Tag Archives: orbital sciences

CHANDLER Hyatt, WEB

Hyatt Place at Chandler Fashion Square officially opens

CHANDLER 254 (1)Hyatt Hotels and Resorts  and Noble Investment Group  (“Noble”) today announce the opening of Hyatt Place Phoenix/Chandler-Fashion Center  in the city of Chandler, Ariz., a prominent suburb of Phoenix.

“As Chandler continues to thrive economically, we are excited to add to the momentum by welcoming the very first Hyatt-branded property to this growing area,” said Kristen Freeman, general manager, Hyatt Place Phoenix/Chandler-Fashion Center. “Whether for business or for leisure, our guests will value the comfortable and functional amenities offered at Hyatt Place Phoenix/Chandler-Fashion Center, such as made-to-order fresh food around the clock, our 24-hour StayFit Gym and free Wi-Fi throughout the hotel.”

The hotel is located in the heart of Chandler’s high-tech district, and is neighbored by the Chandler Fashion Center, home to numerous high-end boutiques, restaurants and other attractions. Additionally, Chandler is the headquarters to major corporate campuses such as Intel, General Motors, and Orbital Sciences, as well as Arizona State University and the Arizona State University Research Park.

CHANDLER 249 (2)Hyatt Place Phoenix/Chandler-Fashion Center offers:
•    129 guest rooms featuring a swiveling 42-inch HDTV, the plush Hyatt Grand Bed® and Cozy Corner sectional sofa
•    Free Wi-Fi everywhere plus hard-wired access is available in each and every guestroom for seamless and secure access
•    Complimentary a.m. Kitchen Skillet TM breakfast for guests, featuring freshly prepared breakfast sandwiches, a variety of fresh fruits, hot and cold cereal, yogurt, breads, premium coffee and an assortment of juices
•    Approximately 1,000 square feet of flexible, high-tech meeting/function space
•    24/7 Gallery Menu serving made-to-order entrees and appetizers around the clock
•    A Coffee to Cocktails Bar featuring specialty coffees and premium beers, as well as wines and cocktail

1800 S. Price, Lee Associates, WEB

Calif. investment firm takes Chandler Iridium facility for $12.7M

A 69,429 SF fl ex manufacturing facility and an adjacent 2.97 AC parcel at 1800 S. Price Rd. in Chandler has been sold for $12.65M. The building is fully-leased to Iridium Communications with an estimated 10 years remaining on their lease.

Cohen Asset Management, Inc., a California-based private real estate investment fi rm purchased the building from Abart Properties Corp. of Scottsdale. Lee & Associates Arizona Principals Rick Lee and Andy Ogan represented Cohen. Bret Angner with Nova Management represented Abart in the transaction.

The building is located in one of the Valley’s best commercial real estate areas. Chandler’s Price Corridor is home to notable companies such as Intel Corp., Motorola, PayPal, Orbital Sciences, eBay, Amkor Electronics, Charles Shwab and General Motors. The area is served by the Loop 101 and Loop 202 freeways with easy access to the entire Valley.

Iridium Communications, based in McLean, Virginia, is a mobile satellite communications company providing voice and data solutions worldwide. It is the only company of its kind that spans the entire globe.

JayTibshraeny_PriceCorridor

Tibshraeny Named Municipal Leader of the Year

American City & County magazine has selected Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny as its Municipal Leader of the Year.

Mayor Tibshraeny will be featured in the November edition of American City & County, which has been the voice of state and local government since 1909. The magazine serves city, county and state officials who are charged with developing and implementing government policy, programs and projects.

“Mayor Tibshraeny proves that through foresight and endurance, America’s local leaders can help overcome their community’s problems,” said Bill Wolpin, Editor, American City & County Magazine. “His story is worth sharing in the hopes that others will become inspired.”

This honor is in large part due to Mayor Tibshraeny’s role in economic development and specifically, creating, protecting and preserving the Price Corridor.  The Price Corridor is Chandler’s major employment corridor and has been instrumental in attracting high wage technology jobs to the city.

