Tag Archives: onboard

Luxury Residential Ship Live And Work Onboard

Luxury Residential Ship Allows People To Live And Work Onboard

You know what a cruise ship is — a small floating city packed with people, all-you-can-eat buffets, frosty umbrella drinks and a few families wearing matching T-shirts that say things like, “Thompson Family Reunion.”

But have you heard of a “community at sea”?

Imagine, if you will, a luxury community where residents have access to the best amenities. Now imagine that luxury community on water and you have The World residential ship.

That’s right, you can buy an apartment on The World and travel the world. You must have a minimum net worth of $10 million just to apply to buy one of the exclusive residences, which range from 357-square-foot studios to 4,200-square-foot, six-bedroom apartments. Besides the crew and staff, the only ones onboard are owners or their guests. The ship is managed and staffed by ResidenSea Management out of Miramar, Fla.

Although capacity on the ship is 600, rarely are more than 300 people onboard at one time. Main thoroughfares and community spaces are often vacant, especially when the ship is in port. That’s when residents are off exploring solo or participating in ship-facilitated group activities on land such as Pretty Women Day, a nine-hour shopping spree on Rodeo Drive.

The World is for those who love luxury travel. But it’s not for everyone. The quiet, reserved vibe, neutral interior design of common areas, and strict dress code help create a community culture that doesn’t seem to fit anyone with mildly eccentric tastes.

While rock stars and other nonconformist types aren’t found here wearing the standard pantsuit, there’s another breed of folks who are plentiful — business people.

Take Richard Reed for example. He is founder and chairman of a company and one of the many World residents who hasn’t hit retirement yet.

Reed lives onboard about four months every year, winters at his penthouse in Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, and spends the rest of his time in Scottsdale. Despite this jet-setter lifestyle, Reed manages to stay well connected while on the high seas.

“It is just as easy to do business in our apartments onboard as it is on land,” says Reed, a resident of The World since its maiden voyage in March 2002.

Every apartment has Internet access and a private fax and telephone line (a Miami area code makes it convenient for domestic callers to get in touch with residents). A conference room equipped with cutting-edge technology and a library offering an array of daily newspapers make doing business at sea easy.

With two networked computers and an all-in-one printer in his condo, Reed has everything he needs to check on business, pay bills and manage his stock portfolio online.

“Just last week I was able to purchase a piece of real estate in Mexico, complete all the paperwork and close — all while the ship was sailing in the Bering Strait, far from civilization,” he says. “Frankly, it’s a lot more fun doing business from the ship than anywhere else I can think of.”

www.residensea.com

Onboarding Employees

The Critical Process Of Onboarding Your New Employees

You’ve sorted through stacks of resumes, interviewed the best and selected the perfect candidate. Now what? Once you’ve made the job offer and it has been accepted, it is time to start thinking about your onboarding process.

Onboarding is the term used to describe the process of integrating a new employee into your organization, and there are three steps to consider.

Be prepared
It is very unpleasant for an employee to show up to a new job, excited about the possibilities, and end up with the feeling that she was not expected and the company is surprised to see her. Since that is not the kind of surprise you want for your newest “most valuable asset,” it is important to prepare in advance for her arrival. Take into consideration such factors as:

The workspace — Is it properly equipped? Is it cleaned up, with the remnants of the prior occupant removed? Include a small “welcome” gift.

Name badge — If your staff wears name badges, be sure your new hire has one on her first day of work.

Time — Be sure the new hire’s manager has taken the necessary time to make introductions with co-workers. Your new hire should not be treated like he is an inconvenience to a busy schedule.

Welcome
Many employees make the decision about whether they are going to stay at their new organization within the first week. Since we only have a short period of time to make a good and lasting first impression, take these important steps to make him feel welcome:

Be sure your front desk personnel are trained to welcome new hires in the same way they welcome your customers. The welcome should say, “We’ve been expecting you and are glad you are here!”

Give your new hire a tour upon arrival. Be sure to point out the restrooms, drinking fountain, coffee maker, vending machines and break room, in addition to her workspace, the copier, supply room and other important rooms in your building. Remember, you want to make a good impression, so team her up with someone who is a great spokesperson for your organization.

The road to success
You want to set your new hire up for success from the start, so consider the following when laying out the roadmap for her first several months onboard:

If you have a formal job description, make sure your new hire receives a copy of it on her first day of work. The manager, or a co-worker who is knowledgeable about the job, should review the job duties and clearly define what is expected for each task. Define “success” up front, so your new hire knows what will be expected of her.

If the manager for the new hire is often in meetings or off-site, assign another “go to” person for your new hire. Since new hires decide early on if they are going to “fit” at this organization, it is important they feel comfortable asking questions and seeking assistance when needed.

We all have things to learn when starting a new job. Be sure your new hire is trained on all aspects of his job, from the mundane to the complex. Depending on your environment, it may be best to wait until a couple of days after the start of the new job to train on more complex matters. Give enough information for your new hire to go home loving his new job on the first day, and not so much information that he wonders how he will ever remember it.

Onboarding is a six-month to one-year process depending on the complexity of the work you do. Check in often with your new hire to make sure she has received the training she needs, has the proper equipment to do her job, understands your corporate culture and has made a few friends with whom she feels comfortable.

Since you have made a significant investment in selecting and hiring your newest “asset,” you want to do everything possible to get them onboard and keep them onboard. An effective onboarding process will set everyone on the right track.