Tag Archives: phoenix children’s hospital

Best Public, Commercial Buildings - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

Arizona's Biggest, Best And Most Memorable Public And Commercial Buildings

Steel, Glass and Marvelous: A look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in Arizona

OK, so we don’t have the skylines of L.A., New York or Chicago. But for a state barely celebrating its first centennial, Arizona — Metro Phoenix in particular — is home to some fairly impressive commercial and public buildings.

Arizona doesn’t have the 110-story Chicago Sears Tower (now called the Willis Tower) … but the Chase Tower in Downtown Phoenix looms as the tallest building in Arizona at 40 stories.

We don’t have New York’s swanky Plaza Hotel … but the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa — The Jewel of the Desert — is a world-famous travel destination.

The Los Angeles Coliseum? … Nope, we don’t have that either. But University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale already has played host to one Super Bowl and two BCS National Championship Games.

As part of AZRE’s Arizona Centennial Series, a look at the biggest, best and most recognizable public and commercial buildings in the state.

Best Sports Venue

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale
Contractor: Hunt Construction
Architect: Peter Eisenman
Year built: 2006

University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale - AZRE September/October 2011One might say that the Arizona Cardinals scored when they found their new home in $455M University of Phoenix Stadium. With a multi-purpose design, the 63,400-seat stadium is host to not only football and soccer games, but to an array of events including motor sports competitions, trade shows and concerts. While the stadium may pride itself on its innovative versatility, the building’s design is equally as impressive. The exterior of the stadium, with alternating reflective metal panels and the iconic “Bird-Air” retractable fabric roof, was designed to replicate a barrel cactus. The interior features artistic elements including nostalgic photos and a series of murals representative of Arizona.


Tallest Building

Chase Tower - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Chase Tower, Phoenix
Contractor: Henry C. Beck Co.
Architect: Welton Becket & Associates
Year built: 1972

Chase Tower certainly stands out in the Phoenix skyline with its modern use of glass, steel and concrete. This 40-story financial establishment was originally constructed for Valley National Bank, which after a series of mergers is today Chase Bank. In addition to its contemporary style, the tower strays from tradition with its underground, retail entry level, as opposed to the traditional commercial lobby space used in other buildings of its type. Aside from the tower’s primary use as an office space, Chase Tower offers restaurants, retail and, of course, banking services.


Oldest Commercial Building

Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix
Contractor: J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace (renovation Orpheum Theatre, Phoenix - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011by Huntcor, phases 1 and 2; Joe E. Woods, Inc., phase 3)
Architect: Lescher & Mahoney
Year built: 1929

As the only designated historic theater and last remaining example of theater palace architecture in the Valley, the fully restored Orpheum Theatre leaves little to the imagination when it comes to envisioning the grandeur of drama and cinema in America’s Golden Age. The original Spanish Baroque style theater was built by J.E. Rickards and Harry Nace as the final major construction project before the Great Depression. Once dubbed the “Grand Dame of Movie Theaters,” the Orpheum was originally intended for film and vaudeville performances. Though ownership of the theater has been passed down from Paramount to cinema aficionado James Nederlander to the City of Phoenix in 1984, its elegant, 1,364-seat Lewis Auditorium and glamorous marquee at Second and Adams prove that the “Grand
Dame” status has survived.


Best Hospitality Property

Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa, Phoenix
Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect and builder: Albert Chase McArthur
Year built: 1929

Albert Chase McArthur certainly called upon the teachings of his former instructor, Frank Lloyd Wright, when he designed “The Jewel of the Desert,” The Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa. The resort’s construction features McArthur’s signature concrete “Biltmore Block,” whose geometry mimics the surrounding palm trees. In its early days as the preferred resort of celebrities and heads of state, the Biltmore was owned by William Wrigley Jr. With expansions and renovations including two golf courses, a spa, the Paradise Guest Wing and Pool, ballrooms and additional meeting spaces, the resort retains its status of elite hospitality and one of the largest hotels in Arizona.


Phoenix City Hall - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Best Government Building

Phoenix City Hall
Contractor: Hunt Construction Group
Architect: Langdon Wilson
Year built: 1993

In relation to its surroundings, and rising up 22 stories, Phoenix City Hall can be classified as one of the Valley’s few skyscrapers. The building, also called the Phoenix Municipal Building, replaced the Old City Hall, which was located in the Calvin C. Goode Municipal Building. The building is home the City of Phoenix and the origin of legislation regarding public safety, transportation, recreation and sustainability. Phoenix City Hall is the common stomping ground for the governments of the city’s eight districts.


