Tag Archives: new hires

Sign-on bonus

Your Next Job Offer May Include A Sign-On Bonus

Despite it being a buyers’ market, employers say they are willing to pay sign-on bonuses to attract the right talent. A new WorldatWork study found that, despite budget cuts, a majority (54 percent) of (mostly large) U.S. employers are still offering sign-on bonuses to new employees, especially key new hires filling critical positions.

A sign-on or signing bonus is a sum of money paid to a new employee by a company as an incentive to join that company. Sign-on bonuses are almost exclusively given to full-time salaried employees of a company, as opposed to a temporary hire or intern. They are often given as a way of making a pay package more attractive to the job candidate.

According to the WorldatWork survey on bonus programs (to be released in early May), sign-on bonuses continue to be fairly prevalent for all employee levels (except clerical) within organizations.  Most employee groups are typically eligible for amounts between $1,000 and $9,999, but many executives have been known to receive more than $10,000.

With today’s unemployment rates, the sign-on bonus may come as a (pleasant) surprise to many job candidates. This is because despite the current economic slump, there remains a shortage of qualified employees in certain hard-to-fill positions.

Sign-on bonuses can help:

To be competitive

If the candidate is considering another comparable job offer, some money up front can be the clincher.

To bridge a gap

If what the candidate is asking for and what the employer is willing to offer is off by a few grand, this is a way to make up the difference.

To replace a lost benefit

When some benefit or perk with the present employer is not part of the offered package, a sign-on bonus might make up for, say, the absence of a car allowance or diminished amount of vacation time with the new employer.

To cover a performance bonus

If a candidate won’t leave their current company until a certain time so they can first collect their annual bonus, a sign-on bonus can sweeten the deal.

Need further proof that companies are using bonuses to attract talent? Sixty percent of the 1,023 surveyed companies have a referral bonus program, whereby cash bonuses are paid to employees who refer new hires.

US Airways jet

U.S. Airways Plans To Fill 500 Jobs In 2011

US Airways has announced plans to hire 500 pilots and flight attendants next year, in order to fill anticipated job openings due to attrition and retirement.

The company announced today that the 500 would come from the ranks of employees currently on furlough, as well as new hires. The majority of the returning and new employees will be on the job by July.

“Our crew member hiring needs are being driven primarily by planned retirements and attrition, as well as international growth,” said US Airways President Scott Kirby. “Today’s announcement is consistent with our previously announced plan to keep our domestic capacity flat in 2011, while growing international capacity by 8 percent.”

The carrier plans to fill 420 flight attendant positions and 80 pilot positions in 2011. US Airways will first offer the positions to employees currently on furlough. Once that process is completed, the airline will begin hiring new employees.

After the recall, US Airways said it will have no flight attendants on furlough, and may have up to 100 pilots remaining on furlough. When the recall and new hire process is complete, the airline said it will have approximately 4,970 active pilots and 7,300 active flight attendants.

Onboarding Employees

The Critical Process Of Onboarding Your New Employees

You’ve sorted through stacks of resumes, interviewed the best and selected the perfect candidate. Now what? Once you’ve made the job offer and it has been accepted, it is time to start thinking about your onboarding process.

Onboarding is the term used to describe the process of integrating a new employee into your organization, and there are three steps to consider.

Be prepared
It is very unpleasant for an employee to show up to a new job, excited about the possibilities, and end up with the feeling that she was not expected and the company is surprised to see her. Since that is not the kind of surprise you want for your newest “most valuable asset,” it is important to prepare in advance for her arrival. Take into consideration such factors as:

The workspace — Is it properly equipped? Is it cleaned up, with the remnants of the prior occupant removed? Include a small “welcome” gift.

Name badge — If your staff wears name badges, be sure your new hire has one on her first day of work.

Time — Be sure the new hire’s manager has taken the necessary time to make introductions with co-workers. Your new hire should not be treated like he is an inconvenience to a busy schedule.

Welcome
Many employees make the decision about whether they are going to stay at their new organization within the first week. Since we only have a short period of time to make a good and lasting first impression, take these important steps to make him feel welcome:

Be sure your front desk personnel are trained to welcome new hires in the same way they welcome your customers. The welcome should say, “We’ve been expecting you and are glad you are here!”

Give your new hire a tour upon arrival. Be sure to point out the restrooms, drinking fountain, coffee maker, vending machines and break room, in addition to her workspace, the copier, supply room and other important rooms in your building. Remember, you want to make a good impression, so team her up with someone who is a great spokesperson for your organization.

The road to success
You want to set your new hire up for success from the start, so consider the following when laying out the roadmap for her first several months onboard:

If you have a formal job description, make sure your new hire receives a copy of it on her first day of work. The manager, or a co-worker who is knowledgeable about the job, should review the job duties and clearly define what is expected for each task. Define “success” up front, so your new hire knows what will be expected of her.

If the manager for the new hire is often in meetings or off-site, assign another “go to” person for your new hire. Since new hires decide early on if they are going to “fit” at this organization, it is important they feel comfortable asking questions and seeking assistance when needed.

We all have things to learn when starting a new job. Be sure your new hire is trained on all aspects of his job, from the mundane to the complex. Depending on your environment, it may be best to wait until a couple of days after the start of the new job to train on more complex matters. Give enough information for your new hire to go home loving his new job on the first day, and not so much information that he wonders how he will ever remember it.

Onboarding is a six-month to one-year process depending on the complexity of the work you do. Check in often with your new hire to make sure she has received the training she needs, has the proper equipment to do her job, understands your corporate culture and has made a few friends with whom she feels comfortable.

Since you have made a significant investment in selecting and hiring your newest “asset,” you want to do everything possible to get them onboard and keep them onboard. An effective onboarding process will set everyone on the right track.