percent of Americans who have a financial plan say those plans have helped them achieve their goals, and 61 percent wish they has created a financial plan sooner.

“We are quick to take our car into the shop when the engine light blinks, giving us peace of mind our vehicle will take us safely to the next destination,” Collum says.

“Take charge of your financial world with this same sense of urgency in order to create and ensure you are headed on a successful journey to your financial destination.”

wealth

NB|AZ Hires New Wealth Advisor

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced Robert Wagner as a new wealth advisor at its Gainey Ranch Wealth Center. Wagner brings numerous years of financial planning, business development and strategic planning experience to his new position at NB|AZ.

As a NB|AZ wealth advisor, Wagner will be responsible for developing high net-worth investment management relationships by combining forward-looking economic and financial analysis with targeted investment strategies. He will work with clients to provide a tailored strategy designed to address specific financial needs, goals and aspirations.

“I am proud to join NB|AZ, a company founded on its local relationships and strong ties to the community,” Wagner said. “I’m confident that my previous financial advisory experience will serve me well in this new position.”

Prior to joining the Wealth Strategies team at NB|AZ, Wagner was a financial advisor with Merrill
Lynch. Robert earned his B.S. in Microbiology and Veterinary Science with a Minor in Chemistry from the University of Arizona.

Wagner is based out of the NB|AZ Gainey Ranch Wealth Center located at 7375 E Doubletree Ranch Road, Scottsdale.

For more information about NB|AZ and its services, visit www.nbarizona.com.

A Guide to Applying for a Bank Loan

NB|AZ Hosts Open House at New Wealth Center

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced the opening of its new Camelback Wealth Center, which strengthens its commitment to the community and clients around the Camelback Corridor.

The existing branch location at 4040 East Camelback Road was remodeled into the new wealth center, which blends executive banking and private banking under one roof. The wealth center provides clients a comprehensive array of financial services under one roof, housing 15 bankers including retail bankers, wealth managers, an executive banking team and a mortgage specialist. The remodeled building also offers a more energy efficient design and has been updated with a cash recycler for quicker processing of cash transactions.

The open house on February 26 is open to NB|AZ clients, Camelback Corridor residents and NB|AZ representatives. Refreshments will be provided by North Italia and entertainment by Urban Electra.

WHO: Keith Maio, President and CEO of National Bank of Arizona

WHEN: Wednesday, February 26 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m.

WHERE: National Bank of Arizona – Camelback Wealth Center, 4040 East Camelback Road, Phoenix, Arizona 85018

89444261

NB|AZ Announces Opening of Camelback Wealth Center

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced the opening of its new Camelback Wealth Center, which strengthens its commitment to the community and clients around the Camelback Corridor. The existing branch location at 4040 East Camelback Road was remodeled into the new wealth center, which blends executive banking and private banking under one roof.

As one of the most affluent areas in the Valley, Camelback Corridor is a prime location for the new wealth center, which provides a wide array of options for high-net-worth clients and a streamlined approach to financial decision making. The wealth center provides clients a comprehensive array of financial services under one roof, housing 15 bankers including retail bankers, wealth managers, an executive banking team and a mortgage specialist. The remodeled building also offers a more energy efficient design and has been updated with a cash recycler for quicker processing of cash transactions.

“NB|AZ was founded on local relationships and we are proud to celebrate our commitment to the Camelback Corridor community with the opening of our new wealth center,” said Jathan Segur, National Bank of Arizona Senior Vice President Sales and Marketing. “We are dedicated to serving our customers and valued partners in the Valley, and this new wealth center will enable us to better foster those relationships.”

NB|AZ plans to commemorate the opening of the new wealth center with an open house event on February 26. Clients, valued partners and members of the Camelback Corridor community will be in attendance.

In addition to the new Camelback Wealth Center, NB|AZ has another wealth center located at 7375 East Doubletree Ranch Road in Scottsdale, which opened in October 2012. For more information about NB|AZ or a full list of NB|AZ branches, visit www.nbarizona.com.

A Guide to Applying for a Bank Loan

National Bank of Arizona Elects New Board

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced the appointment of three prominent business leaders as new members to its Board of Directors. The distinguished members elected to join the Board include David N. Beckham, real estate developer and co-founder of Beckham Gumbin Ventures; Tracy Bame, president of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation; and Steve Christy, Vice Chair of ADOT’s State Transportation Board.