Price Corridor is home to large corporations such as Intel, Bank of America, PayPal, Microchip Technologies, Orbital Sciences, Rogers Corporation and Wells Fargo. In the past year alone, General Motors, Infusionsoft and Nationstar opened in the Price Corridor.

“Chandler is a leader in the region in job creation and today the Price Corridor is home to an impressive roster of companies,” said Mayor Jay Tibshraeny. “This success validates our efforts to protect the area from residential encroachment. I am proud of what we have been able to accomplish in the area as Chandler is now recognized as a premier innovation and technology hub throughout the Southwest.”

In addition to his achievements with the Price Corridor, Mayor Tibshraeny is being recognized for a wide variety of accomplishments including; the Four Corner Initiative and Adaptive Reuse Program, creating a healthier community, neighborhood outreach, job creation and University partnerships and transparency through technology.

SkySong

Innovation unites Arizona’s economic engines

When Arizona became a state 100 years ago, it was easy to identify its economic engines, those industries, innovators and locations that drove the state’s economy and employment.

They all started with C — copper, cotton, citrus, cattle and climate.
A decade later, it’s not so easy.

“We must find ways to diversify our economy, including investing in bioscience and technology, health science and innovation,” Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton says. “We are coming out of the recession, and we need to move forward in a strategic way.”

Today’s economic engines are doing just that. They innovate, they collaborate, and the only one that starts with C is CityScape, and the only copper you’ll find there is Copper Blues Rock Pub and Kitchen and the cotton is at Urban Outfitters.

But today’s economic engines have to clear vision and direction for driving Arizona’s economy during its second century.

The Biodesign Institute at ASU
What it is: The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today’s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
Economic impact: The Biodesign Institute has met or exceeded all of the business goals set in mid-2003 by attracting more than $300 million in external funding since inception, and generating more than $200 million in proposals advanced in 2011 alone.
Companies it has helped grow: Licensed next-generation respiratory sensor technology to a European medical device developer; executed an exclusive license agreement for DNA sequencing technology to Roche, which includes a sponsored research agreement to develop devices in collaboration with Roche and IBM; and launched two Biodesign Commercial Translation companies.
Latest news: Led by electrical engineer, Nongjian Tao, ASU researchers have formulated a new sensor technology that will allow them to design and create a handheld sensor that can contribute to better diagnosis of asthma.
Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health at the Biodesign Institute at ASU: “By establishing biosignatures centers, we hope to build a global network that will provide the scale necessary to overcome scientific limitations while creating a global platform to share methods, results and experiences.”

CityScape
What it is: A highrise mixed-use development in Downtown Phoenix consisting of residential, retail, office, and hotel components. The project covers three downtown Phoenix city blocks and is located between First Avenue and First Street, and between Washington and Jefferson streets.
Economic impact: Officials credit the evolution of Downtown Phoenix — led by CityScape — with helping the Valley land the 2015 Super Bowl, which will bring an economic impact of an estimated $500 million.
Companies it has helped grow: In addition to entertainment venues and top-notch restaurants, business leaders calling CityScape home include Alliance Bank, Cantor Law Group,  Fidelity Title, Gordon Silver, Gust Rosenfeld, Jennings, Strouss and Salmon, PLC, Polsinelli Shughart, RED Development, Squire Sanders and UnitedHealthcare.
Latest news: The 250-room boutique hotel, Hotel Palomar Phoenix by Kimpton, opened in June.
Jeff Moloznik, general manager, CityScape:  “The most progressive and entrepreneurial talent in the Valley have convened at CityScape. The impact our tenants’ businesses have brought to Downtown Phoenix is noticeable and significant. In an area that once lacked a central core, there is now energy, creativity, enterprise and excitement all day, every day in once central location.”