Most Expensive Commercial Building

Most Expensive Commercial Building - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011CityScape, Phoenix
Contractors: The Weitz Company and Hunt Construction
Architect: Callison Architecture
Year built: 2010

The phrase “never a dull moment” is often reserved for people and places that provide some source of endless entertainment—and that’s exactly what CityScape offers. The $900M, mixed-use development hits the perfect balance of work and play with its collection of commercial towers, entertainment venues, retail and restaurants spanning two city blocks. The mixed-use facility may be one of the few places Valley residents and tourists can exercise, have a relaxing morning in Patriot’s Park, grab sushi or burgers for lunch, grocery shop, buy that new dress, attend a baseball game and finish the day off at a swanky restaurant or bar—all without getting in a car.


Best Medical Facility

Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Contractor: Kitchell
Architect: HKS
Year built: 2011

TPhoenix Children's Hospital - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011he visual spectacle that is now the Phoenix Children’s Hospital’s new main building impacts countless drivers on State Route 51 with its lights and seamless architecture. And with the 11-story tower capable of serving 425 patients, the hospital hopes to impact equally as many children. With the new tower comes additional clinic space and operating rooms, a new Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a separate Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit in response to the hospital’s successful Children’s Heart Center. The hospital’s recent makeover was not limited to the construction of the new tower, but included renovations to the existing buildings and new of satellite centers.


Best Public Building

Musical Instrument Museum, Phoenix
Contractor: Ryan Companies US
Architect: RSP Architects
Musical Instrument Museum - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Year built: 2010

Former Target CEO and African art collector, Robert J. Ulrich, was inspired to found the Musical Instrument Museum after visiting a similar museum in Belgium. The museum’s modern design is meant to compliment its surrounding desert landscape. MIM’s interior features a tile path, “El Río,” that flows to connect each of the museum’s galleries, as well as structural lines designed to echo those of common musical instruments. The museum boasts a unique collection of 14,000 musical instruments from 200 countries, with an emphasis on those of Western origin and includes pieces which once belonged to music legends including John Lennon and Eric Clapton.


Biggest Commercial Building

Phoenix Convention Center
Contractor: Hunt-Russell-Alvarado
Phoenix Convention Center - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Architect: HOK Venue
Year built: 2008 (final phase)

Home to countless trade shows, conventions and formal events and weighing in at 1.9 MSF, the Phoenix Convention Center is among one of the largest of its kind. The many structures of the convention center are built with stones and materials native to Arizona and designed to emulate our southwestern landscape and culture. Each building combines innovation and tradition with state-of-the-art technology services for vendor presentations and art from nationally recognized artists that highlight Arizona’s cultural identity.


Most Recognizable Building

Biosphere 2, Tucson
Builder: Space Biosphere Ventures
Architect: Phil Hawes
Year built: 1987, 1991

Biosphere Tucson - AZRE Magazine September/October 2011Biosphere 2 is the much-anticipated sequel to the original biosphere made famous by years of evolution—Earth. The facility functions as a world within a world, separated from the outside by a 500-ton steel liner. Under its 6,500 windows and 7.2M cubic feet of sealed glass, self-sufficient ocean, wetland, grassland, desert and rainforest ecosystems thrive. In addition to the awe-inspiring glass dome structure, it includes the Technosphere basement floor and the Energy Center with electrical and plumbing services to maintain climate and living conditions within the dome. Biosphere 2, originally  funded by a $30M gift from the Philecology Foundation, is now managed by the science program at the University of Arizona.

AZRE Magazine September/October 2011

 

Clean Air Cab & ASU

Clean Air Cab Partners with ASU, Promotes Sustainability

Come September, Clean Air Cab will be promoting two new Arizona State University-themed cabs, which will help promote sustainability as well as raise money for scholarships.

The company, based in Mesa, is Arizona’s first completely carbon neutral taxicab service. Clean Air Cab first started in 2009 with just 19 cabs and has successfully flourished the past two years, adding 31 more. The company uses Toyota Hybrid Prius’.

Clean Air Cab has agreed to partner with ASU to assist students and their families in safety, and sustainably, getting to and from university football, baseball and basketball games.

Even on no-game days, Clean Air Cab will still be around the university. “We’re always going to have a presence on ASU,” says Steve Lopez, president and owner of Clean Air Cab. “We’re just going to spice it up on the weekends for the games and be more present.”

Clean Air Cabs partner with ASUThis partnership is not only helping ASU “go green” but scholarships also will be made available from Clean Air Cab.

This sustainable cab service will be donating one dollar of every fare from the ASU-themed cabs, which will help fund scholarships for university students.

“ASU has always been on my radar with what they do with the community,” Lopez says. “I want to give the funds to young entrepreneurs that want to be challenged, that want to make a difference.”

The company has already donated a $7,500 scholarship for this year’s academic school year. As the company grows, the scholarships will grow as well, Lopez says.

