Tag Archives: patient safety

Banner Baywood Medical Center

8 Banner Health hospitals earn safety recognition

Eight Banner Health hospitals received top grades (A’s and B’s) for patient safety, an independent watchdog organization announced Wednesday.

Four Banner Health hospitals, two in Arizona and a pair in Colorado, earned “A” scores while four additional Arizona hospitals received “B” scores. Banner Boswell Medical Center and Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center in Sun City join North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley, Colo. and McKee Medical Center in Loveland, Colo. with top “A” grades for patient safety.

The Fall 2014 Hospital Safety Score report was released by The Leapfrog Group an independent organization which grades hospitals on how they protect patients from errors, injuries and infections.

“Patient safety is a guiding principle for all of our employees in the communities we serve,” said Dr. John Hensing, Banner Health’s executive vice president and chief medical officer. “We are dedicated to providing the highest quality care in a safe and healthy environment and are proud to be recognized for our ongoing efforts.”

According to Leapfrog, the Hospital Safety Score uses 28 measures of publicly available hospital safety data to produce a single “A,” “B,” “C,” “D,” or “F” score representing a hospital’s overall capacity to keep patients safe from preventable harm. More than 2,500 U.S. general hospitals were assigned scores in fall 2014, with about 31 percent receiving an “A” grade. The Hospital Safety Score is fully transparent, with a full analysis of the data and methodology used in determining grades available online.
Banner Health hospitals and their top Hospital Safety Scores:

Banner Boswell Medical Center (Sun City): A
Banner Churchill Medical Center (Fallon, Nev.): B
Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center (Sun City): A
Banner Desert Medical Center (Mesa): B
Banner Estrella Medical Center (Phoenix): B
McKee Medical Center (Loveland, Colo.): A
North Colorado Medical Center (Greeley, Colo.): A
Banner Thunderbird Medical Center (Glendale): B

Headquartered in Phoenix, Banner Health is one of the largest, nonprofit health care systems in the country. The system manages 25 acute-care hospitals, the Banner Health Network and Banner Medical Group, long-term care centers, outpatient surgery centers and an array of other services including family clinics, home care and hospice services, and a nursing registry. Banner Health is in seven states: Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada and Wyoming.

Modern Medicine

‘Good Old Days’ Of Medicine Are Best As Fond Memories: New Technologies Are Helping All Patients

It’s not unusual to occasionally hear people refer to the good old days when doctors made house calls, or they might wax nostalgic about TV’s Marcus Welby, M.D., whose main character came across as the perfect embodiment of medicine.

There’s no denying that the 1960s and ‘70s were simpler times in many ways, but for health care in particular, they weren’t necessarily better. Medicine has come a very long way over the past 40 years, and we’re all beneficiaries of numerous medical discoveries and innovations that have not only improved our health and well being, but just as importantly, have made us safer and more informed health care consumers. Marcus Welby notwithstanding, doctors and the hospitals that they work in are not perfect.  So adieu to Dr. Welby, but spare us from “House” (unless we need his expertise).

Patient safety was not a major topic in health care during the last century, but today it is a top priority for all health care providers, government agencies and payers. The complexity of technology and care have caused many entities to invest many millions of dollars in new technology, such as Electronic Medical Records (EMR), Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE), simulation training, remote ICU monitoring and other innovations to make hospitals as safe as possible for patients.

Even before the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services reported in 2001 that more than 770,000 people were injured or died each year in hospitals from Adverse Drug Events (ADEs), Banner Health was at the forefront of proving the benefits of an electronic ADE alert system. In 1998, a team of faculty from Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center conducted and published the results of the first-ever study to prospectively evaluate a computer support system with real-time intervention for reducing injury from a broad range of ADEs.

