Tag Archives: own business

Broadway Health Center, 6550 Broadway, Mesa

Multi-Million Dollar Renovation Begins on 2 Medical Office Buildings in Mesa

 

Renovations have begun on Baywood Health Center and Broadway Health Center, two, 2-story medical office buildings in Mesa across the street from Banner Baywood Hospital.

Archway Holdings Corp. of Beverly Hills, Calif., which purchased the properties in February 2012, is implementing significant exterior and interior upgrades. Improvements to the properties include a complete redesign of their exterior façades, renovations to the interior lobbies and common areas, new garden and monument signage and water saving landscaping features.

Construction started in December 2012, with completion in March 2013. LGE Design Build is the general contractor; Cawley Architects will handle the design work.

Kelley Ahrens of CBRE’s Phoenix office will handle the leasing assignment for the property owner.

“In addition to repositioning the buildings into class A assets, Archway is providing tenants with generous improvement dollars to perform renovations to their individual office suites in order to keep up with the improvements to the buildings,” Ahrens said.

The assets are located directly across the street from Banner Baywood Medical Center, a 342-bed hospital providing complete acute care services to the East Valley communities of Mesa, Gilbert, Apache Junction, Queen Creek, Fountain Hills and areas of northeastern Pinal County. The assets are also close to Leisure World, the largest retirement community in Metro Phoenix.

Baywood Health Center, a 36,127 SF medical office building is at 6553 E. Baywood Ave. Broadway Health Center, a 25,277 SF medical office building is at 6550 E. Broadway Rd. The properties are 83% and 19% leased, respectively.

“The renovations will not only add value to these properties, they will add significant value to the surrounding community too,” Ahrens said. “The new look and upgrades will attract additional healthcare professionals to the area, which, in turn, provide more medical services and create more jobs.”

 

Misgana Kebede Company - Accent Transportation Services - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

A Dream Becomes A Reality for Ethiopian-Born Small Business Owner Misgana Kebede

Misgana Kebede
Company: Accent Transportation Services
Title: Owner | Est.: 2008
Web: www.transaccent.com

In May 2008, during the roughest stretch of the recession, a husband-and-wife team made a bold decision to start their own transportation business. Misgana Kebede and his wife, Bilen, started Accent Transportation Services, which specializes in executive car service around the Phoenix area.

Kebede moved to the U.S. from Ethiopia and was drawn to the tourism industry early on. In fact, he worked at various hotels and theme parks after high school and during college. Kebede eventually earned degrees in finance and logistics, transportation and supply chain management.

Prior to the creation of Accent Transportation Services, Kebede was working for Honeywell Aerospace in the supply chain department. Although he was learning a lot about the business, Kebede realized he wanted something more than to work in a cubicle.

“I had the dream of becoming a business owner, and a desire to serve others from the heart,” Kebede says.

When Kebede first started his business, the transportation industry was being hit hard by the economic downturn.
Companies were cutting down on travel costs, and car and limo services weren’t in demand. Despite the challenges, Accent Transportation managed to stand out to clients. Accent Transportation gains most of its business from repeat customers, and has grown from one vehicle to a seven-vehicle fleet within two years.

“Building a repeat customer base tells us we’re doing something right,” Kebede says. “Seventy to 75 percent of our business is repeat customers.”

Accent Transportation retains its customers because it continually focuses on improving the level of service it provides. It offers easy, online registration and account management. Customers can choose from Lincoln sedans, SUVs, stretch limos and a mini-coach. Kebede also emphasizes the importance of being on time.

Another major part of customer retention is that Kebede’s employees have excellent customer service skills. When looking to hire new employees, Kebede looks for people who already have spent time working in the hospitality business.

“If you know how to serve people, anything else can be learned,” Kebede says.

Kebede knows that building a business from the ground up is especially hard right now, but he is committed to his work.

“The first and foremost thing is to have a passion for what you do,” Kebede says. “Plan your days, weeks and months. Think about what will grow your business, not just what will help you get by.”

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

The idea of starting your own business can be frightening with the recession - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

6 Tips To Launching Your Own Business In A Down Economy

The idea of starting your own business can be frightening, particularly with the recession stubbornly choking the Arizona economy. However, by following a few tips for getting started, launching your own company doesn’t need to be scary.

In fact, there are a few advantages to launching a business during an economic downturn. Commercial space is available at extraordinarily good prices. Talented professionals are looking for work. Goods and services can be found at discounted prices. And, depending on your industry, competition may be scarce.

1. Practice Due Diligence
It’s critical to objectively evaluate your proposed venture. Asking yourself some hard questions may discourage you from pursuing your first venture, but that is not a negative or pessimistic approach. It’s a useful tool for evaluating your business. Start with these questions: Is there a genuine need for the product or service you are offering? Is that need already being met by established companies? If so, what improvement or unique feature are you bringing to the table? Do you have the necessary skills and resources to start your business? If not, are you prepared to bring in the people with the skills and capital that are needed, and possibly give up some ownership?

