Tag Archives: nonprofit

Shape Up US, WEB

Scottsdale Nonprofit Hosts Shape-Up Event for Kids and Families

Thousands of Valley kids and families will enjoy a host of carnival activities, sports clinics, music and more at the Shape Up US Carnival on March 29 and 30 at WestWorld in Scottsdale. The event is hosted by Shape Up US, a Scottsdale nonprofit dedicating to fighting childhood obesity.

The Carnival is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday. It will feature a rock climbing wall, kids’ sports clinics, carnival rides, bounce houses, face painting, family entertainment and numerous other activities. Event planners expect more than 10,000 people during the two-day event.

“Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the past 30 years,” said Jyl Steinback, founder and executive director, Shape Up US. “We must reverse this trend through awareness, education and action. The Carnival gives kids and families an opportunity to be active and feel great while having an absolute blast.”

Like the Carnival, Shape Up US hosts events and expos throughout the year to provide fun and engaging opportunities for kids and families to get fit. In addition, the organization is working with schools across the country to implement Hip Hop Healthy Heart for Children™, an innovative, multidisciplinary K-6 education curriculum that brings art, music and physical education back into the classroom. The program includes eight web-based, on-demand modules that help teachers motivate their students to live healthy, active, balanced lives.

foodbank

Buck Truck Adds Substance to Food Drives

Tempe, nonprofit, crowd-funding, grocery stores, farmers, donate perishable food items, Buck Truck, Tempe Leadership, United Food Bank, Mesa, Ed Baker, Tempe Chamber of Commerce, Lisa Pino, Arizona

A Tempe-based nonprofit is utilizing the power of crowd-funding to enable grocery stores and farmers to donate perishable food items.

Buck Truck, a project of this year’s Tempe Leadership team, is accepting donations for refrigerated delivery trucks to the United Food Bank in Mesa.

The United Food Bank currently relies on donations from canned-food drives and retailers.  The donations from retailers are limited, however, as the United Food Bank lacks the ability to transport food that requires refrigeration for freshness.

“You want to provide the best food to those you’re trying to help,” said Ed Baker, a member of this year’s Tempe Leadership team. “The best foods for people to live a healthy life are fresh, perishable foods.”

The Tempe Leadership Program, a product of the Tempe Chamber of Commerce, has been around since 1985 and each year puts together a team of community-centric individuals for nine months to engage in a project that can cover a range of community services.

“When we sat down to decide what our project would be, it was brought up that United Food Bank has a difficult time accepting fresh food,” Baker said. “We thought, ‘If only we could get 10 or 15 people to donate for a refrigerated truck.’”

The final decision was the concept of Buck Truck, to which contributors are encouraged to donate $1, $10 or $15.

The goal is to raise $41,000 for trucks that can “deliver fresh vegetables and meats from local farmers, ranchers, suppliers and grocery stores” as opposed to non-perishable items typically collected by charities in canned-food drives.

The Buck Truck website states that the refrigerated food truck will allow 24,000 pounds of what previously would have been wasted food to be distributed monthly, which it notes equates to 20,000 fresh meals.

“Buck Truck is very important because it will allow us to provide fresh produce and lean protein to our 200 partners,” said Lisa Pino, president and CEO of United Food Bank. “It’s the food you need for a healthy, adequate diet.”

The importance of Buck Truck is not only to increase the quality of food being served to those in need, but also the quantity, as Arizona is currently scarce in resources to serve what she explained is one of the hungriest states in the country, said Pino.

“The Buck Truck is nimble and responsive to Arizona’s hunger needs,” she said.

Arizona is tied as the worst state for childhood hunger, and is fifth worst in food insecurity (limited access to adequate food sources), according to statistics cited on the United Food Bank website.

As well as helping absolve statewide hunger, Pino noted a collateral benefit of Buck Truck is also contributing to helping reduce food waste.

“A theme of sustainability is key for us,” Pino said. “We want to eliminate food waste and engage more young people on the issue.”

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McDowell Sonoran Preserve to close early July

Fire danger prompts restrictions and increased patrols -

Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve will close at 3 p.m. on Thursday, July 4, to reduce the threat of wild fires during the Independence Day holiday. Summer temperatures dry out vegetation and create an extreme fire threat that can endanger lives, property and the Valley’s fragile desert. The availability and popularity of fireworks during the Fourth of July holiday increases that threat.

All trailheads into the 27,800-acre preserve will have “closed” signs posted. Scottsdale police, staff and volunteer stewards will patrol the area to advise visitors about the closure and fire threat. Violating the closure is a Class 2 Misdemeanor punishable by up to four months in jail and a $750 fine.

The use of fireworks is prohibited in Scottsdale, but sales are permitted. Fireworks should not be used in Scottsdale – or anywhere near a natural desert environment.

“While the legislature mandated that firework sales are permitted throughout the state, our local ordinance prohibits the use of any type of consumer fireworks within city limits,” said Deputy Fire Chief Jim Ford. “Fireworks should not be used in Scottsdale – or anywhere near a natural desert environment.”

Scottsdale’s McDowell Sonoran Preserve encompasses the McDowell Mountains and large areas of the Sonoran Desert north of Dynamite Boulevard.

Visit www.scottsdaleaz.gov/fire.

 

Mane Attraction Salon logo

12/12/12 Deals At Mane Attraction Salon

One time only, on a day that happens only once every 100 years, Mane Attraction Salon in Phoenix is offering the following three specials:

  1. Book your next hair appointment for Wednesday, December 12 at Mane Attraction, and receive $12 off — whether it be a haircut, color or style.
  2. For those who haven’t booked an appointment yet, the 12th caller to schedule a service that day will receive a free haircut and a deep conditioning masque.
  3. And, lastly, the 12th client to check in that day will receive all of his or her booked services for free.

12/12/12 at Mane Attraction Salon

When: Wednesday, December 12, 2012 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Where: 3156 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Contact: (602) 956-2996
Web: maneattractionsalon.com

ryan

Ryan House announces new leadership

Ryan House, a Phoenix-based nonprofit that provides respite and palliative care to Arizona children facing life-threatening conditions and, as needed, end-of-life care, is pleased to announce a new Executive Director and Chairman of their Board of Directors.   The nonprofit recently selected Julie Bank as their new Executive Director and Matthew Winter has been appointed as the Chairman of the Board.

Bank comes to Ryan House with more than 25 years of experience in program planning, administration, communications and marketing experience in the nonprofit sector on both the national and local level.  She brings strong qualifications that will enhance Ryan House’s fundraising, program development, and donor relations. Bank will be responsible for a budget of $2million while overseeing the staff and work in collaboration with severalcommunity partners.

“I look forward to furthering the mission of Ryan House and to bring awareness to the good work being done through our respite, palliative and end-of-life care program,” said Bank.  “I have a passion to want to help children and will look forward to bringing my nonprofit expertise to help serve the children and families of Ryan House.”

Bank has previously worked for American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals as the Director of Education, at Maricopa County Animal Care & Control and most recently was the Executive Director at Animal Care & Control of NYC, running the largest animal welfare organization in the North East.  Bank also has spent more than eight years as a CASA volunteer helping children in the foster care system in Calif., New York and Ariz.

In addition, the Board of Directors recently elected Matthew Winter as the Chairman of the Board. He is currently the managing member ofWinter Law Group, P.L.C., founded by Winter in 2008.  He focuses his practice in the areas of commercial transactions and litigation, and has been practicing law for 20 years.

Winter is committed to serving youth through various community organizations and sports, coaching youth football and baseball and serving as an instructor at various youth sports clinics.  He joined the Board of Directors of Ryan House in 2011 to further his personal commitment to helping youth in the community.

“Ryan House truly is a unique nonprofit in our community and in the country,” said Winter.  “ I am honored to be a part of their leadership and look forward to making great strides to bring awareness to such a needed program.”

