Tag Archives: Page

volunteer

SRP Donates $94,500 to Nonprofit Agencies

Salt River Project employees are turning their volunteer hours into much-needed funds for the nonprofit organizations they assist through the SRP Dollars for Doers program.

The program contributes funds, ranging from $250 to $1,000, directly to community nonprofits based upon the number of volunteer hours donated during the 2012 calendar year by SRP employees. The grant program is designed to provide funding to nonprofit agencies that are also supported by the volunteer efforts of SRP employees.

“SRP has a distinct heritage built upon responding to the needs of our customers and the communities in which they live, and we recognize the value of providing support to organizations whose programs are improving the lives of our community,” said Jen Martyn who manages the SRP Volunteer Program.

SRP donated $94,500 to 106 nonprofit agencies in which 141 SRP employees donated more than 29,000 hours of their time and experience in cities throughout the Valley, including Avondale, Camp Verde, Casa Grande, Chandler, Douglas, El Mirage, Gilbert, Glendale, Higley, Litchfield Park, Mesa, Page, Peoria, Phoenix, Pine Top, Queen Creek, San Tan Valley, Scottsdale, St. Johns, Tempe and Tolleson and Tucson.

Employees contributed to their community in a number of ways, including:

· coaching youth football, baseball, soccer and swimming,
· providing children with special needs horse therapy rides,
· ushering during arts and cultural events,
· preparing meals for those in need,
· mentoring and providing leadership to youth and
· assisting schools through parent-teacher organizations and booster clubs.

energy.bill

Navajo Generating Station worth Billions to Navajo Nation

The Navajo Generating Station in northern Arizona will help contribute nearly $13 billion to the Navajo economy and help support thousands of jobs from 2020 through 2044 – if agreements can be reached to keep the plant operating beyond 2019 – according to a study prepared for the Navajo Nation and Salt River Project by the L William Seidman Research Institute at the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

Located on the Navajo Nation, near Page, NGS is one of the largest and most important suppliers of electricity in the Southwest.

According to the ASU report, Navajo Generating Station and Kayenta Mine: An Economic Impact Analysis for the Navajo Nation, NGS and the Kayenta Mine, the plant’s coal supplier, will contribute $12.94 billion to the Navajo Nation economy through sustained jobs and wages if the plant was to remain operational through 2044.

NGS currently employs about 518 people, nearly 86 percent of whom are Native American.  The Kayenta Mine has more than 400 employees, of whom about 90 percent are also Native American.

“I have been saying we need to protect existing jobs on the Navajo Nation,” said Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly.  “This study shows that the plant and the mine not only support existing jobs at the plant and mine, but support other jobs in the area.”

The ASU report examined the direct, indirect and induced economic impact of NGS and Kayenta Mine on the Navajo Nation using the IMPLAN model employed by the state of Arizona to examine various economic projections.  A full copy of the report is available at www.ngspower.com.

The study on the plant’s economic impact on the Navajo Nation is separate from a 2012 study from ASU that concluded that NGS and the Kayenta Mine will provide more than $20 billion in economic contributions throughout the state for the period measured from 2011 to 2044.  The new study examined the economic effects exclusively for the Navajo Nation.

Despite its economic importance, a number of significant challenges threaten the future viability of NGS.  To ensure future operations of NGS, the plant’s lease and various rights of way with the Navajo Nation must be extended and the coal supply contract with Peabody Energy renegotiated prior to any additional costly emission controls from the EPA.

The plant’s lease and various rights of way with the Navajo Nation are set to expire around 2019 and the Navajo Nation Council is currently considering legislation to extend them.  In addition, the plant’s owners are also renegotiating the coal supply contract with Peabody Energy.  Perhaps most significantly, the U.S. Environmental Protection has proposed additional and costly environmental rules to address regional visibility.

NGS is a coal-fired power plant that provides electricity to customers in Arizona, Nevada and California, and energy to pump water through the Central Arizona Project.  The participants in NGS include the plant’s operator, SRP; the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation; Arizona Public Service Co.; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power; Tucson Electric Power Co. and NV Energy.

Northern AZ Weekend Trips - EAZ Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Northern AZ Weekend Trips (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Northern AZ Weekend Trips — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Williams

200 W. Railroad Ave.,
Williams, AZ 86046
(800) 863-0546
experiencewilliams.com
Dubbed the “Gateway to the Grand Canyon,” the picturesque town of Williams sits at the base of Bill Williams Mountain in one of the largest Ponderosa Pine Forests in the world, and it’s just a mere 60 miles south of the Grand Canyon. Here, you can hop aboard the Grand Canyon Railway; stroll its main street, Route 66; or, visit Bearizona, where you can watch bears up-close.


Page

P.O. Box 1507,
Page, AZ 86040
(888) 261-PAGE (7243)
visitpagearizona.com
Page is your destination for hiking, biking, boating and off-road adventure. Have you heard of Horseshoe Bend, the horseshoe-shaped meander of the Colorado River? That’s in Page. How about the the most-visited and most-photographed slot canyon in the American Southwest, Antelope Canyon? That’s here, too. Page is your “Frontier of Adventure.”


Flagstaff

One E. Route 66,
Flagstaff, AZ 86001
(800) 842-7293
flagstaffarizona.org
Welcome to high mountain country, where you can take part in skiing in the winter, watch the flowers bloom in the spring, play rounds of golf in the summer and witness the fall foliage. Breathe in the clean, mountain air as you hike the San Francisco Peaks; or, just a drive away, visit the Grand Canyon National Park, Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, Wupatki National Monument or Meteor Crater.


Kayenta

Navajo Indian Reservation,
Kayenta, AZ 86033
Just 20 miles south of the Utah border on US 163 is Kayenta, located on the Navajo Reservation. Kayenta is considered the gateway to one of the world’s most photographed landscapes, Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, just 30 miles north of the town.


Sedona

331 Forest Rd.,
Sedona, AZ 86336
(800) 288-7336
visitsedona.com
The spectacular Oak Creek Canyon. The magnificent red rocks. Vortexes. There is virtually no end to Sedona’s attraction. Hike or bike the red rock trails, including the popular Cathedral Rock; spend a night or two in one of its award-winning resorts and spas, including Enchantment Resort; or come for the weekend for one of the town’s many festivals and events, such as its Yoga Festival. The possibilities are endless.

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012