Tag Archives: phoenix art museum

Rebecca Senf. (Photo provided.)

Phoenix Art Museum exhibit shares self-published photobooks

The INFOCUS Juried Exhibition of Self-Published Photobooks will be at Phoenix Art Museum from August 23 to September 28, 2014. It explores the ways photographic artists are using newly available commercial technologies to self-publish photobooks. Entries were accepted until the end of July when a jury of seven industry professionals reviewed the 271 photobooks that came from 12 countries to select the 151 that will be on display to the public as part of the exhibition. The selected photobooks represent the diverse examples that were received and will be presented on tables in the gallery for visitors to easily view and enjoy.

DWVibnxiTi0TKguZqkIDs4oOQclBQqSUL1wIoZv7sQ0Phoenix Art Museum’s Norton Family Curator of Photography Rebecca Senf, Ph.D., was inspired to create this exhibition in Phoenix after learning about the DIY: Photographers & Books exhibition that was at Cleveland Museum of Art in 2012. A librarian, retail sales manager, two photography curators, two photography authors, and the founder of a photobook library made up the jury of seven industry professionals. Submissions were accepted until the end of July and the jury was overwhelmed by the nearly 300 submissions received. The photobooks came from 12 countries including Australia, Canada, England, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Ukraine and the U.S. Within the U.S. alone books came from 31 states and Puerto Rico.

Rebecca Senf, Ph.D., said, “This is the first time I’ve done a big juried exhibition and it was such an exciting process.” She added, “Reviewing the books with my colleagues was enjoyable and it was a pleasure to discover so many wonderful books. I cannot wait to share what we discovered with the Phoenix Art Museum audience.”

The INFOCUS Juried Exhibition of Self-Published Photobooks was organized by Phoenix Art Museum, INFOCUS,Phoenix Art Museum’s photography support organization, and the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona. For additional information about the exhibition please visit phxart.org/exhibition/infocusphotobooks.

Nicole France-Stanton, office managing partner, Quarles & Brady.

Stanton named ‘Woman Worth Watching’

The law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix Office Managing Partner Nicole Stanton has been selected by Profiles in Diversity Journal to be honored at its 13th Annual Women Worth Watching® Awards. Stanton will join trailblazing female leaders from across the country in this honor and will be featured in the September/October issue of the magazine.

“Women Worth Watching award winners are role models to young women beginning their careers, and an inspiration to women in the pipeline,” says Profiles in Diversity Journal editor, Kathie Sandlin. “We are proud to tell their stories on lessons learned and obstacles overcome.”

In addition to her position as office manager partner at Quarles & Brady LLP, Stanton is a member of the firm’s Commercial Litigation Group. Her experience includes defense of local and national law firms in legal malpractice actions and other business litigation disputes.

In the Phoenix community, Stanton serves as a founding board member and past president of the Women’s Metropolitan Arts Council of the Phoenix Art Museum as well as a member of Chart 100 Women. She also is an adjunct professor at Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, teaching professional responsibility. A graduate of Valley Leadership Class XXIX, Stanton was the YWCA of Maricopa County’s 2011 Tribute to Women honoree, in the Business Leader category. She also was honored as one of the “50 Most Influential Women in Business” by AZ Business Magazine.

Stanton recently has been appointed to serve as a member of the Business Court Advisory Committee, newly established by order of Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch, which is examining current processes for resolving business cases in the Superior Court of Arizona as well as reviewing business court models, processes, rules and procedures in other jurisdictions.

Stanton received her law degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Arizona and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Utah.

La gran tentación o La gran ilusión [The Great Temptation or The Grand Illusion]
1962
Oil, wood, burlap, canvas, paper, cardboard, glass, leather and metals including chicken wire, sheet metal, tin-plate, iron, smashed cans, and coins; wicker matt, buttons, plastic containers, aluminum foil, vegetal tow, feathers, sequins, lithographic images, staples and nails on plywood
96 7/16 x 95 1/16 in.
Malba - Fundación Constantini, Buenos Aires

Antonio Berni exhibit shares raw, universal struggle

Juanito va a la ciudad [Juanito Goes to the City] 1963 Wood, paint, industrial trash, cardboard, scrap metal, and fabric on wood. 129 x79 in.  The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston Museum purchase funded by the Caroline Wiess Law Accessions Endowment Fund

Juanito va a la ciudad [Juanito Goes to the City]
1963
Wood, paint, industrial trash, cardboard, scrap metal, and fabric on wood.
129 x79 in.
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Museum purchase funded by the Caroline Wiess Law Accessions Endowment Fund

A boy stands in a dark and rustic town. There is nothing distinctive about this boy; he is an “everyman.” Old cloth, cardboard and metals surround him, materials muted by dirt and age. This is the setting of  “Juanito Goes to the City,” or “Juanito va a la ciudad,” an assemblage in the exhibition Antonio Berni: Juanito and Ramona at the Phoenix Art Museum.

Berni started the Juanito and Ramona installations in 1958 as a way to express the culture of Buenos Aires through the eyes of two young fictional characters.

The 20th Century Argentinian artist utilized industrial materials and textiles in most of his pieces related to Juanito Laguna and Ramon Montiel.

His artwork became an easily accessible narrative, said the Sybil Harrington Director James Ballinger. Berni created lives for these two, Juanito a young boy living in an impoverished town on the outskirts of Buenos Aires and Ramona a young working class woman lured into prostitution.

Berni chronicles the characters’ lives using materials that would come from their worlds, said Vanessa Davidson, Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art. For Juanito, Berni used metals from the shantytowns where he would have lived, along with woods and textiles. Ramona was detailed with costume jewelry and lace.

The characters are national icons throughout Argentina, said Michael Wellen, Assistant Curator of Latin American and Latino Art at Museum of Fine Arts Houston. They are rooted to Buenos Aires and realities there. However, Wellen said people from around the world have been able to connect to Juanito and Ramona’s problems.

In every piece, Juanito’s physical traits are different. His common name and differing looks are meant connect the viewer to this boy, Wellen said.

Berni’s wood blocks are unlike any other. They hang on the stark white walls, carved and layered with materials. Fabrics and metals are adhered to the wood, creating an entirely new art form.