Winter currently also serves as Secretary of the Board of Directors of the Fiesta Bowl and Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl, after having served as a member of the Fiesta Bowl Committee since 1997.

boomer

Experience Matters’ Inaugural Encore Fellowship Class Graduates

Experience Matters, an organization that connects baby boomers with nonprofit and social service organizations to improve the quality of life in Maricopa County, announces the graduation of the inaugural encore fellowship class.  The first class of encore fellows has completed their yearlong fellowship with their host nonprofit organizations. Encore fellowships represent a new life-stage in which experienced boomers find meaningful ways to engage in the community and bring skilled and professional resources to these organizations that are often under-resourced.  Nationwide, 31 million boomers indicate an interest in encore opportunities.  In Maricopa County there is significant demand on behalf of both boomers and nonprofit organizations for fellowship and hosting opportunities, respectively.

“My work this past year as an Experience Matters’ encore fellow hosted by the Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits could not have been more rewarding.  I learned more about the needs of nonprofit organizations and how they operate than I thought possible in just one year. It was quite rewarding to see how my 25 years of experience in the corporate world added value to a nonprofit organization.  I have a new-found respect for the Arizona nonprofit community and am committed to staying involved as I graduate from the Encore Fellowship Program,” stated Warren Mills, former valley technology executive.

“It is with great pride that we celebrate the graduation of our inaugural encore fellowship class at Experience Matters.  These fellows and organizations proved the value of matching boomers with nonprofit organizations.  What we have learned from the inaugural class indicates we can significantly increase the number of boomers engaged in paid and unpaid social service opportunities to support our nonprofit community as they work so hard to improve the quality of life in Maricopa County.  The demand is strong to connect the talent with the community, ” stated Nora Hannah, CEO of Experience Matters.

The inaugural class included the following fellows and their host organizations:

Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits, Encore Fellow Mr. Warren Mills
Altered Tails, Encore Fellow Mr. Gregg Cebulski
Arizona Foundation for Women, Encore Fellow Ms. Debbie Hall
Arizona Science Center, Encore Fellow Mr. Kris Guffey
Balsz Elementary School District, Encore Fellow Ms. Anne White
Halle Family Foundation, Encore Fellow Ms. Denise Schubert
HALO, Encore Fellow Mr. Bill Thomson
Maricopa County Animal Care and Control, Encore Fellow Ms. Isabel LeRoy
Mission of Mercy, Encore Fellow Ms. Dianne Aguilar
PetSmart Charities, Encore Fellow Ms. Linda Hannen
St. Mary’s Food Bank, Encore Fellow Ms. Christine McRight
Tempe Community Action, Encore Fellow Mr. Jeff Abraham
Valley of the Sun United Way, Encore Fellow Mr. Bob Ryan

SONY DSC

Jones Lang LaSalle Completes $30M Sale of Phoenix Multi-family Property

Jones Lang LaSalle’s Capital Markets announced the firm closed the sale of La Palma in Phoenix on behalf of LAP LLC of Orange County, California.

Purchased for $30.1M by Seattle-based Weidner Investment Services, the 548-unit apartment complex further cements the local market presence of Jones Lang LaSalle’s new multi-family investment sales practice, created when Executive Vice President John Cunningham joined the firm in fall of 2011.

Cunningham and Vice President Charles Steele led the Jones Lang LaSalle team on this transaction, with assistance from San Diego-based Executive Vice Presidents Darcy Miramontes and Diane Miramontes and Vice President Kip Malo.

“Phoenix has a resiliency that investors trust to grow value,” Cunningham said. “The new owners of La Palma have an excellent opportunity to improve and reposition the asset in a very strong Phoenix marketplace.”

According to Cunningham, Phoenix rental rates were up considerably at the end of the second quarter, reaching an average $774 per month compared to an average $754 in the first quarter of the year. Vacancy has simultaneously decreased, falling from 9.8% in 1Q 2011 to 8.6% by mid-2012.

“That attracts investor dollars, and has ranked Phoenix third in the nation for total transaction volume,” said Cunningham, noting that by August, total transaction velocity in Phoenix already had surpassed its 2011 total volume of $1.49 billion.

The 548-unit La Palma, located on West Bell Road near 7th Avenue, is approximately 90% occupied. It includes 2- and 3-story buildings with 1-, 2- and 3-bedroom units ranging from approximately 720 to 1,444 SF.

The 1984-built property sits on 27.6 acres on a major metro arterial. Amenities include two large clubhouses, four swimming pools and multiple sports courts.

A 25-year industry veteran, Cunningham joined Jones Lang LaSalle last year in response to a surge in multifamily transactions and client demand not seen in greater Phoenix for years. He is charged with establishing and expanding the firm’s multifamily investment sales practice in Phoenix and throughout the region. Steele joined the practice in April.

Jones Lang LaSalle is a leader in the Phoenix commercial real estate market. Employing 344 industry experts, the firm offers office and industrial brokerage, tenant representation, facility and investment management, capital markets and development services. In 2010, the Phoenix team completed 3.2 million square feet in lease transactions, directed $60 million in project management and currently has 13.5 million square feet under management.

 

Jones Lang LaSalle Capital Markets is a full-service global provider of capital solutions for real estate investors and occupiers. The firm’s in-depth local market and global investor knowledge delivers the best-in-class solutions for clients — whether a sale, financing, repositioning, advisory or recapitalization execution. In 2011 alone, Jones Lang LaSalle Capital Markets completed $60 billion in investment sale and debt and equity transactions globally. The firm’s dealmakers completed $52 billion in global investment sales and buy-side transactions, equating to nearly $216 million of investment trades completed every working day around the globe. In the United States, Jones Lang LaSalle grew its total Capital Markets volumes by 122 percent in 2011 and is quickly gaining market share across all property types. The firm’s Capital Markets team comprises more than 1,200 specialists, operating all over the globe.

 

boomer

Experience Matters gets Grant from Virginia G. Piper

Experience Matters, an organization that connects baby boomers with nonprofit and social service organizations to improve the quality of life in Maricopa County, has received a $1.6 million grant over four years from Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust. The grant allows Experience Matters to expand its infrastructure to offer more paid and unpaid opportunities to more boomers seeking work in the social sector. Often referred to as encore careers, this represents a new life-stage in which experienced boomers find meaningful ways to engage in the community. Nationwide, 31 million boomers indicate an interest in encore opportunities.

Engaging boomers as the talent to solve community problems is the driving force of the Experience Matters’ vision and mission, and it is changing the quality of life for boomers such as Encore Fellow Anne White.  “I feel my work as an Encore Fellow brought more rewards to me than I gave to the Balsz CommunityEducation Foundation, my host organization,” stated White.  “Helping them build the infrastructure and fundraising programs for their foundation was incredibly rewarding, and I am thrilled to stay on as a volunteer with the organization beyond my Encore Fellowship,” she added.

Experience Matters aims to expand operations and deliver $34 million in human capital to Maricopa County organizations over the next five years.  The organization’s strategic plan to connect boomers with service organizations was crafted by a group of highly experienced strategists, business owners, technologists, marketing experts and nonprofit executives and community leaders over a six-month period.

“This generous grant from Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust is vital to the successful expansion of Experience Matters.  We can significantly increase the number of boomers engaged in paid and unpaid social service opportunities to support our nonprofit community as they work so hard to improve the quality of life in Maricopa County.  Both boomers and nonprofit organizations are signing up rapidly to engage.  The demand is strong to connect the talent with the community, ” stated Nora Hannah, CEO of Experience Matters.

“Experience Matters produces a high rate of return on investment because there is nothing more valuable than giving a nonprofit talent and skill,” noted Patrick McWhortor, President and CEO of Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits.  “As Experience Matters helps nonprofits engage experienced and talented boomers in their organizations, the capacity and effectiveness of the organizations has the potential to expand exponentially,” he added.

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International Genomics Consortium forms joint venture with Michigan

As a key step toward providing patients with treatments based on their own DNA profiles, the International Genomics Consortium (IGC) and the University of Michigan have launched a new joint venture that will help usher in an age of personalized medicine.

Called Paradigm, the new nonprofit company brings together the expertise of IGC and the U-M Health System, two leaders in using genetic information to understand and treat disease.

