Tag Archives: nyse

toasted-marshmallows

The Dish: Marshmallows

You’ll never have to eat those stale, flavorless blobs from the grocery store again, once you learn how to make your own marshmallows! Imagine: cinnamon spice marshmallows topping off your hot chocolate on a cool fall evening, vanilla bean marshmallows toasted atop your sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving or blushing, pink rose water marshmallows dipped in dark chocolate for Valentine’s Day…The possibilities are endless with these gooey little morsels!

With the holidays right around the corner, marshmallows make excellent gifts. Place several marshmallows, some graham crackers, and a chocolate bar in a box for a homemade s’more kit. You can also wrap marshmallows in cellophane and place in an nice mug with a packet of gourmet hot chocolate for another great gift idea!

Try replacing the corn syrup with honey, agave or even molasses for an interesting twist. Virtually any flavor can be added from lemon juice to rum! Try adding different extracts or spices or even a pinch of salt on top of each to cut the sweetness. You can even use food coloring and cookie cutters to make them fun and festive. The only limit to the possibilities is remembering to keep all the ingredients proportionate (i.e. if you want to add 2 TBSP of limoncello, remove 2 TBSP of water).

Though the recipe may look long, these could not be easier to make. All you need is a mixer and your imagination!

Homemade Marshmallows 

• Vegetable oil or spray for coating pan

• About 1 cup confectioners’ sugar for coating pan and marshmallows

• 3 (1/4-ounce) envelopes powdered unflavored gelatin

• 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

• 1 cup light corn syrup

• 1/4 teaspoon salt

• 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 

Pastry brush; 1 (9-inch) square baking pan; small, fine-mesh sieve; 4 1/2-quart or larger stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment; candy thermometer

Brush the bottom and sides of a 9-inch square baking pan with vegetable oil.

Put 1/2 cup water in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Sprinkle the gelatin into the bowl and stir briefly to make sure all the gelatin is in contact with water. Let soften while you make the sugar syrup.

In a heavy 3- to 4-quart saucepan, combine the granulated sugar, corn syrup, salt, and 1/2 cup water. Place over moderate heat and bring to a boil, stirring until the sugar is dissolved. Put a candy thermometer into the boiling sugar syrup and continue boiling (the mixture may foam up, so turn the heat down slightly if necessary), without stirring, until the thermometer registers 240°F (soft-ball stage). Remove the saucepan from the heat and let stand briefly until the bubbles dissipate slightly.

With the mixer on low speed, carefully pour the hot sugar syrup into the softened gelatin. Gradually increase the mixer speed to high and beat until the marshmallow is very thick and forms a thick ribbon when the whisk is lifted, about 5 minutes. Beat in the vanilla.

Scrape the marshmallow into the prepared pan (it will be very sticky) and use a wet spatula to spread it evenly and smooth the top. Let stand uncovered at room temperature, until the surface is no longer sticky and you can gently pull the marshmallow away from the sides of the pan with your fingertips; at least 4 hours or overnight.

Dust a cutting board with confectioners’ sugar. Use a rubber spatula to pull the sides of the marshmallow from the edge of the pan (use the spatula to loosen the marshmallow from the bottom of the pan if necessary) and invert onto the cutting board. Dust the top with confectioners’ sugar.

Brush a long thin knife or a chef’s knife with vegetable oil and dust with confectioners’ sugar to prevent sticking; continue dusting the knife as necessary. Cut lengthwise into 8 strips, then crosswise into eighths, to form a total of 64 squares. (For larger marshmallows, cut lengthwise into 6 strips, then crosswise into sixths, to form a total of 36 squares.) Coat marshmallows, one at a time, in confectioners’ sugar.

Tip: A larger pan such as a 9 x 13″ or even a jelly roll pan can be used as well. Recipe can make up to 70 marshmallows. 

DO AHEAD: Marshmallows can be stored, layered between sheets of wax paper or parchment in an airtight container in a dry place at cool room temperature, for up to 30 days.

Click below for a printable version of this recipe

Marshmallows

flu

Who Should Get Their Flu Shot?

