Tag Archives: Native American

Diane-Humetewa

Humetewa is first American Indian woman federal judge

Diane Humetewa, Arizona State University Special Advisor to the President for American Indian Affairs, has been named the first American Indian woman to serve as a federal judge.

Humetewa won unanimous approval in the U.S. Senate in a 96-0 vote and will serve in the federal District Court of Arizona.

“I feel privileged to serve in this new capacity and I am certainly grateful for all of the support that President Crow and the ASU community offered me throughout the confirmation process,” Humetewa said.

This isn’t the first time Humetewa has made her mark in history. She was the first American Indian female to be appointed as a U.S. Attorney in 2007. During a long career in public service, she also served as counsel to the U.S. Senate Indian Affairs Subcommittee, then chaired by Sen. John McCain. Before the Senate vote, Senator McCain informed the Senate body of the historic nature of the vote.

As a Professor of Practice in the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and Special Advisor to the President, Humetewa taught Indian law and worked to improve the retention and success of American Indian students at the university.

“Diane Humetewa has excelled in efforts to bring higher education to American Indian people on tribal lands throughout the state and to improve their academic experience at the university,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow.

“We look forward to following her progress as she continues her exceptional career in public service.”

Humetewa, who will leave ASU to serve on the federal district court, was chairperson of the ASU Tribal Liaison Advisory Committee and a member of the Provost’s Native American Advisory Council. She worked to promote higher education opportunities among Arizona’s tribes, notably with the Tribal Nations Tour that brought university students and staff to reservation communities.

Humetewa, a member of the Hopi tribe, was born and raised in Arizona. She began school on the Hualapai Reservation and traveled throughout Arizona’s Indian country with her father, who worked for the Bureau of Indian Affairs. She maintains close ties to her family and culture on the Hopi reservation.

Humetewa received her Juris Doctor degree in 1993 from ASU’s Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law and her bachelor’s degree from ASU in 1987. She has served on the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law Indian Legal Advisory Committee since 1997.

MEETING OF THE MINDS: Jeff Ehret interviews CIIC founders Jefferson Begay and Urban L. Giff during the 2013 conference opening.

Building the bridge: CIIC Conference sets sights on university program

Entering its 11th year, Arizona State University’s Construction in Indian Country conference is a means to recruit prospective Native American construction students, educate local tribes and foster industry connections. It is also a key contributor to the CIIC endowment, which has raised $400,000 and put 14 students through the construction management program at ASU. It is currently supporting nine undergraduates, including Shane Cody who came to the program after working in the industry as a field laborer.

“I really enjoyed my working experience in the field, but I knew that obtaining a management position would require me to obtain a construction management degree from a university,” Cody says. Cody contacted the CIIC through the suggestion of his ASU adviser and has since landed two internships with DPR Construction offices.

Program chair Allan Chasey, at the Del E. Webb School of Construction, is proud of what the CIIC conference and endowment have accomplished, but when he stepped into his current role at the school a year ago, he says he saw more to the CIIC culture; he saw a full academically involved program. The first step toward making the conference into a year-round program was replacing an events coordinator with a program manager. The department landed Jerome Clark, who had extensive experience with the Intertribal Council of Arizona and an understanding of Chasey’s vision.

“The question we find ourselves asking more often is nation-building for tribes — what does it take for a tribe to build up their nations. build up its hospitals, roads, etc.,” Clark says.

The CIIC’s updated vision includes more conversations with tribes, research into tribal construction laws and potentially building a clearing house. But first, CIIC must address its 2014 theme, “Bridging Our Communities – Building for Our Futures,” — the key to its future as a program.

The Conference

11TH ANNUAL CONSTRUCTION IN INDIAN COUNTRY
April 28 to 30
Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino
5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler
http://ciic.construction.asu.edu

asu

ASU recognized for American Indian education

A new study, “For Our Children: A Study and Critical Discussion of the Influences on American Indian and Alaska Native Education Policy,” cites Arizona State University as one of the most influential universities in American Indian education and recognizes American Indian Studies Director and Professor John Tippeconnic as one of the most “influential people in American Indian/Alaska Native Education.”