Beginning with cancer and then extending into other disease groups, Paradigm will offer doctors and health care organizations anywhere access to whole gene and multi-gene sequencing and molecular diagnostics.  The company will also help support clinical trials at UMHS and other healthcare systems.

Paradigm is being formed under the Michigan Health Corporation, the part of UMHS that enables outside partnerships. The company will have a presence in Phoenix and Ann Arbor.

“Paradigm builds on our ever-increasing understanding of the interplay of multiple disease-causing genes and how this affects sensitivity to specific treatment regimens,” says Robert Penny, M.D., Ph.D., the chief executive officer and co-founder of Paradigm and IGC, which was formed by veteran genetic researchers and played a key role in compiling The Cancer Genome Atlas, a catalog of genes known to be involved in cancer. “We will bring our expertise to bear to create true personalized medicine options for clinicians and their patients.”

“We’re thrilled to take this important step that allows us to harness the power of genetic information to guide patient therapy and improve outcomes,” says Jay Hess, M.D. Ph.D., M.H.S.A.,chair of the Department of Pathology at the U-M Medical School and a co-founder of Paradigm. “IGC has a proven track record of bringing molecular diagnostics to market, yet shares our nonprofit patient-focused vision.”

“Through this new venture, we will continue our leadership role supporting and translating cutting edge medical research to improve patient care,” said David Mallery, J.D., M.B.A., the president and co-founder of Paradigm and IGC.

Initially, Paradigm will focus on offering services to oncologists and oncology groups, pathologists, academic medical centers and clinical trial groups studying personalized medicine regimens. Its first products will be especially of use in better tailoring treatments for cancer patients.

“The International Genomics Consortium played a pivotal role in ushering in Arizona’s bioscience initiative in 2002 and has continued to be a leader in the industry. Over the years, IGC has provided Arizona with federal research grants, successful commercial ventures, and high-quality jobs while contributing to the advancement of human medicine,” said Jack B. Jewett, president and CEO of the Flinn Foundation.  “This collaboration among two outstanding national institutions demonstrates Arizona’s leadership in molecular medicine and is a testament to both IGC’s and Arizona’s stature in the biosciences nationally.”

“With the University of Michigan Health System as our partner in Paradigm, IGC strengthens its revolutionary role in gene-based research, making our country more competitive internationally and keeping Maricopa County at the forefront of personalized medicine,” said Richard Mallery, Founding Chair of IGC.

Piper Charitable Trust

Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Launches ‘Piper Trust Encore Prize’

To recognize and build on the achievements of nonprofit and public sector organizations that engage the talent of people over 50 in “Encore” roles—Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust is launching the Piper Trust Encore Prize. “Mature adults that either want to retire or retool, have something of great value—experience—and as such, organizations are learning to tap their expertise in new ways”

The Encore concept—engaging people over 50 in roles that combine personal meaning with social impact—has been gaining popularity across the country, and particularly in Phoenix, as nearly 10,000 people each day turn 60 in the United States.

Piper Trust will award up to three $5,000 prizes to organizations; one of the three winning organizations may receive a $50,000 “Encore Enhancement Prize” in addition, to expand the organization’s use of Encore talent. The Piper Trust Encore Prize is anticipated to be awarded every other year.

“Since its inception, Piper Trust has strategically invested in programs and innovations that support older adults. The Piper Trust Encore Prize is a way for us to not only recognize our local organizations for the work they are doing to engage older adults in meaningful work—but to advance the growth and understanding of Encore roles and the tremendous impact they can have on individuals, organizations, communities, and society at large,” said Judy Jolley Mohraz, president and CEO, Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust.

“The first of 78 million baby boomers have begun to hit the traditional retirement age but many aren’t retiring in traditional ways—or for that matter at all,” said Marc Freedman, founder and CEO, Civic Ventures—a San Francisco-based nonprofit think tank focused on boomers, work, and social purpose. “Instead, tens of millions want to contribute in meaningful ways to their communities, using the skills and talents they have acquired over a lifetime.”

Nonprofit and public sector organizations within Maricopa County can apply (or be nominated by others) for the Encore Prize. The Encore Prize targets organizations that engage experienced older adults (age 50+) in making significant contributions to the organization’s work in paid and/or unpaid roles. Preference will be given to organizations that provide some form of compensation. Compensation is broadly viewed and can include health insurance, stipends, salary, living allowance, expense reimbursement (e.g., mileage, meals), office space, computer use, Wi-Fi, cell phones, administrative support or other creative benefits.

“Mature adults that either want to retire or retool, have something of great value—experience—and as such, organizations are learning to tap their expertise in new ways,” said Nora Hannah, CEO, Experience Matters and former business executive. Experience Matters is a Phoenix nonprofit focused on connecting talent with community needs. ”The benefits are threefold: the organization gets invaluable talent, the individual gets personal satisfaction from doing work that makes a difference, and ultimately the community advances closer to its goals of a better life for all its citizens.”

There are 1.1 million people in Maricopa County who are age 50 or older.

“We commend Piper Trust for taking this important step toward building a community that values all its citizens and invests in what older adults can give back,” added Freedman.

To apply or nominate an organization for a Piper Trust Encore Prize or for more information, visit: www.pipertrust.org/encore. Applications are due June 29, 2012 through the online portal. Prize awardees will be selected by mid-September 2012.

carey school - graduate

More Than 2,000 Will Graduate From W. P. Carey School

More than 2,000 students will graduate from Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business next week. This is one of the biggest graduation classes ever for the school, known as one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the country. The president of the Phoenix Suns, a group of executives flying in from China, and a student who already started a nonprofit to help foster teens will be part of the ceremonies.

“We have another fantastic graduating class this year,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “These students exemplify why our undergraduate, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs are all ranked Top 30 by U.S. News & World Report. It’s another batch of high achievers.”

The school’s graduate-level convocation will include more than 900 students, most of them receiving MBAs, but others getting master’s degrees in accountancy, tax, information management, real estate development and health systems management. The event will be held Friday, May 4 at 5 p.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe. The featured speaker will be Brad Casper, president of the Phoenix Suns basketball team, who is known for his community involvement and heavy focus on area schools.

In addition, about 20 of the 120 executives graduating from the school’s executive MBA program in Shanghai are traveling to Phoenix to participate in the Tempe ceremony. The Shanghai program educates some of the highest-level business and government leaders in China and is currently ranked among the Top 20 executive MBA programs in the world by the Financial Times, Britain’s equivalent of The Wall Street Journal. Past students have included the CEOs of Baosteel and Shanghai Electric, three vice governors of China’s major provinces, six city mayors, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange, several bank chairmen and the chairman of Shanghai Airlines.

At the undergraduate level, more than 1,100 students are eligible to walk the stage, and more than a dozen different types of business degrees will be awarded. The undergraduate convocation is set for Thursday, May 3 at 8 a.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena. The main speaker will be Chris Spinella, chief executive officer of Apriva, which develops and advances smart-card technology and wireless applications for payment processing and secure mobile communications.

The graduates at this ceremony will include the winner of the spring 2012 Turken Family Outstanding Graduating Senior Award, Christos Makridis. He co-founded the Quanta Foundation LLC, an educational services company that connects high school students with high-profile university projects to produce research and multimedia materials. Makridis is also a McCord Scholar, an economics teaching assistant, chairman of the business school’s Dean’s Advisory Council and editor in chief of an international undergraduate-research journal on science policy at ASU.

Another finalist for the Turken Family award, Priya Nathan, co-founded a nonprofit to benefit young people. Partnered for Success helps foster and orphan youth successfully transition out of the foster care system in the Phoenix area. The program has been recognized by Fast Company magazine and was selected as an ASU Innovation Challenge grant winner twice.

“Many of these graduates are already making their mark well beyond the classroom,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Executive Dean Amy Hillman. “We have students who are small-business owners, working moms, members of the military and lots of others already making us proud. We look forward to their continued success.”

