Tag Archives: NCAA

St. Mary's

Cox introduces NCAA March Madness Live App

The NCAA March Madness Live® app now offers Cox Communications’ customers free streaming, live coverage of the 2013 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship when and where they want it at no additional charge across all tablets, smartphones and desktop computers using a broadband connection. NCAA March Madness Live® features social and interactive components to provide portable access to the tournament and is available via download from Google Play and the Apple App Store.

“We know our customers look forward to exciting basketball in March – whether they watch on their TV, online, mobile or tablet, they won’t miss a minute of coverage! Cox customers who subscribe to the Essential package or higher can experience all of the action wherever they are and at no additional charge,” said Susan Anable, vice president of public affairs for Cox Communications.

The 2013 NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship will be televised by CBS, TBS, TNT and truTV now through the Men’s Final Four® and National Championship Game from Atlanta on April 6 and April 8.

Cox communications will offer a wide array of viewing options so that its customers can enjoy the entire NCAA Championship tournament through their:

· Television: For the third consecutive year, all 67 games will be televised in their entirety across four television networks — TBS, CBS, TNT, and truTV.

· Computer: Cox customers with access to TNT, TBS and truTV on their TV will also be able to watch the games live online by going to www.ncaa.com/march-madness and using their Cox User ID and Password to sign in.  All games broadcast on CBS are available with no registration.

· Tablet/Smart phone: Cox customers with access to TNT, TBS,CBS and truTV on their TV will be able to watch the games live via the March Madness Live ® app.  The app is available on Android or Apple smart phones and tablets.

Clifton

Jackson Lewis names new managing partner

Jackson Lewis LLP, one of the country’s largest and fastest-growing workplace law firms, is pleased to announce Gregg E. Clifton has assumed the role of Phoenix office Managing Partner, succeeding Amy J. Gittler.  Ms. Gittler, who has served as Managing Partner since she opened the Phoenix office for the firm in December 2007, will continue her legal practice as a Partner, representing employers in all facets of employment matters.

“During Amy’s tenure as Managing Partner, she did an outstanding job of establishing Jackson Lewis as a ‘go to’ firm in Phoenix,” said Firm Chairman Vincent A. Cino.  “We are confident in Gregg’s ability to step right into his leadership role and continue to strengthen our presence and reputation in the region.  Over the years, he has earned the respect of colleagues and clients alike with his invaluable knowledge of workplace law and the sports industry specifically, and we look forward to seeing how the Phoenix office will continue to flourish under his management.”

“I am excited to assume the role of Managing Partner and work with this team of talented attorneys,” said Clifton.  “I am fortunate to be able to build upon the solid foundation that exists here, and I look forward to our continued success in Phoenix.”
Mr. Clifton, who began his career as an Associate at Jackson Lewis, has advised numerous professional franchises on general labor and employment issues, including Title III ADA regulatory compliance and wage and hour issues.  He serves as lead counsel for several Major League Baseball teams in their salary arbitration matters and has represented NCAA and NAIA collegiate clients regarding rules compliance, investigatory matters and in disciplinary hearings.  In addition, Clifton has worked extensively in the area of agent regulation and enforcement in professional and college sports and regularly provides counsel on matters relating to NCAA and NAIA amateurism issues and athlete eligibility questions.

Clifton also continues to counsel clients in the areas of collective bargaining negotiations, representation cases, arbitrations and National Labor Relations Board matters.  Prior to joining Jackson Lewis, he spent six years as Chief Operating Officer and Vice President of Team Sports for Gaylord Sports Management.  He also served as President of the Athlete and Entertainment Division for famed sports attorney Bob Woolf’s firm, Woolf Associates, in Boston.

Clifton frequently serves as a guest speaker to law schools, including Harvard University, Boston College, Hofstra University and Arizona State University, and bar associations regarding sports law issues.  He is often cited as an expert source in national news media for his commentary and opinion on legal issues in sports.  Clifton is a graduate of the Hofstra University School of Law and graduated cum laude from Harvard University where he played on the basketball team and was a recipient of the John Harvard Scholarship for Academic Excellence.  He is a member of the Arizona State Bar Association, New Jersey State Bar Association, New York State Bar Association and the American Bar Association.

