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2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Winners & Photos

David Lincoln and the Lincoln family earned Arizona Business Magazine’s first Lifetime Achievement Award to highlight the 5th annual, 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Thursday, March 8 at the Arizona Biltmore.

“Even though this is a lifetime award, I hope that I have a lot more life to live,” David Lincoln joked.

Thirteen other awards were presents to honorees, who heard keynote addresses from Dr. Michael Birt, director of the Center for Sustainable Health and interim co-director at ASU’s Biodesign Institute; and Elizabeth Reich, President and CEO, Make-A-Wish Foundation of Arizona.

Congratulations to the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists and winners!


View photos of the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards on our Facebook!


2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards Winners:

Community Outreach: Ruth Rimmer, Director of Psycho/Social Research, Arizona Burn Center, Maricopa Integrated Health Systems

Institution or Educational Program: Arizona Institute for Breast Health

Insurance Provider or Executive: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Volunteer of the Year: Jean Reynolds, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Dentist of the Year: Tony S. Hashemian, DDS, A.T. Still University Arizona School of Dentistry & Oral Health

Nurse or Nursing Advocate: Dr. Anne McNamara, Grand Canyon University

Manager of the Year: Brain Shelley, Banner Del E. Webb

Hospital Executive of the Year: Rhonda Anderson, Cardon Children’s Medical Center

Hospital Administrator of the Year: Dr. Edgar Staren, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Researcher of the Year: Julie Robbins, Battelle

Healthcare Leadership Physician of the Year: Dr. Stephen Pophal, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Surgeon of the Year: Dr. David Jacofsky, The CORE Institute

Medical Center or Hospital: Thunderbird Medical Center

Lifetime Achievement Award: David Lincoln and the Lincoln Family


Photos of the 2012 Healthcare Leadership Awards reception and ceremony:

Photos: Cory Bergquist

[slickr-flickr tag="2012-hcla-reception" items="38" type="slideshow" id="77774765@N07"]


Presenting Sponsors:

CTCA Logo Quarles & Brady Logo
National Bank of Az Health Care Trust of America, Inc.

Event Sponsor:

Arizona Biltmore Resort

Dessert Sponsor:

Scan Health Plan Arizona

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Future of Technology In Arizona: Where Do We Go From Here?

The future of technology: Science and engineering turned Arizona’s first 100 years upside down, so where do we go from here?


Think about the achievements in technology that came during Arizona’s first 100 years.

  • The first transcontinental telephone service between New York and San Francisco (1915).
  • The world’s first radio broadcasting station goes on the air  (1920).
  • Television has its first successful demonstration in the United States (1927).
  • James Watson and Francis Crick at Cambridge University describe the structure of the DNA molecule (1953).
  • The microchip is invented (1959).
  • The first test-tube baby is born (1978).
  • IBM introduces its first personal computer (1981).
  • Cellular telephones are introduced to consumers (1982).
  • Development of the World Wide Web begins (1989).
  • Dolly the sheep becomes the first mammal cloned from an adult cell (1996).
  • Apple introduces the iPod (2001).
  • Facebook is launched (2004).
  • Scientists discover how to use human skin cells to create embryonic stem cells (2007).

They are all innovations that have changes the way we lives our lives and do business.

Where will technology take us as Arizona enters its second century? How will it affect our lives? Here are technologies and scenarios that some of Arizona’s best and brightest minds see playing out in the state’s next 100 years.


The Future of Technology In Arizona


Future of TechnologyMark Bonsall
General manager and CEO
SRP

If I had to pick one technology with the potential to truly revolutionize the industry it would be finding affordable ways to store energy on a very large scale.  This would increase the value of intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar and could transform electricity into a more common commodity.  It isn’t clear that this is possible, but with the growing focus on electric vehicles and other storage technologies, it is certain there will be significant gains over the next century.


Future of TechnologyMark Edwards
Vice president of corporate development and marketing
Algae Biosciences, Inc.

Algae-based food, fiber, feed, fertilizer, fuels, and advanced medicines will transform those industries, as we know them today. The current serious problems of waste and pollution will be solved with sustainable algae-based production that recycles and reuses nutrients, water, and energy while regenerating air, water and soils. Our children’s children will have sufficient natural resources to produce the food, energy and transportation they will need.

Algae Biosciences is Scottsdale-based and focused on discovering and unlocking the powers of algae to resolve critical human issues – nutrition, health, energy and environment.


Future of TechnologySteve Sanghi
President and CEO
Microchip Technology Inc.

If I had to pick one (technology that will have biggest impact on Arizona’s next 100 years) it would be the renewable-energy complex of technologies. For Arizona, the primary renewable-energy opportunities can be broken into three categories—measurement, conservation and harvesting.  The world’s oil supply will eventually run out, and Arizona has more days of sun than most areas.  We must continue working to tap into this ever-present energy source.  At the same time, we must focus on developing the technologies that will enable individuals and companies to both measure and conserve their energy usage.  For example, Arizona has the potential to play a key role in developing the technologies that will be employed at the home, industrial and utility levels to make the burgeoning “smart grid” work.


Future of TechnologyJohn Lefebvre
President
Suntech America

The amount of energy generated through renewable sources like solar power has the potential to surpass that derived from fossil fuels in the next 50 years. We’ve already seen remarkable technological innovations in the solar field to increase efficiency, develop solutions for energy storage, and further reduce costs, with further improvements on the horizon. With over 300 days of sunshine, Arizona is naturally poised to take advantage of these advancements and its abundant resource by generating clean electricity without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.


Future of TechnologyDiane Brossart
President
Valley Forward Association

The biggest issues facing Arizona over the next 100 years are managing a finite water supply and transitioning to a clean energy economy. Green technology and innovation will create economic and environmentally sound solutions, making Arizona the leading destination for living wisely and sustainably in a desert.

Valley Forward Association promotes cooperative efforts to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities.


Future of TechnologyKelly Mott Lacroix
Graduate research associate
Water Resources Research Center in Tucson

We do not have a silver bullet to solve our water supply and demand challenges The state and its water issues are too diverse.  Rather, there are many smaller pieces from the simple and small scale, such as rainwater harvesting, to the large and complex, such as increased reclaimed water use, that when taken together will constitute a solution.


Future of TechnologyBill Hubert
President and founder
Cology, Inc.

Universal, personal-application based technology in general, and highly-sophisticated, profile-driven applications that help consumers (students and parents in our industry) not only gain access to a broader spectrum of programs and services available – but an interactive relationship with providers that will help both sides of the “economic equation” benefit from the transaction.

Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc. is a leading provider of end-to-end private student loan origination and repayment servicing solutions for lenders.


Future of TechnologyCR Herro
Vice president of environmental affairs
Meritage Homes

In the next century, climate will take the lead role in transforming Arizona and its buildings into energy-producing solar collectors. Arizona has the ability to become the largest producer of renewable, clean energy nationwide. In residential construction, that has already started.  The first cost-effective solar communities debuted in Arizona. Meritage Homes introduced the nation’s first net-zero homes in Arizona, saving owners both energy and money. And Arizona utilities lead the country in sponsoring energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.  Arizona is shaping up to be a state powered by the sun in every way imaginable.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Niemiec
President
Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

Technology will be used to not only focus on the tiny gene, but to see the bigger picture of the bio-energetic field of the body. Not unlike what you would see in a Star Trek movie, technology would be used to assess and heal both the body and mind, taking into account the bio-electric system. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine has been focused on individualized medicine for thousands of years, with each treatment and formula specifically adapted to an individual, changing as the person changes and moves toward health. Thus, this dynamic medicine is the forefather of modern “individualized medicine” and can work well to make modern biotechnology more effective.


Future of TechnologyDanny Murphy
Airport director
Sky Harbor International Airport

With the explosion of mobile devices, coupled with high speed wireless networks, there is a new generation that will live their lives on mobile technology, using smartphones, touchpads and other mobile devices.
In the past we used to print so many information pieces about the airport. And while we still provide printed materials to an extent, our focus is on providing information via the web and for mobile units.


Future of TechnologyDr. Grace Caputo
Director
Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

Moving to a system where we utilize electronic medical records will really give us the ability to shape and improve health care across the board. Pediatric healthcare will be heavily impacted as we have just started to unravel genetic bases diseases. In the future, we hope to understand the genetic process of diseases so we can treat them and ultimately prevent diseases with wellness and lifestyle changes.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Anaya
Anchor
CBS 5 News

I think the internet technology we currently use to help in our news gathering will become a bigger factor in how we do things. Smart phones  (or whatever replaces them in the next 100 years) will replace cameras and studios creating more intimacy and accessibility. That accessibility will make it much easier to hold those in power more accountable for their actions which I hope will have a positive impact on how the state’s laws are created, shaped and enforced.


Future of TechnologyMahesh Seetharam, M.D.
Medical oncologist and hematologist
Arizona Oncology

Personalized medicine through whole genome sequencing (genomics), proteomics and noninvasive imaging will pave the way for the future.  Current research to evaluate for circulating cancer cells, and evaluation for cancer in urine samples are already being studied, and holds promise for the future.


Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D.
Radiation oncologist
Arizona Oncology

Immensely precise and conformal radiation treatments in the form of stereotactic radiation, high dose-rate radiation and molecularly targeted radiation will allow radiation oncologists surgical precision in assisting the people of Arizona to improve cancer cure and control. Just as the technological advances in the past have allowed women diagnosed with breast cancer to pursue breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and have allowed men to preserve erectile function with prostate cancer, future advances will allow more Arizonans diagnosed with cancer to enjoy a better quality of life along with improved cure rates.


Michael Crow
President
Arizona State University

The biggest single technology to impact the future of Arizona will be individualized learning technologies that allow individuals to master subjects in ways customized to their particular types of intelligence and learning modalities.  This technology will allow people to learn more quickly and more deeply and more broadly. Those places, hopefully like Arizona, that enable and empower this kind of learning will see tremendous positive impacts from this technological development.


Where to invest in technology

Patricia Ternes, a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Scottsdale says these are the four technology sectors to invest in going into Arizona’s next century:

1. Water 
Growing imbalances in global water supply and demand are well documented. Within that heading, the companies involved with water fall into four categories: (1) activities and technologies that increase supply; (2) the building of the necessary water structure; (3) processes that help reduce demand; and (4) water management.

2. Agriculture
When you look at the growth of the world’s population companies that are involved in agriculture and food production will continue to be attractive and important.