For more information on W. P. Carey School of Business, visit W. P. Carey School of Business’ website at wpcarey.asu.edu.

Provided By Flickr

Five Monopolies, Methods of Communication Losing Their Hold

1.

Landlines

According to CITA, an International Wireless nonprofit organization, 91% of Americans carry a cell phone as of 2009, and those numbers have continued to expand.  Now more than ever, with the growing popularity of the iPhone and Droid, cell phones have become both a necessity and an addiction.

In past decades, landlines were an essential part of the home, but with cell phone giants like Apple, wireless communication is quickly eliminating the need for both a home phone and cell.  Now, phones do much more than dial, and let’s be honest — landlines don’t have Angry Birds or Restaurant Finder Apps.

Landline Phones No More

2.

“Snail” Mail vs. Email

Once a monopoly on long-distance communication, mailing letters to friends or loved ones has been virtually phased out of everyday conversation and proven to be the least efficient means of interaction.  What was once a necessity for love notes, bank statements, and college acceptance letters, “snail” mail is quickly becoming replaced with the popularity of social media platforms and widespread use of email.

Since cell phone’s and the internet explosion in the early 1990’s, this generation’s lack of composition skills have been harshly scrutinized.  In 2009, The United States Postal Service stated that 177 billion pieces of mail were delivered in the US, compared to 14.4 trillion by email.  Now, young people rely heavily on a keyboard, 140 characters and auto-correct spelling.

"Snail" Mail Replaced by Email

3.

Newspapers

Electronic tablets, such as Apple’s iPad, Samsung’s Galaxy Pad, Amazon’s Kindle or the BlackBerry Playbook, have been 2010’s newest toy.  According to the Washington Post, “average daily circulation of all U.S. newspapers has been in decline since 1987″ and “has hit its lowest level in seven decades.”

Newspapers have been undoubtedly hit hard — as major stations are reporting record losses, cuts and even closures across the country.  Despite the change in the medium which news is delivered, there will always be a desire and need for the public to be informed and educated on current events.  It’s just that now news is viewed on a 9 x 5 LED screen — not paper.

Physical Newspapers Moving Online

4.

Video Rental Stores

Some of my fondest childhood memories include “Power Rangers:  The Movie” and the newest Nintendo 64 game — both of which were rented from the local Blockbuster.  Video rental stores, like Blockbuster, have been slowly declining in business over the past 6 years as online sites such as Netflix and RedBox have stolen much of the business which these stores once had.

Having closed over 600 stores in just the past three years and reported record losses in the hundreds of millions, it’s no wonder Blockbuster is struggling to stay afloat.  According to an article by MSNBC.com, “Blockbuster Inc. may close as many as 960 stores by the end of next year,” primarily in response to appeal and ease of online streaming — in a society glued to their computer screens.

Video Rentals Like Blockbuster Replaced by Nexflix, Flickr, Scott Clark

5.

In-Person Classrooms

As a current student at ASU, I recognize that most classes still meet in a physical room with a paper syllabus and wooden desks from the Jimmy Carter administration.  However, as technology of educational tools increases, so does the medium with which it is taught.

Arizona State University offered over 700 online classes this spring, which range from Managerial Economics to History of Hip Hop.  It’s not just ASU, but virtually all major universities across the country offer online classes and degrees, and sites like Blackboard allow professors to post assignments and readings for the week online.

Classrooms Moving Online
Entrepreneurs Can Reach High Levels Of Success - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

The Entrepreneurs Of Today Can Reach High Levels Of Success — And Impact The World

In today’s fluctuating economy, the notions of entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial leadership and entrepreneurial decision-making are receiving increased attention by citizens, academics, managers and politicians on a global basis. The current global financial crisis has put added pressure on creating new ideas and bringing these to the market, resulting in financial fruition, economic development and employment.

Being an entrepreneur and creating value by establishing a new organization in both the profit and nonprofit sectors in business, as well as the arts, impacts economic and social conditions. This creation process takes more time and effort than one can imagine and is by no means easy, with a high failure rate reaching more than 70 percent in certain countries.

Since entrepreneurs are found in all professions — education, medicine, research, law, architecture, arts, engineering, social work and distribution — the definition of entrepreneurship in my book, “Entrepreneurship,” is relevant: “Entrepreneurship is the process of creating something new with value by devoting the necessary time and effort, assuming the accompanying financial, psychic, and social risks, and receiving the resulting rewards of monetary and personal satisfaction and independence.”

Global entrepreneurial leaders create visionary scenarios that assemble and mobilize participants, who become committed by the vision to discovery and creation of sustainable value. They have a wide variety of attributes, including being a visionary, having a passion for their idea, being a risk-taker, having perseverance, building a team, recognizing opportunities and needs, solving problems, and giving back. Let us look at a few examples:

Leonardo Da Vinci — In addition to his many other titles, Leonardo Da Vinci should be labeled as one of the great global entrepreneurial leaders of all time. It is, in fact, the breadth and depth of his work, his wide-ranging skills and his lasting impact on both the arts and society that reflect the strength of his entrepreneurial vision. He created many new and different pieces of art, devices and ways of thinking that were ahead of their time.

Edward Teach (Blackbeard the Pirate) — From 1716-1718, Blackbeard the Pirate ruled the seas and also was an entrepreneurial leader who flourished in his trade. The pirates who joined Blackbeard’s command often came from the lowest classes of society, or were former members of the British Navy, who found the conditions and treatment they received better than life on farms or plantations. All booty taken by the pirates would be divided evenly among the crew, one part each, save the captain’s two.

Peter the Great — Peter I ruled Russia from 1682 until his death in 1725, bringing about major modernization to his country. His global entrepreneurial vision and leadership gave Russia a new position of power as the country was transformed into a Western empire. Educators, military personnel and businessmen were invited to Russia; the army was modernized; a strong navy was developed; and arts and education flourished.

John D. Rockefeller — John D. Rockefeller was an extraordinary American entrepreneur and philanthropist. Through hard work, determination and a strong competitive nature, he became the world’s first billionaire. Rockefeller chose to change his entrepreneurial pursuits away from making money toward giving it away. From his equity position in Standard Oil, a company he co-founded, he felt the need to disperse his wealth to those less fortunate and formed the Rockefeller Foundation; this started the rise of American social philanthropy.

Madam C.J. Walker — Entrepreneurs often find opportunities and success in spite of great odds and obstacles. Madam C.J. Walker was one such person who identified a gap in the market — hair care products for black women. Walker became the first self-made, female black millionaire in the United States. At one point, she employed more than 3,000 women, and had a wide range of hair and skin care products.

Muhammad Yunus — Muhammad Yunus is an example of a selfless global entrepreneurial leader. After seeing the impact of his first micro-loan and the way in which he was repaid, Yunus began to envision a model that could work anywhere. He found that the poor would often quickly repay their loans with few problems. By the early 1980s, Yunus had expanded to other developing countries, and in 1983 formed the Grameen Bank, the institutional home of his micro-lending practices, both of which were honored with a Nobel Peace Prize in 2006.

Bill Gates — Microsoft founder Bill Gates’ entrepreneurial skills are varied. His company revolutionized the computer industry, helped to usher in the Internet age, and had a deep and profound impact on the daily lives of people around the world. Because of this persistence and risk taking, he shaped the evolution of the information age, making him the world’s richest man in 1995. In 2000, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation was founded with the goal of alleviating many of the problems that are afflicting the world’s poorest people. It has grown into one of the premier philanthropic organizations in the world.

The role of global entrepreneurial leaders throughout history indicates the diversity in backgrounds, mindsets and goals that spawn entrepreneurial actions, decisions and leadership. From public sector to private, for-profit to nonprofit, in science, arts, religion, medicine, politics and business, and across industries, the variety of forms that entrepreneurial leadership takes is clear.

For the contemporary entrepreneur who actually starts his or her own business, the experience is filled with enthusiasm, frustration, anxiety and hard work. There is a high failure rate due to poor sales, intense competition, lack of capital, or lack of managerial ability. The financial, social and emotional risks are high, as are the rewards. As history has shown, the individual’s reward can easily set the stage for an accelerated impact on the larger community, region, country or even the world.