Getting your flu shot is even more critical when you are pregnant or have recently given birth, a University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix faculty member warns.

“Influenza is more dangerous in pregnant women than other women because the changes in the immune system while you are carrying your child,” said Maria Manriquez, MD, who is also an obstetrics/gynecological physician at Maricopa Medical Center. “That’s why it is imperative that pregnant women get their flu shot now that we are entering the season.”

The first Arizona flu case was reported earlier this month.

According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, influenza is five times more likely to cause severe illness in pregnant women than in women who are not pregnant. Pregnant women undergo changes in their immune systems, heart and lungs while pregnant making them more susceptible. Pregnant women with the flu also increase their risk of premature labor and delivery, the CDC says.

Vaccination during pregnancy has been shown to protect both the mother and child up to six months of age. Flu vaccines are not given to children until six months after they are born.

“Millions of pregnant women have received flu shots over the last several years and it has not been shown that it did any harm to mothers or babies,” Dr. Manriquez said. “In fact, it likely saved many of these women from getting sick or passing on sickness to their infant.”

The CDC said women at any point in their pregnancy can receive a flu shot and should get the vaccine rather than the nasal spray. Physicians also say women should get inoculated after they have given birth, even if they are breastfeeding, and can receive either type of vaccine.

104257362-1

Cole Real Estate Investments, Inc. Common Stock Begins Trading on the NYSE

Cole Real Estate Investments, Inc. (NYSE: COLE), a full-scale real estate and investment management firm, today announced that its common stock has begun trading on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker symbol “COLE.”

“Listing on the NYSE is a significant milestone for our firm, and I look forward to continuing to work with our talented team to capitalize on the significant opportunities this presents,” said Chris Cole, founder and executive chairman of Cole Real Estate Investments. “As a market-leading net-lease REIT, our high-quality portfolio and fully integrated real estate platform position us to be successful in today’s market. I am proud of the accomplishments that have led us to this most historic day in Cole’s 34-year history.”

To commemorate the listing, executives and guests of Cole will visit the NYSE to ring the Opening Bell on Friday, June 21st at 9:30 a.m.

Marc Nemer, chief executive officer of Cole Real Estate Investments, added, “It is an honor to be a NYSE-traded company, continuing our mission of being the premier, trusted brand in real estate. Stockholders will benefit from our proven investment strategy that has built one of the largest REITs focused on the net-lease sector. We are confident today’s listing provides the opportunity to build on that market leadership.”

With Cole’s listing, investors can own an interest in Cole’s high-quality commercial real estate portfolio featuring a 12.4 year weighted average lease term, 99% portfolio occupancy and 55% investment grade tenancy. The $7.7 billion of gross assets is well diversified by industry, tenancy and geography. Industry-leading tenants in the net lease portfolio include Walgreens, CVS/pharmacy, Amazon.com, Walmart, Target, Costco, Home Depot, FedEx, PetSmart, AT&T, Kohl’s and Merrill Lynch. In addition to being one the largest REITs in the net lease sector, Cole’s private capital business, Cole Capital, provides additional income as a result of management fees earned from sponsored real estate vehicles.

In addition, on June 17, 2013, Cole’s Board of Directors authorized the declaration and payment of a cash distribution on a monthly basis, in the amount of $0.05833334 per share of common stock (an annualized rate of $0.70 per share) for stockholders of record as of each of July 31, 2013, August 30, 2013, and September 30, 2013. Payment dates for each record date are August 1, 2013, September 3, 2013, and October 1, 2013, respectively.

IPOs

To Create Phoenix Jobs, Resuscitate IPOs

Job creation in Phoenix is a critical issue that threatens our hope for a sustained economic recovery. While we have heard many suggestions for creating Phoenix jobs, we have yet to hear of the positive role that resuscitating the initial public offering (IPO) market can play on job creation. By taking a look back at successes of the past, perhaps it can help to resuscitate IPOs as we move forward to economic recovery.