Wood block is the means by which a print can be made; it is not usually considered the work of art. However, in Berni’s work, there is always a wooden base with collaged materials from the city, Wellen said.

Hanging next to the blocks of wood are the prints that go with them. Berni found a new way to create these wood block prints, which included making his own paper and at times hand painting the prints.

Berni’s artwork, consisting of paintings, assemblages and wood block prints, give social comment with an air of whimsy and humor, Ballinger said.

The exhibition is a tribute to Berni, to Ramona and Juanito. Walking through the exhibit, there is a sense of kinship with these two characters. One can find him or herself in these youths, regardless of social standing or background. Juanito and Ramona had hopes, dreams and fears – which can be felt in every piece.

The assemblages are dirty and worn, yet beautiful in their own right. Each piece adds another layer to a world unseen by many. While the lives of Ramona and Juanito are based almost 50 years ago, they still hold true and not just in Buenos Aires, but in communities around the world.

Antonio Berni: Juanito and Ramona will be at the Phoenix Art Museum until September 21, before moving on to Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Things to do this weekend

The Valley is not resting this Independence Day weekend and neither should you! From a music festival, firework displays at the zoo and Tempe Town Lake, a movie festival and a beer pong tournament, there is no excuse for being bored this holiday weekend.


Independence Day Music Festival with Phillip Phillips
The American Idol will start off this long weekend right, headlining the fourth annual Independence Day Music Festival at Salt River fields.  Phillips won “American Idol” back in 2012 and has been busy ever since. He released a platinum debut, “The World From the Side of the Moon.” He first saw success with his inaugural five-times-platinum breakthrough of his “Idol” single, “Home” and his second single, “Gone, Gone, Gone,” also went platinum.  The opening acts are set to start performing at about 5:30 p.m. and the Independence Music Festival promises the “largest fireworks show in Metro Phoenix,” which is set to start after the show, at about 9:55 p.m.
Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, 7555 N. Pima Road Scottsdale, ticketmaster.com, Thursday July 3. 5:30 p.m. $20 to $40

4th of Zoo-Ly
The Phoenix Zoo celebrates Independence Day with a special 4th of Zoo-Ly! There will be plenty of family fun and exclusive evening access to the zoo with fun activities for everyone. The event features a classic summer BBQ, carousel rides, face painting, bounce houses and special animal guests. The evening will close with a bang with a special view of the Tempe Town Lake Fireworks Spectacular at a “VIP” seating area in the back of the zoo.
Phoenix Zoo, 455 N. Galvin Pkwy., Phoenix, tickets here , Friday, July 4, 7 to 10 p.m., SOLD OUT

July 4th Tempe Town Lake Festival
The Tempe Town Lake Festival, featuring Tempe’s 63rd annual fireworks display over Tempe Town Lake, is always a major hit on July fourth. The festival features many attractions, including live music, splash park,  a climbing wall, and numerous culinary delights.  People will line the lakeshore and kick back on the grassy “beach” for a fireworks show that cannot be beat in terms of location in the valley.  The fireworks are shot from the Mill Street Bridge and nearby buildings and bridges are strung with colorful lights reflecting in the water. Also, lit-up and decorated boats float on the lake to add more color.
Tempe Beach Park, 54 W. Rio Salado Parkway Tempe, http://www.tempe4th.com/ , Friday July 4. 5 p.m., $ 5 general admission, $30 children’s VIP garden tickets, and  $60 adult VIP garden tickets

Dawn to Dusk Film Festival
Escape the heat this weekend at the Phoenix Art Museum as it says goodbye to its Hollywood Costume exhibit with an all-day film festival! All-day screenings will highlight films from classic to contemporary. Enjoy an entire day of art, cinema, and surprises at the Museum and FilmBar. The schedule: “The Searchers” at 9 a.m., “The Birds” at 11:30 a.m. and “Taxi Driver” at 5 p.m. “Animal House” will also be shown at FilmBar, 815 N. Second St., Phoenix, at 2 and 7 p.m. as part of the festival.
Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave Phoenix, tickets here, Sunday July 6, $20 and $10 for museum members.

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Beer Pong Tournament
Fire House in Tempe will be racking up red cups in the classic pyramid formation, so perfect your arch for a beer pong tournament that comes with series prizes.  The second place prize is complimentary bottle service and the first place winners get a cash prize of $150 cash. Even if you do not sink that winning shot, you can still have beer as a consolation prize.
Firehouse Tempe, 4 East University Drive Tempe, Sunday July 6. 2 p.m.

Things to do this weekend

School’s out and there’s a long weekend ahead of us. If you’re not going camping, sitting poolside or catching up on “Game of Thrones,” give one of these events a try! Don’t forget to share photos of you enjoying these events with the hashtag #SL5 and follow us at @scottsdaleliving on Instagram!

Christopher Titus
It’s a disgusting understatement to say Christopher Titus has gone through some valleys in his life (schizophrenic mom and an unfaithful wife who also forged checks and drained his bank accounts during their 15-year marriage). Titus has a lot to be angry about, it’s just for our pleasure that his anger comes out in hilarious observations on life. On Titus’ “Angry Pursuit of Happiness” tour, he brings his hard humor reminiscent of the late greats (think George Carlin, Richard Pryor, Bill Hicks, Sam Kinison, Lenny Bruce, you get it).

