Tag Archives: Phoenix Baptist Hospital

A computerized image of the brain fibers shows the sheath, deployed in conjunction with the BrainPath, inserted into the brain. The sheath allows a neurosurgeon easy access to the surgical site inside the brain.

Phoenix Baptist Hospital uses innovative brain surgery technology

BrainPath - DevicesAbrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced that Phoenix Baptist Hospital is the first in Arizona to provide a breakthrough surgical approach to remove once-inoperable brain abnormalities while minimizing damage to healthy brain tissue.

Dr. Marco Marsella, a neurosurgeon on staff at Phoenix Baptist has successfully performed this new surgery using the new NICO BrainPath device. He is the only physician in Arizona and among 121 doctors nationally trained to use the NICO BrainPath device.

The BrainPath device works with several existing and new advanced technologies integrating high-definition imaging, computerized navigation, access, optics, and tissue removal and collection. The device allows physicians to navigate safely through the natural folds and delicate fibers of the brain to reach the abnormality and minimizing tissue damage.

“With this technology we may approach tumors that were considered hard to remove or whose resection would pose a high intraoperative risk,’’ said Dr. Marsella. “Benefits of this device include safer surgery, that usually provides faster recovery time, minimal internal and external scarring, less trauma to the brain and nerves, and fewer side effects and complications post-surgery.”

The purchase of this new technology underscores Phoenix Baptist Hospital’s commitment to neurological patient care,” said Phoenix Baptist Hospital CEO Dan Jones.

“This is a promising and significant development for both the hospital and patients needing targeted, flawless brain surgery,” Jones added.

Paul Martsall - Surgical Services Nurse for PBH

Phoenix Baptist Hospital nurse earns honor

Abrazo Health, the second largest health care delivery system in Arizona, has announced that Phoenix Baptist Hospital surgical services nurse Paul Marstall has been inducted into the Tenet Heroes Hall of Fame. The announcement was made at a ceremony in Dallas, Texas earlier this month.

Marstall is recognized for his compassion and professionalism during one family’s difficult decision to remove a loved one from life support and donate her organs. The patient’s cardiac arrest created a time-sensitive situation in which the family had limited time to say goodbye so the transplant team could retrieve her organs. Marstall worked to make the patient’s final moments meaningful for the family, going beyond the medical definition of “care” by providing emotional support and guidance in a delicate situation. Due to his professional care, several patients received organ transplants from the patient’s donation.

“Our Tenet Hero inductees represent the best of who we are at Tenet and what we do as healthcare providers in the communities we serve,” said Trevor Fetter, president and chief executive officer of Tenet Healthcare. “Paul’s extraordinary character and dedication is an inspiration to us all.”

Marstall was one of seven employees inducted into the Tenet Heroes Hall of Fame, Tenet Healthcare Corporation’s highest honor for employees. This year’s recipients were chosen from more than 130 nominations. Tenet Heroes are nominated by their hospital’s leadership team and selected based on their dedication to their patients, colleagues and communities. The Tenet Heroes Hall of Fame recognizes exceptional employees who demonstrate Tenet’s values of quality, integrity, service, innovation and transparency.

brain

Abrazo Announces Cutting-Edge Neuroscience Center

Abrazo Health announced that Phoenix Baptist Hospital is now home to a new state-of-the-art Neuroscience expansion. The new suite will include all the latest equipment, including a Biplane Neuroangiography System. The Biplane Neuroangiography technology will allow surgeons to deliver potentially life – saving care to patients with speed and accuracy by providing enhanced visualizations of the brain and spine, treatment that reduces the risk of additional problems and will also expedite recovery.

This latest move by Phoenix Baptist Hospital adds to an already banner year, further advancing the care patients in need of neurological care. Earlier this year, the hospital was once again honored with the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award. The hospital has also earned honors of being placed on the Target Stroke: Honor Roll for a second year in recognition for their commitment to turning patient guidelines into lifelines.

Right now in the U.S., stroke is the fourth leading cause o f death among adults, and someone suffers from a stroke in this country every forty seconds, making need for such a technologically advanced center even greater. Dan Jones, CEO of Phoenix Baptist Hospital says, “This new neurosciences care suite is just further proof of our commitment to the best in quality care for the patients here in the valley and across the southwest. Stroke patients, head injury patients and spine injury patients will have access to the latest in technology and trained physicians here at Phoenix Baptist and our entire staff couldn’t be more excited to be bringing this all to the community.”

Good Samaritan Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Health Care Industry Has Flourished From Cottages To World-Class Facilities

A Century of Care

From cottages to world-class facilities, Arizona’s health care industry has flourished

Mayo Clinic Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 In the nearly 100 years since Arizona became a state, the health care sector has become a powerful economic force.

According to a study by Arizona State University’s L. William Seidman Research Institute, Arizona’s hospital community alone employs more than 80,000 people and contributes $11.5 billion to the gross state product. Indirectly, hospitals create about 120,000 additional jobs, more than the combined populations of Coconino, Graham and Santa Cruz counties.

Sisters of Mercy

It all started some 17 years before statehood in January 1895, when the Sisters of Mercy had collected enough money to rent a six-bedroom cottage at Fourth and Polk streets in Downtown Phoenix. Each room was equipped with two beds for TB patients, and thus was born St. Joseph’s Sanitarium, predecessor of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and the first hospital in Phoenix. Downtown Phoenix 1900s - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

In the mid-1940s, the nuns purchased 10 acres at Third Avenue and Thomas Road, which was part of an old dairy farm. Today, St. Joseph’s is a 670-bed, not-for-profit hospital that is one of the cornerstones of the state’s health care industry.