Jackson Lewis’ Phoenix office can be reached by calling (602) 714-7044.

Moneyball

Taking A Gamble On March Madness

Office pools and social gambling can be harmless fun — if the rules are followed

Every human resources department in Arizona would flip a chip if employees set up a poker table in the middle of the boardroom and started playing Texas Hold ‘Em in the middle of the work day. But somehow, gambling in March Madness office pools gets a free pass.

“For many of us, March Madness is a rite of passage in the spring,” says Pavneet Uppal, managing partner of Fisher & Phillips in Phoenix. “It’s a chance to build camaraderie with co-workers through office pools, a chance to reconnect with college friends during games and a chance to indulge in a few chicken wings with the family.”

March Madness — the nickname given to the NCAA basketball tournament — is the nation’s largest gambling event. Conservative estimates project that more than $2.5 billion will be wagered on the tournament, which doubles the amount bet each year on the Super Bowl. More importantly for employers, March Madness costs anywhere from $1.4 billion to $3.8 billion in lost employee productivity each year.

Lost productivity aside, is it legal to bet in March Madness office pools?

“Under Arizona statute, March Madness pools are not illegal if they meet the four criteria of legal social gambling,” says Melissa Costello, an attorney in Bryan Cave’s labor and employment group.

The four criteria of legal social gambling are:
1. All of the participants compete on equal terms.
2. Each participant is at least 21 years old.
3. The participants can only receive winnings, and no other benefit.
4. No non-participant will gain any benefit from the pool.

“If an office pool does not meet all of the criteria for legal ‘social gambling,’ a company that allows an office pool could be charged with a class 5 felony if it conducts, organizes, manages, directs, supervises, finances, or furnishes advice or assistance in promoting the office pool,” Costello says. “A felony conviction could subject the company to a significant fine.”

If the office pool does not meet the ‘social gambling’ criteria, the organizer of the pool could also be charged with a class 5 felony for promoting illegal gambling and, if found guilty, could be sentenced to jail time and ordered to pay a significant fine, Costello warns.

“There can be numerous (other) legal issues, particularly if the gambling crosses state lines,” says Craig O’Loughlin, a partner with Quarles & Brady. “There can be IRS issues with winnings, (and) whistleblower issues.”

Beyond the legal ramifications of office pools, a Spherion study found that 52 percent of human resources executives say their top priority this year is cost containment. March Madness — accompanied by excessive score-checking and an exorbitant amount of water cooler game analysis — erodes workplace productivity and can jeopardize cost-saving measures.

“Employers have every right to expect employees to devote 100 percent of their energies to the job between stated work hours, and as long as they act consistently, can fire employees who play fantasy sports instead of working,” Uppal advises. “Human resources teams should consider reviewing and communicating the company’s office policies on the topic to ensure good people aren’t destroying their careers in the name of March Madness.”

Uppal says many managers are beginning to recognize and accept that employees will spend a portion of their work day handling personal business or surfing the Internet. And some even run March Madness pools as a team-building activity.

“If the employer sponsors (March Madness pools), make the entry free, and have prizes for the winners,” O’Loughlin says. “Also, know the tax ramifications of the prizes.”

Even if employers feel disinclined to allow March Madness office pools because they are a drain on employee productivity and efficiency, the reality is that employees will likely still participate in pools outside of the office, Costello says.

“Office pools should not be official company events, but rather than spend energy prohibiting office pools that meet the ‘social gambling’ criteria, employers should consider using March Madness as a tool for developing employee relationships and increasing morale, such as by inviting employees to wear a shirt from their alma mater on game days, hosting viewing parties during lunch hours, or providing basketball-themed snack breaks in the afternoon.”