Intel

What it is: Intel is a world leader in computing innovation. The company designs and builds the essential technologies that serve as the foundation for the world’s computing devices.
Economic impact: Since 1996, Intel has invested more than $12 billion in high-tech manufacturing capability in Arizona and spent more than $450 million each year in research and development. Intel is investing another $5 billion in its Chandler site to manufacture its industry-leading, next-generation 14 nanometer technology.
Companies it has helped grow: Intel has been a catalyst for helping to create Chandler’s “tech corridor,” which includes Freescale, Microchip Technology, Orbital Sciences, Avnet, Amkor, and Marvell Technologies.
Latest news: Intel and ASU’s College of Technology and Innovation (CTI) are developing a customized engineering degree for some of the chip maker’s Arizona-based employees. The program is based on CTI’s modular, project-based curriculum and upon completion will provide a Bachelor’s of Science in Engineering degree from ASU, with a focus in materials science.
Chandler Mayor Jay Tibshraeny: Intel likes the partnership it has with Chandler, likes doing business in Arizona, and they’re a very good corporate citizen.”

Phoenix Mesa-Gateway Airport

What it is: Formerly Williams Gateway Airport (1994–2008) and Williams Air Force Base (1941–1993), it is a commercial airport located in the southeastern area of Mesa.
Economic impact: The airport helped generate $685 million in economic benefits last year, and the airport supports more than 4,000 jobs in the region.
Companies it has helped grow: Able Engineering & Component Services, Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Embraer, CMC Steel, TRW Vehicle Safety Systems Inc..
Latest news: The Airport Authority’s Board of Directors announced Monday the airport will undergo a $1.4 billion expansion. There is also an effort to privately raise $385 million to build two hotels and office and retail space near the airport.
Mesa Mayor Scott Smith: “Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport has gone through tremendous growth and expansion and has truly arrived as a major transportation center in the Valley.”

SkySong

What it is: A 1.2-million-square-feet mixed use space that gives entrepreneurs and innovators the resources they need  to grow and thrive, and provide them an exceptional home for when their businesses begin to take off.
Economic impact: Projected to generate more than $9.3 billion in economic growth over the next 30 years, according to an updated study by the Greater Phoenix Economic Council.
Companies it has helped grow: Emerge.MD, Channel Intelligence, Adaptive Curriculum, Alaris, Jobing.com/Blogic, webFilings.
Latest news: Jobing, an online company that connects employers and job seekers nationally, relocated its corporate headquarters from Phoenix to SkySong.
Scottsdale Mayor Jim Lane: “It is hard to think of a business attraction initiative the city has recently used that has not mentioned SkySong as a major attribute. SkySong has a national reputation and as it grows it will continue to elevate Scottsdale’s standing.”

Talking Stick

What it is: This economic engine encompasses a complex that includes the 497-room Talking Stick Resort, Courtyard Marriott Scottsdale Salt River, Casino Arizona at Talking Stick Resort, Talking Stick Golf Club, and Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, the spring training home of the Colorado Rockies and Arizona Diamondbacks.
Economic impact: Salt Rivers Fields аt Talking Stick accounted fоr 22 percent оf the the attendance for Cactus League baseball, which generates more thаn $300 million а yeаr іn economic impact tо the greater Phoenix metropolitan area economy.
Companies it has helped grow: In 2011, nearby Scottsdale Pavilions — which features 1.1 million square feet of select retail and mixed-use properties — became The Pavilions at Talking Stick. Pavilions has added Hobby Lobby, Mountainside Fitness, Buffalo Wild Wings and Hooters.
Latest news: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick will be one of the ballparks selected to host the first round of the 2013 World Baseball Classic in the spring.
David Hielscher, advertising manager, Casino Arizona and Talking Stick Resort: “Our property’s diverse, entertainment-driven culture and convenient locations allow us limitless opportunities for future expansion and development.”

Translational Genomics Research Institute

What it is: TGen is a non-profit genomics research institute that seeks to employ genetic discoveries to improve disease outcomes by developing smarter diagnostics and targeted therapeutics.
Economic impact: TGen provides Arizona with a total annual economic impact of $137.7 million, according to the results of an independent analysis done by Tripp Umbach, a national leader in economic forecasting.
Companies it has helped grow: TGen researchers have collaborated with Scottsdale Healthcare, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center, Mayo Clinic, Ascalon International Inc., MCS Biotech Resources LLC, Semafore Pharmaceuticals Inc., Silamed Inc., Stromaceutics Inc., SynDevRx Inc., and Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC). and many others.
Latest news: When TGen-generated business spin-offs and commercialization are included,  Tripp Umbach predicts that in 2012 TGen will produce $47.06 for every $1 of state investment, support 3,723 jobs, result in $21.1 million in state tax revenues, and have a total annual economic impact of $258.8 million.
Michael Bidwill, president of the Arizona Cardinals: “TGen is one of this state’s premier medical research and economic assets, and is a standard-bearer for promoting everything that is positive and forward-looking about Arizona.”