Clean Air Cab not only supports ASU, but is involved in other charities as well, such as Mesa United Way and Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

For more information on Clean Air Cab, visit www.cleanaircab.com.

 

Robert Meyers, president & CEO of Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Robert Meyer, President And CEO Of Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Robert Meyer discusses his very first job, what he learned from it, who his biggest mentor is, and more.

Robert Meyer

Title: President and CEO
Company: Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Describe your very first job and what you learned from it.
I was a laborer in a forge shop in Toledo, Ohio, making leaf springs for trucks. The major lesson I learned from this job was the value of a college education. While the money was good, the work was very hard and dirty, and most importantly, the 50+ old guy next to me was making the same wages.

Describe your first job in your industry.
Medicare auditor for Blue Cross of Northwest Ohio. I learned early the complexity and nuances of Medicare reimbursement and its impact on hospital operations.

What were your salaries?
The forge shop was $7.50 an hour. Blue Cross was $12,000 annually.

Who is your biggest mentor?
My father, who gave me my work values and respect for integrity and honesty in dealing with people.

What advice would you give to a person entering your industry?
Take the time to learn all aspects of the business. Don’t be afraid to roll up your sleeves and get dirty.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I would love to be a business school professor preparing our next generation of leaders to be successful.

Robert Meyer

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

AZ hospitals, how to attract top talent, AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Arizona Hospitals Share Strategies For Recruiting, Retaining Top Performers

The health care industry in Arizona managed to hold its own during the worst of the recession. But the challenges aren’t over yet.

Human resources experts have been warning companies across industries about the next big wave of change as the economic recovery takes hold: retaining the top talent that helped a company survive.

In good economic times, the health care industry often was faced with shortages of nurses and other professionals, so it’s an old hand at devising ways of attracting and retaining talent. Arizona Business Magazine asked four hospitals and health care systems about how they attract the best.

Abrazo Health Care

Currently, Abrazo Health Care’s website is the No. 1 way candidates are found when applying for an open position. Additionally, Abrazo Health Care utilizes social media sites such as LinkedIn and Facebook to attract and hire future employees. A large number of new hires comes from referrals within the organization.

Other recruitment efforts include the new graduate development program, a unique opportunity available to 100 nursing graduates per year. This competitive program gives new nurses 12 weeks of education and training to become an acute care nurse at an Abrazo Health Care facility. New graduates entering a specialty area also will be part of a bridge program for additional training.

Another opportunity available is the nurse-specialty training program for current nurses, which is offered four times per year. Nurses can apply to receive training to transition to a specialized nursing position in the operating room, emergency room or intensive care unit.

All applicants must complete a web-based interview developed in partnership with the Gallup Organization. The assessment helps to ensure a candidate will align with the cultural environment at Abrazo Health Care.

Abrazo Health Care employs more than 5,000 people. Currently, there are 400 positions available. Abrazo Health Care offers competitive salaries, health benefits and tuition reimbursement.

[stextbox id="grey"]Carmen Hern is regional manager of talent acquisition at Abrazo Health Care, abrazohealth.com. [/stextbox]

Banner Health

Banner Health recruits talent through strategic work force planning such as:

  • Targeted media events
  • Academic relationships
  • Social media
  • Banner Health’s website


Banner’s approach to recruiting top talent aligns with the strategies of the organization by emphasizing Banner’s vision on patient care. Its hiring incentives are centered on total rewards compensation.

The Banner journey begins with a potential employee’s first experience (the website, at an event, videos or even as a patient). Once they have joined Banner, there is an ongoing, one-year, onboarding program. Throughout their time at Banner, there are opportunities for learning, coaching and developing employees’ careers.

There are three main reasons an employee stays at Banner are:

  • The relationship with their manager
  • The people they work with
  • Learning and growth opportunities


In addition, employees have a choice in their selection of benefits. They also get to participate in a 401k plan, life insurance, food discounts, transportation discounts, and childcare at some facilities. We look at each employee’s needs to determine which benefits are best for them

Banner prides itself on having created an environment of innovation and teamwork. It offers opportunities for employees to spread their wings, in addition to pay for performance. There is compensation for all when Banner meets and exceeds goals in the areas of patient satisfaction, financial performance and employee retention.

Recognizing that Banner Health is competing with many other health care systems in Arizona for quality employees, the company tries to stay in tune with the community. Banner may have more hospitals than anyone else, but we have to pay attention because we know there are other good hospitals out there.
[stextbox id="grey"]
Shyrl Johnston is senior director of talent acquisition at Banner Health, www.bannerhealth.com.[/stextbox]

Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Phoenix Children’s strategy to attract new talent includes expanding space, growing programs and services, and aggressive recruiting.