The study by Hollie J. Mackey, University of Oklahoma assistant professor of education, and Linda Sue Warner, special assistant to the president on Indian affairs at Northeastern A&M College in Miami, Okla., determined and described influential studies, organizations, information sources and people for American Indian/Alaska Native education policy. The “Journal of American Indian Education” that is published by the ASU Center for Indian Education was also identified as one of the most influential sources of information in the study.

Arizona State University was cited as an influential university with five other institutions across the United States, including Northern Arizona University. Arizona is home to 22 tribes and 28 percent of the state is comprised of tribal lands. Tippeconnic is recognized as one of the most influential professors in American Indian/Alaska Native education among a cohort of 20 professors from throughout the nation.

Tippeconnic is an accomplished scholar who was awarded the National Indian Education Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award last year. He is the former director of the U.S. Department of Education Office of Indian Education and past director of the Office of Indian Education Programs for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of Interior.

Tippeconnic, who is of Comanche and Cherokee heritage, was instrumental in bringing higher education to American Indian students in Oklahoma when he helped start a college there. Emphasizing the tribe’s native language and culture, the Comanche Nation College will soon achieve accreditation status.
ASU has one of the highest American Indian/Native American student populations in the nation with approximately 2,000 Native American students currently enrolled at the university. A new American Indian Studies master’s program that Tippeconnic was instrumental in creating began last year, offering a comprehensive view of Native American life with the opportunity to work directly with tribes.

ASU is also home to the American Indian Policy Institute that serves as a resource for research, partnerships and entrepreneurial endeavors that involve Arizona’s tribes and tribal nations throughout the United States.

American Indian Studies faculty at ASU are all American Indians and members of tribal nations while  American Indian Student Support Services supports the academic achievement and personal success of American Indian students while promoting traditional culture at Arizona State University.

A new course to be taught by Professor Donald Fixico at the university in the fall, “AIS 191: Preparing for Academic Success,” will mesh American Indian views and values with tools to succeed academically at ASU.

energy.bill

Navajo Generating Station worth Billions to Navajo Nation

The Navajo Generating Station in northern Arizona will help contribute nearly $13 billion to the Navajo economy and help support thousands of jobs from 2020 through 2044 – if agreements can be reached to keep the plant operating beyond 2019 – according to a study prepared for the Navajo Nation and Salt River Project by the L William Seidman Research Institute at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

Located on the Navajo Nation, near Page, NGS is one of the largest and most important suppliers of electricity in the Southwest.

According to the ASU report, Navajo Generating Station and Kayenta Mine: An Economic Impact Analysis for the Navajo Nation, NGS and the Kayenta Mine, the plant’s coal supplier, will contribute $12.94 billion to the Navajo Nation economy through sustained jobs and wages if the plant was to remain operational through 2044.

NGS currently employs about 518 people, nearly 86 percent of whom are Native American.  The Kayenta Mine has more than 400 employees, of whom about 90 percent are also Native American.

“I have been saying we need to protect existing jobs on the Navajo Nation,” said Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly.  “This study shows that the plant and the mine not only support existing jobs at the plant and mine, but support other jobs in the area.”

The ASU report examined the direct, indirect and induced economic impact of NGS and Kayenta Mine on the Navajo Nation using the IMPLAN model employed by the state of Arizona to examine various economic projections.  A full copy of the report is available at www.ngspower.com.

The study on the plant’s economic impact on the Navajo Nation is separate from a 2012 study from ASU that concluded that NGS and the Kayenta Mine will provide more than $20 billion in economic contributions throughout the state for the period measured from 2011 to 2044.  The new study examined the economic effects exclusively for the Navajo Nation.

Despite its economic importance, a number of significant challenges threaten the future viability of NGS.  To ensure future operations of NGS, the plant’s lease and various rights of way with the Navajo Nation must be extended and the coal supply contract with Peabody Energy renegotiated prior to any additional costly emission controls from the EPA.