3. Health
Another important sector will be health care services and life sciences tools and services that provide better quality of life for the aging population.

4. The unknown
The fourth sector doesn’t exist yet.  Advances are happening so fast that something new will be created that will change our lives.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

red-awards-2012

2012 RED Awards: Winners & Honorable Mentions

Kitchell, DAVIS and Banner Health captured top honors Thursday night as Arizona Commercial Real Estate Magazine held the 7th Annual, 2012 RED Awards (Real Estate and Development) to recognize the biggest, best and most notable commercial real estate projects and transactions of 2011.

The event drew more than 400 CRE professionals to the Arizona Biltmore as winners and honorable mentions were selected from a record 116 nominations received in 12 project categories and individual and team broker categories.

Kitchell was named General Contractor of the Year; DAVIS was Architect of the Year; and Banner Health won Developer of the Year.

2012 RED Awards category winners:

Best Education Project: Grand Canyon University Arena; Best Hospitality Project: Westin Downtown Phoenix; Best Industrial Project: Dunn-Edwards Phoenix; Best Healthcare Project: Phoenix Children’s Hospital; Best Multi-Family Project: Devine Legacy on Central; Best Office Project: Fountainhead Office Plaza; Best Public Project: Virginia G. Piper Sports & Fitness Center for Persons with Disabilities; Best Redevelopment Project: Adelante Healthcare Surprise; Best Retail Project: iPic Theater/Tanzy/Salt; Most Challenging Project: Salt River Fields at Talking Stick; Most Sustainable Project: DPR Construction Phoenix Headquarters; and Best Tenant Improvement Project: Limelight Networks.

Merit Award winners were OASIS Hospital (Healthcare) and P.L. Julian Elementary School (Education).

Broker of the Year honors went to Jay Hoselton, Cushman & Wakefield, Individual Leasing; Ken Elmer, Commercial Properties Inc., Individual Sales; Bo Mills and Mark Detmer, Cushman & Wakefield, Team Leasing; and Tyler Anderson and Sean Cunningham, CBRE, Team Sales.

2012 RED Awards honorable mentions:

Education: NAU Health & Learning Center; Healthcare: Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center; Hospitality: Casino Del Sol Hotel Convention Center and Parking Structure Expansion; Industrial: Crescent Crown Distribution; Most Challenging: Arizona Science Center Phase III Remodification; Multi-Family: Phoenix Towers Terrace; Office: UniSource Energy Corporate Office; Public: Maricopa County Downtown Court Tower; Redevelopment: The Q Building at Paradise Valley Community College; Retail: American Sports Complex-Retail Center; Most Sustainable: Phoenix Children’s Hospital; and Tenant Improvement: Gap Fulfillment Center.


View photos from the 2012 RED Awards on our Facebook!


2012 winners can order Awards, Plaques & Reprints


HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. David Jacofsky

HCL Awards 2012: Surgeon, Dr. David Jacofsky


Surgeon

Dr. David Jacofsky

The CORE Institute

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. David JacofskyDr. David Jacofsky takes a multi-pronged approach to orthopedic research, which gives him the opportunity to study devices and drugs from the bench top to the bedside. In a few short years, he has developed a Division of Research and Development and partnership with The Sun Health Research Institute, whose projects are studying total knee replacement devices; ways to improve hip fracture implants; improved methods of fracture treatment; and release of antibiotics from implants in an attempt to reduce the risk of post-operative infections.  With his leadership, this collaborative contribution in biomechanics, clinical research programs, and motion analysis (which uses state-of-the-art equipment to analyze human movement) has contributed enormously to the care of orthopedic conditions.

In addition, surgeons and researchers at The CORE Institute are working with both large and very small companies to help them create and improve products for patient care.  The CORE Institute has developed and patented products of its own to either license or sell to industry. This demonstrates Jacofsky’s continuous effort to work with local, regional and international partnerships within private orthopedic companies as well as research institutions. His focus brings greater economic development opportunities to Arizona.

thecoreinstitute.com


Finalist

John J. Nigro, MD

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

HCL Awards 2012 - John J. Nigro, MDNigro exemplifies the values of leadership and knowledge in a population of children who live with congenital heart defects. He is the division chief of cardiothoracic surgery and program director of transplant at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Nigro has been active in the healthcare field for more than 20 years and served as the director of the Congenital Heart Center at Saint Joseph’s Hospital Medical Center for seven years. He devotes his time to the American Heart Association, Heart Center board and assisted in the initiation of the Heart Lung Transplant program for St. Joseph’s in 2010.

phoenixchildrens.com


Finalist

Dr. Marc Matthews

Maricopa Integrated Health System

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. Marc MatthewsIn the story of Arizona’s Burn Center, Matthews is a name to remember. In addition to working 18 years in surgery with Maricopa Medical Center and Arizona’s largest burn center, Matthews is a lieutenant colonel with the 161st Air Refueling Medical Group, US Air Force. He served as a trauma surgeon at the Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan for three months, where his war zone experiences included operating on children and soldiers alike. Matthews is a volunteer for the American Red Cross and the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, as well as a speaker for Drug Free AZ.

mihs.org


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

HCL Awards 2012 - Arizona Institute for Breast Health

HCL Awards 2012: Institution Or Educational Program, Arizona Institute For Breast Health


Institution Or Educational Program

Arizona Institute For Breast Health

Arizona Institute for Breast Health was formed in 1998 by local breast cancer experts Drs. Coral Quiet and Belinda Barclay-White. Their focus was to offer women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer a second opinion, completely free of charge. There is no other non-profit organization in the country doing this. AIBH has created an unparalleled synergy between medical professionals, patients and their families to provide information, education, resources, hope and peace of mind.

Being diagnosed with breast cancer is overwhelming, and the realization is difficult to comprehend. But knowledge is power. AIBH seeks to inform and educate so that patients are empowered in their battle against breast cancer. To date, AIBH has worked with thousands of women and their families – and not only to provide second opinions. In fact, they also provide free support, resources, fitness and nutrition advice and more.
More specifically, when Dr. Quiet came to Arizona, 80 percent of women with breast cancer were treated with mastectomy. Now that women have the knowledge to know their options, that number is only 40 percent. Breast conservation has skyrocketed since the organization began educating the community and women diagnosed about all of their options.

aibh.org


Finalist

United Cerebral Palsy of Central Arizona

HCL Awards 2012 - United Cerebral PalsySince 1952, UCP has served and educated individuals and families faced with various disabilities, including cerebral palsy, Down’s syndrome and autism. Based in Arizona, UCP team members make efforts to directly reach out – despite a family’s location – with the purpose of addressing each person’s needs. UCP offers an innovative early learning center intended to blend children with and without disabilities in order for them to teach and learn from each other in an educational setting. In 2011, UCP united with the Ballet Academy of Arizona to produce a unique ballet performance predominantly cast with children with disabilities.

ucpofcentralaz.org


Finalist

Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Injury Prevention Center’s Educational Mobile App

HCL Awards 2012 - Phoenix Children's HospitalIn 2010, 71 percent of child deaths caused by car crashes involved a child that was improperly or not restrained. Phoenix Children’s Hospital generated another innovative step to merge the importance of healthcare with the convenience of technology. The “Car Seat Helper” application for mobile phones provides recipients with assistance in selecting the safest car seat for a child. The app was launched in October 2011 to improve child passenger safety and was named “app of the month” by ANSCA Mobile. With recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics, “Car Seat Helper” can help reduce the number of child deaths and injuries in Arizona.

phoenixchildrens.com


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. Anne McNamara

HCL Awards 2012: Nursing Advocate, Dr. Anne McNamara


Nursing Advocate

Dr. Anne McNamara

Grand Canyon University

HCL Awards 2012 - Anne McNamaraDr. Anne McNamara is dean and professor in the College of Nursing at Grand Canyon University. She is the department head for 57 faculty and staff members and is responsible for oversight of six Arizona sites, as well as GCU’s nursing program in New Mexico. There are more than 700 traditional pre-licensure BSN students, 2,700 RN-BSN students, and 1,330 MSN students currently enrolled in GCU’s nursing programs.

Under McNamara’s leadership, GCU’s College of Nursing graduates have been actively recruited by Arizona’s leading healthcare providers. Hospitals and physicians’ offices value the direct and immediate applicability of GCU’s College of Nursing’s core curriculum. McNamara encourages students to examine what they’ve learned, determine its relevance, and see how the knowledge can be incorporated into their role as a nurse. As a result of her efforts, GCU recently opened a state-of-the-art simulation lab that provides students with hands-on experience, which is highly valued by employers and has proven to decrease the occurrence of medical errors.

Outside of her role as an educator, McNamara and her students, faculty and staff contribute hundreds of volunteer hours to the community each year through GCU’s Canyon Cares Initiative.

gcu.edu


Finalist

Vicki Doctor

Cancer Treatment Centers of America

HCL Awards 2012 - Vicki DoctorBeginning a career in oncology 15 years ago, Doctor now serves as the Survivorship Support Care Manager for the Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Her responsibilities include informing patients of potential treatments and creating wellness plans that are tailored to patients’ specific needs. Doctor’s experience and dedication to oncology led to her selection as the CTCA’s first clinic manager, and in 2011 she became the care manager. Doctor also participates in several cancer awareness groups and events, such as American Cancer Society Relay for Life, Gateway for Cancer Research, and the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure.

cancercenter.com


Finalist

Beth Rumac

St. Joseph’s and Phoenix Children’s Hospital

HCL Awards 2012 - Beth RumackRumack works as CHIEF (Congenital Heart Infant Evaluation and Follow-up) program administrator as a pediatric cardiologist nurse practitioner. She contributes to a 24-hour help hotline, at times being the only nurse available. While devoting long hours to St. Joseph’s Hospital and Phoenix Children’s Hospital, Rumack developed a combined assistance program for children with congenital heart defects (CHD). This idea will bring together CHD networks to aid families of children with heart defects. In addition to daily labors at the hospital, Rumack spends her time working with several non-profit organizations designed to research, raise funds for research, and assist children with CHDs.

stjosephs-phx.org  |  phoenixchildrens.com


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. Stephen Pophal

HCL Awards 2012: Physician, Dr. Stephen Pophal

 


Physician

Dr. Stephen Pophal

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. Stephen PophalDr. Stephen Pophal is a pediatric cardiologist who specializes in the care of children with complex congenital heart defects. His medical vision has built programs that provide a continuum of care through advanced comprehensive heart programs that are dedicated to meeting the individual needs of children and their families. In addition, Pophal’s leadership as division chief of pediatric cardiology for Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s Heart Center inspires and guides his team of 30 to go above and beyond to provide comprehensive family-centered cardiac care.