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Successful Business Women Add Philanthropic Endeavors - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Three Successful Business Women Add Philanthropic Endeavors To Their Already Busy Work-Life Balance

Giving back to the community is an important component of being a true success in the business world. As the greatest minds in history have declared, responsibility is the companion of power and privilege.

Regardless of workloads or fluctuations in the economy, true business leaders — whether they are corporate executives or entrepreneurs — have acted as stewards of their communities. In recent decades, family life has been added to the mix, making the work-life- philanthropic balance even more challenging, especially for women. But it can and is done every day.

Jordan Rose is the founder and president of Rose Law Group pc, the largest law firm in Arizona ever owned by a woman. She is also a mother of two young boys, and for the past 11 years has been an integral member of the American Heart Association’s Arizona Heart Ball Committee.

Rose’s inspiration to pursue law came from her father, also an attorney, who loved going to work every day.

“I never think of it as work,” she says. “I love what I do, it’s the perfect fit for me.”

The perfect fit means having a team that shares her enthusiasm, work ethic and high standards, so Rose can have time for family and charitable pursuits.

“I wake up every day quite grateful that I have others around to help me do all the things I find tremendously rewarding,” Rose says.

What Rose finds rewarding is giving her time and expertise to not-for-profit organizations such as the Arizona American Heart Association, a group that for more than 50 years has been dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke — and subsequently poured millions of dollars into this community to support life-saving programs.

“My husband’s family has a history of heart disease, and I have a passion for making any small attempt I can at helping support the medical professionals who are currently researching a cure,” she says.

Rose’s legal and business expertise give her the ability to further support this cause by reviewing and restructuring contracts, so the Phoenix Heart Ball can maintain its low cost-to-fundraising ratio, while at the same time limiting any risk or exposure to members and donors. It’s a charity she loves and a business model she admires.

“I think for-profit businesses could learn a lot about motivating people and managing by shadowing the Heart Ball board,” Rose says.

And she has this advice for working moms who also want to serve the community: “Pick a charity that you have a passion for and you will be grateful, as it will make you happy to wake up and be able to give something back.”

Like Rose, Denise Resnik runs her own business. Denise Resnik & Associates is a strategic marketing and public relations firm she started 25 years ago. Also, like Rose, Resnik has a deep, personal connection to a nonprofit, in this case the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center (SARRC). In 1993, Resnik’s son was diagnosed with autism.

“We were told to love him, accept him and plan to institutionalize him,” Resnik recalls.

Wanting a better life for her son and other children with autism, Resnik used her knowledge and experience as a business owner to find a better outcome.

“I allowed my heart and entrepreneurial spirit be my guide,” she says.

Years later, what started as a mother’s support group is now the 18,000-square-foot Campus for Exceptional Children and a 10,000-square-foot Vocational and Life Skills Academy. Both are focused on advancing research and providing support for thousands of individuals with autism and their families throughout their lifetimes.

“SARRC is another full-time job for me and a major pro bono client for our firm,” Resnik says.

As for finding the work-life balance, Resnik says, “I layer many of my priorities and interests, like creating big ideas and plans, while hiking with friends and colleagues through the Phoenix Mountain Preserve with our son and daughter.”

Her business acumen helped her build SARRC, and in turn SARRC has taught her some valuable business lessons.

“Our board and staff at SARRC lead by example and demonstrate for us all what it takes to make our community a better place, and what businesses and individuals can do to forever impact our community and change lives,” Resnik says, adding that if you’re thinking about volunteering, even if your plate is overflowing, you’ll find a way to make it work.

“The return on your investment will likely exceed your expectations,” she says. “It certainly exceeded mine.”

Michelle Kerrick, managing partner of Deloitte, stands tall alongside Rose and Resnik in terms of the tremendous impact she’s making on the community. She too juggles motherhood, a demanding career and her passion for volunteering.

“My position at Deloitte has a strong market focus, so it can be a win-win-win for me, the firm and the not-for-profit,” she says. “I get the opportunity to meet other key leaders in our community, while also giving back.”

The organization Kerrick “gives so much back to” is Fresh Start Women’s Foundation (FSWF).

“I was inspired by the cause,” Kerrick says. “FSWF is all about women helping women and developing confidence and self-esteem.”

Kerrick knows that financial stewardship is key to success, so it’s no wonder her business, financial and risk management skills benefit a charity like Fresh Start.

“I started my board work with FSWF as the treasurer of the board, held a number of other positions and have also chaired the annual gala fundraiser,” she says. “I believe my background has been particularly helpful in these challenging economic times.”

In turn, her involvement with FSWF has had a tremendous impact on her life.

“When I meet women striving to improve their lives, it makes me more focused to lead a better life and be a better example to my daughter,” Kerrick says.

So although it’s not always easy being the perpetual plate spinner, Kerrick says it’s worthwhile.

“I want to make sure organizations like FSWF are available for the next generation of women.”


Jordan Rose - Rose Law Group pcJordan Rose
Rose Law Group pc

Charitable Organization: Phoenix Heart Ball
Favorite Quote: “Bring all your capacities to a situation and stick with it — apply all you’ve got to make fate unfold.” — Jim Balsillie, R.I.M.


Denise Resnik - Denise Resnik & AssociatesDenise Resnik
Denise Resnik & Associates

Charitable Organization: SARRC/Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center
Favorite Quote: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.” — Margaret Mead

Michelle Kerrick - DeloitteMichelle Kerrick
Deloitte

Charitable Organization: Fresh Start Women’s Foundation
Favorite Quote: “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” — Mahatma Ghandi

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

You don't have to be santa to give charitable gifts this season

Charitable And Socially Responsible Shopping Sites

There are so many ways to share the spirit of giving to those that need it.

 Many of your favorite online stores have special sections that donate portions of purchases to specific causes. Also, don’t forget the many independent artists and product-specific initiatives like (RED) and Tom’s Shoes that make contributions to improving quality of life as well.

 The list below includes sites in which portions of purchases go toward supporting a variety of charitable causes. These can be in the form of direct donations in someone else’s name, socially responsible, economically supportive and fairly traded gifts, coupons for charitable giving and other philanthropic initiatives.

 Choose what is important to you or the person you are shopping for. These sites operate year round, so you can make a difference everyday not just during the holidays!

 Happy shopping and thank you for sharing this season!

1. GoodSearch
GoodSearch is an online shopping outlet where a portion of your purchase from many online shopping sites will go to your choice of cause or charity.

2. iGive
iGive is another online shopping outlet, where you can register and donate a portion of your purchases from brand name online stores is donated to your cause.

3. GiftBack
At GiftBack, an online gift shopping center, 10% of your purchase goes to a charity of your choice.

4. Nonprofit Shopping Mall
When you purchase your gifts through Nonprofit Shopping Mall, a virtual mall in which you can find many popular retailers, a donation is made to your favorite charity.

5. The Hunger Site
The Hunger Site is an online charitable retailer that donates to charities for hunger, literacy, child health, the rainforest, breast cancer and animal rescues.

6. Greater Good
At Greater Good you can make a donation to a cause of your choice in someone else’s name here.

7. Oxfam America Unwrapped
At Oxfam America Unwrapped you can buy a charitable gift for worldwide communities in need in someone else’s name.

8. Network For Good
At Network for Good you can purchase a gift card for a friend or loved one to be used toward charity.

9. Universal Giving
Universal Giving is a searchable database of volunteer and donation opportunities.

10. Common Kindness
Common Kindness is home to coupons for many popular products. When you use a coupon from the site the organization donates to your favorite charity.

11. Wounded Warrior Project
The Wounded Warrior Project is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping wounded U.S. service men and women. On their site you can make a donation in your name or in honor of someone else.

12. USO
The USO (United Service Organization) is dedicated to helping U.S. service men and women by providing care packages and much needed services where they are serving. You can make donations in your name or in honor of someone else.