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

NCAA March Madness

NCAA March Madness: Get Your Tickets Now

You can watch as much of Joe Lunardi’s Bracketology as possible, study your match-ups and build your Excel spreadsheets, but the office secretary who picked her teams based on mascots will still beat you.

Yes, it is that time of the year again: March Madness.NCAA March Madness Bracket

And luckily for us college hoops fans here in Phoenix, the West Regional will be landing at the US Airways Center March 22 and 24.

Tickets through Ticketmaster already are sold out, but they are currently on sale on StubHub. Get them now before the tournament gets started and before fans make plans to come to Phoenix to support their teams.

If rankings play out, there could be some high-profile programs coming through town.

From Big 10 Tournament champion Michigan State (27-7) to Big East Tournament champion Louisville (26-9), the best of the best have the opportunity to play in the building Barkley built.

That’s only if they can get past some of the dark horses hidden within the West Regional.

And what would March Madness be without some of the tournament-defining upsets?

So here we go. My predictions. Because what kind of March Madness article would this be without them?

While I’ve been doing March Madness brackets for more than 10 years now, I am in no way an expert. Because, truthfully, no one is thanks to past teams like Virginia Commonwealth and George Mason.

I’m going to break this down region by region.

South

In the South Regional, there aren’t too many teams that will get the upper hand in the earlier rounds. And picking VCU in the 5-12 matchup versus Wichita St. is not going to give you the edge on any of your friends or co-workers, as they are likely to pick after the runs they’ve made in the past.

But watch out for Indiana. Even though they are a four seed, they still have a tough road ahead facing the No. 1 overall Kentucky in the Sweet 16 (if both make it there). And don’t forget about Indiana’s year-defining win over Kentucky earlier this season.

I expect to see Indiana taking out Baylor in the Elite 8 and representing the South Region in the Final Four.

West

My end result of the West Regional may be a little conventional, but leading up to that I took some risks with my picks.

And while this may not be a shocker due to their amazing record (30-1), Murray State is going to face Michigan State in the Elite 8.

Also, watch the Lobos from New Mexico as a I predict them taking out Louisville in the round of 32. I don’t see them getting past Michigan State, which will eventually head to the Final Four in New Orleans out of the West.

East

Like the West Regional, my end results here are not very unconventional.

While Syracuse and Ohio State sat in the top 10 rankings all year long, it’s the Florida State Seminoles who you need to watch out for. Coming off their ACC Tournament championship, and beating Duke and UNC both twice this year, they are my pick to come out of the East Regional.

With experienced guards and an athletic inside game, this is the year the usually-disappointing Seminoles make a run in the tournament.

And riding off alumni’s Linsanity, watch Harvard to win the 5-12 matchup against Vanderbilt, and then upset No. 4 seed Wisconsin.

Midwest

And finally, the Midwest.

We’ll start with the upsets. After San Diego State takes out NC State in the first round, look for them to end No. 3 Georgetown’s championship dreams.

Also, Cal., coming off the play-in game vs. South Florida will follow my trend of 5-12 upsets taking out Temple. And if Cal doesn’t beat South Florida in the play-in game, look to see the athletic USF team create the 5-12 upset on their terms.

Every year I seem to end up picking Kansas to make a nice run in the tournament, and it’s the same this year. I don’t know what it is about the Jayhawks and coach Bill Self, but they impress me every year. And this year is no different.

Final Four

On the left bracket we’re going to see Indiana and Michigan State meet in New Orleans. While Michigan State should be the obvious victor in this matchup, Indiana will be riding a string of huge victories that will carry them into the championship.

And on the right, the Seminoles and the Jayhawks will also be meeting in New Orleans. The inside play of Robinson will be too much for the Seminoles to handle, propelling Jayhawks into the NCAA championship tournament for the first time since 2008.

On April 2, Indiana’s amazing tournament run will end. Kansas has too many weapons inside and out and will win the university’s fourth national championship.

To see all my March Madness bracket picks, click here.