Pophal directly oversaw the medical care of the valley’s first infant heart transplant, a patient he continues to care for today. He has been instrumental in developing and implementing the only neonatal/pediatric heart failure/transplantation treatment program in Arizona. Approximately 10-15 Arizona children require heart transplants each year. Before Pophal helped create the local program, families had to relocate to obtain life-saving medical services. The transplantation program allows these families to remain in Arizona with their existing support network while experiencing an emotionally and stressful situation. This effort has improved local access to care, saved lives, kept families together, helped control healthcare costs, and helped keep Arizona healthcare dollars in Arizona.

phoenixchildrens.com


Finalist

Dr. Alan Pitt

Southwest Neuroimaging

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. Alan PittA neuroradiologist for 11 years, Pitt is committed in his search for ways to enable the continuum of care with sustainable business models. Pitt’s duties include imaging interpretation and serving as co-director of the Interventional Spine Service. He is currently involved in building S2dents and participates in other non-profits such as Phoenix Country Day School and Homeward Bound. Dr. Pitt’s credentials and service earned him teacher of the year in Neuroradiology in 2008, as well as the GreenLight Award for Innovation that researches a solution involving social networking for patient satisfaction and follow-up.

sniweb.net


Finalist

Dr. Gino Tutera

SottoPelle, Inc.

HCL Awards 2012 - Dr. Gino TuteraTutera is an OB/GYN who specialized in PMS, menopause and other hormonal imbalance health issues. He is now the Medical Director of SottoPelle, Inc. as of 2000. With more than 30 years of experience in the medical profession, Tutera is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the field of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy (HRT). He opened an out-of-state PMS clinic in 1982 and introduced this therapy clinic to Arizona a few years ago. Additional accomplishments include his extensive research and documentation of breast cancer and a book, which he authored, discussing various issues that coincide with aging.


HCL Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZ Business Magazine March/April 2012

RED Awards 2012 - Phoenix Children's Hospital

RED Awards 2012: Best Healthcare Project, Phoenix Children's Hospital

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for Best Healthcare Project was Phoenix Children’s Hospital.


Best Healthcare Project

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Developer: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Size: 760,000 SF
Location: 1919 E. Thomas Rd., Phoenix
Completed: October, 2011

Phoenix Children's HospitalPhoenix Children’s Hospital is the largest pediatric hospital in the Southwest and one of the biggest in the country. The facility embraces sustainability techniques. They include energy conservation through sun-shading screens found in each room, cutting an overuse of paper through online distribution and maintaining air quality while utilizing recycled materials. PCH was built to keep up with the expected growing population in Maricopa County. The team produced a pediatric hospital four months early and $50M under budget. Inspection and renovations were completed at night to avoid disrupting the neighboring hospital. Open forum meetings between the owner, architect and contractor with nearby residents contributed to the building productivity and swiftness. Before opening the facility, Kitchell executed an All-Systems Testing method that verified the effectiveness of every life-safety feature. The value and efficiency of this trial run led the Phoenix Fire Department Fire Safety Advisory Board to vote on implementing the All-Systems Test in every project that calls for a Fire and Life Safety Report. The project is a winner of the Valley Forward Merit Award – Environmental Technologies-Central Energy Plant, and the 2011 Modern Healthcare Design Award.

phoenixchildrens.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


Honorable Mention

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Developer: Banner Health
Contractor: DPR Construction
Architect: Cannon Design
Size: 133,000 SF
Location: 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert
Completed: June, 2011


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

RED Awards 2012 - Kitchell

RED Awards 2012: General Contractor of the Year, Kitchell

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for General Contractor of the Year was Kitchell.


General Contractor of the Year

Kitchell

Winner of Best Healthcare Project: Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Honorable Mention for Best Healthcare Project: Phoenix Children’s Hospital

RED Awards 2012 - KitchellKitchell’s contracting of the Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s new 11-story pediatric tower enables it to serve its pediatric patients with 168 new beds, as well as high-quality outpatient care in new clinics housed on site. Modeled on a night-blooming desert flower and visible from throughout the Valley, the building is visually striking.

However, it is the inner workings of the hospital that are most remarkable – all designed and built with the highest quality patient care, comfort of patients and families, and proximity of specialties in mind. The project also included a new central plant, renovations, and two parking garages, which had to be built in a highly active environment in a busy metropolitan area. Kitchell also implemented an All-Systems Test that will potentially be a staple in the construction of future structures requiring Fire and Life Safety Reports.

The Phoenix landmark was completed four months ahead of schedule and $48M under budget.

kitchell.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

Arizona Centennial Series - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Arizona Centennial Series: Looking Ahead At The State’s Next Century

Arizona Centennial — Forward thinking: Algae, solar, personalized medicine or none of the above? Some of Arizona’s greatest minds look ahead at the state’s next century

A century ago, Arizonans with an entrepreneurial spirit ventured deep into the deserts and mountains in search of gold and copper. Today, as Arizona celebrates its 100th birthday, their counterparts are exploring the unknown frontiers of biotechnology and renewable energy.

“Imagine the technologies of 100 years ago,” says Steven Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “Now, think about how far we have come. Only a very few science fiction writers even envisioned the technologies that are now a part of our everyday lives. It is very likely that (100 years from now), the mix of industries and companies will be very different. There will be subsectors that don’t even exist yet. One thing is sure, there will be more technology than ever to drive our economy and improve our quality of life.”

So with 100 years in the history books, what’s in store for Arizona’s next century? One expert says algae will be Arizona’s 21st-century gold rush. Will Arizona’s yet-to-be-written history prove him to be right?

As part of the Arizona Centennial Series, Arizona Business Magazine asks some of the state’s greatest minds how they see Arizona taking shape over the next decade and beyond.


Economy

Lee McPheters, director of the JPMorgan Chase Economic Outlook Center at the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University

The next 5 years will be a period of agonizingly slow recovery from the Great Recession. Arizona employment will return to post-recession levels within two to three years, but new, more frugal spending habits will put a damper on growth. The next 25 years has the potential to be a period of strong growth. Under historical growth assumptions, Arizona’s population will almost double within 25 years, as the state grows to more than 10 million residents.  Phoenix will have a population between 7 and 8 million, larger than the entire state today.  Immigration will exceed 125,000 every year by 2030.  Over the next 25 years, to accommodate growth, more than 1 million single-family homes will be needed, a seemingly impossible pace of building compared to conditions today.In the next 100 years, the gap between those with education, training and skills and those without will grow even greater as technology will benefit those who develop, control and use it.

Lee Vikre, senior vice president, organizational development and consulting, BestCompaniesAZ, LLC

In the next 10 years, the Arizona workforce will be more diverse than ever before, with wide spans in age ranges of workers and greater cultural diversity. White males may become the minority. Entrepreneurship will be ingrained in workers of all ages who were affected by the recession. This entrepreneurial, independent atmosphere will continue to define Arizona. Homegrown, innovative businesses in the fields of technology, manufacturing, healthcare, and sustainable energy will prosper. The movement towards creating great workplaces will move from a novelty to mainstream as both workers and management discover the competitive advantage of a culture of trust.

Patricia Ternes, financial advisor, RBC Wealth Management, Scottsdale

For the next 100 years, we need to address the concept that the world is flat.  Right now, we have multiple currencies and multiple stock markets. The financial services industry needs to better integrate the products and services we offer our clients worldwide. In 100 years, there will probably be huge, world-wide investment markets that are available to everyone 24/7.  This will increase the complexity of planning one’s financial future.


Technology

Steven Zylstra, president and CEO, Arizona Technology Council

In the next 10 years, the biosciences and renewable energy (and even the broader clean tech) sectors will become significant components of our economy.  Aerospace and defense, semiconductor and electronics, ITC, and optics will continue to grow.  The technology sector will be an ever-increasing component of our economic landscape, leading to more diversity.

Mark Edwards, PhD., vice president of corporate development and marketing, Algae Biosciences, Inc., Scottsdale

Arizona has the critical elements for algae production including lots of sunshine, waste and brine water for nutrients, CO2, and cheap land.  The state has a competitive advantage for algae production and will become the algae capital world. Arizona will go from two firms producing algae in 2011 to 200 algae firms in 2020. Arizona producers will cultivate algae for food, feed, fertilizers, pharmaceuticals, cosmeceuticals, nutraceuticals, functional foods, medicines and advance compounds. In the next 100 years, Algae will become the leading industry in Arizona, eclipsing tourism; more than 80 percent of all medicines, vaccines and pharmaceuticals will be made predominately from advanced compounds derived from algae; our fossil-based transportation system will transform to a sustainable algae-based transportation system.

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO, Microchip Technology Inc., Chandler

Given this expansion and the number of semiconductor players that have operations in Arizona, the semiconductor industry is likely to have a significant impact in this state over the next 10 years. This expansion will lead to a sharp increase in the growth of well-paying, high-tech jobs in our state. Take the case of medical advancements.  Over the next 10 years, we will see a significant expansion in the use of semiconductors for surgical and analysis equipment; in portable, wearable and implantable medical devices; and in the cost-cutting use of remote medicine, where patients will be monitored by medical professionals in lower-cost regions.

I will, however, add one cautionary note to the optimistic picture I have just painted.  The formation of new start-up companies is driven by the availability of venture-capital funding. Arizona continues to be plagued by a scarcity of risk capital, as most venture-capital firms are located in California, Texas and Massachusetts. The result is that those states continue to attract the bulk of VC-backed startups.  While Arizona has been a technology hotbed in recent years, we must fix this problem if we are to remain the “Silicon Desert.”


Environment

Diane Brossart, president, Valley Forward Association

In the next 10 years, Arizona will diversify its economy through green jobs and technology. Renewable energy sectors will proliferate with solar leading the way. In the next 100 years, we will become the solar capitol of the world. Light rail connects Valley cities. Commuter rail takes us across the nation. Arizona is a burgeoning hub of economic activity. Parks and open space dot the landscape. Innovation and technology abound. Our legislature is enlightened and the green revolution leads to new water sources in our vibrant desert oasis, now free of particulate pollution.