1990s

  • Net creation of more than 20 million jobs in the United States
  • Average of 530 corporate IPOs per year (excluding funds, LPs, REITs and SPACs)
  • Nearly half of IPOS came from traditional America (neither venture capital nor private equity sponsored)

IPOs in the 1990s inspired confidence and created a source of capital that led to equity investment in private companies, giving rise to a “virtuous circle” of capital formation, job growth, innovation and increases in tax revenues.

2000s

From 2000 to 2009, we saw an average of only 126 corporate IPOs per year – down more than 76 percent from the prior decade, nowhere near enough to replace the 360 public companies that are lost annually to delistings.

Common sense dictates that when the number of IPOs declines, the availability of capital for job creation shrinks; when the number of companies de-listed from stock markets exceeds the number listed, jobs are shed. This “circle of destruction” undermines investment in private companies — considered the “foundation of job formation” — leaving behind a “foundation for unemployment.”

Consider that by 2000, unemployment had fallen to a mere four percent after an eight-year decline that coincided with the robust IPO market. Unemployment began to rise in the next few years amid the bursting of the dot-com bubble and the dissolution of thousands of businesses, but then ebbed once again from 2004-2007 as IPOs modestly reemerged. As we have seen, the credit crisis and the concurrent disappearance of IPOs in the past couple of years has been the backdrop for a sharp rise in unemployment.

2010s

The antidote is simple: restore the ecosystem that supported the allocation of capital to small Phoenix companies.

To do this we need to create a new stock market structure — subject to the same regulatory oversight and disclosure requirements that govern the NYSE and NASDAQ — that provides specifically for adequate economic incentives for Wall Street to return to the business of supporting small companies with research, capital and sales support. This new market would have minimum spreads of $0.10 for stocks below $5 per share and $0.20 for stocks trading at or above $5 per share, thus restoring incentives for brokerages to pursue profitability, while providing sufficient economics to support small cap liquidity.

The U.S. stock market once was the envy of the world — in large part because it fueled economic growth. Access to capital is the life blood of growing companies.

Resuscitating the IPO market for small cap businesses may not be the sole answer to Phoenix job creation, but it certainly should be part of every conversation.

For more information about resuscitating IPOs, please visit gt.com.

avnet nyse anniversary

Avnet, Inc. Unveils Sculpture For 50th Anniversary

Avnet, Inc., one of Phoenix’s largest publicly-held companies will unveil a new sculpture outside its global headquarters in Phoenix on Monday, February 7th at 3 p.m. This year will mark the companies’ 50th anniversary on the New York Stock Exchange. For Roy Vallee, Avnet’s chairman and chief executive officer, this means only good things for the company.Duncan Niederauer and Roy Vallee

“There are very few companies that ever reach a milestone of this magnitude, and it speaks volumes about how our employers and leadership team have been able to adapt, innovate and succeed in accelerating the success of Avnet and our stakeholders,” Vallee said.

Vallee will be one of a number of Avnet executives participating in the unveiling. Among the executives attending are Rick Hamada, Al Maag, Ray Sadowski, Harley Feldberg and Phil Gallagher. Dignitaries also scheduled to attend include NYSE Euronext chief operating officer Lawrence Liebowitz and the Arizona artist who designed the sculpture Lyle London.

A sculpture may be a common way to commemorate a significant milestone, but for Avnet there is more personal meaning behind this one. Lester Avnet, who led the company in the 1950s and 1960s, was a well-recognized patron of the arts. The new sculpture will not only be a symbol of business accomplishments but also of a rich, artistic history.

This heritage of the arts and Avnet’s employees and business partners, who have made Avnet a $20B+ leader in technology distribution, will be recognized at the sculpture unveiling.NYSE Bell Ringing

Avnet, Inc. is one of the largest distributors of electronic components, computer products and embedded technology serving customers in more than 70 countries worldwide.

“Driven by the proliferation of technology, profitable organic growth and strategic acquisitions — 115 since joining the NYSE — Avnet has grown rapidly while demonstrating financial sustainability over the last 50 years on the NYSE, and it is well positioned to continue to thrive as an industry leader,” Vallee said.

For more information about Avnet, visit www.avnet.com