Stand Up Live, 50 W. Jefferson St., #200, Phoenix, May 24 and 25, times vary, standuplive.com, $25

“The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein”
Young Frankenstein, Paul KolnikWant a side order of kitsch with your night at Arizona Broadway Theatre? “Young Frankenstein” is a musical of monstrous proportions of entertainment. Dr. Frankenstein and a cast of funny characters overcome the complications of reanimating a corpse through numbers such as “The Transylvania Mania” and “Puttin’ on the Ritz.” (Also, check out the delicious menu for this particular show.)
Arizona Broadway Theatre, 7701 W. Paradise Ln., Peoria, May 23 to June 22, times vary, azbroadway.org, tickets (http://azbroadway.org/index.php/the-shows/2013-2014-series/the-new-mel-brooks-musical-young-frankenstein)

“The Composer is Dead”
Composer is Dead, iTunes, WEBLooking for a way to make a night at the symphony fun for the family? Lemony Snicket has brought his “A Series of Unfortunate Events” to the orchestra pit for a dreadfully entertaining and interactive “whodunnit” show. The composer is dead and the crowd must figure out who did it. The diva violins, overlooks violas, sneaky clarinets and wallflower tuba are all possible culprits…
Symphony Hall, 75 N. 2nd St., Phoenix, Sunday, May 25, 2:30 p.m., $11 to $19

“Hollywood Costume”
478207119Those ruby slippers. That Dalmatian coat. A fedora and whip. Costumes are sometimes what propel beloved movie characters into pop culture icons, more so than scripts or special effects and makeup magic. The Phoenix Art Museum’s “Hollywood Costume” exhibit has set the Valley abuzz with its famous folds of fabric on display. The exhibit features more than 100 of the most iconic costumes — from “The Wizard of Oz” to “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince,” “Titanic” and many, many others in an up-close showcase.
Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, Tues/Thurs. noon to 5 p.m., Wed. noon to 8:30 p.m., Friday 10 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., Sat/Sun 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., phxart.org, $20 adults, $10 children, free for children 5 and younger

Memorial Day Ride
469789901This annual charitable motorcycle ride through the northwest Valley is in its fourth year. Things rev up at 8 a.m. at Sanderson Ford, takes a stop at Veterans Memorial Cemetery before continuing to Westgate for an evening of entertainment.
Sanderson Ford, 6400 N. 51st Ave., Glendale, Saturday, May 24, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., aztributerides.com, $25 per rider

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AZIMA’s TIM Awards set for March 20

The Arizona Interactive Marketing Association (AZIMA) will host its 2nd Annual TIM Awards from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thurs., March 20 at the Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 North Central Ave., in Phoenix. Named after Sir Timothy Berners-Lee, acknowledged father of the World Wide Web, the TIM Awards showcase Arizona talent and work in the interactive realm for calendar year 2013.

Twelve TIM awards will be given for “Best”: Website, Social Media Campaign, Integrated Interactive Campaign, Email Marketing Campaign, Display Ad (single or campaign), Rich Media Execution, Mobile Marketing Campaign, App, Blog, Online Video, Brand of the Year and Interactive Person of the Year.

Roger Hurni, of Off Madison Ave, received AZIMA’s coveted 2013 Interactive Marketing Person of the Year TIM award last year. “It was quite an honor to have won this award. To me, the AZIMA TIM Awards are a demonstration of the amazing, cutting edge work being done in Arizona by companies from all kinds of industries,” said Hurni.

Guests to the TIM awards ceremony will have a chance to network with top digital marketing professionals and view Phoenix Art Museum’s current exhibits before enjoying a delicious sit-down dinner and awards presentation. The official program will kick off with keynote speaker Marcus Sheridan, president and founder of The Sales Lion. Sheridan is best known for skillfully using content and inbound marketing efforts to increase traffic to his website and becoming one of the largest pool installers in the U.S. during the Great Recession. In 2009, he started his sales, marketing and personal development blog, The Sales Lion, to teach others about content and inbound marketing.

AZIMA offers four options for event registration: $75 for a single seat; $50 for a single seat if an AZIMA Corporate/VIP member; $700 for a Table of 10; and $475 for a Table of 10 for Corporate/VIP members.

To learn more, visit www.azimaawards.com or www.joinazima.org.

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Close Will Attend Hollywood Costume pARTy Opening

Six-time Academy Award® nominee, actress and producer Glenn Close, will be the guest of honor for the ninth annual pARTy hosted at Phoenix Art Museum on March 22. The gala will celebrate the opening and final scheduled stop of the international Hollywood Costume exhibit and attendees will have an exclusive opportunity to experience the show before it opens to the public on March 26.

A world-class exhibition that originated at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, Hollywood Costume showcases more than 100 iconic Hollywood costumes throughout a century of cinema, many of which have never been publicly displayed or seen beyond the secure walls of studio archives. As part of the exhibit, two costumes worn by Close will be on view – the gray and black houndstooth skirt and jacket worn by Cruella de Vil in “102 Dalmatians” and the 18th century inspired gown of Marquise Isabelle de Merteuil from “Dangerous Liaisons.”

In addition to costumes from Hollywood film characters, there will also be two gowns worn by Close on display as part of a second exhibit, Hollywood Red Carpet. The Giorgio Armani silk gown worn as the nominee for Best Actress Award for “Fatal Attraction” (1988), and the dark green Zac Posen gown and jacket worn as a nominee for Best Actress in the film, “Albert Nobbs” (2011).

Attendees of the pARTy will enjoy a first-class event where every detail is meticulously planned. From world-renown ‘get on the floor and dance’ band ensembles, to contemporary cuisine that will engage one’s culinary senses; the pARTy is truly an experience that should not be missed.

To purchase tickets or to sponsor the event, contact Jan Nesburg at 602-257-2101. Tickets are $750 per person and tables start at $7,500.

For more information or to purchase tickets for Hollywood Costume at Phoenix Art Museum, visit phxart.org/hollywoodtickets.

The Phoenix Art Museum would anchor the retail portion of the project.

Scottsdale Developer to Revisit Mixed-Use Project in Carefree

The professionally laid back town of Carefree could soon be home to Arizona’s newest “Main Street” condo and commercial project, aptly named Easy Street both for the street it fronts and its cool, casual lifestyle.

Butte Development is revisiting plans for the $90 million mixed-use project near Cave Creek Road and Tom Darlington Road.  The project includes 80 ultra-luxurious, amenity-stocked condos and approximately 50,000-square-feet of retail and commercial space.

Butte is working closely with the Phoenix Art Museum and the town of Carefree to consider a 10,000-square-foot satellite museum at the project.  Current discussions include an exhibit schedule that rotates seven times per year and a 1,500-square-foot multipurpose community center.