Kelly Mott Lacroix, graduate research associate, Water Resources Research Center, Tucson

Over the next 100 years, our water management will need to be flexible and progressive enough to allow us to prosper in the face of supply uncertainty from changes in climate and the continuing growth of our economy.  Arizonans will have to make decisions about what we value most about this state and those decisions will dictate how the water issue changes Arizona.

Larry Howell, CEO and president of KEBAWK Response Technologies, a Scottsdale-based engineering company that responds immediately to hazardous or catastrophic disasters

Environmentally-conscious companies like KEBAWK are going to continue to grow and have a much more pivotal role in growing the economy in the next 10 years as businesses strive to be as sustainable as possible. What was once a trendy, cottage industry is now a must for businesses.


Health

Dr. Grace Caputo, director, Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

I see medical education as a dominant force in Arizona, especially with the growth of the University of Arizona campus downtown. Innovative pediatric care will continue to be a highlight at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, but healthcare overall will continue to improve our community as birth to age 5 is the fastest growing population in Arizona.

Catherine Niemiec, president, Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

In the future, acupuncture and oriental medicine (AOM) will fill the gaps created by high insurance rates, fewer primary care physicians, and seemingly incurable or chronic conditions. Acupuncture can be available for the same cost as a co-payment, supporting the need of those who have no insurance or who need to seek different care beyond what their insurance will cover. A report on “Complementary and Alternative Medicine in the United States” cites widespread use of CAM, with more future visits to CAM providers than to primary care physicians (with most of these visits paid out-of-pocket).

Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D., radiation oncologist, Arizona Oncology

Long-term changes for the use of radiation in cancer care will involve a combination of treatment directed at the molecular level and immense precision with external radiation. Targeting cancer with radiation at the molecular level has been developed for only a handful of cancers to date. The struggle to find and develop cures at the molecular level will be one of the determining factors in how the people of Arizona will receive cancer treatment for the next hundred years.

Mahesh Seetharam, M.D., medical oncologist and hematologist, Arizona Oncology

In the next decade, electronic medical records will continue to evolve to help coordinate care between the various providers to optimize outcomes. It is very difficult to predict given the current labile healthcare environment.  The concept of universal healthcare is very possible, but with that comes the need for additional providers and resources to provide the necessary care.  Personalized medicine could be a reality in the next decade or two, and this will certainly improve outcomes.


Banking

Lynn Crane, executive vice president, bank operations and services, Mutual of Omaha Bank in Arizona

Mobile devices will replace plastic cards.  This will completely change the “check out” experience at retailers. Arizona shoppers will be able to scan merchandise as they pick it up off the shelf and make payment without stopping at a checkout counter when they leave the store. On the negative side, this transition to non-traditional delivery channels will make bank branches less relevant. Online financial consultants will replace branch employees and a trip to the bank will become a thing of the past for Arizonans. Some branches will close and the industry will require a smaller workforce. The future value of currency will not rely on paper, but on digital data, so heightened security concerns and demand for data protection will prevail.  As a trusted source of security, banks will play a much larger role in helping Arizonans secure their valuables and their future.

Craig Doyle, Arizona market president, Comerica Bank

Some of the industry segments critical to our future are aerospace and defense, semi-conductor manufacturing, business services technology, health care and renewable energy.  Effectively supporting their growth requires a deep understanding of supply chains and related capital markets.  It will take time, but the Arizona banking industry should help facilitate the appropriate capital markets so that Arizona is competitive with other major economic regions in helping companies, form, grow and mature.


Education

Michael M. Crow, president, Arizona State University

Within 10 years, ASU will be America’s finest example of a widely accessible research intensive public university and in this mode it will be capable of operating at a very rapid and large scale for educational competitiveness for Arizona.  In this mode, the university will have deployed its assets to maximize the competitive position of Arizona through its role as a comprehensive knowledge enterprise producing fantastic graduates, ideas and new technologies. ASU will be a critical asset for Arizona going forward over the next 100 years as the knowledge based economy or at least knowledge driven adaptation and innovation to the uncertainties and the complexities that lie ahead in the areas of global finance, economic competitiveness, environmental sustainability and so forth will be such that what universities like ASU do will be more important than ever.  This is true specifically for ASU in the context of Arizona as Arizona in the next 100 years grows and matures into America’s preeminent example of a free enterprise driven innovation catalyzed state.

Bill Hubert, president and founder of Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc., which helps lenders enter the student loan market

At some point, the cost of education is going to have to “normalize” within the overall economy.  For decades, cost of attendance, whether private or public, traditional or trade-based, has increased at much higher than normal rate.  Our business of providing financial services that connect students and families with a broad spectrum of relationship based funding sources will certainly help increase access and drive down overall costs – of program administration, funding sources, and even institutional administrative costs.

Deanna Salazar, senior vice president and general counsel of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

I believe that by supporting community outreach efforts similar to the Green Schoolhouse Series, which makes schools healthy and green “inside and out” through the development of an integrated health and wellness curriculum and green gardens to promote nutrition and wellness in disadvantaged schools, BCBSAZ will continue to be positioned as a leader who is genuinely taking care of the health of Arizonans, in both traditional and non-traditional ways that create a better future for all. For years to come, it’s BCBSAZ’s hope for the green gardens to teach children about healthy eating and physical activity by allowing them to use and maintain the garden.


Marketing

Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president, general manager, Cramer-Krasselt

As I look into a crystal ball, the marketing world as we know it will change dramatically in the next 100 years. It will be forever changed even in the next 10 years. However, brands will not go away. In fact, they will be even more valuable both in the next decade and in the next century if they can evolve as we evolve, as our technology evolves. Those brands that increase in value over time will have very different ways of communicating with consumers. Everything will be personalized. Everything will happen in real time. There’s a good chance that 100 years from now, as far as commercial messaging and targeting goes, “Minority Report” will be seen as an amazingly accurate forward-looking documentary rather than a work of fiction.

Rob Davidson, co-owner of Phoenix-based Advertising firm Davidson & Belluso

Think of how social media has drastically impacted communications with customers and prospects in recent years. Marketing and advertising will keep changing at an even faster rate as new technology becomes available. Smart phones and tablets have already become standard channels of any marketing plan. Companies who stay on top of the latest marketing tools and learn about their customers changing behaviors are the ones who will be successful in reaching their target markets.


Energy

Mark Bonsall, general manager and CEO, SRP

In the next decade, the growth in wind and solar will continue to be strong, but will still provide a relatively small portion of the needed energy just because the scale of what is needed is so large. It is likely most of the new baseload resources will be fueled by natural gas.  New drilling and recovery technology is providing access to vast quantities of natural gas within the U.S. at relatively low costs, at least so far.  This provides a good bridge to develop systems that can improve the efficiency of solar systems, address the intermittent nature of most renewable resources, find safe and more cost-effective ways to deploy nuclear power, and provide the time for innovative new ideas we aren’t even aware of now.

John Lefebvre, president, Suntech America

With supportive policies, the solar industry will continue to grow and flourish, creating a major employment sector for the state. Additionally, every year the cost of solar is driven down, getting closer and closer to achieving grid parity in the U.S. As solar becomes a market-driven industry, Arizona is poised to be a major global solar industry hub, particularly with the continued development of large-scale solar projects. Ultimately, I hope to see energy generated from solar grow to a significant percent of the U.S. energy supply portfolio and eliminate our dependence on foreign oil, providing a low-cost solution to power our homes and cars. With solar, the sky’s the limit.


Housing

Rachel Lang and Marcy Briggs, loan officers for the Briggs-Lang team of Cobalt Mortgage

The rental market will continue to strengthen with long-term renters. We also see a stabilization within the Arizona real estate market due to the mortgage underwriting guidelines remaining more conservative than they were five years ago, and slightly less conservative five years from now.

Alan Boughton, director of commercial operations, W.J. Maloney Plumbing

As the population in the West increases and the demand for water intensifies by a seemingly unpredictable water supply and snow pack, innovation in low-flow plumbing fixtures could be our industry’s greatest impact on Arizona as more people are forced to live with less water.

CR Herro, vice president, environmental affairs, Meritage Homes

Homes will be built to work better, use fewer resources, be healthier, and adjust to the needs of owners. On the fringe of the market today are homes that can adjust the transparency of windows, extend and retract solar shades, turn on lights, change thermostat settings over a smart phone, and achieve net-zero energy demand. These changes allow homes to adapt to the unique needs of its occupants, offer more control, and waste less energy and resources (money) in their operation.


Transportation

Danny Murphy, Airport director, Sky Harbor International Airport

The biggest evolution our industry will experience is a transformation of the entire national air transportation system to avoid gridlock in air travel, called “NextGen.” This means moving from ground-based technologies to a new and more dynamic satellite-based technology.  While airport delays are minimal in Arizona, our passengers are impacted most when traveling to and from other locations and this technology will greatly improve that. Over the next 100 years, continental investment and enhancements to the state’s main airports will be critical to serve the needs of Arizona’s growing population.


Entertainment

Brad Casper, president, Phoenix Suns

In continuing to operate at the forefront of innovation, the Suns will offer fans the most technologically advanced atmosphere in professional sports, while emerging as the most winning franchise in NBA history. Through strategic partnerships, the Suns will act as a catalyst towards creating a sustainable entertainment and business environment, unmatched by any NBA/WNBA organization.

Catherine Anaya, chief journalist, KPHO CBS 5 News

I think in the next 100 years the marriage between television and computers will be such that we will be doing everything we do on a computer. There will still be a place for television news. However, I don’t think we’ll see it in the studio format we’ve been accustomed to seeing. I think we’ll end up shooting and broadcasting our news via our smart phones or whatever those evolve into in time. As a result, I think it will create more intimacy and interaction among Arizonans. That may or may not be a good thing as familiarity lines will get blurred.

Teri Agosta, general manager, Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort

The hospitality industry will continue to drive revenue into the Arizona market through increased travelers, due to the aging demographic, who will have more leisure time and money to spend. Also business travel will continue to grow as corporations realize people need direct contact with team members and clients to build a successful business, and webinars and teleconferencing do not meet these needs.  Also, our consistent weather will become more valuable to travelers, who will scrutinize their travel spending even more.

Melody Hudson, public relations manager, Gila River Gaming Enterprises

The opportunity for new job creation will become more prevalent than ever before with potential capital expansion opportunities which could result in not only new construction positions, but new positions within the Enterprises’ casinos as well. This potential growth could also result in an increase of revenues for both local and national businesses that supply goods and services to the Enterprise. Additionally, potential growth from not only Gila River Gaming  Enterprises, but the gaming industry in general in Arizona,  would result in larger amounts of funding going to the state for education, tourism, wildlife conservation and emergency services.