In those “early days” of the electronic record, phone calls and faxes to and from the laboratory, pharmacy and physician served as a way to catch issues before they occurred. Today, every Banner hospital in Arizona is equipped with an EMR that includes electronic alerts to help prevent ADEs from happening. Patients should feel assured that if they receive care in one Banner hospital and then go to another, their medical history with tests, as well as medications, will be easily accessible at every location. This is important, because the general public may not be aware of the number of drugs that have similar sounding names, such as Clonidine for high blood pressure or Klonopin for seizures; Celebrex for arthritis pain or Celexa for depression. If you’re at a Banner Hospital and a drug is ordered for you, an ALERT will pop up right at the nursing station and require immediate attention if it doesn’t match your medical condition or if it might cause a reaction with your other medications. At a point in the not too distant future, if it hasn’t already occurred, your physician’s office will be tied into a system that provides your medical record and safety features at all sites of care.

But, even with all of these innovations, patients should know that they have an important role and responsibility for ensuring their own safe care during a hospitalization. First and foremost, if at any time something doesn’t feel right, or if you’re unsure about something, SPEAK UP! You have the right to question anything. Also, proper hand hygiene is critical. Make sure that all caregivers and visitors, including your own family and friends, who come into your room wash their hands with soap and water or use antibacterial gel. Here are some other tips for ensuring your safe care:

  • Provide your complete and accurate health history information at the time of admission, including all allergies you might have
  • Know your medications and tell your care providers what you’re taking, including herbal and over-the-counter supplements, and how the drugs affect you.
  • Always confirm your identity — all hospital staff should check your wristband and ask your name before they draw blood, administer tests, give medicine or provide any treatments
  • Follow your health care instructions — never tamper with your IV pump, monitors or other devices. When you are ready to go home, get your health care instructions in writing and make sure you understand how to follow them. Again, ask questions.

The safest medical care occurs when everyone is working together as a team, including the patient, and utilizing all of the tools available to ensure the most successful outcome.

AzHHA’s 2010 Annual Membership Conference - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

AzHHA’s 2010 Annual Membership Conference Is Aimed At Helping Members Prepare For Change

With the health care field on the brink of a major upheaval, the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association’s (AzHHA) 2010 Annual Membership Conference offers members information on what to expect in the future.

The theme, Bringing the Future into Focus, incorporates a mix of topics and speakers intended to appeal to a diverse hospital audience. Attendees will hear from leading economists, patient safety experts, health care visionaries and others.

LeAnn Swanson, vice president of education services for AzHHA, says the conference is the ideal venue to bring the new health care reality into full focus.
“Some of the best minds in the industry will be providing hard-hitting education and thought-provoking commentary,” she says. “This conference is intended for the entire hospital family, including the C-suite leadership team, hospital trustees, legal counsel, operations, quality, patient safety, human resources, and marketing officers.”

This year’s conference, Oct. 14-15 at The Buttes Resort in Tempe, kicks off with a keynote session featuring Lowell Catlett, Ph.D., regent’s professor, dean and chief administrative officer at New Mexico State University’s College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences. He will speak on the present and future of the economy.

Catlett notes that economic downturns are common — with 14 recessions during the past 80 years — and provide a means for society to re-balance what it deems to be important.

“Every recession leads to a spurt in new business starts, reformulation of business practices and new technological adaptations,” he says. “This current pause is no exception as we focus on what we value most. Get ready for phenomenal growth in health care, energy and lifestyle markets. For those willing to embrace the opportunities, the next decade will be successful beyond any in history.”

Immediately after Catlett’s presentation on Oct. 14, the general session will feature Ron Galloway, director of the documentary “Why Wal-Mart Works and Why That Makes Some People Crazy,” and the newly released “Rebooting Healthcare.” His topic, Wal-Mart and the Future of Healthcare, covers in-store health care clinics that offer everything from eyeglasses to flu shots to urgent care.

Galloway says the discount retailer aims to leverage its 4,000 stores into the largest force in American health care.