Phoenix Children’s continues to grow and expand, thus offering exciting new prospects for top talent in the health care industry. An 11-story patient tower, which opened in June, will raise the hospital’s bed count from 345 rooms to 626 private rooms by early 2012. The hospital also added 96 PCIU/CICU rooms, 12 operating rooms, new services and programs, innovative research supported by leading clinical trials, and advanced education/training for clinical providers.

Collaborations and partnerships with Arizona State University, University of Arizona, Mayo Clinic, Banner Good Samaritan, and a Strategic Alliance with St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center also add jobs and opportunities for attracting the best and brightest.

The hospital’s six Centers of Excellence also are growing. Phoenix Children’s is the only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center in Arizona; the Children’s Heart Center is recognized as one of the nation’s best; there is the Phoenix Children’s Center for Pediatric Othopaedic Surgery; the Newborn Intensive Care Unit, with 110 licensed beds, is one of the largest NICUs in the country; the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders is Arizona’s only fully dedicated facility of its kind; and the Children’s Neuroscience Institute provides comprehensive care for children with neurological and behavioral disorders.

For the past four years, Phoenix Children’s Hospital has been steadily and aggressively increasing recruitment of nationally known physicians and superior staff. Medical staff at the hospital has increased to include more than 1,000 pediatric specialists with 40 pediatric specific specialties.

Recent prominent additions, to name a few, include: David Adelson, MD, a renowned neurosurgeon, recruited to lead the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s; Richard Towbin, MD, a top neuro-radiologist who has served at children’s hospitals in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Michigan; Lee Segal, MD, who came from Hershey Children’s to initiate the Center for Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery; Heidi Dalton, MD, section chief critical care, who was recruited from Children’s Medical Center in Washington, DC; and Tamir Miloh, MD, a hepatologist recruited from Mt. Sinai, NY, who will create and lead Arizona’s first pediatric liver transplant center.

[stextbox id="grey"]Jane Walton is head of media relations at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, www.phoenixchildrens.com.[/stextbox]

UA Healthcare

UA Healthcare is a private, nonprofit health-care entity located in Tucson. It was formed by the merger of two highly respected and well-established organizations: University Medical Center (UMC) and University Physicians Healthcare (UPH). The organization consists of the largest physician practice plan in Arizona, including a Health Plan Division, two academic medical centers and Southern Arizona’s only Level 1 Trauma Center.

UA Healthcare employs more than 6,000 people and is ranked one of the top 10 employers in Southern Arizona. University Medical Center was the first hospital in Arizona to earn the Magnet designation — the American Nurses Association’s highest honor for nursing excellence. The designation recognizes hospitals that provide the best nursing care and a supportive, professional environment. As the only academic medical center in Arizona, UMC offers many opportunities for professional growth, personal enrichment and career development.

UA Healthcare’s 2011 benefits package is designed to promote wellness and encourage healthy lifestyle choices. UA Healthcare considers staff members to be its most valuable resource and it is dedicated to providing a culture that keeps patients healthy.

The system provides managers with the tools required to retain its first-rate staff. It offers learning opportunities that ensure high levels of patient and employee satisfaction, as well as a strong financial position. UA Healthcare gives total rewards that are competitive in the Arizona employment market. UA Healthcare ensures individual and group accountability for performance, rewards and growth through ongoing communication.
[stextbox id="grey"]
John Marques is vice president for human resources at UA Healthcare, www.azumc.com.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

Pediatric Hospital, AZRE Maagazine May/June 2011

Healing Young Bodies: Building a Pediatric Hospital

Building a Pediatric Hospital

At a pediatric hospital, the healing process should begin as soon as Mom or Dad drives up the driveway to look for a parking space. That’s where it all begins for the young patient and his or her family. And that’s where the differences begin when it comes to building a pediatric hospital, as compared to a “traditional” facility.

After completing three pediatric hospitals in Arizona within the past two years, Kitchell has refined strategies and tactics regarding these special hospitals, which have become ever more complex as technology advances and medical care evolves to treat increasingly acute patients.

Over the past two years, Kitchell has been CMAR (Construction Management At Risk) for Banner Desert Medical Center’s Cardon Children’s Hospital in Mesa, the recently opened Diamond Children’s Center at University Medical Center in Tucson and Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

Fortunately for hospital architects, engineers and builders, there is solid research to draw upon to guide the development of the most effective, functional children’s medical campuses.

Transformation by Design, produced by the National Association of Children’s Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI), reviewed 320 evidence-based design studies published in academic literature. This report concludes “the physical environment of healthcare settings affects the clinical, physiological, psychosocial and safety outcomes among child patients and their families.”