The Phoenix Art Museum satellite fits strategically into the town of Carefree’s current revitalization plans and builds on the already robust arts community in the area.  The village feel of the town will be enhanced by the museum and other planned revitalization efforts creating an atmosphere similar to Santa Fe, New Mexico and Carmel, California.

Phoenix Art Museum Director Jim Ballinger is excited about the possibilities at Easy Street.

“We are doing due diligence research.  We are very interested in the possibility of a quality outreach program in the Northeast Valley.  If the community support is there, we will respond to that request,” Ballinger said.

The Phoenix Art Museum would anchor the retail portion of the project with other tenants to include chef-driven restaurants, a sidewalk café, art galleries, boutique clothing, custom jewelers and unique home accessories.

The town of Carefree also voiced strong support for this potential development.  Mayor David Schwan stated that “Both the Easy Street development and the Phoenix Art Museum would be welcome additions to Carefree, and help bring to life the recent Urban Land Institute recommendations that the Carefree Village Center has enormous appeal and even greater potential.”

Ed Lewis, President of Butte said, “Easy Street will be built like towns used to be built with two stories of residential over retail.  The warm pedestrian friendly environment and the residential component above will add a neighborhood feel to the area.”

Easy Street condos will have ten-foot ceilings, spacious balconies and views of the big sky, mountains, stars and the Sonoran Desert for which Carefree is famous. Other balconies look over the pool/spa area or Easy Street’s strolling ambiance in the heart of Carefree.

The project, which covers almost four and a half acres, would be built in two phases.  If negotiations with the Phoenix Art Museum and the town of Carefree are successful, Butte hopes to break ground on the south phase of the project by year-end.

Phoenix-based Ryan Companies is the general contractor; Kendle Design Collaborative in Scottsdale is the design architect.  Butte Realty will be heading sales efforts

PainPartiesWorkhcc

Arizona Costume Institute Nouveau Fundraiser Raises the Fashion Bar in Phoenix

Screen Shot 2013-07-22 at 9.38.08 AM

The opening of the #DigitalPrintFashion exhibition

Love fashion? Love the fashion exhibitions at Phoenix Art Museum? Then grab your kitten heels and support our state’s notable institution with at the Arizona Costume Institute Nouveau (under-35) division’s ridiculously swanky, 1950s-themed fundraiser at 7 p.m. October 11 in the Great Hall at Phoenix Art Museum. Poet Elizabeth Winder of Pain, Parties, Work: Sylvia Plath in New York, Summer 1953 will join in a chat, book signing and glamourous cocktail party to celebrate and appreciate Sylvia Plath’s experience as guest editor at Mademoiselle in 1950s NYC.

The evening, which will transport guests to the scene of fashion editing in the 1950s, dazzling parties, places and of course, fashion, is open to all and any. Just wear your 1950s best and glam it up! Proceeds from the event’s ticket sales will directly support the Arizona Costume Institute and fashion acquisitions, events and the work of curator Dennita Sewell.

Gift bags, raffles, (surprises) and glorious fashion will abound. For more information or to purchase tickets, click here.

Time to go vintage shopping!

PainPartiesWorkhcc

Arizona Costume Institute Nouveau Fundraiser Raises the Fashion Bar in Phoenix

Screen Shot 2013-07-22 at 9.38.08 AM

The opening of the #DigitalPrintFashion exhibition

Love fashion? Love the fashion exhibitions at Phoenix Art Museum? Then grab your kitten heels and support our state’s notable institution with at the Arizona Costume Institute Nouveau (under-35) division’s ridiculously swanky, 1950s-themed fundraiser at 7 p.m. October 11 in the Great Hall at Phoenix Art Museum. Poet Elizabeth Winder of Pain, Parties, Work: Sylvia Plath in New York, Summer 1953 will join in a chat, book signing and glamourous cocktail party to celebrate and appreciate Sylvia Plath’s experience as guest editor at Mademoiselle in 1950s NYC.

The evening, which will transport guests to the scene of fashion editing in the 1950s, dazzling parties, places and of course, fashion, is open to all and any. Just wear your 1950s best and glam it up! Proceeds from the event’s ticket sales will directly support the Arizona Costume Institute and fashion acquisitions, events and the work of curator Dennita Sewell.

Gift bags, raffles, (surprises) and glorious fashion will abound. To purchase tickets, click here.

Time to go vintage shopping!

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R&R Partners Wins Big

R&R Partners’ government and public affairs and public relations practices were big winners at the 2013 Best of the Capitol Awards held this week at the Phoenix Art Museum.

Jim Norton, R&R’s government and public affairs director, was recognized as Best Lobbyist. Norton, an instrumental force behind the passage of key legislation over the past 20 years represents many of the state’s most well-known companies and trade associations.

Jeff Gray, government and public affairs deputy director client services, took home Best Lobbyist Under 40 and is considered a rising star.

David Weissman, R&R’s public relations director, known for his adept, high-profile-client reputation management skills, accepted the award for Best PR Firm on behalf of his team.

image004

R&R Partners Wins Big

R&R Partners’ government and public affairs and public relations practices were big winners at the 2013 Best of the Capitol Awards held this week at the Phoenix Art Museum.

Jim Norton, R&R’s government and public affairs director, was recognized as Best Lobbyist. Norton, an instrumental force behind the passage of key legislation over the past 20 years represents many of the state’s most well-known companies and trade associations.

Jeff Gray, government and public affairs deputy director client services, took home Best Lobbyist Under 40 and is considered a rising star.

David Weissman, R&R’s public relations director, known for his adept, high-profile-client reputation management skills, accepted the award for Best PR Firm on behalf of his team.

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Phoenix Attorney Appointed to AZ Humane Society Board

The law firm of Morris, Hall & Kinghorn, P.L.L.C (MHK) announced that partner Ronald G. Wilson has been appointed to the Arizona Humane Society’s Board of Directors.

Wilson has dedicated much of his time to serving and participating on various boards in the past.   When asked about this new appointment, Wilson stated “I look forward to working with the Humane Society and their endeavors to help all homeless animals. It is an honor to be appointed and to have the opportunity to work with a caring staff and board members.”   Previously he has served as president for the Phoenix Art Museum Men’s art council, the Greater Southwest Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation and the Terrance retirement community just to name a few

Since 1957, the Arizona Humane Society has been committed to helping all animals and believes that every pet deserves a good life. They have grown to become the largest animal welfare and protection agency in Arizona.