University of Arizona’s Tech Park

What it is: The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park (UA Tech Park) sits on 1,345 acres in Southeast Tucson. Almost 2 million square feet of space has been developed featuring high tech office, R&D and laboratory facilities.
Economic impact: In 2009, the businesses that call Tech Park home had an economic impact of $2.67 billion in Pima County. This included $1.81 billion in direct economic impacts such as wages paid and supplies and services purchased and $861 million in indirect and induced dollar impacts. In total, the Tech Park and its companies generated 14,322 jobs (direct, indirect, and induced).
Companies it has helped grow: IBM, Raytheon, Canon USA, Citigroup, NP Photonics, and DILAS Diode Laser.
Latest news: A 38.5-acre photovoltaic array is the latest addition to the Solar Zone technology demonstration area at Tech Park. Power generated from the facility will be sold to Tucson Electric Power Co., providing power for  about 1,000 homes.
Bruce Wright, associate vice president for University Research Parks:  “By 2011, the park had recaptured this lost employment (resulting from the recession) with total employment increasing to 6,944. In addition, the number of tenants had expanded from 50 to 52 reflecting the addition of new companies in the Arizona Center for Innovation and the development of the Solar Zone at the Tech Park.”

rsz_orbital_sciences_bldg

CBRE Completes $19.5M Sale of Orbital Sciences Building in Chandler

 

CBRE has completed the $19.5M sale of an 83,183 SF, 3-story office building and two-level parking garage located at 3377 S. Price Road in Chandler.

The property is 100% leased to Orbital Sciences, one of the world’s leading space technology companies.

Barry Gabel and Mindy Korth of CBRE’s Phoenix office represented the seller, Gilbane Development Company of Providence, R.I., in negotiating the sale. The buyer, Paramount International LLC of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was represented by Tivon Moffitt of Colliers International, also in Phoenix.

“Gilbane developed a high-tech, Class A office property for one of the world’s leading space technology companies.  Paramount International recognized the quality of the tenancy, the building as well as the location and believes in the long-term, intrinsic value of Chandler and the Price Corridor,” Gabel said.

Located within the Price Corridor, home to numerous research, technology and financial services firms, the Class A office building was built specifically for Orbital Sciences and sits directly across from its 40-acre regional manufacturing, research and development campus.

Its high-tech look features blue-tinted glass curtain walls with bright red accents and well-appointed interior finishes. The building was also designed to LEED Silver-level specifications, with the final certification pending.

 

Manufacturing Companies

Arizona’s Largest Manufacturing Companies

Arizona’s 10 largest public and privately held manufacturing companies, ranked by the number of employees based on full-time equivalents of 40 hours per week and based on industry research.

ŒRaytheon Co.
Arizona employees in 2012: About 12,000
Employment change since 2011: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $25.2 billion
Principal: Taylor W. Lawrence, president
Company’s focus: Missile manufacturing
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Waltham, Mass.
Phone: (520) 694-7737
Website: raytheon.com

Intel Corp.
Arizona employees in 2012: About 11,000
Employment change since 2011: Added about 1,300 jobs
2010 revenue: $43.6 billion
Principal: Paul S. Otellini, president and CEO
Company’s focus: Semiconductor manufacturing
Year founded: 1968
Headquarters: Santa Clara, Calif.
Phone: (480) 554-8080
Website: intel.com

ŽHoneywell International Inc.
Arizona employees in 2012: 10,100
Employment change since 2011: Added about 384 jobs
2010 revenue: $33.4 billion
Principal: Tim Mahoney, president and CEO, aerospace
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Morristown, N.J.
Phone: (602) 231-1000
Website: honeywell.com