The No. 1 goal as builders is to produce a stress-reducing, healing environment, while reducing the chances of infections and medical errors. There are several issues to consider when constructing pediatric hospitals:

Pediatric IPD

Bringing all stakeholders, including young patients who are “frequent fliers” at the hospitals, as well as owners, architects, engineers and contractors, into the pre-design phase has proven highly beneficial to construction outcomes. The theme, Through the Eyes of a Child, drove the entire Cardon Children’s Hospital project. And Diamond Children’s Medical Center hosts two ongoing advisory councils comprised of children and teens. Initiatives like these ensure children’s perspectives are always front and center.

Phoenix Children's Hospital, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011Motifs/Theming

Theming to engage and entertain is certainly the most obvious defining characteristic of a pediatric hospital, but how to achieve the right tone, taking age-appropriateness into consideration, is far from obvious. Creating a sense of comfort and fun for a toddler is very different than creating a sense of coziness and relaxation for a teenager, both of whom will be sharing space. Some hospitals cultivate a playground/amusement park feel, while others try to maintain a more staid, yet welcoming youth-driven atmosphere. Cutting-edge technology is being utilized to bring “edutainment” and social media options directly into patient rooms.

Noise Maintenance

A quiet environment may reduce recovery time. Rubber flooring with high STC acoustical ratings has replaced vinyl sheeting predominantly used in the past.

Creative Materials

Multiple textures, varied artwork and soothing finishes reinforce the healing process. Highly durable, vibrantly colored terrazzo flooring is currently very popular. Natural elements, such as whimsical water features, are a dynamic way to bring the outside in (and engage the senses of hearing, smell and touch, as well as sight) to what has traditionally been a cold and sterile place.

Lighting

Studies show natural lighting helps babies heal faster. The industry is coming up with creative ways to integrate natural lighting with state-of-the-art LED interior lighting that enables healthcare staff to perform their jobs effectively, but is also pleasing to the patients — a huge leap forward from the harsh cathode lighting of the past.

Pods vs. Private Rooms

What is better for the youngest patient and family, a private room or a pod arrangement? This is actively being discussed right now. The benefits of private rooms seem obvious, but healthcare experts value the interactive nature of community-oriented pod set-ups, which are conducive to family-to-family interaction. After all, no one can relate to a family’s ordeal better than another family simultaneously going through the same challenges. Current designs have trended toward private rooms, but family areas, clinical programs and hospital-directed family support groups have promoted the “community” healing benefit for the young patients.

Space

At pediatric hospitals, more space is needed to accommodate more than one family member. For example, ample space is available for fold-out beds and private guest showers in patient rooms. In general, there are more “soft” spaces for siblings and other family members. The most critical issues to consider when constructing or expanding a pediatric hospital? All involved need to minimize negative impacts to the recovering patients. “The patient comes first,” says Mike Wolfe, a Kitchell project director. “If you or a loved one had the misfortune to be in a hospital that was undergoing construction, would you want a construction crew to be jack-hammering concrete in the middle of the night? Working in and around children’s hospitals requires extra sensitivity and flexibility to work around patients’ needs.”

[stextbox id="grey"]

Some Unique-to-Pediatric-Hospital Construction Features

  • Expanded kitchens to fulfill children’s menu preferences (pizza, stir-fry, etc.)
  • Treatment rooms on each floor so patient bedrooms are “pain-free” safe havens
  • Wireless Internet access for each patient and their families
  • Interactive play/family spaces on each floor
  • Teen activity rooms
  • Lactation rooms
  • Auditorium/stages for children to see performances, concerts, graduations
    or have parties
  • Meditation rooms
  • Healing gardens
  • Toy stores

[/stextbox]

 AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

top 10 places 2011

Top 10 Places To Work In Arizona For Women

Arizona has an increasing number of employers that women have seen as a beneficial place to work. The following are companies that have been selected as the best places for women to work . No matter what your background there is a company that is dynamic enough to fit your needs.

10.

Bryan Cave LLPLaw firm

Bryan Cave professionals practice in client service groups and industry practice teams that offer legal counsel and advice in virtually every area of interest to business and entrepreneurial clients. Services range from insurance, commercial litigation, government contracts to non-profit organizations. This is a great place for women to work because of the diversity and the women’s groups the company supports such as:

St. Louis Women’s History Month Symposium

New York Women’s Forum Holds ‘Women of Inspiration’ Luncheon

New York Women’s Forum Holds Trunk Show

top 10 places 2011

9.

Express Scripts Inc. – Pharmacy benefits manager

Founded in 1986 and never owned by a drug manufacturer, Express Scripts aligns its interests with those of plan sponsors and their members. Express Scripts handles millions of prescriptions each year through home delivery and at retail pharmacies. A nice place for women to work because of the diversity and the wide-range of departments from which to choose.

8.