13. Veterans Of Foreign Wars
Veterans of Foreign Wars advocates on behalf of veterans and ensures they are recognized for their service. You can donate through their website in your name or in honor of someone else.

Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce’s prestigious Sterling Award.

Scottsdale Area Chamber Of Commerce Gives Out Its Annual Sterling Awards

Four Scottsdale businesses received the Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce’s prestigious Sterling Award.  The 25th annual Sterling Awards were handed out yesterday, Nov. 16, to a packed house at the Scottsdale Resort and Convention Center.


The Sterling Award is presented to companies that make Scottsdale a great place to live, work and play. Four teams of judges narrowed the field from 12 and selected one winner in each of the following four categories–micro, small and big business, and nonprofit.

Celebration of Fine Art was awarded the Sterling Award in the micro business category, which is awarded to businesses with fewer than seven employees that exhibit success through innovation, creativity and collaboration. Celebration of Fine Art champions art in all forms, from furniture and jewelry to watercolor and pastels, and gives visitors the opportunity to converse with the artists as they work.

Human Capital Strategies won the Sterling Award in the small business category, which is awarded to businesses with seven to 99 employees that demonstrates innovation, quality, professionalism and commitment to community. Jason Knight started Human Capital Strategies in 2007 to “do what small business owners and office managers don’t like to do, don’t know how to do and, often times, don’t even know they are supposed to do.®”

Scottsdale Fashion Square was awarded the Sterling Award in the big business category, which goes to businesses with more than 100 employees that significantly impacts the community’s economic fabric. Scottsdale Fashion Square is one of the Valley’s premier tourist destinations, but also gives back in many ways, including partnerships with nonprofit organizations and employee volunteerism.

St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance received the Sterling Award in the nonprofit category, which is awarded to a charitable organization that contributes to the social, cultural and educational well-being of those it serves. As the world’s first food bank, St. Mary’s Food Bank Alliance is committed to improving the quality of life in Arizona and serves 13 of Arizona’s 15 counties.

Other businesses were recognized in the four categories. Reliable Background Screening, Sonoran Studios, Payroll Experts, Hot Air Expeditions, DMB Associates, Mayo Clinic, Gabriel’s Angels and Every Kid Counts, Inc. were all recognized at the ceremony, which was emceed by Good Morning Arizona anchor and host Tara Hitchcock.

www.celebrateart.com
www.hcscando.com

www.fashionsquare.com

www.firstfoodbank.org

www.scottsdalechamber.com

2010 CFO Of The Year Awards

2010 CFO Of The Year Awards

The 4th annual CFO of the Year Awards ceremony took place on Nov. 4, at the Fairmont Scottsdale. The awards recognized 28 CFOs for their outstanding performances in their roles as corporate financial stewards. Four overall winners from the categories of private, small public and large public companies and nonprofit organization were recognized. The Arizona Chapter of Financial Executives International partnered with Arizona Business Magazine to make these awards possible.

CFO Awards recognizing leaders

Joan Brubacher

Gayle Pincus

From left: Jonathan Keyser, Tim Einwechter and Joan Brubacher.

Finalists

From left: Cheryl Green, Joan Brubacher, Ryan Suchala and Mary Jane Rynd of the Virginia G Piper Charitable Trust.

From left: Andrew Ernst, Dan Bacchus, Cheryl Vogt and Joan Brubacher.

From left: Jonas McCormick, David Jackson, Tod Holmes, James Hatfield, Jason Berg and Joan Brubacher.
From left: Jonas McCormich, Tod Holmes and Joan Brubacher.

Christine French - Creates a Nonprofit & successful entrepreneurial venture. - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Christine French Of The Nonprofit Diversity Leadership Alliance & Global Diversity Consulting

Christine French Took Her Expertise In Diversity To Create A Nonprofit And A Successful Entrepreneurial Venture.

Even as a young child growing up in Vietnam, Christine French always knew her main purpose in life was to help people from different backgrounds and experiences come together and form a whole.

“When I was eight, the first lesson in social studies was talking about ambassadors. Right then and there I stood up and announced to my teacher and my class, to their surprise and mine, ‘I am going to be one of those,’” French says. “The ambassador, as I learned that day in the lesson, is the person who helps people understand each other so they no longer have a need to fight, to have war. That has followed me since I was eight.”

In 2002, in the wake of Sept. 11, French hosted a roundtable in Phoenix that brought together business leaders and various associations to discuss the importance of diversity to business success.

Since the Diversity Leadership Alliance was officially formed in 2003, it has grown rapidly, and now hosts a wide range of events, including monthly workshops with average attendance rates of more than 100 people, quarterly executive and legal forums, an annual diversity conference, and a youth council.

French says she started the nonprofit Diversity Leadership Alliance and her business, Global Diversity Consulting, to dispel the many myths surrounding diversity efforts.

Diversity’s progress has been slowed, French says, because the creation of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and affirmative action programs have led many employers to view diversity as a numbers game.

This misconception created resistance to embracing diversity, as many people and companies thought hiring minorities meant not hiring the most qualified candidate, she says.

But French, who is founder and co-chair of the Diversity Leadership Alliance, argues that diversity is really about embracing the gifts and talents of every individual, and putting those strengths to work for a company.

“EEOC and affirmative action are counting people; diversity and inclusion (are) making people count,” French says.

The only way to combat misunderstandings about diversity, French says, is to create dialogue, which is the goal of the Diversity Leadership Alliance and the forums it hosts. French says she wants this dialogue to lead to major changes in the way people think about diversity.

While promoting the benefits of diversity, French says she is often asked, “Why do I have to change? I’ve been successful so far.”

Her response?

“We all need to change, myself included,” she says. “We all need to change because what brought us here today, all the skill and talent and good work we’ve done yesterday to bring us here today, will not be enough to take us where we need to be tomorrow.”

French’s commitment to diversity extends to her own livelihood. In 2007, she left her job as senior global diversity leader at American Express to spend more time with her four grandsons. However, she continues to champion diversity through Global Diversity Consulting.

French has written and self-published two books, “The Lotus Path” and “How to Get Along With Other People Without Hiring a Hit Man.”

“The Lotus Path,” which will be available in March, details French’s life, her success and how she learned transformational leadership during her world travels.

French co-wrote “How to Get Along With Other People Without Hiring a Hit Man” with Rico Burton. The book, which was published in October, features 10 stories about workplace challenges, and includes activities to help readers find solutions to each situation.

With her books, her life and her work, French is trying to clear away the fallacies about diversity, and one day hopes, to quote Martin Luther King Jr., that her “grandsons (will) be judged by the content of their character, and not by the color of their skin.”

Until then, French will continue pushing for more and more dialogue about diversity.

“Diversity … is about people. It’s about you. It’s about me,” French says. “Let’s clear it once and for all, because as long as we have a misconception, a misunderstanding, the work will never be done.”

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Photo: TED / James Duncan Davidson.

TEDxPhoenix Brings Together Local Minds

TEDxPhoenix is bringing together Arizona’s thinkers and doers on Nov. 6 in the hopes of finding solutions to our local and global community’s problems.

The TEDx program aims to provide communities with an experience similar to the international TED conference.

TED began as a “Technology, Entertainment and Design” conference but has since become a forum for people to discover new ideas and possibilities and receive inspiration. The TED conference has been bringing together scientists, educators, adventurers, entrepreneurs, social activists and business leaders since 1984.  TED has drawn such big-name speakers as Bill Gates, Al Gore, Sir Richard Branson and Jane Goodall.

A staff of local volunteers, speakers and sponsors organized the nonprofit TEDxPhoenix event. Like the international TED conference, the second annual TEDxPhoenix lineup of speakers includes educators, innovators and community activists.

The list of speakers includes Lawrence M. Krauss, director and founder of Arizona State University’s Origins Initiative; Jany Deng, program manager of the Arizona Lost Boys Center; Kimber Lanning, community activist and Local First AZ founder; and Dry River Yacht Club, an acoustic symphony indie rock band; among others.