Carey Pena, co-anchor, 3TV News at 10 p.m.

There is a generally accepted theory of human knowledge that says:  today, we know 5 percent of what we will know in 50 years. In other words, in 50 years, 95 percent of what we will know will have been discovered in the past 50 years.  That makes it hard to imagine what 100 years will look like.

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

 

GoGreen Conference '11

GoGreen Conference ’11 Emphasizes Sustainability Education, Patience

Whether it’s educating attendees of green and sustainability in the workplace or the speakers’ efforts to educate public and private entities of sustainability in their community, “education” was the buzzword and couldn’t have been stressed enough at the GoGreen Conference ’11 this past Tuesday, November 15. Well, that and a lot of patience.

“It’s not just about being and going green,” said Ed Fox, chief sustainability officer for APS.” It’s about educating and sustaining it.”

Dr. George Brooks, owner of Southwest Green and NxT Horizon Group, agreed: “There’s more to sustainability than solar panels,” he said. “If you want to make sustainability and its process sustainable, you need to make it useful.”

More than 50 speakers from all over the state were in attendance for the first GoGreen Conference ’11 held at the Phoenix Convention Center. Furniture IKEA donated to the panel discussions will be donated to the Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

This all-day conference held back-to-back panel sessions with leaders of sustainable business, who educated attendees on the latest sustainable practices for their respective businesses.

City of Phoenix Major Phil Gordon announced that this was possibly his last opportunity to speak as an elected official about his and the city’s green efforts. He said that although mayor elect Greg Stanton was unable to attend the GoGreen Conference, Stanton is committed to “help build Phoenix as the greenest city.”

Gordon also shared Phoenix-area, sustainability-related statistics and accomplishments over the years, including:

  • Phoenix is home to the only solar light rail stop (near the U.S. Airways Center) in the nation, “maybe in the world.”
  • The city has raised more than $1M in incentives to businesses and homeowners for their sustainability efforts.
  • Through Solar Phoenix, the Valley has more than 425 solar-installed homes. These homeowners have saved 10 percent on utility bills, on average.
  • By 2025, 15 percent of the city will be powered by fossil fuels. And also by 2025, 25 percent of the city will be shaded throughout with canopies and palm trees.

Maria Baier, commissioner of the Arizona State Land Department, provided opening remarks, emphasizing the importance of supporting universities and higher education seeking research dollars for its sustainability efforts. She continues to speak about how to not only go green, but also stay green.

“In order to go green and stay green, we need to keep our product legitimate,” Baier said. “We need to continue to defend it and improve reliability and dependability.”

Rounding out the first session of the conference was Al Halvorsen, senior director of environmental sustainability of Frito-Lay North America.

Halvorsen spoke about Frito-Lay and PepsiCo’s environmental sustain/ability journey — how they were able to confront their challenges (reducing its environmental impact), become an “embracer” of sustainability instead of a “cautious adapter,” and view sustainability as a competitive advantage — incorporating it into PepsiCo’s business with the following strategies:

  • Move Early: Over time, your business will evolve.
  • Balance Short/Long Term: Achieve near-term wins with long-term vision. Your business needs a foundation to help push longer-term envelopes.
  • Focus Top Down and Bottom Up: Track and monitor usage every day.
  • Measure Everything: By 2020, Frito-Lay predicts it will cut its diesel fuel usage in half.
  • Value Intangible Benefits
  • Be Authentic and Transparent: Share your business’s wins, losses and challenges.

“Sustainability for us is a journey and by no means are we there,” Halvorsen said. Jonce Walker, sustainability manager for Maricopa County agreed: “We are nowhere near done,” he said. “We still have so much left to do.”

Check back for part II of the GoGreen Conference ’11 coverage on AZNow.Biz.

For more information about the GoGreen Conference, visit www.gogreenconference.net.

 

Best Public, Commercial Buildings - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

Arizona's Biggest, Best And Most Memorable Public And Commercial Buildings

Steel, Glass and Marvelous: A look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in Arizona

OK, so we don’t have the skylines of L.A., New York or Chicago. But for a state barely celebrating its first centennial, Arizona — Metro Phoenix in particular — is home to some fairly impressive commercial and public buildings.

Arizona doesn’t have the 110-story Chicago Sears Tower (now called the Willis Tower) … but the Chase Tower in Downtown Phoenix looms as the tallest building in Arizona at 40 stories.

We don’t have New York’s swanky Plaza Hotel … but the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa — The Jewel of the Desert — is a world-famous travel destination.

The Los Angeles Coliseum? … Nope, we don’t have that either. But University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale already has played host to one Super Bowl and two BCS National Championship Games.

As part of AZRE’s Arizona Centennial Series, a look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in the state.

Best Sports Venue

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale
Contractor: Hunt Construction
Architect: Peter Eisenman
Year built: 2006

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale - AZRE September/October 2011One might say that the Arizona Cardinals scored when they found their new home in $455M University of Phoenix Stadium. With a multi-purpose design, the 63,400-seat stadium is host to not only football and soccer games, but to an array of events including motor sports competitions, trade shows and concerts. While the stadium may pride itself on its innovative versatility, the building’s design is equally as impressive. The exterior of the stadium, with alternating reflective metal panels and the iconic “Bird-Air” retractable fabric roof, was designed to replicate a barrel cactus. The interior features artistic elements including nostalgic photos and a series of murals representative of Arizona.


Tallest Building

Chase Tower - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Chase Tower, Phoenix
Contractor: Henry C. Beck Co.
Architect: Welton Becket & Associates
Year built: 1972

Chase Tower certainly stands out in the Phoenix skyline with its modern use of glass, steel and concrete. This 40-story financial establishment was originally constructed for Valley National Bank, which after a series of mergers is today Chase Bank. In addition to its contemporary style, the tower strays from tradition with its underground, retail entry level, as opposed to the traditional commercial lobby space used in other buildings of its type. Aside from the tower’s primary use as an office space, Chase Tower offers restaurants, retail and, of course, banking services.


Oldest Commercial Building

Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix
Contractor: J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace (renovation Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011by Huntcor, phases 1 and 2; Joe E. Woods, Inc., phase 3)
Architect: Lescher & Mahoney
Year built: 1929

As the only designated historic theater and last remaining example of theater palace architecture in the Valley, the fully restored Orpheum Theatre leaves little to the imagination when it comes to envisioning the grandeur of drama and cinema in America’s Golden Age. The original Spanish Baroque style theater was built by J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace as the final major construction project before the Great Depression. Once dubbed the “Grand Dame of Movie Theaters,” the Orpheum was originally intended for film and vaudeville performances. Though ownership of the theater has been passed down from Paramount to cinema aficionado James Nederlander to the City of Phoenix in 1984, its elegant, 1,364-seat Lewis Auditorium and glamorous marquee at Second and Adams prove that the “Grand
Dame” status has survived.


Best Hospitality Property

Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa, Phoenix
Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect and builder: Albert Chase McArthur
Year built: 1929

Albert Chase McArthur certainly called upon the teachings of his former instructor, Frank Lloyd Wright, when he designed “The Jewel of the Desert,” The Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa. The resort’s construction features McArthur’s signature concrete “Biltmore Block,” whose geometry mimics the surrounding palm trees. In its early days as the preferred resort of celebrities and heads of state, the Biltmore was owned by William Wrigley Jr. With expansions and renovations including two golf courses, a spa, the Paradise Guest Wing and Pool, ballrooms and additional meeting spaces, the resort retains its status of elite hospitality and one of the largest hotels in Arizona.


Phoenix City Hall - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Best Government Building

Phoenix City Hall
Contractor: Hunt Construction Group
Architect: Langdon Wilson
Year built: 1993

In relation to its surroundings, and rising up 22 stories, Phoenix City Hall can be classified as one of the Valley’s few skyscrapers. The building, also called the Phoenix Municipal Building, replaced the Old City Hall, which was located in the Calvin C. Goode Municipal Building. The building is home the City of Phoenix and the origin of legislation regarding public safety, transportation, recreation and sustainability. Phoenix City Hall is the common stomping ground for the governments of the city’s eight districts.


Most Expensive Commercial Building

Most Expensive Commercial Building - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011CityScape, Phoenix
Contractors: The Weitz Company and Hunt Construction
Architect: Callison Architecture
Year built: 2010

The phrase “never a dull moment” is often reserved for people and places that provide some source of endless entertainment—and that’s exactly what CityScape offers. The $900M, mixed-use development hits the perfect balance of work and play with its collection of commercial towers, entertainment venues, retail and restaurants spanning two city blocks. The mixed-use facility may be one of the few places Valley residents and tourists can exercise, have a relaxing morning in Patriot’s Park, grab sushi or burgers for lunch, grocery shop, buy that new dress, attend a baseball game and finish the day off at a swanky restaurant or bar—all without getting in a car.


Best Medical Facility

Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Year built: 2011

TPhoenix Children's Hospital - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011he visual spectacle that is now the Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s new main building impacts countless drivers on State Route 51 with its lights and seamless architecture. And with the 11-story tower capable of serving 425 patients, the hospital hopes to impact equally as many children. With the new tower comes additional clinic space and operating rooms, a new Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a separate Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit in response to the hospital’s successful Children’s Heart Center. The hospital’s recent makeover was not limited to the construction of the new tower, but included renovations to the existing buildings and new of satellite centers.


Best Public Building

Musical Instrument Museum, Phoenix
Contractor: Ryan Companies US
Architect: RSP Architects
Musical Instrument Museum - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Year built: 2010

Former Target CEO and African art collector, Robert J. Ulrich, was inspired to found the Musical Instrument Museum after visiting a similar museum in Belgium. The museum’s modern design is meant to compliment its surrounding desert landscape. MIM’s interior features a tile path, “El Río,” that flows to connect each of the museum’s galleries, as well as structural lines designed to echo those of common musical instruments. The museum boasts a unique collection of 14,000 musical instruments from 200 countries, with an emphasis on those of Western origin and includes pieces which once belonged to music legends including John Lennon and Eric Clapton.