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.
Arizona employees in 2012: About 7,600
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $19 billion
Principal: Richard Adkerson, CEO
Company’s focus: Mining
Year founded: 1834
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 366-7323
Website: fcx.com

General Dynamics C4 Systems
Arizona employees in 2012: 5,402
Employment change since 2011: Added about 376 jobs
2010 revenue: $32.5 billion
Principal: Chris Marzilli, president
Company’s focus: Defense, communications
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Falls Church, Va.
Phone: (480) 441-3033
Website: generaldynamics.com

‘Boeing Co.
Arizona employees in 2012: 4,878
Employment change since 2011: Added about 78 jobs
2010 revenue: $64.3 billion
Principal: Harry Stonecither, CEO
Company’s focus: Aircraft manufacturing
Year founded: 1916
Headquarters: Chicago
Phone: (480) 891-3000
Website: boeing.com

’Freescale Semiconductor
Arizona employees in 2012: 3,000
Employment change since 2011: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.5 billion
Principal: Rich Beyer, chairman and CEO
Company’s focus: Microchip manufacturing
Year founded: 1953
Headquarters: Austin
Phone: (512) 895-2000
Website: freescale.com

“Shamrock Foods Co.
Arizona employees in 2012: 1,828
Employment change since 2010: Added about 47 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.650 billion
Principal: Norman McClelland, CEO
Company’s focus: Processor of dairy products
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 477-6400
Website: shamrockfoods.com

”Microchip Technology Inc.
Arizona employees in 2012: About 1,539
Employment change since 2011: Lost about 21 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.487 billion
Principal: Steve Sanghi, CEO
Company’s focus: Microcontroller, memory and analog semiconductors manufacturing
Year founded: 1987
Headquarters: Chandler
Phone: (480) 792-7200
Website: microchip.com

•Orbital Sciences Corp.
Arizona employees in 2012: 1,378
Employment change since 2011: Lost about 58 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.294 billion
Principal: Christopher Long, vice president and GM Gilbert operations
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1963
Headquarters: Dulles, Va.
Phone: (480) 899-6000
Website: orbital.com

Aerospace and defense industry - AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

Aerospace And Defense Industry – Critical To Expanding Economy

Aerospace and defense industry is critical to expanding economy

When I’m asked to name one sector of Arizona’s technology community that is critical to expanding the strength of the economic recovery, I always sum it up in two letters: A&D  — the aerospace and defense industry. It’s a cornerstone industry for Arizona, as our state has seen groundbreaking innovation in this arena for decades.

Boeing, General Dynamics, Honeywell, Raytheon, Lockheed Martin, Northup Grumman and Orbital Sciences are just a handful of the state’s major industry players contributing to Arizona’s impressive resume. An Arizona economic impact study conducted in 2010 reported that compensation per employee in the Arizona aerospace and defense industry is approximately $109,000. This is 2.3 times the statewide average for all employed individuals. The study also reported when accounting for multiplier effects, the Arizona A&D industry in 2009 can account for a total of 93,800 jobs, labor income of $6.9 billion, and gross state product of $8.8 billion.

But keeping Arizona’s aerospace and defense industry healthy and at pace with the ever-changing knowledge-based economy requires competitive business policies and a coordinated effort among state and federal leaders. Recognizing the critical importance of this imperative, there has been a resurgent statewide support for A&D over the last few years.

A big step was taken when Gov. Jan Brewer created the Arizona A&D Commission. Its active members develop industry goals, offer technical support, recommend legislation and provide overall direction. Another milestone occurred when the Arizona Commerce Authority formed and designated the aerospace and defense industry as one of its foundational pillars. Through the efforts of these two organizations, a request for proposal was issued for the first ever Aerospace, Aviation & Defense Requirements Conference in Arizona. Hosted by the Arizona Technology Council in late January, this successful historic event offered a major opportunity for the A&D community to connect with potential new partners. Attendees also heard a multitude of informative speakers, including a gripping keynote address delivered by Gen. Philip M. Breedlove, the Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force.

A new chapter in the state’s expanding role in A&D research also recently began when the Arizona A&D Research Collaboratory was formed. The organization brings leaders from Arizona’s A&D industries together with researchers from the University of Arizona, Arizona State University and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University to work together to gain insight into future technological needs for A&D.