The current Board made a strategic decision to elect three additional members to expand the Board for greater bandwidth, a stronger element of diversity and to broaden community representation.

“The criteria we used for selecting candidates for the Board was in keeping with the high standards of excellence we adhere to as a bank,” said Keith Maio, CEO and president, National Bank of Arizona. “We appointed three leaders with an excellent reputation and the best in their field of work.”

“I’m honored to serve on the NB|AZ Board with individuals of such high integrity,” said incoming member, David N. Beckham. “I’m fortunate to have had long-term relationships with some of the current members of the Board, and I look forward to being a productive addition in supporting the vision of this strong financial institution.”

“National Bank of Arizona is an organization that clearly is committed to being an outstanding business and community partner,” said Tracy Bame. “Adding new directors that bring expanded insight and perspective to the Board is continued demonstration of this. I’m privileged and thrilled to accept the invitation to serve the bank in advancing these goals across the state in every way I can.”

“I am truly looking forward to serving as a director with NB|AZ,” added Steve Christy. “I hope to bring to the bank a voice from southern Arizona, and will offer my connections within this community to further the bank’s Tucson interests in any way possible.”

maio

Leadership spotlight: Keith Maio

Keith Maio
President and CEO
National Bank of Arizona
nbarizona.com

Maio has been in banking for more than 30 years. He joined NB|AZ in 1992, was appointed president in 2001 and CEO in 2005.

Biggest challenge: “The challenges of the severe economic downturn, beginning in 2008.  Bringing a sharp, tactical approach to working through the problems of the day, while continuing to stay focused on a long term vision for our organization.”

Best advice received: “Know your strengths and weaknesses and hire smart people to fill the voids.”

Best advice to offer: “Ask yourself what activities you are accomplishing today that support your long-term goals. Not a day should go by that does not move you a step closer to your vision for yourself and your organization.”

Greatest accomplishment: “I am very proud and honored that NB|AZ has been selected by Arizonans as the No. 1 bank for 10 of the last 12 years in Ranking Arizona. I believe this is a testament to the power of an organization holding true to its core values and demonstrating a consistent approach to servicing customers each and every day.”

dinner

NB|AZ to Host Taste of the Biltmore Oct. 3

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced its seventh annual Taste of the Biltmore event, which is scheduled for Thursday, October 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the NB|AZ Biltmore Corporate Center. This highly anticipated kick-off to the Fall social season will bring the best of the Biltmore community together to enjoy unlimited food and wine tastes from more than 20 local restaurants.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the Act One Foundation (Act One), an organization that provides educational field trips to visual and performing arts centers for Arizona students. Act One provides transportation and resources to underserved public school children so that they can experience art and culture within their communities. In its inaugural year, Act One benefitted more than 20,000 K-12 public schoolchildren in Maricopa County.

“NB|AZ Taste of the Biltmore is the perfect way to bring the community together to enjoy delicious cuisine, while giving back to the community,” said Jathan Segur, senior vice president of sales and marketing for NB|AZ. “Each year the attendance grows allowing us to offer tremendous support to our designated beneficiary, and this year we are thrilled to be able to contribute to the Act One Foundation.”

“We are thrilled National Bank of Arizona has selected Act One as their partner in NB|AZ Taste of the Biltmore,” said Teniqua Broughton, executive director of the Act One Foundation. “Less than 50 percent of Arizona public schools provide integrated arts education in the curriculum due to budget constraints. Act One Foundation was created to address this need, and the collected funds from this event will help us serve these students.”

Participating restaurants include some of the Valley’s most recognized names: Central Bistro, Lon’s at the Hermosa Inn, Donovan’s Steak & Chop House, The Capital Grille, Season’s 52, True Food Kitchen, Zinburger Wine & Burger Bar, amongst many others.

Tickets are $35 online and at the door. To purchase tickets or to find out more about the event, including a full list of participating restaurants, please visit www.nbaztaste.com.

dinner

NB|AZ to Host Taste of the Biltmore Oct. 3

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced its seventh annual Taste of the Biltmore event, which is scheduled for Thursday, October 3 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the NB|AZ Biltmore Corporate Center. This highly anticipated kick-off to the Fall social season will bring the best of the Biltmore community together to enjoy unlimited food and wine tastes from more than 20 local restaurants.