Wilson has been a partner with Morris, Hall and Kinghorn since 2006 and focuses only on estate planning.  He has worldwide experience and education in estate planning and trust law, and is an Accredited Estate Planner from the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils.

MHK devotes its practice to estate planning matters and has helped thousands of families and individuals to meet their long-term estate planning and financial goals. The firm is a premier member of the American Academy of Estate Planning Attorneys (AAEPA).

Ripe Awards logo

Phoenix Art Museum To Host Ripe Awards, Awarding Valley's Top Five Chefs

The Phoenix Art Museum has announced the Valley’s top five chefs who will be recognized at the annual Ripe Awards on January 31. The chefs include Josh Hebert of Posh, Charleen Badman of FnB and Bodega, Bernie Kantak of Citizen Public House, Greg LaPrad of Morning Glory Cafe and Silvana Salcido Esparza of Barrio Cafe and Barrio Queen.

These diverse and gifted chefs have been identified for their yearning passion for cooking by creating exquisite dishes that embody artistic vision and culinary expertise.

Ryan O’Donovan, member of the Men’s Arts Council, says, “The fusion of art and the culinary arts combining to raise awareness of the gifted chefs and artisans residing in the Phoenix metro area is monumental and stands to be recognized.”

About the chefs:

Ripe Awards chefs

(Left to right): Bernie Kantak, Charleen Badman, Silvana Salcido Esparza, Greg La Prad and Josh Hebert

Bernie Kantak, Citizen Public HouseFirst up is Bernie Kantak, chef and co-owner of Citizen Public House in Scottsdale. Not only has Kantak made quite a name for himself in the Valley, but he has also been featured on the Food Network and covered in the pages of Food & Wine and Bon Appetit. Kantak’s reputation revolves around his groundbreaking menus that make the locals crave his delicious delicatessens.
Charleen Badman, FnB and BodegaUp next is Charleen Badman, executive chef and co-owner of FnB and Bodega in Scottsdale. Badman’s approach to cooking involves simple and ingredient-driven recipes that build the overall foundations of her restaurants. Badman received formal training under some of the world’s best female chefs, making her a huge threat in this year’s awards.
Silvana Salcido Esparza, Barrio Café and Barrio QueenSilvana Salcido Esparza, executive chef and owner of Barrio Café and Barrio Queen, was inducted into the Arizona Culinary Hall of Fame and nominated for the James Beard Award — so this award show isn’t her first. Esparza incorporates a Mexican flare that lures her loyal customers in and makes them go wild. With her experience and loyal followers, Esparza definitely has a chance for the Ripe award.
Greg LaPrad, Quiessence and Morning Glory CaféNext is Greg LaPrad, chef and owner of Quiessence and Morning Glory Café. With his fascinating culinary style influenced in Tuscany, LaPrad’s method to cooking is unlike anything Phoenix has seen. With his innovative slow food movement, LaPrad has not only won the hearts of the locals, but he has made quite a name for himself in the Valley.
Josh Hebert, PoshJosh Hebert is the executive chef and owner of Posh in Scottsdale. Posh is a one-of-a-kind restaurant and the Valley’s first venue to serve “improvisational cuisine.” Hebert has trained in some of the world’s most notable kitchens and his passion for the culinary arts seeps through every bite.

This class of truly talented professionals will be honored on January 31 at 6:30 p.m. at the Phoenix Art Museum. Guests will be wined and dined as nominated chefs serve up their signature cuisines. Guests will also have the chance to view a spectacular art show from local artist Lalo Cota. Tickets are $65 — and be sure to come with an empty stomach.

For more information about the Ripe Awards, visit ripephx.com.

Ripe Awards

Where: Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix
When: January 31, 6:30 p.m.
Cost: $65 per person (purchase tickets here)
Website: ripephx.com

Top 5: Arizona Museums, Experience AZ, Fall-Winter 2012

Top 5: Arizona Museums (Fall-Winter 2012)

The Top 5 Arizona Museums — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Musical Instrument Museum

4725 E. Mayo Blvd.,
Phoenix, AZ 85050
(480) 478-6000
themim.org
At the first global musical-insturment museum, nearly 300 exhibits immerse visitors in the sights and sounds of the world’s instruments.


Phoenix Art Museum

1625 N. Central Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85004
(602) 257-1222
phxart.org
The Southwest’s premier destination for world-class visual arts, features popular exhibitions and a collection of more than 18,000 works.


Heard Museum

2301 N. Central Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85004
(602) 252-8848
heard.org
Experience the myriad cultures and art of American Indians in 10 world-class exhibit galleries, plus enjoy sculpture courtyards, superb dining and shopping for your own uniquely Southwestern gifts and art.


Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art

7374 E. 2nd St.,
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
(480) 994-ARTS (2787)
smoca.org
SMoCA is an educational institution dedicated to presenting exhibitions on contemporary and modern art, architecture and design.


Pima Air & Space Museum

6000 E. Valencia Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85706
(520) 574-0462
pimaair.org
Pima Air & Space Museum is one of the largest air and space museums in the world, and the largest non-government funded aviation museum.

 

Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

 

Phoenix Art Museum, Zhang Ken, "Before Marriage"

Phoenix Art Museum To Host ‘Healing’ Chinese Art

Starting December 15, the Phoenix Art Museum will debut an exhibit showcasing rare art, as collected by Gerry and Leslie Jones, from the post-Cultural Revolution in China called “Visions of Humanity: 20th Century Art from the Gerry and Leslie Jones Collection.”

Starting in the 1960s and venturing through the 1980s, the collection will provide a gateway into a time in Chinese history when artists were only able to work for themselves, with no hope of an audience ever viewing their work. Most of the work was done during and after the Chinese Cultural Revolution of the 1960s, when the country began destroying old customs, culture, habits and ideas, starting with the destruction of artwork and historical artifacts that represented centuries of Imperial Rule. It wasn’t until the 1980s when the Chinese government began to create policies that created space to allow painters to work publicly, creating a new hope for the people of China and birthing a new generation of artists for a broader audience.