If You Go:
Tickets: $50
Date: Saturday, Nov. 6, 2010
Time: 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Venue: Eight KAET Arizona PBS Studio A, 555 N. Central Ave.
Website: www.tedxphoenix.com

Green World

Green News Roundup-Sustainable Haiti, Economic Development & More

The catastrophic events that have stricken the people of Haiti demonstrate — quite lamentably — that in a world of nanotechnology, Google-enabled mobile phones, double tall soy lattes, and proposed universal healthcare, there remain societies on the brink of social, economic, and environmental collapse. For comparison sake, recall the 1989 earthquake that struck the San Francisco Bay Area; a 7.0 geological shift took the lives of 63 people. The same magnitude befell the people of Haiti on Jan. 12; while estimates vary, 100,000 could be dead. That is half of the population of the City of Tempe.

International aid organizations have begun to alleviate immediate suffering; there has been a nationally televised charity concert where people could “text-message” help from the comfort of their own home; myriad countries have sent physical and monetary support. However, there remains a normative question that should be on our minds:

What should we do to ensure a more sustainable Haiti, in the future?

Consider these:

Expand education efforts:

In a nation where 38 percent of the population is under the age of 14, developing intellectual capital will allow good ideas to originate, blossom, and be implemented in a country that is in dire need of them.

Economic development and investment:

Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. By advancing an equitable combination of foreign direct investment, NGO/nonprofit work, and domestic revenue producing opportunities we can ensure that Haitians are placed on a path of economic self sufficiency;

Further micro-lending networks and opportunities to allow access to entrepreneurial capital and development. Jobs starting from bottom up will empower individuals and reduce the economic stratification that is rampant in the country.

Establish legitimate governance systems:

Haiti’s government has utilized 8,000 U.N. peacekeepers to maintain some semblance of order and control since 2004. While a future government does not have to be a veritable paragon of representative democracy and efficiency, the people of Haiti deserve a government that will work — vigorously and in earnest — to advance their well-being. Imagine there were a comprehensive and enforced modern building code prior to the earthquake; would Haiti have fared more like San Francisco?

The world is not a mutually exclusive place anymore. We, a global people, are connected to one another in innumerable ways. As such, we need to demonstrate our solidarity and resolute commitment to creating a more sustainable Haiti. I challenge you to ask what else you, your business, organization, or nonprofit can contribute towards the economic, social, and environmental revitalization of Haiti.

Let’s start a thoughtful and innovative conversation about how businesses, organizations, and nonprofits can move beyond status-quo assistance and be truly entrepreneurial and ground-breaking in their aid. I look forward to making positive change happen, together.

Environmental Media Awards

Environmental Media Awards — Celebrities Helping The Green Cause

I’ll admit, I have a guilty pleasure — celebrity gossip.

Though personal opinions about celebrities vary, it’s difficult to argue the fact that they have an amazing platform to send a message. The nonprofit Environmental Media Association has been been trying to place environmentalism into the mainstream since the association launched in 1989.

The association hosts the Environmental Media Awards, “the only program solely devoted to celebrating the entertainment industry’s environmental efforts,” as stated on its Web site. “The annual EMA Awards honor film and television personalities, productions, musicians and musical tours that convey environmental messages in the most creative and influential ways.”

The 20th anniversary Environmental Media Awards took place on Oct. 25, and an assortment of high-profile guests came to support the green cause. I came across the information about the EMA Awards while indulging my guilty pleasure of perusing the entertainment section of MSN. Several popular actors, musicians, etc., were walking the appropriately chosen green carpet at the event that honors the entertainment industry’s environmental achievements.

Categories for the awards ranged from feature film to documentary, as well as special honors that were given to people who have “gone above and beyond to help the environment both professionally and personally.” This year those honors went to Sir Richard Branson, Centropolis Entertainment, the National Geographic Society and singer Jason Mraz.

Winners in the various categories included: The Lazy Environmentalists: The Lazy Family/The Lazy Pet Groomer in the reality program category; Food, Inc. and The Cove for documentaries; and Disneynature EARTH in the feature film category.

In addition to the EMA Awards, the association also hosts the EMA Green Seal Awards that honors productions and corporate entertainment offices that go green ‘behind the scenes.’ Throughout the year, the association works with writers, directors and producers to integrate environmental messages into film and television productions. Events with a sustainable message are also held year-round with the help of celebrities’ familiar faces bringing it to the attention of the media and public.

Certain aspects of celebrity surely aren’t to be desired. However, taking a public stance in helping the environment and becoming involved with associations like this one are positive causes those in the entertainment industry can bring to the attention of the public. Communicating information about sustainable practices is a necessary component to make the changes we need for a greener future.

http://www.ema-online.org

cress in lab

Researchers At The Translational Genomics Research Institute Have Embarked On A Number Of Cancer Studies

While scientists at the Phoenix-based Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) investigate diseases of the brain and heart, as well as deadly pathogens, most of the nonprofit biomedical institute’s research is devoted to seeking the genetic causes of cancer.

TGen’s central goal is to discover which genes within our 3-billion-base DNA either protect us from cancer or allow cancers to form.

This year, TGen has been involved in two cancer research initiatives that have potentially far-reaching implications.

In May, Stand Up to Cancer awarded an $18-million grant to TGen and the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, TGen’s physician-in-chief, and Dr. Craig B. Thompson, director of the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, will lead a three-year investigation into new approaches in treating pancreatic cancer, the fourth-leading cause of cancer death in the United States.

In April, a study sponsored by TGen, Scottsdale Healthcare and Caris Dx showed that molecular profiling of patients can identify specific treatments for individuals, helping to keep their cancer in check for significantly longer periods and in some cases even shrink tumors. Von Hoff, the study’s principal investigator, released the study’s results at the 100th annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research in Denver.

TGen this year also has made major headlines on a monthly basis following other discoveries and partnerships that could lead to new treatments for cancer patients.

In August, Dr. Glen Weiss, who works for TGen and Scottsdale Healthcare, announced two significant advances in treating lung cancer. Weiss, an associate investigator in TGen’s cancer and cell biology division and director of thoracic oncology at TGen Clinical Research Services at Scottsdale Healthcare, made both announcements at the 13th World Conference on Lung Cancer in San Francisco. In one presentation, Weiss described research that eventually could help prevent lung cancer from spreading to the brain. In the second presentation, Weiss discussed the results of phase I clinical trials for a drug called TH-302 developed by Threshold Pharmaceuticals. The trials, conducted at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, found that 75 percent of patients with small cell lung cancer who were treated only with TH-302 “achieved stable disease or better.” The trials also found that 67 percent of patients with non-small cell lung cancer who were treated with a combination of TH-302 and other chemotherapy agents “achieved stable disease or better.”

In July, an international scientific team led by TGen received a $1 million grant from the Melanoma Research Alliance to study skin cancer. The team, led by Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen’s president and research director, will conduct a two-year study called, Identification of Novel Melanoma Risk Genes Using High-Throughput Genomics.

Also in July, California and Arizona researchers identified a gene variant that carries nearly twice the risk of developing an increasingly common type of blood cancer, according to a study published by the science journal, Nature Genetics. Investigators at the University of California, Berkeley and at TGen found that mutations in a gene called C6orf15, or STG, are associated with the risk of developing follicular lymphoma. This is a cancer of the body’s disease-fighting network and has an incidence rate that has nearly doubled in the past three decades.

In May, the opening of a new breast health center next to John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital provided significant new research opportunities for TGen. The 9,000-square-foot Breast Health and Research Center includes a tumor biorepository for TGen that will aid the research institute in discovering new ways to diagnose and treat breast cancer, which affects one in every eight American women.

In April, TGen researchers announced they might have found a way to stop the often rapid spread of deadly brain tumors. One gene, named NHERF-1, may be a serious target for drugs that could prevent malignant tumors from rapidly multiplying and invading other parts of the brain, according to a cover story in Neoplasia, an international journal of cancer research.