Although these initiatives and programs indicate that there’s a resurgence of attention on A&D in Arizona, there are several key elements upon which the industry leaders within the state must still focus. The industry can’t do it alone. We need a unified congressional delegation employing strategies focused on promoting the desirable, high-wage jobs that A&D bring to their constituents.

We also need states leaders to take the lead in advocating for federal A&D projects that are critical to the existence of the state’s industrial base. These efforts not only reap benefits to the large manufacturers but they are hugely significant to building a robust small business supplier base in the state.

Indeed there are great needs still to be met for achieving newly conceived and exciting goals for manned space flight, homeland security and connecting the world with ever-evolving modern communications technologies. With the proper support, Arizona’s aerospace and defense industry can be critical to meeting those needs.

Steven G. Zylstra is president and chief executive officer of the Arizona Technology Council.

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

RED Awards 2010 - AZRE Magazine March/April 2010

2010 RED Awards Winners & Honorees

On Thursday, March 4, 2010, AZRE | Arizona Commercial Real Estate Magazine presented the 5th Annual RED Awards — Arizona’s most comprehensive annual real estate awards. The reception honored the Biggest, Best and Most Notable commercial real estate projects and transactions of 2009. The top projects were announced and awards given to the developer, general contractor, architect and broker/teams of each winning project. All of the award winners and honorable mentions were featured within a special award section published within the March/April 2010 issue of AZRE Magazine.


2010 RED Awards Winners & Honorees

Best Education Project:

Winner:

ASU College of Nursing & Health Innovation

Honorable Mention:

Ironwood Hall

Best Hospitality Project:

Winner:

Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino

Honorable Mention:

aloft Hotel

Best Industrial Project:

Winner:

Rockefeller Group Distribution Center

Honorable Mention:

Spectrum Ridge, Phase I

Best Medical Project:

Winner:

Banner Ironwood Medical Center

Honorable Mention:

Banner Thunderbird Medical Center Tower

Best Multi-Family Project:

Winner:

Grigio Metro

Honorable Mention:

Ninety Degrees Paradise Ridge

Best Office Project:

Winner:

One Central Park East

Honorable Mention:

Orbital Sciences Corp.

Best Public Project:

Winner:

Surprise City Hall

Honorable Mention:

Camelback Ranch Spring Training Facility

Best Retail Project:

Winner:

Scottsdale Quarter

Honorable Mention:

Aspen Place at the Saw Mill

Best Re-Development Project:

Winner:

300 M

Honorable Mention:

Phoenix Country Club Modernization

Best Tenant Improvement Project:

Winner:

Barneys New York Interior Build-Out

Honorable Mention:

Arcadia Gateway Reimaging

Most Challenging Project:

Winner:

Moenkopi Legacy Inn & Suites

Honorable Mention:

3900 Camelback Center

Most Sustainable Project:

Winner:

Appaloosa Branch Library

Honorable Mention:

Flagstaff Courtyard by Marriott

Developer of the Year:

Winner:

Ryan Companies US Inc.

Architect of the Year:

Winner:

SmithGroup

General Contractor of the Year:

Winner:

McCarthy Building Companies

Brokerage Team of the Year for Leasing:

Winner:

CB Richard Ellis

Brokerage Team of the Year for Sales:

Winner:

Cushman & Wakefield


For information on sponsorship opportunities, corporate tables or attendance, please email events@azbusinessmagazine.com or call (602) 277-6045.


AZRE Magazine March/April 2010

Orbital Sciences, AZRE July/August 2009

Office: Orbital Sciences


ORBITAL SCIENCES

Developer: Gilbane Development
General contractor: McShane Construction Company
Architect: Gromatzky Dupree and Associates
Location:
NWC Price & Dobson roads, Chandler
Size: 82,000SF

The 3-story, Class A build-to-suit office facility is being built for the Orbital Sciences Corp., one of the world’s leading developers and manufacturers of smaller, more affordable space launch systems. Construction finishes in August, and includes a post-tensioned concrete frame and glass curtain wall enclosure.

AZRE July/August 2009