“What is most distinct about the art of this period is not just what it depicts, but whom it depicts,” said Janet Baker, PhD, the curator of Asian Art at the Phoenix Art Museum and organizer of the exhibit. “The artists of this time developed a new artistic language for their homeland, and that meant depicting ordinary people, something that was highly uncommon prior to 1950.”

The subjects of many paintings in the collection include workers, soldiers, peasants, children, elderly persons and how they lived their day-to-day lives.

Gerry and Leslie Jones, who lived in China during the 1980s, were able to gain special permission by the Ministry of Culture in China to visit the homes and studios of artists across China in order to assemble this collection.

In addition to a 30-minute film in the gallery featuring an interview with Jones, Gerry will host a special gallery talk in the Orme Lewis Gallery on January 2, 2013 at 12 p.m., highlighting his favorite pieces in the collection.

For more information on the exhibit or about the Phoenix Art Museum, please visit phxart.org.

 
Visions of Humanity: 20th Century Art from the Gerry and Leslie Jones Collection
Where: Phoenix Art Museum, 1625 N. Central Avenue, Phoenix
When: December 1, 2012 – April 14, 2013
Contact: (602) 257-1222
Online: phxart.org

 

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Phoenix Art Museum’s ‘Big Picture’ highlights scale, perspective

Beginning October 13, 2012, Phoenix Art Museum will present The Big Picture, a special installation of large-scale photography from Phoenix Art Museum’s collection.  These 15 large-scale photographs, some measuring as big as five feet by seven-and-a-half feet, represent trends in large scale contemporary photography apparent in museums across the country, which are a relatively new phenomena made possible by advances in photographic technology.

The works in this installation, selected by Rebecca Senf, Norton Family Curator of Photography, encompass a range of styles and approaches from contemporary photographers, including James Casabere, Gus Foster, and Gregory Crewsdon. Some represent compositions constructed or staged for the camera, while others are genres familiar in traditional photography, such as portraiture, landscape, and architectural shots. Usually displayed in contemporary art spaces in the Katz Wing, the special installation allows for comparisons between works of the same media, giving visitors an opportunity to see these large-scale images in relation to each other. “By grouping these works side by side,” says Senf, “we can appreciate how this medium is being used in radically different and inspiringly creative ways.”

But why big pictures? Why large scale images versus smaller photographic works? “People relate to photographs printed in large scale differently than smaller prints,” explains Senf. While it is true that a small photograph promotes intimacy and allows for a measure of subtlety that is hard to achieve in a big print, the large-sized images offer something smaller works cannot. “When a photograph nears life-size and fills your field of vision, it has a power to impact and encompass you. Many artists appreciate the visceral impact of a large, wall-sized art object and use it to powerful effect.”  Totaling 15 huge images, this special presentation will allow every visitor an opportunity to engage with each individual work, to truly experience the impact of the images.

The Big Picture, which opens October 13 and is on view until December 2, will be installed in Norton Family Photography Gallery, located on the upper level of the Museum’s south wing.

vincent

Vincent on Camelback headlines Phoenix Art Museum’s The pARTy

Chef Vincent Guerithault, owner of Vincent on Camelback in Phoenix has captured international acclaim for his creative approach to traditional French food. When given the opportunity to headline the menu for Phoenix Art Museum’s annual fundraising gala The pARTy, Vincent didn’t give it a second thought.

Vincent’s talents go well beyond his restaurant doors. He has created a very successful full-service catering business that can handle groups from five to 1,000.

“Vincent’s food is sumptuous with a timeless charm, which is one of the many reasons our committee selected him to headline the pARTy,” said pARTy Chair Diana Ellis Smith.

“It is my passion to make every dining experience memorable,” said Vincent Guerithault. “Combining culinary art amongst the ambiance of the Phoenix Art Museum’s vast collection is sure to be a dining experience of a lifetime.”

Vincent’s love for cooking began in his youth in France, where he worked at L’Oustau de Baumaniere in Les Baux de Provence, and Maxim’s and Fauchon in Paris. He came to the U.S. in 1976 to be sous–chef at Chicago’s Le Français, and within 10 years opened his own restaurant in the Valley, that helped put Phoenix on the culinary map.

The pARTy is one of the premier events in Phoenix for attracting guests from across the Valley and the United States.

Phoenix Art Museum will host its annual pARTy on Saturday, Nov. 3, which will be held downtown at the Phoenix Art Museum. The event promises to be an elegant evening centered on art and entertainment. Now in its seventh year, the pARTy has raised more than $9 million in support of the Museum’s education programs and exhibitions.

Tickets for the black-tie event are $750 per person and tables start at $7,500. To purchase tickets or to learn about sponsorships, contact Jan Nesburg at 602-257-2101.

For more information about the Phoenix Art Museum, the exhibitions, upcoming events and programs, visit www.phxart.org/theparty.

Top 5 Arizona Museums (Spring-Summer 2012)

Top 5: Arizona Museums (Spring-Summer 2012)

The Top 5 Arizona Museums — as voted on by Experience AZ readers:

Heard Museum

2301 N. Central Ave.,
Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-252-8848
heard.org
Experience the myriad cultures and art of American Indians in 10 world-class exhibit galleries, plus enjoy sculpture courtyards, superb dining and shopping for your own uniquely Southwestern gifts and art.


Scottsdale Museum Of Contemporary Art

7374 E. 2nd St.,
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
480-994-ARTS (2787)
smoca.org
SMoCA is an educational institution dedicated to presenting exhibitions on contemporary and modern art, architecture and design.


Musical Instrument Museum

4725 E. Mayo Blvd.,
Phoenix, AZ 85050
480-478-6000
themim.org
At the first global musical-insturment museum, nearly 300 exhibits immerse visitors in the sights and sounds of the world’s instruments.


Phoenix Art Museum

1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-257-1222
phxart.org
The Southwest’s premier destination for world-class visual arts, features popular exhibitions and a collection of more than 18,000 works.


