Tag Archives: pew research center

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3 Red Flags That She’s Too Good to be True

Not only have online dating sites opened up a whole new dynamic for singles looking for company – attitudes about the viability of these sites have become more positive.

The Pew Research Center recently published the following survey results:

• Almost 60 percent of Americans say online dating sites are a good way to meet people, up from 44 percent in 2005.

• While one-third of those who use the sites never go on an actual date – that leaves 66 percent of users who do.

• One in five young adults have used a dating site, and they’re growing in popularity with older adults, too.

“I was one of those older adults who found online dating sites to be a convenient way to meet women for potential romance,” says Charles W. Massie, a baby boomer who wrote about his online dating experience in a new novel, “Stains on the Gavel.” “Middle-aged singles have a smaller pool to draw from because so many men and women are married with families by then. That makes finding love tough.”

Massie, an entrepreneurial businessman with his own business and a full schedule, says he was elated when things progressed quickly online with a hot prospect.

“I almost couldn’t believe how lucky I was,” he says. “Unfortunately, I did believe it, which led to this woman taking advantage of me in the worst way.”

The woman set him up in an elaborate ruse that resulted in him going to jail on false charges, while she took possession of everything he owned.

“Something that was too good to be true wound up becoming a nightmare,” says Massie, who suggests these red flags:

• She likes everything about you. “To put it simply, I quit thinking with my brain,” he says.

No matter how smart, established or successful you may be in other aspects of life, just about everyone of any age loves being love-drunk; it’s not just for teens like Romeo and Juliet. But what are the chances that a smart and very attractive woman, about whom you know next to nothing, likes everything you like, do and are?

“The food I liked, the hobbies I liked, the music I liked and political affiliations were identical to hers,” he says. “That was a red flag.”

• She asks you to move in almost immediately. Most smart young women are somewhat cautious while getting to know a potential new love interest.

“This woman, however, was all too eager for me to leave my home state to move into her home,” Massie says. “That should tell you one of at least two things: she’s either desperate for someone because she’s emotionally unstable, or she has no fear of you, which could mean she’s working an angle.”

• She really is, physically, too good to be true. It’s possible that a hot date that’s “out of your league” will come to love you for who you are – in time! On the other hand, when you weigh all of the conditions that may include the fact that you don’t really know her, nor she you; that you are financially sound and she is not; that she suggests a living situation that’s moving far too fast; that you’ve only known each other for a matter of weeks, and never met in person – “yeah, at that point, you should be at least a little skeptical,” he says.

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Rich got richer during recovery, report shows

A new report says the richest Americans got richer during the first two years of the economic recovery while average net worth declined for the other 93 percent of the nation’s households.

The Pew Research Center report says wealth held by the richest 7 percent of households rose 28 percent from 2009 to 2011, while the net worth of the other 93 percent of households dropped by 4 percent.

It says the main reason for the widening gap is that affluent households have stocks and other financial holdings that increased in value, while the less wealthy have more of their assets in their homes, which haven’t fully regained their value since the housing downturn.

Post-Recession Employment Trends, Pew Research

Infographic: Post-Recession Employment Trends

Regarding employment trends, the sluggish recovery from the Great Recession has been better for men than for women, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

The post-recession trends are a sharp turnabout from the gender patterns that prevailed during the recession itself, when men lost more than twice as many jobs as women.

Employment trends during the recovery have favored men over women in all but one of the 16 major sectors of the economy, identified in the report. This infographic reveals the gender patterns of employment during the two years of economic recovery.

Post-recession employment trends:

Post-Recession Employment Trends

 

 

 

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Infographic: Who Uses Twitter?

We all know that Facebook is popular, but what about Twitter?

In just one year, Twitter’s popularity has exploded. Television shows have integrated it into their programming, and businesses have discovered its a useful tool.

Nearly everyone has one, but the question is, “Who uses Twitter?”

Well, you’re in luck. Here are the stats and demographics, provided by the Pew Research Center:

Who's using Twitter in 2011

 

[stextbox id="grey"]Read more on Twitter’s demographics for 2010 & 2011.[/stextbox]

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Where Are Americans Getting Their News?

For the past ten years television has been the most popular source of news for Americans, but according to a recent study by the Pew Research Center internet is quickly gaining ground towards becoming the most popular news source in America. In fact, among 18 to 29 year olds it already is, though for those 50 years and older the internet still ranks below both newspaper and television as their main source of news. The internet is also gaining ground among college graduates, while 75% of those who have a high school education or less turn to television. Where do you get your news?

Where do Americans get their news?

A New Approach to Green

A New Approach To Going Green- Kansas Takes The Lead

Kansas probably isn’t the first place that comes to mind when you think of sustainability, but you’d be surprised — the Sunflower State is making immense progress in saving energy and reducing dependence on fossil fuels.

This piece in The New York Times highlights the humble beginnings of the Climate and Energy Project, a small nonprofit group whose missions is to get people to limit their fossil fuel emissions. Kansas town managers are attributing the state’s new resolve largely to a yearlong competition sponsored by the Climate and Energy Project that “set out to extricate energy issues from the charged arena of climate politics” as noted in the article.

What sets this project apart from the countless other sustainability initiatives is the approach.  The decision was made to focus on thrift, patriotism, spiritual conviction and economic prosperity, using these four pillars to try to rally resident of six Kansas towns to make a change in their energy use.

Why did the conversation have to be about climate change, countered project chairwoman Nancy Jackson. If the goal was to persuade people to reduce their use of fossil fuels, why not identify issues that motivated them instead of getting stuck on something that did not, the Times article reported.

Despite a hefty roadblock — according to a poll conducted by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press just  48 percent of people in the Midwest agree with the statement that there is “solid evidence that the average temperature on Earth has been getting warmer” — the project trudged on and worked to overcome the skeptics.

By the looks of things, it’s going well. One of the cities has already reduced its energy use by 5 percent and a wind turbine factory will be built in the Reno County area, creating as many as 400 local jobs.

Hopefully this will serve as an example for other communities who aren’t so quick to embrace the green movement. This unique approach proves that there you can always find a  way to move toward a sustainable future.

Source: www.nytimes.com