Tag Archives: next generation

Educational Partnership - Maricopa Community Colleges & University of Phoenix

University of Phoenix Forms Educational Partnership With Maricopa Community Colleges

Alliance creates career pathways to address workforce skills gaps

University of Phoenix, the nation’s largest private university and leader in educating today’s working learner, today announced an educational partnership with Maricopa Community Colleges that will provide new educational opportunities in manufacturing, healthcare, business, and hospitality. The new partnership was announced at a special signing ceremony at Rio Salado College.

“This new partnership will provide a transition from associate’s to bachelor’s degree in areas like manufacturing, hospitality and business, where we know we need skilled workers and need them now.”

Through the new partnership, University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges will work with area business, academic and diversity leaders to identify workforce needs and develop focused curriculum and specific career pathways to meet those area workforce skills gaps. Students will have the opportunity to earn an associate’s degree at any Maricopa Community College and then seamlessly transition to a bachelor’ degree program at University of Phoenix.

“We agree with President Obama—community colleges are critical in developing our next generation of skilled workers—and that’s why we continue to invest in these types of partnerships,” said Dr. Bill Pepicello, President, University of Phoenix. “When two education providers like University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges come together to present education solutions, the benefit to students, employers and the local economy is that much greater.”

As part of the partnership, Maricopa Community College students will have the opportunity to potentially convert prior training and work experience into college credit through Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) at University of Phoenix. Through a new University of Phoenix transfer policy, credits earned through an associate’s of arts degree at Maricopa Community Colleges will transfer to University of Phoenix and satisfy general education course requirements so students can immediately begin working towards their bachelor’s degree in their field of study. University of Phoenix and Maricopa Community Colleges will also explore transfer trends to ensure the partnership is meeting local employer demands.

“The Maricopa Community Colleges are committed to helping our students reach their educational goals, and part of that commitment is ensuring that they have as many ways as possible to achieve success,” said Dr. Rufus Glasper, Chancellor of the Maricopa Community Colleges. “This new partnership will provide a transition from associate’s to bachelor’s degree in areas like manufacturing, hospitality and business, where we know we need skilled workers and need them now.”

[stextbox id=”alert” bwidth=”1″ bcolor=”000000″ bgcolor=”e0e0e0″ image=”null”]For more information on this educational partnership go to Maricopa Community Colleges  or University of Phoenix.[/stextbox]

Intel Building

Intel Announces Multibillion Dollar Investment in Arizona, Oregon Plants

Intel will be investing between $6 billion and $8 billion to develop and upgrade facilities at its Arizona and Oregon plants.

The investment, which was announced by Intel today, will create 6,000-8,000 construction jobs and 800-1,000 permanent high-tech jobs. The company says the investment also will allow Intel to maintain its current manufacturing employment base at its U.S. sites. Intel’s operations in Arizona are located in Chandler

The investment also will pay for a new development fab in Oregon, as well as upgrades to Intel’s four four existing fabs to manufacture the next-generation 22-nanometer (nm) process technology. The first 22nm microprocessors, codenamed Ivy Bridge, will be in production in late 2011.

“The most immediate impact of our multibillion-dollar investment will be the thousands of jobs associated with building a new fab and upgrading four others, and the high-wage, high-tech manufacturing jobs that follow,” said Intel President and CEO Paul Otellini.

This new capital expenditure follows a U.S. investment announcement made in February 2009 to support state-of-the-art upgrades to its manufacturing process. Those upgrades resulted in 32nm process technology that has already produced computer chips being used today in PCs, servers, embedded and mobile devices around the world.

Future Generations Go Green

The American Dream Reborn Through Sustainability

When my father’s grandparents immigrated to America, they had one objective: to give their children, and some day their grandchildren, a better life. They worked hard and sacrificed to instill the desire to make thing better for the next generation, my grandparents.

Maybe you can remember the sacrifices you saw growing up, how past generations saved money and withheld pleasure from themselves in order to make sure the next generations strived.

That generation is long gone and has been replaced with an American culture that is more focused on the here and now. We don’t think as much about the future, particularly one that doesn’t include us. Today, we look out more for our own best interest. Yes, of course, we want our children to have a better life than us, that is, as long as our lives are exceptionally good.

In 1928, Herbert Hoover was elected president based on the promise of prosperity. “A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage” boasted the campaign slogan, and people lined up at voting booths. Think about that for a moment – to our ancestors the thought of owning a car and having a good meal seemed like a dream! Times have changed.

Our society is in debt, and I am not just talking about our financial woes. We are borrowing resources from future generations: their trees, water, air, flora, fauna. And we have no plan or intention to pay it back, leaving the bill and a big mess to our children and their children.

So the question is: How do we deal with environmental issues that will exist beyond our allotted time here on earth, affecting generations that may never even know our names but will remember our water bottles?

Issues like global warming, pollution, loss of biodiversity and an economy based on carbon will have a much larger effect on our ancestors than it ever will on us, and the solutions for those issues will take generations to fix. Weaning ourselves from carbon is not as easy as electric cars and solar panels, carbon-based fuels are used for much more than powering our cars and heating and cooling our homes. Plastic, makeup, diapers, medical equipment, roads, computers, nearly everything you have in your home in some way or another is connected to these products. Our demand continues to grow and the technology to replace oil, coal and natural gas will take time to evolve and take even longer to meet our growing needs.

So what can we do? First, we need to start thinking beyond our own lifetime and the impact that our actions today will have on future generations and take personal responsibility for those actions. It is a seedy picture of those 25 generations from now weeding through mounds of our plastic, living amongst a significantly smaller circle of species, and enduring famine and disease as a result of decisions made by us today.

Second, we need to demand accountability of our government and the companies we support, asking them to create positions and departments that represent the rights of future generations. In addition, our justice department needs to aggressively defend the rights of those inheriting this planet.

Finally, we need to reconnect to our instinct of sacrificing to create a better world for our children.

To our children, our impact will not be taught from history books but seen in the evidence we left on the planet we lived.