The plant’s lease and various rights of way with the Navajo Nation are set to expire around 2019 and the Navajo Nation Council is currently considering legislation to extend them.  In addition, the plant’s owners are also renegotiating the coal supply contract with Peabody Energy.  Perhaps most significantly, the U.S. Environmental Protection has proposed additional and costly environmental rules to address regional visibility.

NGS is a coal-fired power plant that provides electricity to customers in Arizona, Nevada and California, and energy to pump water through the Central Arizona Project.  The participants in NGS include the plant’s operator, SRP; the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Arizona Public Service Co.; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Tucson Electric Power Co. and NV Energy.

Photo: Heard Museum - Native American Experiences

Top 5: Native American Experiences (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Native American Experiences — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Heard Museum

2301 N. Central Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85004
(602) 252-8848
heard.org
Experience myriad cultures and the art of American Indians in 10 world-class exhibit galleries, plus enjoy sculpture courtyards, superb dining and shopping for your own uniquely Southwestern gifts and art.


Hubbell Trading Post

1 mile west of Hwy. 191,
Ganado, AZ 86505
(928) 755-3475
nps.gov/hutr
Feel the old wooden floor give slightly and squeak beneath your feet as you enter the oldest, continuously operating trading post on the Navajo Nation. As your eyes adjust to the dim lighting of the “bullpen,” you might catch the trader negotiating a deal with a Native American artist for their art.


Navajo Arts & Crafts Enterprise

W. Highway 264 & SR-12,
Window Rock, AZ 86515
(928) 871-4090
gonavajo.com
The only enterprise of the Navajo Nation that specializes in handmade Navajo jewelry, such as bracelets, rings, belts necklaces and more, Navajo Arts & Crafts Enterprise also offers woven rugs and represents many artisans on and off the Navajo Reservation.


Navajo Nation Hospitality Enterprise

6677 W. Thunderbird Rd., #J176,
Glendale, AZ 85306
(623) 412-0297
explorenavajo.com
Come visit the largest Indian Reservation in the United States. The Navajo Nation Hospitality Enterprise owns and operates three properties in the heart of Indian Country — Quality Inn Navajo Nation, Quality Inn Navajo Nation Capital and the Navajo Travel Center.


The Yavapai Experience

14803 N. Hiawatha Hood Rd.,
Fort McDowell, AZ 85264
(480) 816-6465
fortmcdowelladventures.com
Learn all about the Yavapai, the tribe’s culture, history and heritage, on this two-hour cultural heritage experience from the people of the Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation. The professional guide will facilitate your tour with possible opportunities to interact with Yavapai tribal members as well.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

Top 5 Native American Experiences (Spring-Summer 2012)

Top 5: Native American Experiences (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Native American Experiences — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Annual World Championship Hoop Dance Contest

2301 N. Central Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-252-8848
heard.org/hoop
Experience the fast-paced precision and grace of hoop dancing as the top hoop dancers from the U.S. and Canada compete. Visitors can enjoy delicious fry bread and other American Indian foods. Saturday and Sunday, February 11-12, 2012.


Heard Museum

2301 N. Central Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-252-8848
heard.org
Experience myriad cultures and the art of American Indians in 10 world-class exhibit galleries, plus enjoy sculpture courtyards, superb dining and shopping for your own uniquely Southwestern gifts and art.


Pueblo Grande Museum Indian Market

4619 E. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85034
602-495-0900
pueblograndestore.com
Native American artisans representing more than 50 tribes display and sell arts and crafts.


Southwest Indian Art Fair

1013 E. University Blvd.
Tucson, AZ
520-621-6302
statemuseum.arizona.edu/events/swiaf
The Southwest Indian Fair features some of Arizona’s best Native American arts from 200 renowned artists. Demonstrations, food, music and dance performances will also be on hand. February 18-19, 2012.


Turkey Mountain Traders

7008 E. Main St.
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
480-423-8777
turkey-mountain.com
Turkey Mountain Traders specializes in the finest antique (pre-1940) American Indian art, antique American Indian jewelry, and antique American folk art. Its gallery is located on Main Street in Scottsdale and is open Monday and Wednesday-Saturday (and by chance or appointment on Tuesdays) from October through May.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012