In February, TGen and the Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) announced they would forge a strategic alliance to enable both to maximize their worldwide contributions to science and health. The partnership between TGen and the Grand Rapids, Mich.-based VARI will enable both institutes to speed up their mutual goals of moving research discoveries about cancer and other debilitating medical conditions from laboratories to patient care as quickly as possible.

TGen’s efforts are also international. The institute is partnering with the small European country of Luxembourg to help develop the Integrated Biobank of Luxembourg (IBBL). In addition, TGen is part of the first IBBL demonstration project, Luxembourg Project Lung Cancer, in collaboration with the Partnership for Personalized Medicine.

Steve Yozwiak is a senior science writer at TGen, www.tgen.org.

A New Study Provides Lessons On Enhancing Hospital Board Effectiveness

A New Study Provides Lessons On Enhancing Hospital Board Effectiveness

It’s no secret that nonprofit hospitals, which account for the majority of hospitals in the U.S., are under growing scrutiny from legislators and regulators. In exchange for being exempt from paying taxes, nonprofit hospitals must provide benefits to their communities, including charity care. As health care reform efforts are beginning to get underway, an increasing emphasis has been placed on tax-exempt hospitals, and legislators are questioning the level of benefits actually provided to the local communities. At the core of this debate is how these hospitals are governed. Consequently, effective health care governance has never been more important.

So, what should health care systems be doing to maximize governance effectiveness? And what can these organizations learn from the governance practices of the most-effective community health systems?

According to a recent study, “Governance in High-Performing Community Health Systems: A report of trustee and CEO views,” which Grant Thornton co-sponsored in collaboration with the University of Iowa, College of Public Health and the American Hospital Association, there are a number of important lessons to consider. The study examines the governance of community health systems based on feedback from 123 hospital CEOs, and follow-up visits and onsite interviews with CEOs and trustees of 10 “high-performing” systems. The “high-performing” systems were selected from a set of performance and governance metrics.

Six principal factors emerged from the study as critical to effective governance at high-performing systems:

Strong values-based CEO leadership and effective management teams
Effective CEO leadership is vital to achieving and maintaining a high level of health system operating performance. Among the specific attributes mentioned by interviewees were a commitment to the system’s mission and values, excellent communication and relationships with the board and medical staff, expertise in financial management and cost controls, a passion for improving the system and its patient care, and strategic vision. They also cited the importance of a strong, effective management team with expertise in the full range of management functions.

Well understood systemwide mission, vision and values
Interviewees emphasized that key internal and external stakeholder groups must understand and support a meaningful systemwide mission statement, a compelling vision for the system’s future and a clearly stated set of core values. These expressions of organizational mission, vision and values can be powerful in unifying the stakeholders and galvanizing energy toward established goals and standards, but only if they are consistently reinforced by organizational leaders throughout the system. Interviewees also recognized that building the understanding and support of key constituencies within the system, and in the communities the system serves, requires continuous attention by the board and management.

A highly committed and engaged board of directors
Trustees commented that a highly committed, well informed and proactive governing board is extremely important to achieving and maintaining organizational success. The board should work collaboratively with the CEO and physician leadership. In addition, many board members stressed the importance of well organized and staffed board committees, the leadership role of the board chairperson and a mutually supportive relationship between the board chair and the CEO. They also noted the need for trust-based relationship between the board of directors and its CEO.

Strong clinical leadership and capabilities
The majority of interviewees underscored the need for committed, competent clinicians as a critical determinant of operational performance. They commented that without strong physician leadership, no hospital or health system can achieve enduring success. A number of interviewees also noted the importance of excellent nursing leadership. Also critical were strong, mutually beneficial partnerships between the system and physicians.

Clearly defined organizational objectives, targets and metrics
Interviewees stressed the importance of working toward well defined organizational targets and evidence-based metrics. These enable the board, management team and clinical leadership to monitor actual performance in relation to established standards in key aspects of system operations. Metrics should include the health systems’ community benefit program, financial performance and quality of patient care.

Healthy organizational culture
Interviewees frequently mentioned the importance of organizational culture. They commented that the prevailing culture within their systems included broad-based commitment to excellence in patient care and operating performance.

In addition to the importance of these six factors, there is ample room for improving board performance, particularly related to boardroom culture, board evaluations and community benefit programs. We recommend the following:

Devote time and energy to serious reflection and dialogue about the board’s fundamental role, responsibilities and the overall caliber of its performance in recent years. Then, develop a concrete strategy for creating a better, more proactive and more effective board.

Reexamine the organization’s current board size and composition. Consider adding greater racial and gender diversity, as well as respected and experienced nursing leaders as voting members. Keep in mind that large boards can be unwieldy; nine to 17 members is considered ideal.

Take a hard look at existing board-development programs. On that basis, adopt a strong commitment and a concrete plan for improving them.

Initiate an overall review of the present board evaluation process. Objectively assess the value it has provided for the organization and determine how to improve its effectiveness. Board evaluation must not be a pro forma exercise with minimal value.

Give careful attention to the boardroom culture and determine steps to make it healthier and more effective. Board members must feel free to express their views and constructively challenge each other and the system’s management team. Directors should actively engage in discourse and decision-making.

Devote attention and resources to meeting emerging benchmarks of good governance for community benefit responsibilities. Establish formal measurable policies and measurable objectives for community benefit plans, with regular reporting on the achievement of those objectives. It’s also important to collaborate with other organizations in ongoing community needs assessment and to provide thorough reports to the communities served regularly at least once per year.

Current and emerging benchmarks of good governance for nonprofit hospitals and health systems should be reviewed, refined and compiled into authoritative, consolidated documents to provide guidance for trustees and CEOs as they strive to meet these benchmarks.

With growing attention from the IRS, Congress and the media, forward-looking health care organizations are taking steps to examine their governance and identify opportunities to strengthen it. Organizations that are committed to continuous improvement not only will enhance their performance, but also improve their systems’ contributions to the communities they serve. The time has never been better to apply these lessons learned.

first job john j. bouma

First Job: John J. Bouma, Snell & Wilmer

John J. Bouma
Chairman
Snell & Wilmer

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
My first job was working for my father at the Rialto Theater in Pocahontas, Iowa. It was a very nice, small town theater. I ushered guests, changed the names of the movies on the marquee, switched out movie posters, took tickets, sold tickets, and occasionally ran the projectors. I learned how important it is to be on time, to be courteous and attentive to customers, and to take into consideration people’s individual circumstances. People, and particularly kids, who did not have the ticket price would often get in free.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
My first job in the legal field was as a brand new lawyer at a law firm in Milwaukee. After a few months, I went on active duty as a lieutenant in the Army Judge Advocate General’s Corp (JAG).  Through both jobs, I learned the importance of listening and of preparation. I learned to try cases in the Army, first as a defense lawyer, and then as a prosecutor.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
During my years at the Rialto Theater my father gave me an allowance. I may have received an additional quarter or two on the nights I changed the marquee or ushered.
The law firm I joined in Milwaukee following college was one of the top-paying firms in the country at that time, paying new associates a yearly salary of $7,800.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
My biggest mentor was my father. He had run away from school in the sixth grade, but became a very successful businessman. He encouraged me in sports, throwing or catching baseballs endlessly, encouraged me to go to law school (on the principle that since I argued so much, I should get paid for it), and then encouraged me to settle in Arizona. My father taught me to say what I think, and to stick to my position if I believe I am right.

Mark Wilmer was also an important mentor to me. He was an outstanding trial lawyer and a real gentleman. From working with him and trying cases with him, I learned that being gentle and courteous is not inconsistent with being a great trial lawyer.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
It is crucial to establish a reputation for absolute honesty and integrity that can never be compromised or subject to question. Beyond that, if you don’t recognize law as a calling –– an opportunity to help people solve problems –– rather than just a way to make a living, you are in the wrong profession.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I would be involved with some nonprofit or public enterprise where I could keep my mind active and where my background and experience could be helpful to the organization. I would also devote even more time to a variety of outdoor activities and travel with my wife and family.