All proceeds from the event will benefit the Act One Foundation (Act One), an organization that provides educational field trips to visual and performing arts centers for Arizona students. Act One provides transportation and resources to underserved public school children so that they can experience art and culture within their communities. In its inaugural year, Act One benefitted more than 20,000 K-12 public schoolchildren in Maricopa County.

“NB|AZ Taste of the Biltmore is the perfect way to bring the community together to enjoy delicious cuisine, while giving back to the community,” said Jathan Segur, senior vice president of sales and marketing for NB|AZ. “Each year the attendance grows allowing us to offer tremendous support to our designated beneficiary, and this year we are thrilled to be able to contribute to the Act One Foundation.”

“We are thrilled National Bank of Arizona has selected Act One as their partner in NB|AZ Taste of the Biltmore,” said Teniqua Broughton, executive director of the Act One Foundation. “Less than 50 percent of Arizona public schools provide integrated arts education in the curriculum due to budget constraints. Act One Foundation was created to address this need, and the collected funds from this event will help us serve these students.”

Participating restaurants include some of the Valley’s most recognized names: Central Bistro, Lon’s at the Hermosa Inn, Donovan’s Steak & Chop House, The Capital Grille, Season’s 52, True Food Kitchen, Zinburger Wine & Burger Bar, amongst many others.

Tickets are $35 online and at the door. To purchase tickets or to find out more about the event, including a full list of participating restaurants, please visit www.nbaztaste.com.

Bridget_Cooney

NB|AZ Hires New Senior Vice President

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced Bridget Cooney as its new senior vice president (SVP), retail banking group manager. Bridget brings more than 25 years of banking industry experience to her new position at NB|AZ.

In her role as SVP, retail banking group manager, Cooney will be responsible for sales and service delivery at seventy-two branch offices statewide, as well as enhancing the overall customer experience across all bank channels. She will work directly under Brent Cannon, executive vice president (EVP) and director of community banking.

“I am thrilled to join the NB|AZ team,” Cooney said. “I feel truly aligned with the bank’s core values and mission, and am confident that my leadership and business development skills will add considerable value to the retail banking group.”

Originally from the Midwest, Cooney graduated from Indiana University with a Bachelor of Science degree, and later earned her Master of Business Administration degree from W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. Bridget has worked in several large markets including Columbus, Dallas and Phoenix, growing her career from branch manager to sales and service coach, district manager, market manager and regional sales manager. Most recently, she represented Comerica Bank as an SVP, regional manager, where she worked to expand the bank’s Arizona market, while developing a sales culture to grow the bank’s business and profitability.

Cooney is based out of the NB|AZ Corporate Center located at 6001 N. 24th St., Phoenix.

For more information about NB|AZ and its services, visit www.nbarizona.com.

Bridget_Cooney

NB|AZ Hires New Senior Vice President

National Bank of Arizona (NB|AZ) announced Bridget Cooney as its new senior vice president (SVP), retail banking group manager. Bridget brings more than 25 years of banking industry experience to her new position at NB|AZ.

In her role as SVP, retail banking group manager, Cooney will be responsible for sales and service delivery at seventy-two branch offices statewide, as well as enhancing the overall customer experience across all bank channels. She will work directly under Brent Cannon, executive vice president (EVP) and director of community banking.

“I am thrilled to join the NB|AZ team,” Cooney said. “I feel truly aligned with the bank’s core values and mission, and am confident that my leadership and business development skills will add considerable value to the retail banking group.”

Originally from the Midwest, Cooney graduated from Indiana University with a Bachelor of Science degree, and later earned her Master of Business Administration degree from W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. Bridget has worked in several large markets including Columbus, Dallas and Phoenix, growing her career from branch manager to sales and service coach, district manager, market manager and regional sales manager. Most recently, she represented Comerica Bank as an SVP, regional manager, where she worked to expand the bank’s Arizona market, while developing a sales culture to grow the bank’s business and profitability.

Cooney is based out of the NB|AZ Corporate Center located at 6001 N. 24th St., Phoenix.

For more information about NB|AZ and its services, visit www.nbarizona.com.