A second giant in health care, Good Samaritan Hospital of Phoenix, launched its first facility in an apartment building at Third Street near Van Buren in 1911. Initially incorporated as the Arizona Deaconess Hospital and Home, it opened with 15 beds.

One-hundred years later, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Downtown Phoenix is the flagship of Banner Health, with more than 662 licensed patient care beds. Banner Good Samaritan employs more than 4,200 health care professionals and support staff. Nearly 1,700 physicians representing more than 50 specialties work with Banner Good Samaritan staff to care for more than 43,000 inpatients a year.

Another early entry in the health care scene was the State Asylum for the Insane, which was rebuilt after a fire in 1911. In 1924, the asylum was informally renamed Arizona State Hospital.

Established in 1943 as a community hospital, Tucson Medical Center is among the 300 largest hospitals in the country. It is licensed for 650 adult and skilled nursing beds, and serves more than 30,000 inpatients and 122,000 outpatients a year.

St. Luke Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011In 1971, University Medical Center — a private, nonprofit hospital located at the Arizona Health Sciences Center adjacent to the University of Arizona in Tucson — was established. UMC is Arizona’s only academic medical center, and earlier this year it became an international focal point for neurosurgery and trauma care after a gunman shot and wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and killed six people.

In Northern Arizona, the Flagstaff Medical Center, a not-for-profit hospital, was founded in 1936. A part of the Northern Arizona Healthcare family, it has some 270 beds and its medical staff includes about 200 physicians. Among its specialties are cancer, heart and sports medicine.

Health care continues to be a concern on Indian reservations throughout Arizona, particularly in some of the remote regions. A relatively new program, the American Indian Research Center for Health is designed to improve the health status of Native Americans and increase the number of Native American scientists and health professionals engaged in research. Classes for the student-training component of the program are held at the University of Arizona.

Read more…

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards recognizes the Valley's professionals in the health indsutry

2010 HCLA – Nurse or Nursing Advocate

Honoree: Kim Wilson, RN, BS, MS

Vice President of Patient Care Services and CNO
Mercy Gilbert Medical Center
Vice President of Patient Care Services and CNO Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, 2010 Health Care Leadership AwardsEven before the doors opened at Mercy Gilbert Medical Center in 2006, Kim Wilson was shaping the hospital’s work environment, quality of patient care, clinical excellence and innovations.

As chief nursing officer, she has worked closely with other members of the hospital’s leadership team to establish an environment of “Pause, Reflect, Heal.” The Pause, Reflect, Heal concept is simple. For patients, it is a blend of clinical excellence with extraordinary compassion, crafted to heal both body and soul.

For the hospital’s leaders, it is a commitment to caring for the caregivers — a blend of tough-minded, yet tenderhearted leadership, balancing accountability with endearing relationships with staff.

At Mercy Gilbert, Wilson’s responsibilities range from planning and managing to maintaining direct and regular contact with the hospital’s patients. She plays an integral role in establishing a vision for and providing leadership in the delivery of excellent patient care, including plans for high patient and physician satisfaction, employee and patient safety, clinical education, and incorporating innovative technologies. In tune with innovation, she brings new technologies to the bedside. Along with ensuring that each patient receives quality care, Wilson wants patients to feel safe and to be able to heal body, mind and spirit. She does this through regular daily contact with patients and effective communication with the nursing staff.

Prior to joining Mercy Gilbert, Wilson spent 25 years in Bakersfield, Calif., where she served in several nursing leadership roles.

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Finalist: Linda Lindquist, RN

Director of Critical Care
Phoenix Baptist Hospital
Linda Lindquist, Director of Critical Care Phoenix Baptist Hospital, 201 Health Care Leadership Awards
In just two short years, Linda Lindquist’s impact on leadership and patient care is evident at Phoenix Baptist Hospital. A nurse for 40 years, including 30 in the Valley, Lindquist manages the critical care areas of the hospital.

Following the example she sets, Lindquist’s staff takes care of the sickest patients with kindness, compassion and technical excellence. In fact, Lindquist’s patients consistently have among the highest patient satisfaction levels at Phoenix Baptist. The reason? She personally visits all of the patients in her areas, which no doubt has an impact on their care and recovery. Lindquist is easygoing, with an approachable manner that makes working with her a pleasant experience. She serves as a mentor for her nursing partners, and as a resource for non-nursing leaders at the hospital.

Since joining Phoenix Baptist in May 2008, Lindquist has been given additional responsibilities, and is serving as interim director of the medical/surgical unit.

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Finalist: Peg Smith, RN, MBA

Chief Nursing Officer
Chandler Regional Medical Center
Peg Smith, Chief Nursing Officer Chandler Regional Medical Center, 201 Health Care Leadership Awards

Peg Smith, chief nursing officer for Chandler Regional Medical Center, has a true passion for patient care. One way she shares this passion is through a program she developed called the Medicine of Compassion/Day of Reflection. That’s when new and existing employees learn about how Smith expects care to be delivered, focusing on patient needs, compassion, communication, and healing of the mind, body and spirit.

Each day, Smith makes sure she anticipates her patients’ needs by including patients in making decisions about their care, communicating effectively with other members of the care team and, when patients go home, overseeing the team that calls them the next day to make sure the former patients are doing well. Smith joined the Chandler hospital in 1993 as the evening charge nurse in the operating room.

Since then, she has taken on increased responsibilities, being promoted regularly until she was named to her current position in 2001.

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