Biggest Commercial Building

Phoenix Convention Center
Contractor: Hunt-Russell-Alvarado
Phoenix Convention Center - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect: HOK Venue
Year built: 2008 (final phase)

Home to countless trade shows, conventions and formal events and weighing in at 1.9 MSF, the Phoenix Convention Center is among one of the largest of its kind. The many structures of the convention center are built with stones and materials native to Arizona and designed to emulate our southwestern landscape and culture. Each building combines innovation and tradition with state-of-the-art technology services for vendor presentations and art from nationally recognized artists that highlight Arizona’s cultural identity.


Most Recognizable Building

Biosphere 2, Tucson
Builder: Space Biosphere Ventures
Architect: Phil Hawes
Year built: 1987, 1991

Biosphere Tucson - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Biosphere 2 is the much-anticipated sequel to the original biosphere made famous by years of evolution—Earth. The facility functions as a world within a world, separated from the outside by a 500-ton steel liner. Under its 6,500 windows and 7.2M cubic feet of sealed glass, self-sufficient ocean, wetland, grassland, desert and rainforest ecosystems thrive. In addition to the awe-inspiring glass dome structure, it includes the Technosphere basement floor and the Energy Center with electrical and plumbing services to maintain climate and living conditions within the dome. Biosphere 2, originally  funded by a $30M gift from the Philecology Foundation, is now managed by the science program at the University of Arizona.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

Clean Air Cab & ASU

Clean Air Cab Partners with ASU, Promotes Sustainability

Come September, Clean Air Cab will be promoting two new Arizona State University-themed cabs, which will help promote sustainability as well as raise money for scholarships.

The company, based in Mesa, is Arizona’s first completely carbon neutral taxicab service. Clean Air Cab first started in 2009 with just 19 cabs and has successfully flourished the past two years, adding 31 more. The company uses Toyota Hybrid Prius’.

Clean Air Cab has agreed to partner with ASU to assist students and their families in safety, and sustainably, getting to and from university football, baseball and basketball games.

Even on no-game days, Clean Air Cab will still be around the university. “We’re always going to have a presence on ASU,” says Steve Lopez, president and owner of Clean Air Cab. “We’re just going to spice it up on the weekends for the games and be more present.”

Clean Air Cabs partner with ASUThis partnership is not only helping ASU “go green” but scholarships also will be made available from Clean Air Cab.

This sustainable cab service will be donating one dollar of every fare from the ASU-themed cabs, which will help fund scholarships for university students.

“ASU has always been on my radar with what they do with the community,” Lopez says. “I want to give the funds to young entrepreneurs that want to be challenged, that want to make a difference.”

The company has already donated a $7,500 scholarship for this year’s academic school year. As the company grows, the scholarships will grow as well, Lopez says.

Clean Air Cab not only supports ASU, but is involved in other charities as well, such as Mesa United Way and Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

For more information on Clean Air Cab, visit www.cleanaircab.com.

 

Robert Meyers, president & CEO of Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Robert Meyer, President And CEO Of Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Robert Meyer discusses his very first job, what he learned from it, who his biggest mentor is, and more.

Robert Meyer

Title: President and CEO
Company: Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Describe your very first job and what you learned from it.
I was a laborer in a forge shop in Toledo, Ohio, making leaf springs for trucks. The major lesson I learned from this job was the value of a college education. While the money was good, the work was very hard and dirty, and most importantly, the 50+ old guy next to me was making the same wages.

Describe your first job in your industry.
Medicare auditor for Blue Cross of Northwest Ohio. I learned early the complexity and nuances of Medicare reimbursement and its impact on hospital operations.

What were your salaries?
The forge shop was $7.50 an hour. Blue Cross was $12,000 annually.

Who is your biggest mentor?
My father, who gave me my work values and respect for integrity and honesty in dealing with people.

What advice would you give to a person entering your industry?
Take the time to learn all aspects of the business. Don’t be afraid to roll up your sleeves and get dirty.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I would love to be a business school professor preparing our next generation of leaders to be successful.

Robert Meyer

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

AZ hospitals, how to attract top talent, AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona Hospitals Share Strategies For Recruiting, Retaining Top Performers

The health care industry in Arizona managed to hold its own during the worst of the recession. But the challenges aren’t over yet.

Human resources experts have been warning companies across industries about the next big wave of change as the economic recovery takes hold: retaining the top talent that helped a company survive.

In good economic times, the health care industry often was faced with shortages of nurses and other professionals, so it’s an old hand at devising ways of attracting and retaining talent. Arizona Business Magazine asked four hospitals and health care systems about how they attract the best.

Abrazo Health Care

Currently, Abrazo Health Care’s website is the No. 1 way candidates are found when applying for an open position. Additionally, Abrazo Health Care utilizes social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to attract and hire future employees. A large number of new hires comes from referrals within the organization.

Other recruitment efforts include the new graduate development program, a unique opportunity available to 100 nursing graduates per year. This competitive program gives new nurses 12 weeks of education and training to become an acute care nurse at an Abrazo Health Care facility. New graduates entering a specialty area also will be part of a bridge program for additional training.

Another opportunity available is the nurse-specialty training program for current nurses, which is offered four times per year. Nurses can apply to receive training to transition to a specialized nursing position in the operating room, emergency room or intensive care unit.

All applicants must complete a web-based interview developed in partnership with the Gallup Organization. The assessment helps to ensure a candidate will align with the cultural environment at Abrazo Health Care.

Abrazo Health Care employs more than 5,000 people. Currently, there are 400 positions available. Abrazo Health Care offers competitive salaries, health benefits and tuition reimbursement.

[stextbox id="grey"]Carmen Hern is regional manager of talent acquisition at Abrazo Health Care, abrazohealth.com. [/stextbox]

Banner Health

Banner Health recruits talent through strategic work force planning such as:

  • Targeted media events
  • Academic relationships
  • Social media
  • Banner Health’s website


Banner’s approach to recruiting top talent aligns with the strategies of the organization by emphasizing Banner’s vision on patient care. Its hiring incentives are centered on total rewards compensation.

The Banner journey begins with a potential employee’s first experience (the website, at an event, videos or even as a patient). Once they have joined Banner, there is an ongoing, one-year, onboarding program. Throughout their time at Banner, there are opportunities for learning, coaching and developing employees’ careers.

There are three main reasons an employee stays at Banner are:

  • The relationship with their manager
  • The people they work with
  • Learning and growth opportunities


In addition, employees have a choice in their selection of benefits. They also get to participate in a 401k plan, life insurance, food discounts, transportation discounts, and childcare at some facilities. We look at each employee’s needs to determine which benefits are best for them

Banner prides itself on having created an environment of innovation and teamwork. It offers opportunities for employees to spread their wings, in addition to pay for performance. There is compensation for all when Banner meets and exceeds goals in the areas of patient satisfaction, financial performance and employee retention.

Recognizing that Banner Health is competing with many other health care systems in Arizona for quality employees, the company tries to stay in tune with the community. Banner may have more hospitals than anyone else, but we have to pay attention because we know there are other good hospitals out there.
[stextbox id="grey"]
Shyrl Johnston is senior director of talent acquisition at Banner Health, www.bannerhealth.com.[/stextbox]

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Phoenix Children’s strategy to attract new talent includes expanding space, growing programs and services, and aggressive recruiting.

Phoenix Children’s continues to grow and expand, thus offering exciting new prospects for top talent in the health care industry. An 11-story patient tower, which opened in June, will raise the hospital’s bed count from 345 rooms to 626 private rooms by early 2012. The hospital also added 96 PCIU/CICU rooms, 12 operating rooms, new services and programs, innovative research supported by leading clinical trials, and advanced education/training for clinical providers.

Collaborations and partnerships with Arizona State University, University of Arizona, Mayo Clinic, Banner Good Samaritan, and a Strategic Alliance with St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center also add jobs and opportunities for attracting the best and brightest.

The hospital’s six Centers of Excellence also are growing. Phoenix Children’s is the only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in Arizona; the Children’s Heart Center is recognized as one of the nation’s best; there is the Phoenix Children’s Center for Pediatric Othopaedic Surgery; the Newborn Intensive Care Unit, with 110 licensed beds, is one of the largest NICUs in the country; the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders is Arizona’s only fully dedicated facility of its kind; and the Children’s Neuroscience Institute provides comprehensive care for children with neurological and behavioral disorders.

For the past four years, Phoenix Children’s Hospital has been steadily and aggressively increasing recruitment of nationally known physicians and superior staff. Medical staff at the hospital has increased to include more than 1,000 pediatric specialists with 40 pediatric specific specialties.

Recent prominent additions, to name a few, include: David Adelson, MD, a renowned neurosurgeon, recruited to lead the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s; Richard Towbin, MD, a top neuro-radiologist who has served at children’s hospitals in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Michigan; Lee Segal, MD, who came from Hershey Children’s to initiate the Center for Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery; Heidi Dalton, MD, section chief critical care, who was recruited from Children’s Medical Center in Washington, DC; and Tamir Miloh, MD, a hepatologist recruited from Mt. Sinai, NY, who will create and lead Arizona’s first pediatric liver transplant center.

[stextbox id="grey"]Jane Walton is head of media relations at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, www.phoenixchildrens.com.[/stextbox]

UA Healthcare

UA Healthcare is a private, nonprofit health-care entity located in Tucson. It was formed by the merger of two highly respected and well-established organizations: University Medical Center (UMC) and University Physicians Healthcare (UPH). The organization consists of the largest physician practice plan in Arizona, including a Health Plan Division, two academic medical centers and Southern Arizona’s only Level 1 Trauma Center.

UA Healthcare employs more than 6,000 people and is ranked one of the top 10 employers in Southern Arizona. University Medical Center was the first hospital in Arizona to earn the Magnet designation — the American Nurses Association’s highest honor for nursing excellence. The designation recognizes hospitals that provide the best nursing care and a supportive, professional environment. As the only academic medical center in Arizona, UMC offers many opportunities for professional growth, personal enrichment and career development.

UA Healthcare’s 2011 benefits package is designed to promote wellness and encourage healthy lifestyle choices. UA Healthcare considers staff members to be its most valuable resource and it is dedicated to providing a culture that keeps patients healthy.

