Tag Archives: North Mountain Hospital

JCL Surgery

Partnership Creates New Valley Medical Resources

At a time when healthcare dominates the national news, Midwestern University in Glendale and John C. Lincoln Hospitals, Phoenix, are working together to augment local medical resources by creating a general surgery training program for osteopathic medical school graduates.

The new osteopathic general surgery residency program, accredited by the American Osteopathic Association, was jointly developed by Midwestern and John C. Lincoln. The program was approved for two residents to begin each year, for a total of 10 residents in the program.

Residents will be trained at both John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, 250 East Dunlap, Phoenix, and John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital, 19829 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix. John C. Lincoln Hospitals are not-for-profit acute care community medical centers that have been nationally recognized for their quality of patient care and medical technology.

“Midwestern University is committed to the development of quality postdoctoral residency programs in the State of Arizona and around the country,” said Kathleen H. Goeppinger, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer of Midwestern University. “Our mission is to provide our communities with well-trained physicians and other much-needed healthcare providers both now and in the future.”

“John C. Lincoln brings a vast array of surgical experience to this program,” noted Alicia Mangram, M.D., FACS, Medical Director of the Level 1 Trauma Services program at John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital and Program Director of the new General Surgery Residency Program. “We have 20 general surgeons who will be associated with the residency program with experience in trauma surgery, advanced laparoscopic, and robotic procedures.”

Projected physician shortages have made establishing new Arizona-based osteopathic surgical residency opportunities a top priority for Midwestern University’s Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine (AZCOM) and the University’s Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institute (MWU/OPTI). According to Midwestern statistics, 97 percent of Arizona-native AZCOM students who receive postdoctoral training in-state remain in Arizona to practice, reducing the state’s physician shortage.

Any graduate of an accredited osteopathic medical school may apply to participate in the surgical residency program, Dr. Mangram explained. Residents selected to participate in the program will complete training in basic general surgery, advanced laparoscopic, robotic, colorectal, trauma, surgical critical care, endoscopy, vascular, and cardiothoracic procedures. Training in burns and pediatrics will be provided offsite.

stroke

Deer Valley Hospital Now Primary Stroke Center

John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital in North Phoenix has become the Valley’s newest hospital certified as a Primary Stroke Center by DNV Healthcare, an international certifying agency approved by the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, according to John Harrington Jr., hospital CEO and senior vice president, Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network.

John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital was accredited as a Primary Stroke Center by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations in 2007 and by DNV Healthcare in 2011.

“Deer Valley Hospital demonstrated that its stroke care program follows national standards and guidelines that can significantly improve outcomes for stroke patients,” said Chief Medical Officer Mary Ann Turley, DO, Deer Valley Hospital, who led the stroke certification task force that started preparing the hospital for stroke certification last year.

“We received only one finding when the surveyors visited from DNV and awarded John C. Lincoln Deer Valley Hospital certification as a Primary Stroke Center,” Turley added. “I could not be more proud of our entire stroke certification team and hospital co-workers who all jumped at the opportunity to earn this recognition for our caregiving capability.”

Strokes are the third most prevalent cause of death, the leading cause of adult disability, and affect 700,000 Americans every year. A stroke occurs when blood flow to the brain is disrupted by a blood clot (ischemic) or by bleeding from a burst blood vessel (hemorrhagic), either of which impairs the brain’s ability to function, but which require opposite treatments.

Because diagnosing the cause is key to ensuring appropriate and effective care, it’s important for patients and families to insist that EMS providers take them to a Primary Stroke Center, said Donna Sells, administrator for the Health Network’s Neurosciences/Orthopedic Service Line. “A Primary Stroke Center is where staff is trained not only to recognize symptoms of stroke, but more importantly, to correctly identify the cause,” she explained.
When people have strokes, time is of the essence. Rapid medical treatment – started less than 3 hours after onset of symptoms and completed within 45 minutes of the patients arrival at the hospital – can save many stroke patients from a lifetime of disability.
“Time loss equals brain loss,” said Sells. When stroke symptoms begin, people should call 9-1-1 without delay.

DNV Primary Stroke Center certification is based on submitted documentation and a site visit by DNV surveyors, during which the hospital staff demonstrates its commitment to excellence, Harrington said. DNV’s PSC Certification program incorporates elements from federal CMS hospital standards as well as requirements from the guidelines of the Brain Attack Coalition and recommendations of the American Stroke Association.

Members of the Deer Valley Stroke Team Include: Alice Montoya, RN, Nelson Faux, MD, Anil Goud, MD, Patrick Sciara, MD, Clark York, DO, Bonnie Fuerst, MT, Kevin Veale, DO, Patty Erickson, RN, Danny Blanco, RN, Lalit Mansukhani, PharmD, Peter Burrows, RT, Linda DeLuca, RN, Lawrence Finkel, MD, Renee Featherly, David Price, Linda Ott, RN, Donna Sells, RN, Karrie Smith, RN, Lisa Hughes, RN, Susan Hoffmeister, RN, Holly Grems, RN, Maria Soriano, MD, Tracy Moroney, RN, Jennifer Gallegos, MA, Mary Ann Turley, DO, Victor Zach, MD, Jessica Rivas, MSN, Matt Sainsbury, MHA, and Joanne Motley, RN.

6588-Lobby Overview

Lincoln unveils new $5 million entrance

A $5 million reconstruction project to redesign and rebuild the entrance area of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital at Dunlap Avenue and Second Street, Phoenix, is nearing completion, with the a dedication event scheduled for Nov. 29.

The renovation was made possible when David and Joan Lincoln and his sister, Lillian Lincoln Howell – descendants of John C. Lincoln – donated $4 million to upgrade and reconstruct the entrance. Additional major contributors include the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation Guild, Lincoln GIVES, the Health Network employee giving program and the John C. Lincoln North Mountain Auxiliary.

Construction began in January 2012 as part of a larger renovation at the North Mountain Hospital.  Areas to be unveiled Nov. 29 include the hospital’s main entrance, lobby, gift shop, spiritual center, admitting, coffee bistro and newly designed donor wall. The final phase of renovations will begin on Nov. 30 and include enhanced indoor public dining and the addition of outdoor and staff dining areas.

“This gift will allow us to re-invent the patient and visitor experience at the North Mountain Hospital,” said Rhonda Forsyth, president and CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Network. “We’ll create a welcoming and warm entry lobby that is the pathway to healing for patients, visitors, staff and the community.”

The transformation of the 12,840 square-foot areas of John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital creates a soothing and calming environment for patients and visitors. The journey to wellness begins here – on the Pathway to Healing – with a welcoming and inviting experience on par with the quality of care provided by nurses, physicians and staff throughout the John C. Lincoln Health Network.

“The hospital is dear to our family’s hearts, and it is important that the lobby reflect the quality of care received inside the hospital,” David Lincoln said shortly after the donation was made. He added, “You never get a second chance to make a good first impression, and this is our chance to make a great first impression to our patients and visitors.”

Marcia Mintz, CEO of the John C. Lincoln Health Foundation, noted that “this gift demonstrates the philanthropic leadership of the Lincoln family and serves as a principal gift model for the Foundation and our developing donor base. We are grateful for the generous support of the Lincoln family whose governance and philanthropic support have been steadfast for more than 80 years. This is a reflection of their continuing pride in the direction and mission of this organization.”