2. Prepare a Business Plan
Too often, entrepreneurs articulate a great idea and foresee success, but gloss over the hard work. That hard part is thinking through the idea for your business and writing it into a plan, including the steps you’ll need to take to implement your idea. Start with an outline and consult a book or online guide about writing business plans. It’s important that your end result is a completed plan that includes a budget for your business.

3. Determine Capital Requirements
Most small businesses are funded with the business owner’s own money and funds from family and friends. A venture capitalist or angel investor may provide the necessary capital in exchange for part ownership of your business. It’s critical to focus on the amount of money you will need to start and operate your business, including at each stage of the company’s development.

4. Create a Board of Advisers
Creating a network of advisers can be a tremendous asset to a start-up business. It’s helpful if that board consists of advisers with a diverse array of professional backgrounds. That diversity will ensure you receive insights from a wide range of perspectives. Good choices for advisers may include your attorney, accountant, suppliers, customers, bankers and realtors.

5. Tap Into Available Resources
There are myriad advisers, consultants and nonprofit agencies that will assist you in developing your business — marketing it, creating websites and raising capital — who work for free or a nominal fee. The Small Business Administration (SBA), for instance, is a valuable and cost-effective resource. Moreover, SCORE: Counselors to America’s Small Business, provides free advice and mentoring for small business owners. If you pay for a similar service, be sure to get recommendations from a trusted adviser. Then, check that company’s references.

6. Listen
The more you listen — the more you truly hear an adviser’s ideas — the more advice you will be able to translate into actionable plans for your company.

Still, while these recessionary times may present a good opportunity for entrepreneurs, there are several considerations to keep in mind.

Select an industry that is doing well, despite the recession. The health care industry, senior care and information technologies are financially better off than many other industries.

Choose a business sector with a bright future — Businesses that tap into growing consumer demand for green or sustainable products may be an avenue worth pursuing. There was a 41 percent increase in consumer purchases of green products and services from 2004 to 2009, according to the research firm Mintel. Moreover, there may be federal or state subsidies or tax credits available for green companies.

Select a company with low capital requirements. Home-based businesses with low start-up costs may be good choices, notably because the ongoing credit crunch will likely make it tough to get a loan to cover these expenses.

If you are considering starting your own business, you will be in good company. More than half the companies listed on the Fortune 500 in 2009 were launched during a recession, according to the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation.

Moreover, in 2009, an average of 558,000 new businesses were launched each month in the United States.

The trick to joining these ranks is to get started. There’s no better time than now, recession or not.

“The critical ingredient is getting off your butt and doing something,” Nolan Bushnell, founder of both Atari and Chuck E. Cheese, once said. “It’s as simple as that. A lot of people have ideas, but there are few who decide to do something about them now. Not tomorrow. Not next week. But today. The true entrepreneur is a doer, not a dreamer.”

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

Lisa Nisleit of Color Repro Consulting

Color Repro Consulting

Lisa Nisleit
Color Repro Consulting
Title: President
Est.: 2001 | www.colorrepro.com

Lisa Nisleit was working for a large format printing company in 2001, when a client suggested she branch out on her own. She liked what she was doing and her accounts were satisfied with her performance, but Nisleit was frustrated that all the services she wanted to offer her clients weren’t available.

That’s when she decided to take the leap and launch her own business.

“The first thing I did was go out and visit as many accounts as I could. I wanted them to know that I would be the one-stop contact,” Nisleit says.

Color Repro Consulting’s primary services include printing for large format projects, trade shows, pamphlets and any other printing needs. Instead of customers dealing with a variety of vendors, Color Repro is responsible for every aspect of the project, from recognizing the types of services needed to completing the job and locating the suppliers and products, to printing and finishing the job on time.

“It’s project management, not just printing,” Nisleit says.

Her determination and focus on vendor-client relationships has helped transform her idea into a successful business.

“We depend on (vendors) to assist us with taking care of our clients. They depend on us to bring them work. Our clients depend on us to complete their project on time and on budget. Everyone is happy,” Nisleit says.

After holding a variety of jobs, including positions in retail and even in the semiconductor industry, running her own business was not something Nisleit expected to do.

“I’m still amazed that I’m still here after all this time. At the beginning, it was a week-to-week thing, but I’m still here,” she says.

The early hurdles of running a business, such as cash flow problems, were something Nisleit encountered but overcame. Now, Color Repro has developed a reputation as a dependable printing company that will work hard to meet its customers’ needs.

“We find ourselves always being the go-to people. So many projects are last minute. One of the biggest industries we deal with is construction and architecture. These companies put together their proposal projects to submit, and then we’ve only got a couple hours to print it,” Nisleit says.

Delivering on her promise to get the job done on time and on budget is a key ingredient to the success of Color Repro.

“It is our job to know who is in this town who can turn things quickly on a budget,” Nisleit says.

Through hard work and determination, Nisleit was able to lead her company to success. Her future plans for the business include moving to a new, larger location and hiring more employees.

For all the potential entrepreneurs out there, Nisleit has these simple words of wisdom: “Take the risk. If it’s something that you really want to do and it’s something that you love, you’re going to be successful at it.”