At the Oct. 15 breakfast meeting, sponsored by the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE), Chris Van Gorder, president and CEO of Scripps Health in San Diego and ACHE 2010-2011 chairman, will offer a look at Scripps’ medical response team. Van Gorder will describe the team’s efforts in the Hurricane Katrina-ravaged Gulf of Mexico, San Diego after its massive wildfires and quake-stricken Haiti.

Concurrent breakout sessions will look at the key drivers of physician behavior and the natural tension that exists in doctor-hospital relationships; trends and technologies that are “re-forming” health care in unexpected and beneficial ways; and the notion of being in a health care bubble with a high potential for a correction over the next five years.

The closing session will feature John Nance, author of “Why Hospitals Should Fly,” which was named the 2009 book of the year by the ACHE. Based on his book, Nance offers some solutions to the patient safety and quality-care crises that resonate deeply with all health care audiences.

The conference also will feature AzHHA’s annual awards luncheon, and a president’s reception that will give attendees an opportunity to say goodbye to the organization’s longtime president and CEO, John Rivers, as he nears retirement. The reception also will serve to introduce AzHHA’s new leader, Laurie Liles.

Along with the conference, during the upcoming year AzHHA also will offer a series of webinars and other events of interest to members of the hospital and health care industry, as well as representatives of the business community, Swanson says. The emphasis will be on compliance-related topics, including rules and regulations of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and the Federal Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act, also known as EMTALA.

To learn more about upcoming education opportunities from AzHHA and to register for conference events, visit www.azhha.org/educational_services and click on education events.

    Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association’s
    2010 Annual Membership Conference

    Oct. 14-15
    The Buttes Resort
    2000 Westcourt Way, Tempe
    www.azhha.org

Arizona Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

Outgoing AzHHA Leader John Rivers Talks About The Past, Present And Future Of Health Care In Arizona

After more than 23 years as president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association (AzHHA), John Rivers announced he will be stepping down in January of next year. Arizona Business Magazine asked Rivers about his tenure at AzHHA and the challenges facing the health care system.

How has the Valley and state’s health care industry changed in the 23 years you’ve helmed AzHHA?
Health care in Arizona barely resembles what it looked like 25 years ago when I first arrived. In fact, I think it is better in every respect. Hospitals in particular are more sharply focused on cost-containment strategies, physician integration, patient safety and, of course, providing cutting-edge medical care to their patients. Hospitals have also made giant strides in better management of their human resources, particularly nurses, who are the heart and soul of good hospital care.

How has AzHHA’s mission changed over the years to adapt to the Valley and state’s evolving health care industry?
Our primary mission remains political advocacy, although the complexity and difficulty of doing that well has increased exponentially. The tremendous diversity among types of hospitals, and the even greater diversity of personalities among our CEOs, requires a great deal of adaptability on the part of the association CEO.

What are some of the biggest challenges you see facing the health care industry today?
All of us in health care are facing tremendous uncertainty about our future. Congress is on the verge of re-writing the book on government’s role in health care, and at the state level we face the greatest budget crisis in our history. With the federal and state government already purchasing about 70 percent of the hospital care in Arizona, our world will no doubt change dramatically. At a minimum, our future will require us to be more accountable, more transparent and more integrated. Also, we’ll see a seismic shift away from the revenue enhancement model to a cost-control model.

What would you say are some of AzHHA’s greatest successes over the past 20 years?
I think we have been very successful in our political advocacy and our record more than speaks for itself in that regard. More than that, I tend to define our success in terms of achieving our mission with competence and integrity — and keeping our focus on what is best for health care in Arizona and what is best for the patients served by our institutions.

Do you plan to stay involved in health care, and how?
I will definitely stay involved in a number of charitable and community service activities in which I currently participate, but I have no plans to remain involved in health care except as a citizen who cares profoundly about all that we do. I’ve spent the past 40 years of my life in health care, 25 of them in Arizona, and it’s time for me to move on and enjoy life in ways that I have not had time to do up until now. There’s more to life than driving to the office each morning and I intend to live my other dreams while I am still in good health and able to do so.

www.azhha.org

Arizona Business Magazine

January 2010