The system provides managers with the tools required to retain its first-rate staff. It offers learning opportunities that ensure high levels of patient and employee satisfaction, as well as a strong financial position. UA Healthcare gives total rewards that are competitive in the Arizona employment market. UA Healthcare ensures individual and group accountability for performance, rewards and growth through ongoing communication.
[stextbox id="grey"]
John Marques is vice president for human resources at UA Healthcare, www.azumc.com.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

Pediatric Hospital, AZRE Maagazine May/June 2011

Healing Young Bodies: Building a Pediatric Hospital

Building a Pediatric Hospital

At a pediatric hospital, the healing process should begin as soon as Mom or Dad drives up the driveway to look for a parking space. That’s where it all begins for the young patient and his or her family. And that’s where the differences begin when it comes to building a pediatric hospital, as compared to a “traditional” facility.

After completing three pediatric hospitals in Arizona within the past two years, Kitchell has refined strategies and tactics regarding these special hospitals, which have become ever more complex as technology advances and medical care evolves to treat increasingly acute patients.

Over the past two years, Kitchell has been CMAR (Construction Management At Risk) for Banner Desert Medical Center’s Cardon Children’s Hospital in Mesa, the recently opened Diamond Children’s Center at University Medical Center in Tucson and Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Fortunately for hospital architects, engineers and builders, there is solid research to draw upon to guide the development of the most effective, functional children’s medical campuses.

Transformation by Design, produced by the National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI), reviewed 320 evidence-based design studies published in academic literature. This report concludes “the physical environment of healthcare settings affects the clinical, physiological, psychosocial and safety outcomes among child patients and their families.”

The No. 1 goal as builders is to produce a stress-reducing, healing environment, while reducing the chances of infections and medical errors. There are several issues to consider when constructing pediatric hospitals:

Pediatric IPD

Bringing all stakeholders, including young patients who are “frequent fliers” at the hospitals, as well as owners, architects, engineers and contractors, into the pre-design phase has proven highly beneficial to construction outcomes. The theme, Through the Eyes of a Child, drove the entire Cardon Children’s Hospital project. And Diamond Children’s Medical Center hosts two ongoing advisory councils comprised of children and teens. Initiatives like these ensure children’s perspectives are always front and center.

Phoenix Children's Hospital, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Motifs/Theming

Theming to engage and entertain is certainly the most obvious defining characteristic of a pediatric hospital, but how to achieve the right tone, taking age-appropriateness into consideration, is far from obvious. Creating a sense of comfort and fun for a toddler is very different than creating a sense of coziness and relaxation for a teenager, both of whom will be sharing space. Some hospitals cultivate a playground/amusement park feel, while others try to maintain a more staid, yet welcoming youth-driven atmosphere. Cutting-edge technology is being utilized to bring “edutainment” and social media options directly into patient rooms.

Noise Maintenance

A quiet environment may reduce recovery time. Rubber flooring with high STC acoustical ratings has replaced vinyl sheeting predominantly used in the past.

Creative Materials

Multiple textures, varied artwork and soothing finishes reinforce the healing process. Highly durable, vibrantly colored terrazzo flooring is currently very popular. Natural elements, such as whimsical water features, are a dynamic way to bring the outside in (and engage the senses of hearing, smell and touch, as well as sight) to what has traditionally been a cold and sterile place.

Lighting

Studies show natural lighting helps babies heal faster. The industry is coming up with creative ways to integrate natural lighting with state-of-the-art LED interior lighting that enables healthcare staff to perform their jobs effectively, but is also pleasing to the patients — a huge leap forward from the harsh cathode lighting of the past.

Pods vs. Private Rooms

What is better for the youngest patient and family, a private room or a pod arrangement? This is actively being discussed right now. The benefits of private rooms seem obvious, but healthcare experts value the interactive nature of community-oriented pod set-ups, which are conducive to family-to-family interaction. After all, no one can relate to a family’s ordeal better than another family simultaneously going through the same challenges. Current designs have trended toward private rooms, but family areas, clinical programs and hospital-directed family support groups have promoted the “community” healing benefit for the young patients.

Space

At pediatric hospitals, more space is needed to accommodate more than one family member. For example, ample space is available for fold-out beds and private guest showers in patient rooms. In general, there are more “soft” spaces for siblings and other family members. The most critical issues to consider when constructing or expanding a pediatric hospital? All involved need to minimize negative impacts to the recovering patients. “The patient comes first,” says Mike Wolfe, a Kitchell project director. “If you or a loved one had the misfortune to be in a hospital that was undergoing construction, would you want a construction crew to be jack-hammering concrete in the middle of the night? Working in and around children’s hospitals requires extra sensitivity and flexibility to work around patients’ needs.”

[stextbox id="grey"]

Some Unique-to-Pediatric-Hospital Construction Features

  • Expanded kitchens to fulfill children’s menu preferences (pizza, stir-fry, etc.)
  • Treatment rooms on each floor so patient bedrooms are “pain-free” safe havens
  • Wireless Internet access for each patient and their families
  • Interactive play/family spaces on each floor
  • Teen activity rooms
  • Lactation rooms
  • Auditorium/stages for children to see performances, concerts, graduations
    or have parties
  • Meditation rooms
  • Healing gardens
  • Toy stores

[/stextbox]

 AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

top 10 places 2011

Top 10 Places To Work In Arizona For Women

Arizona has an increasing number of employers that women have seen as a beneficial place to work. The following are companies that have been selected as the best places for women to work . No matter what your background there is a company that is dynamic enough to fit your needs.

10.

Bryan Cave LLPLaw firm

Bryan Cave professionals practice in client service groups and industry practice teams that offer legal counsel and advice in virtually every area of interest to business and entrepreneurial clients. Services range from insurance, commercial litigation, government contracts to non-profit organizations. This is a great place for women to work because of the diversity and the women’s groups the company supports such as:

St. Louis Women’s History Month Symposium

New York Women’s Forum Holds ‘Women of Inspiration’ Luncheon

New York Women’s Forum Holds Trunk Show

top 10 places 2011

9.

Express Scripts Inc. – Pharmacy benefits manager

Founded in 1986 and never owned by a drug manufacturer, Express Scripts aligns its interests with those of plan sponsors and their members. Express Scripts handles millions of prescriptions each year through home delivery and at retail pharmacies. A nice place for women to work because of the diversity and the wide-range of departments from which to choose.

8.

Arizona Women’s Education and Employment Inc. - Workforce development

AWEE has been transforming the lives of Arizonans into “faces of success” for nearly 30 years. Since their inception, they have helped create successful beginnings and renewed hope for more than 90,000 women, men and young adults. They assist in getting people off welfare. Today, AWEE is Arizona’s preeminent workforce development organization, offering a diverse range of evidence-based training and support services throughout Maricopa and Yavapai counties. This is a great place for women because it allows women to inspire other women and educate one another on business and employment. The name speaks for itself.

7.

WestGroup ResearchMarket-research services

WestGroup Research is a full service market research company based in Phoenix. As Arizona’s original and largest research firm, they have a history of working with most key government and corporate entities in the state since 1959. They are now the Southwest’s largest full-service market research firm, serving clients across the nation. This company has been selected as a great place for women to work because of they dynamic client base that connects with positions that typically are male based, such as banking and government.

top 10 workplaces 2011

6.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of ArizonaHealth insurance

BlueNet offers online tools, resources and services for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona members, brokers, providers and group benefit administrators. Women have advanced with this company quickly and possess skills for all health insurance offices.

5.

Arizona Department of Corrections

Women have been raising the bar with the Dept. of Corrections positions they obtain. Forty-seven percent of the officers are women.

4.

Intel Corp

Intel corporation are sponsors of tomorrow not only through their technical innovation, but through the endless efforts in education, environmental sustainability, healthcare, and much more — with the belief that technology makes life more exciting and can help improve the lives of people around the world. This is a great place for women to work because of the growth and transfer opportunities.

top 10 workplaces 2011

3.

Cox Media

As the third-largest cable entertainment and broadband services provider in the country, Cox Communications Inc. is best known for pioneering the bundle of television, Internet and telephone services together, offering consumers the ability to consolidate their services with one provider. This company made the list because they provide training that encourages women to be committed to ongoing learning, entrepreneurship, and Cox offers great benefits.

2.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital - Children’s hospital

Phoenix Children’s is one of the 10 largest children’s hospitals in the country and provides specialty and sub-specialty inpatient, outpatient, trauma, emergency and urgent care to children and families in Arizona and throughout the Southwest. This is a great place for women to work because as it expands the need for positions will grow giving women a wide variety of areas to transfer and explore higher educational options.

top 10 workplaces 2011

1.

USAA - Insurance, banking and financial services

USAA provides a full range of highly competitive financial products and services to the military and their families. Their  world-class employees are personally committed to delivering excellent service and great advice. Women have been able to gain great skills that will promote growth. This company encourages women to succeed and do better.

Best of the Best Awards 2011, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Best of the Best Awards 2011: Advertising, Marketing & Media

Winner: KPNX-TV, Channel 12

KPNX, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 12 News is Arizona’s leading source for local news on television, online with top-viewed website azcentral.com, and on-the-go with text and video available on mobile devices. With the combined resources of NBC News, The Arizona Republic and USA Today, 12 News is consistently the first choice for information whenever a major story breaks. 12 News is one of the top-performing NBC affiliates in the country, with ratings that frequently exceed the network’s national average. With a long history as the leader in innovation, 12 News was the first to deliver a local newscast in high-definition. Whenever and wherever consumers want quality news and information, 12 News is positioned to meet their needs.

Year Est: 1953
Weekly Audience: 1.1M
Principal(s): John Misner

12 News Logo,  AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 200 E. Van Buren Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-257-1212
www.azcentral.com



Finalist: News Talk 92.3 KTAR

KTAR, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 What started as one radio station 88 years ago has now evolved into one of the state’s leading media companies, delivering content to not only radios, but also cell phones and Internet browsers. KTAR’s news team is one of the largest in the state and is the winner of the coveted Edward R. Murrow Award for journalistic excellence. In the world of sports, KTAR is the play-by-play home of the state’s most popular teams. And, when it comes to on-air personalities, KTAR is the place to interact with the biggest names in news and sports talk. Also, its commitment to the community has generated more than $3 million in listener donations to Phoenix Children’s Hospital and the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center.
Year Est: 1922
AZ STAFF: 100
Principal(s): Scott Sutherland
KTAR News Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 7740 N. 16th St., #200
Phoenix, AZ 85020
602-274-6200
www.ktar.com



Finalist: The Lavidge Company

Lavidge Company, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 Lavidge Interactive’s roster of clients includes Massage Envy, LifeLock and Phoenix International Raceway, just to name a few. This specialized division is made up of creative strategists, marketers, software engineers and developers. Together, they work to create websites, online marketing campaigns, mobile apps, digital assets, social media strategies and more — transforming businesses that merely exist on the Web to Digital Magnets that profit on it. Also known as Internet Marketing Agency, Lavidge Interactive is a division of The Lavidge Company, an independently owned full-service advertising, interactive and public relations agency serving local, regional and national clients since 1982.
Year Est: 2006
AZ STAFF: 18
Principal(s): Bill Lavidge
Lavidge Company Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 2777 E. Camelback Rd., #300
Phoenix, AZ 85016
480-998-2600
www.lavidge.com


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Researcher

Honoree: Eric Reiman, M.D., Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute

Eric Reiman, M.D., Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer's InstituteDr. Eric Reiman’s goal as a researcher is to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease before another generation is lost. In order to achieve this goal, Reiman conducts research utilizing brain imaging, genomics, early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease, disease-slowing therapies and prevention therapies.