Arizona Women’s Education and Employment Inc. - Workforce development

AWEE has been transforming the lives of Arizonans into “faces of success” for nearly 30 years. Since their inception, they have helped create successful beginnings and renewed hope for more than 90,000 women, men and young adults. They assist in getting people off welfare. Today, AWEE is Arizona’s preeminent workforce development organization, offering a diverse range of evidence-based training and support services throughout Maricopa and Yavapai counties. This is a great place for women because it allows women to inspire other women and educate one another on business and employment. The name speaks for itself.

7.

WestGroup ResearchMarket-research services

WestGroup Research is a full service market research company based in Phoenix. As Arizona’s original and largest research firm, they have a history of working with most key government and corporate entities in the state since 1959. They are now the Southwest’s largest full-service market research firm, serving clients across the nation. This company has been selected as a great place for women to work because of they dynamic client base that connects with positions that typically are male based, such as banking and government.

top 10 workplaces 2011

6.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of ArizonaHealth insurance

BlueNet offers online tools, resources and services for Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona members, brokers, providers and group benefit administrators. Women have advanced with this company quickly and possess skills for all health insurance offices.

5.

Arizona Department of Corrections

Women have been raising the bar with the Dept. of Corrections positions they obtain. Forty-seven percent of the officers are women.

4.

Intel Corp

Intel corporation are sponsors of tomorrow not only through their technical innovation, but through the endless efforts in education, environmental sustainability, healthcare, and much more — with the belief that technology makes life more exciting and can help improve the lives of people around the world. This is a great place for women to work because of the growth and transfer opportunities.

top 10 workplaces 2011

3.

Cox Media

As the third-largest cable entertainment and broadband services provider in the country, Cox Communications Inc. is best known for pioneering the bundle of television, Internet and telephone services together, offering consumers the ability to consolidate their services with one provider. This company made the list because they provide training that encourages women to be committed to ongoing learning, entrepreneurship, and Cox offers great benefits.

2.

Phoenix Children’s Hospital - Children’s hospital

Phoenix Children’s is one of the 10 largest children’s hospitals in the country and provides specialty and sub-specialty inpatient, outpatient, trauma, emergency and urgent care to children and families in Arizona and throughout the Southwest. This is a great place for women to work because as it expands the need for positions will grow giving women a wide variety of areas to transfer and explore higher educational options.

top 10 workplaces 2011

1.

USAA - Insurance, banking and financial services

USAA provides a full range of highly competitive financial products and services to the military and their families. Their  world-class employees are personally committed to delivering excellent service and great advice. Women have been able to gain great skills that will promote growth. This company encourages women to succeed and do better.

Best of the Best Awards 2011, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Best of the Best Awards 2011: Advertising, Marketing & Media

Winner: KPNX-TV, Channel 12

KPNX, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 201112 News is Arizona’s leading source for local news on television, online with top-viewed website azcentral.com, and on-the-go with text and video available on mobile devices. With the combined resources of NBC News, The Arizona Republic and USA Today, 12 News is consistently the first choice for information whenever a major story breaks. 12 News is one of the top-performing NBC affiliates in the country, with ratings that frequently exceed the network’s national average. With a long history as the leader in innovation, 12 News was the first to deliver a local newscast in high-definition. Whenever and wherever consumers want quality news and information, 12 News is positioned to meet their needs.

Year Est: 1953
Weekly Audience: 1.1M
Principal(s): John Misner

12 News Logo,  AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011200 E. Van Buren Ave.
Phoenix, AZ 85004
602-257-1212
www.azcentral.com



Finalist: News Talk 92.3 KTAR

KTAR, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011What started as one radio station 88 years ago has now evolved into one of the state’s leading media companies, delivering content to not only radios, but also cell phones and Internet browsers. KTAR’s news team is one of the largest in the state and is the winner of the coveted Edward R. Murrow Award for journalistic excellence. In the world of sports, KTAR is the play-by-play home of the state’s most popular teams. And, when it comes to on-air personalities, KTAR is the place to interact with the biggest names in news and sports talk. Also, its commitment to the community has generated more than $3 million in listener donations to Phoenix Children’s Hospital and the Southwest Autism Research and Resource Center.
Year Est: 1922
AZ STAFF: 100
Principal(s): Scott Sutherland
KTAR News Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 20117740 N. 16th St., #200
Phoenix, AZ 85020
602-274-6200
www.ktar.com



Finalist: The Lavidge Company

Lavidge Company, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011Lavidge Interactive’s roster of clients includes Massage Envy, LifeLock and Phoenix International Raceway, just to name a few. This specialized division is made up of creative strategists, marketers, software engineers and developers. Together, they work to create websites, online marketing campaigns, mobile apps, digital assets, social media strategies and more — transforming businesses that merely exist on the Web to Digital Magnets that profit on it. Also known as Internet Marketing Agency, Lavidge Interactive is a division of The Lavidge Company, an independently owned full-service advertising, interactive and public relations agency serving local, regional and national clients since 1982.
Year Est: 2006
AZ STAFF: 18
Principal(s): Bill Lavidge
Lavidge Company Logo, AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 20112777 E. Camelback Rd., #300
Phoenix, AZ 85016
480-998-2600
www.lavidge.com


Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Researcher

Honoree: Eric Reiman, M.D., Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute

Eric Reiman, M.D., Executive Director, Banner Alzheimer's InstituteDr. Eric Reiman’s goal as a researcher is to find a cure for Alzheimer’s disease before another generation is lost. In order to achieve this goal, Reiman conducts research utilizing brain imaging, genomics, early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease, disease-slowing therapies and prevention therapies.

He serves as executive director of Banner Alzheimer’s Institute, clinical director of the Neurogenomics Division at the Translational Genomics Research Institute, professor and associate head of psychiatry at the University of Arizona and director of the Arizona Alzheimer’s Consortium.

In using brain-imaging technology, Reiman and his team are characterizing regions of the brain that are used for different aspects of emotion, memory, pain, hunger and satiation, and those that work together to create anxiety disorders. For years, Reiman and his team also have used brain-imaging techniques to detect and record brain changes in cognitively normal carriers and non-carriers of a common Alzheimer’s susceptibility gene. In 2007, Reiman and his colleagues published the first genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer’s disease and normal human memory.

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David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children's Neuroscience, Phoenix Children's HospitalFinalist: David Adelson, M.D., FACS, FAAP, Medical Director, Children’s Neuroscience, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. David Adelson has devoted much of his career to researching avenues that might improve the lives of people around the world, especially children. He founded the Children’s Neuroscience Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital (PCH) and currently serves as its director. He also holds the position of division chief of neurosurgery at PCH. In the time he has off from his practice, Adelson is currently involved with eight separate research projects.

Included in those research projects is a multi-centered clinical trial with the Cool Kids Trial that is studying whether moderate hypothermia treatment can improve the outcomes of children who have experienced traumatic brain injury.

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Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Neonatal Care Award

Cristina Carballo, M.D., Medical Director of Neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children's HospitalCristina Carballo, M.D., Medical Director of Neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. Cristina Carballo’s passion has always been neonatology. Her love for its patients and the subject drove her to develop the second Neuro/NICU program in the country at Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Her dedication to develop an entire program that diagnoses and treats all neurologically affected neonates has saved many lives and given many babies a better chance at a quality life.

Carballo, who has been with the hospital since 1988, brought an innovative, cutting-edge treatment therapy to the Valley and implemented it at Phoenix Children’s — the first in the state and only the second in the country. With the treatment, Carballo is trying to prevent hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. It occurs when a baby suffers from lack of oxygen before or during birth. The lack of oxygen can cause disabilities such as dyslexia or cerebral palsy, or even death. Using hypothermia therapies, affected babies are cooled down, allowing physicians to conduct brain studies so they can direct the appropriate treatment. The therapy also decreases an infant’s risk of developing a disability.

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Photos: Clean Air Cab, LLC

Clean Air Cab Brings New Charity to Arizona Streets

Many Phoenix-area consumers can now go green as well as give to charity simply by calling a cab.

Clean Air Cab, based in Mesa, has partnered with Phoenix Children’s Hospital to donate $1 of every fare from their charity cab. This vehicle is uniquely wrapped in a Phoenix Children’s theme for the charity.

Clean Air Cab provides eco-friendly transportation. With Arizona’s first carbon-neutral taxicab, Clean Air Cab is cutting down on emissions and giving consumers more miles per gallon. For those looking for a way to be green and charitable, Clean Air Cab is a great way to do so.

The PCH Foundation is the second charity cab that Clean Air Cab has brought to the streets of Arizona.Phoenix Children's Hospital Cab, Clean Air Cab, LLC

“We believe in giving back to the community by creating unique partnerships with Susan G. Komen and, most recently, the Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation,” said Steve Lopez, founder of Clean Air Cab. “It’s a great way to help local and national organizations in a clean, eco-friendly way.”

The PCH car isn’t just a temporary charity either. Just like their Susan G. Komen cabs, Clean Air Cab is offering them indefinitely to anyone in need of a ride. Their service extends to Flagstaff and Yuma as well, so more than just the Phoenix area can help.

If you want to contribute to the charity, there are a few things to keep in mind.Clean Air Cab, LLC

“You have to request the cab in order for your ride to benefit the hospital,” Lopez said. “If you would like to pay a donation towards that charity, Clean Air Cab is going to have a charity page on our website in the next couple of months that will collect donations even if you are not riding in one of our charity vehicles.”