Pima Air & Space Museum

6000 E. Valencia Rd.,
Tucson, AZ 85706
520-574-0462
pimaair.org
Pima Air & Space Museum is one of the largest air and space museums in the world, and the largest non-government funded aviation museum.

Experience AZ Spring-Summer 2012

The pARTy, Phoenix Art Museum

Phoenix Art Museum’s pARTy Black-Tie Fundraiser To Dazzle, Delight

The Phoenix Art Museum will be hosting its 7th annual, black-tie fundraising event this November with the pARTy, aptly named for celebrating the art housed in the Museum as well as the lively feel for which the occasion strives.

Initially an event to celebrate the Museum’s grand opening after the completion of a multi-year construction project, the pARTy was such a success, it was turned into an annual fundraising event for the Phoenix Art Museum’s exhibitions and educational programs, which include tours with experts, lectures, festivals, cultural performances and an award-winning film program.

“Over the past six years, an average of 795 individuals have attended the event each year,” says Alesha Corey, head of media relations for the pARTy. “The pARTy has raised more than $9 million.”

Coordinators behind the event have maintained their focus on keeping the pARTy an unsponsored event, only receiving money from those who donate without the influence of personal benefits.

“This is not a typical event as it is not a sponsored event,” Corey adds. “The guests are not buying sponsorship; they are buying tables and donating to the Museum. There are options to underwrite various aspects to the event and those are strictly donations with no benefits attached.”

At the pARTy, attendees can either purchase individual tickets or tables for groups. There are 4 different table options, varying in price from $7,500 to $50,000. Individual tickets range from $750 to $5,000, depending on the table.

The pARTy is also run entirely by volunteers who have taken an interest in the Phoenix Art Museum.

“The Museum has a cadre of eager and outstanding volunteers that work for the Museum in numerous ways,” says Corey. “On the night of the event, there are also staff members that volunteer to work to be part of this huge event for the Museum. For the volunteers that evening, the pARTy is a highlight event of the year.”

Corey has no doubt this year’s event will amaze its guests. She says with the stunning décor, “this year’s black-tie event … promises to dazzle and delight guests.”

For more information on the Phoenix Art Museum and The pARTy, visit phxart.org.

Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix
(602) 257-1222

Phoenix Art Museum

Phoenix Art Museum: Beat The Heat And Enrich The Senses

Phoenix Art MuseumI went on an adventure to the Phoenix Art Museum with my boyfriend, a place I haven’t visited since I was in middle school. With compelling exhibits and a great location, this is a fun way to beat the heat. Incorporate your five senses while enjoying the variety of artists and mediums that provide the perfect summer distraction.

As I made my way through the museum, I was amazed by the variety of mediums that make up the galleries and collections of the museum. The artwork was not only impressive, but the unique textures seem to come alive in your imagination — almost as though you could almost feel it just by examining the piece. Clearly the desire to feel these textures must be something natural in viewing some of the exhibits because there were numerous signs reminding visitors not to touch.

PAMAlthough I did not physically touch the artwork, the sense of touch seemed to be simulated because of how detailed the artwork was, especially when I was examining “The Sea” exhibit, which allows the visitor to appreciate the variety of design and color of old-fashioned clothing. The details and style differ far from our own modern clothing but provide the basis for how fashion has developed. Whether your interpretation of old-fashioned clothing stems from classic movies or Mickey Mouse cartoons, the unique outfits provide you with something at which to marvel.

Some of the exhibits, such as one that utilized dark wood, had a smell that changed my perspective on the exhibit. The more I examined and inhaled the aroma, I began to consider different interpretations of the artwork. However, not all the exhibits provide a smell that made an impression, but a few that did challenged the visitor to create an interpretation.

PAMRegarding the senses, let me make it clear that I did not taste any artwork, but passing by the restaurant Palette is as close as you can get. With Arizona wines and beers, it makes it the perfect way to end your trip.

Collections and galleries I encountered on my visit include: American, Western American, PhxARtKIDS, Art of Philip C. Curtis, Asian, European, Thorne Miniature Rooms, Latin American, Fashion Design, and Modern & Contemporary. Other amenities offered are the Palette restaurant, tours and a museum store.

Spending my afternoon in the Phoenix Art Museum provided me with an experience I never thought possible. It had me utilizing my senses, wondering what the smooth or shiny textures would feel like. Throw yourself into the world of art that utilizes almost any medium imagined and be amazed on how you react. From paintings, sculptures, lights, music and so much more, visit a truly magical place.

For more information about the Phoenix Art Museum, including hours and admission prices, please visit phxart.org.

Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
NEC Central Avenue & McDowell Road
(602) 257-1222
phxart.org

Phoenix Art Museum

Paper! Exhibit On Display At Phoenix Art Museum

Now on display in Steele Gallery, Phoenix Art Museum’s Paper! exhibition includes works on paper and about paper, featuring fashion, photography and pieces from four continents.

Rarely-exhibited work from the Museum’s collection is on display, along with special loans and commissions from area artists and collectors.

The exhibition attempts to broaden the understanding of paper both as a material and a subject for artists.

Manufactured paper dates back to China in 2 A.D. Now, it is mostly associated as being made from trees, but can be made from a variety of materials such as cactus, grass, bamboo, cotton or even jeans. A prevalent part of daily life, paper usage has increased by 400 percent in the past 40 years, according to ecology.com.

Phoenix Art MuseumWith paper as such a ubiquitous material, Phoenix Art Museum began to consider paper’s role in creating art.

Lead by Jim Ballinger, Phoenix Art Museum’s Sybil Harrington Director, the Museum’s curatorial and education departments sorted through thousands of works in the Museum’s collection, identifying close to 200 pieces that best captured the impact of paper in art.

“It was exciting to bring every curator to the table, to work together in this way,” says Ballinger. “It was also exciting to create a dialogue among different works of art in the collection with the assistance of our educators and installation team.”

The exhibition also provided an opportunity to open up a conversation about art with the local community. At a First Friday at the Museum, a community event that invites people of all ages to attend the Museum at no cost the first Friday of each month, visitors responded to a simple question: What do you think of when you hear the word “paper”? Responses filled hundreds of sticky notes with everything from money and trees to the NBC television show “The Office” and a drawing of toilet tissue.