He serves as executive director of Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, clinical director of the Neurogenomics Division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, professor and associate head of psychiatry at the University of Arizona and director of the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium.

In using brain-imaging technology, Reiman and his team are characterizing regions of the brain that are used for different aspects of emotion, memory, pain, hunger and satiation, and those that work together to create anxiety disorders. For years, Reiman and his team also have used brain-imaging techniques to detect and record brain changes in cognitively normal carriers and non-carriers of a common Alzheimer’s susceptibility gene. In 2007, Reiman and his colleagues published the first genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer’s disease and normal human memory.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.bannerhealth.com[/stextbox]


David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children's Neuroscience, Phoenix Children's HospitalFinalist: David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children’s Neuroscience, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. David Adelson has devoted much of his career to researching avenues that might improve the lives of people around the world, especially children. He founded the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH) and currently serves as its director. He also holds the position of division chief of neurosurgery at PCH. In the time he has off from his practice, Adelson is currently involved with eight separate research projects.

Included in those research projects is a multi-centered clinical trial with the Cool Kids Trial that is studying whether moderate hypothermia treatment can improve the outcomes of children who have experienced traumatic brain injury.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.phoenixchildrens.com[/stextbox]

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Neonatal Care Award

Cristina Carballo, M.D., Medical Director of Neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children's HospitalCristina Carballo, M.D., Medical Director of Neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. Cristina Carballo’s passion has always been neonatology. Her love for its patients and the subject drove her to develop the second Neuro/NICU program in the country at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Her dedication to develop an entire program that diagnoses and treats all neurologically affected neonates has saved many lives and given many babies a better chance at a quality life.

Carballo, who has been with the hospital since 1988, brought an innovative, cutting-edge treatment therapy to the Valley and implemented it at Phoenix Children’s — the first in the state and only the second in the country. With the treatment, Carballo is trying to prevent hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. It occurs when a baby suffers from lack of oxygen before or during birth. The lack of oxygen can cause disabilities such as dyslexia or cerebral palsy, or even death. Using hypothermia therapies, affected babies are cooled down, allowing physicians to conduct brain studies so they can direct the appropriate treatment. The therapy also decreases an infant’s risk of developing a disability.

[stextbox id="grey"]www.phoenixchildrens.com[/stextbox]

Photos: Clean Air Cab, LLC

Clean Air Cab Brings New Charity to Arizona Streets

Many Phoenix-area consumers can now go green as well as give to charity simply by calling a cab.

Clean Air Cab, based in Mesa, has partnered with Phoenix Children’s Hospital to donate $1 of every fare from their charity cab. This vehicle is uniquely wrapped in a Phoenix Children’s theme for the charity.

Clean Air Cab provides eco-friendly transportation. With Arizona’s first carbon-neutral taxicab, Clean Air Cab is cutting down on emissions and giving consumers more miles per gallon. For those looking for a way to be green and charitable, Clean Air Cab is a great way to do so.

The PCH Foundation is the second charity cab that Clean Air Cab has brought to the streets of Arizona.Phoenix Children's Hospital Cab, Clean Air Cab, LLC

“We believe in giving back to the community by creating unique partnerships with Susan G. Komen and, most recently, the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation,” said Steve Lopez, founder of Clean Air Cab. “It’s a great way to help local and national organizations in a clean, eco-friendly way.”

The PCH car isn’t just a temporary charity either. Just like their Susan G. Komen cabs, Clean Air Cab is offering them indefinitely to anyone in need of a ride. Their service extends to Flagstaff and Yuma as well, so more than just the Phoenix area can help.

If you want to contribute to the charity, there are a few things to keep in mind.Clean Air Cab, LLC

“You have to request the cab in order for your ride to benefit the hospital,” Lopez said. “If you would like to pay a donation towards that charity, Clean Air Cab is going to have a charity page on our website in the next couple of months that will collect donations even if you are not riding in one of our charity vehicles.”

For more information, visit www.cleanaircab.com or www.phoenixchildrens.com.

Most Admired Companies - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

2010 Most Admired Companies Award Winners

Arizona Business Magazine and BestCompaniesAZ are honored to unveil the winners of our inaugural Arizona’s Most Admired Companies Awards.

With 43 winners, we think you’ll agree the awards selection committee has done an outstanding job in determining some of the most admired companies in our state.  Our primary goal in developing this program was to find those organizations that excel in four key areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, social responsibility and customer opinion.  This list features the most prestigious companies in our state, providing us the opportunity to learn from the best.

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 69
Recent Award: AIA Kemper Goodwin Award – 2009
WEB: www.a-p.com

AlliedBarton Security Services
Headquarters: Conshohocken, Penn.
Year Est.: 1957
No. of Employees in AZ: 1,047
Recent Award: Brandon Hall Research Award for Best Integration of Learning and Talent Management – 2009
WEB: www.alliedbarton.com
Facebook
Twitter

American Express
Headquarters: New York
Year Est.: 1850
No. of Employees in AZ: 7,219
Recent Award: Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies – 2010
WEB: www.americanexpress.com
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Twitter

Arizona Charter Academy
Headquarters: Surprise
Year Est.: 2001
No. of Employees in AZ: 61
Recent Award: Elks Lodge Community Partner of the Year – 2010
WEB: www.azcharteracademy.com
Twitter

Banner Health
Headquarters: Phoenix
Year Est.: 1999
No. of Employees in AZ: 27,528
Recent Award: Gallup Great Workplace Award – 2009
WEB: www.bannerhealth.com
Facebook
Twitter

BeachFleischman PC
Headquarters: Tucson
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 104
Recent Award: Accounting Today’s Best Accounting Firms to Work For – 2009
WEB: www.beachfleischman.com

To buy a print version of the 2010 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies
go to MagCloud.com

Arizona's Most Admired Companies November-December 2010

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

2010 HCLA – Researcher

Honoree: Nabil Dib, Medical Director

Nabil Dib, MD, M.SC., FACC
Director, Cardiovascular Research
Mercy Gilbert Medical Center

A highly respected interventional cardiologist, Dr. Nabil Dib, director of cardiovascular research for Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical centers, serves as principal investigator for a variety of cardiovascular clinical trials, including cardiac regeneration involving cell and gene transplant, new pharmaceuticals and genomics.

Nabil Dib, MD, M.SC., FACC Director, Cardiovascular Research Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

With a support team of 10, Dib treats patients with advanced cardiac disease and provides expert consultation to referring physicians from all specialties. His clinical services include assessment and diagnosis of cardiac diseases, angina, heart failure, arrhythmias, and vascular disorders, as well as pre-operative cardiac surgical evaluations.

In addition, Dib performs more than 330 non-surgical procedures annually, such as cardiac catheterization, balloon angioplasty, coronary artery stenting, intravascular ultrasound, percutaneous left ventricular assist devices, and peripheral vascular interventions.

A tireless scientist, Dib is committed to improving the lives of people suffering from heart disease by developing innovative treatment methods. One of his current areas of focus involves cardiac adult stem cell transplantation to determine if heart tissue damaged by a heart attack can, in fact, be regenerated. His research is also exploring the regeneration of blood vessels through gene therapy. To date, he has completed two leading-edge research projects in translational adult stem cell research, which led to FDA clearance for both projects to begin Phase I clinical trials.

Dib is the founding member and president of the International Society for Cardiovascular Translational Research, a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to bring innovations tested and proven through research into mainstream medical practice for the benefit of patients.

[stextbox id="grey" image="www.chw.edu"]www.chw.edu[/stextbox]




Finalist: Mitchell Shub, MD

Mitchell Shub, MD
Medical Director/Research
Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. Mitchell Shub, medical director of research at Phoenix Children’s Medical Group, has been in a leadership position at the hospital for 25 years. While he still sees patients on a daily basis, most of his time is spent overseeing research operations on campus. Mitchell Shub, Medical Director at Phoenix Children's Hospital, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

Additionally, he is co-chair of the Institutional Review Board, and chair of the Scientific Review Committee that reviews all investigator-initiated research studies and fosters collaborations with the University of Arizona Medical School, Arizona State University, T-Gen and Mayo Clinic.

Shub is involved in three research projects of his own and is developing two others, funded by grants from the National Institute of Health, UA and pharmaceutical companies.

In the health care industry for 28 years, Shub serves as professor of clinical pediatrics/associate head of the department of pediatrics at the UA. In this capacity, he oversees all pediatric training for medical students, and with the dean makes decisions on appointments, academic promotions and academic program development.

[stextbox id="grey" image="www.phoenixchildrens.com"]www.phoenixchildrens.com[/stextbox]

David Winston, MD, FACP, AGAF
Director, Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Cigna Medical Group

Dr. David Winston has a long-standing commitment to medical research, and throughout his 35 years in medicine he has worked to develop a deeper understanding of the treatment and prevention of colon cancer and Hepatitis C.
Winston has been director of gastroenterology and hepatology at Cigna Medial Group in Sun City for nearly 20 years, and is a clinical investigator for the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

David Winston, MD, FACP, AGAF Director, Gastroenterology & Hepatology Cigna Medical Group, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

He has participated in 33 research studies, 18 of which he served as principal investigator. He has published 33 papers and lectured in 25 cities and five countries around the world about new advancements in GI treatment and research.

As a practicing physician, Winston treats patients daily for a wide variety of gastro and digestive needs, such as stomach pain, frequent indigestion, and chronic GI problems, and encourages patients to participate in clinical trials so science can progress in the areas of early cancer detection.


[stextbox id="grey" image="www.cigna.com"]www.cigna.com[/stextbox]