“As we sorted through their responses, we noticed many of their ideas fell into several natural categories,” Blake says. “We used those categories as a basis for how we then organized the exhibition.”

The result is a complex collection from big names like Norman Rockwell, as well as relative unknowns. Works include delicate, hand-painted Asian scrolls; Pop Art paper dresses from the 1960s; a white, steel sculpture emulating crumpled paper by Phoenix metal sculptor Pete Deise; and papier-mâché sculptures by Tucson artist Michael Cajero.

On view until September 23, 2012, Phoenix Art Museum’s Paper! explores the impact on the world of art of something as seemingly simple as paper.

For more information about the Phoenix Art Museum, visit:


Phoenix Art Museum

1625 N. Central Avenue,
Phoenix
(602) 257-1222
phxart.org

First Friday in Downtown Phoenix

First Friday In Downtown Phoenix

The First Friday evening of every month in downtown Phoenix will provide you with all flocks of life gathered around multiple forums of artwork. From dancing and singing, to high-priced artwork lining gallery walls and local street vendors selling their handcrafted delights, First Friday has every culturally stimulating experience you can imagine without having to leave the city.

Phoenix’s First Friday event started as an annual event in the spring of 1988 known as the annual Art Detour. Met with large crowds and a new life to the downtown art district, the annual event turned monthly in early 1994. Since then, huge numbers of Phoenix locals and city visitors continue to fill the streets of Phoenix’s art district to share and explore their interest in local art, making this First Friday art walk the largest monthly event in the United States.

Free to all attendees, arrive on the  Valley Metro Light Rail or park at the Phoenix Art Museum and travel to all the hot spots by a free shuttle to soak up all that the night has to offer. Comprised of more than 70 galleries, venues and street vendors, you’ll surely find something to please everyone’s interests with this self-guided walking tour.

For me, the event’s convenient location off the city’s beloved light rail system made First Friday a regular monthly outing here in my home away from home. Just four years ago I packed up everything I knew to move out of state for college and began looking for other off-campus experiences to take in what Phoenix had to offer. With several hits and misses, I quickly found refuge in the streets of Phoenix’s art district, as I became a familiar face at First Friday.

With every first Friday of the month, my frequent visits are met with new sights, smells and sounds. Although the usual, art-loving crowd is to be expected, you can never really predict what little wonders you’ll find that night. After attending a few times, I began to know which galleries are worth lingering in the longest, which shops have the best vendors in their yards and what artists will stimulate my desire for unique works of art.

Despite art snobbery stereotypes, First Friday is more about the “come as you are” philosophy while you comfortably stroll the town enjoying an evening of good art, music and food. As a poor college student in love with all artistic forms, this event has truly fed my hunger for great art without having to endure the stuffy galleries quiet enough to hear a pin drop.

Rather, in the streets, yards and galleries of downtown Phoenix, you are greeted with open arms despite your level of love or knowledge for art. As a safe haven for those looking for a lively event full of spirit and culture, First Friday has served as my regular form of entertainment along with being a must for any visitors asking for something to do around Phoenix. In that, I will continue to attend the monthly events and encourage all to join in on the evening of great festivities.

For more information about First Friday visit artlinkinc.wordpress.com.

Phoenix Museums

Phoenix Museums: History, Culture And More

Interested in the history of Phoenix or the culture surrounding it? Or are you just looking for a good, educational and interesting time? Check out one of many Phoenix museums, focusing on everything from art and music, to science and history.

With so many from which to choose, here are five well-known museums located throughout Phoenix and the state:

Arizona Science Center

Located in the heart of downtown Phoenix, the Arizona Science Center is one of the more well-known Phoenix museums. With more than 350 permanent exhibits, as well as a number of nationally traveling exhibits, the Arizona Science Center gives visitors a great hands-on look at science, nature, the human body and other subjects.

The experience is constantly changing thanks to the traveling exhibits that stop by; even if you’ve visited once before, there’s always something new to experience and explore. The Arizona Science Center also features a planetarium, an IMAX theater and a series of multimedia classrooms.

[stextbox id="grey"]600 E. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
(602) 716-2000[/stextbox]

Heard Museum

The Heard Museum doesn’t focus specifically on scientific exhibits; rather, this is the place you want to see if you’re interested in the history and culture of Native Americans in Arizona. This isn’t just a history museum, either. It features both ancient and contemporary art and literature, as well as a collection of exhibits about Native American history.

[stextbox id="grey"]2301 N. Central Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
(602) 252-8840[/stextbox]

Phoenix Art Museum

If it isn’t science or culture you’re looking for, then what about art? The Phoenix Art Museum is another one of the great Phoenix museums … so great, in fact, that it just might be one of, if not the biggest art museum in the southwestern United States.

The museum features, among other things, more than 18,000 works of art from all over the world, as well as the occasional festival, live performance or other event.

[stextbox id="grey"]1625 N. Central Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
(602) 257-1222[/stextbox]

Pueblo Grande Museum Archeological Park

This one isn’t the kind of museum that most people would think of when they hear the word “museum”; it’s actually a preserved site that is thought to be where a group of Native Americans settled as far back as 450 AD.

These ruins of a platform mound and a series of irrigation canals offer visitors a unique look at ancient Arizona and the people who lived there long before we did, and they’re definitely worth a look.

[stextbox id="grey"]4619 E. Washington St.
Phoenix, AZ 85034
(602) 495-0900[/stextbox]

Musical Instrument Museum

Probably the most recent of the Phoenix museums on this list, the Musical Instrument Museum is a place any music lover should visit at least once. It has a collection of more than 13,000 musical instruments from all places and times; nearly 200 countries and territories are represented in its collection. Guests are given a wireless headset as they explore the museum, allowing them to hear the music of an exhibit as they approach it. A system like this gives visitors a unique experience.

[stextbox id="grey"]4725 E. Mayo Boulevard
Phoenix, AZ 85050
(480) 478-6000 [/stextbox]

What other Phoenix museums do you like?
Let us know in the comments section.