For more information, visit www.cleanaircab.com or www.phoenixchildrens.com.

Most Admired Companies - AZ Business Magazine Sept/Oct 2010

2010 Most Admired Companies Award Winners

Arizona Business Magazine and BestCompaniesAZ are honored to unveil the winners of our inaugural Arizona’s Most Admired Companies Awards.

With 43 winners, we think you’ll agree the awards selection committee has done an outstanding job in determining some of the most admired companies in our state.  Our primary goal in developing this program was to find those organizations that excel in four key areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, social responsibility and customer opinion.  This list features the most prestigious companies in our state, providing us the opportunity to learn from the best.

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 69
Recent Award: AIA Kemper Goodwin Award – 2009
WEB: www.a-p.com

AlliedBarton Security Services
Headquarters: Conshohocken, Penn.
Year Est.: 1957
No. of Employees in AZ: 1,047
Recent Award: Brandon Hall Research Award for Best Integration of Learning and Talent Management – 2009
WEB: www.alliedbarton.com
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American Express
Headquarters: New York
Year Est.: 1850
No. of Employees in AZ: 7,219
Recent Award: Fortune Magazine’s Most Admired Companies – 2010
WEB: www.americanexpress.com
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Arizona Charter Academy
Headquarters: Surprise
Year Est.: 2001
No. of Employees in AZ: 61
Recent Award: Elks Lodge Community Partner of the Year – 2010
WEB: www.azcharteracademy.com
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Banner Health
Headquarters: Phoenix
Year Est.: 1999
No. of Employees in AZ: 27,528
Recent Award: Gallup Great Workplace Award – 2009
WEB: www.bannerhealth.com
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BeachFleischman PC
Headquarters: Tucson
Year Est.: 1991
No. of Employees in AZ: 104
Recent Award: Accounting Today’s Best Accounting Firms to Work For – 2009
WEB: www.beachfleischman.com

To buy a print version of the 2010 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies
go to MagCloud.com

Arizona's Most Admired Companies November-December 2010

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

2010 HCLA – Researcher

Honoree: Nabil Dib, Medical Director

Nabil Dib, MD, M.SC., FACC
Director, Cardiovascular Research
Mercy Gilbert Medical Center

A highly respected interventional cardiologist, Dr. Nabil Dib, director of cardiovascular research for Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical centers, serves as principal investigator for a variety of cardiovascular clinical trials, including cardiac regeneration involving cell and gene transplant, new pharmaceuticals and genomics.

Nabil Dib, MD, M.SC., FACC Director, Cardiovascular Research Mercy Gilbert Medical Center, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

With a support team of 10, Dib treats patients with advanced cardiac disease and provides expert consultation to referring physicians from all specialties. His clinical services include assessment and diagnosis of cardiac diseases, angina, heart failure, arrhythmias, and vascular disorders, as well as pre-operative cardiac surgical evaluations.

In addition, Dib performs more than 330 non-surgical procedures annually, such as cardiac catheterization, balloon angioplasty, coronary artery stenting, intravascular ultrasound, percutaneous left ventricular assist devices, and peripheral vascular interventions.

A tireless scientist, Dib is committed to improving the lives of people suffering from heart disease by developing innovative treatment methods. One of his current areas of focus involves cardiac adult stem cell transplantation to determine if heart tissue damaged by a heart attack can, in fact, be regenerated. His research is also exploring the regeneration of blood vessels through gene therapy. To date, he has completed two leading-edge research projects in translational adult stem cell research, which led to FDA clearance for both projects to begin Phase I clinical trials.

Dib is the founding member and president of the International Society for Cardiovascular Translational Research, a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to bring innovations tested and proven through research into mainstream medical practice for the benefit of patients.

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Finalist: Mitchell Shub, MD

Mitchell Shub, MD
Medical Director/Research
Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Dr. Mitchell Shub, medical director of research at Phoenix Children’s Medical Group, has been in a leadership position at the hospital for 25 years. While he still sees patients on a daily basis, most of his time is spent overseeing research operations on campus. Mitchell Shub, Medical Director at Phoenix Children's Hospital, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

Additionally, he is co-chair of the Institutional Review Board, and chair of the Scientific Review Committee that reviews all investigator-initiated research studies and fosters collaborations with the University of Arizona Medical School, Arizona State University, T-Gen and Mayo Clinic.

Shub is involved in three research projects of his own and is developing two others, funded by grants from the National Institute of Health, UA and pharmaceutical companies.

In the health care industry for 28 years, Shub serves as professor of clinical pediatrics/associate head of the department of pediatrics at the UA. In this capacity, he oversees all pediatric training for medical students, and with the dean makes decisions on appointments, academic promotions and academic program development.

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David Winston, MD, FACP, AGAF
Director, Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Cigna Medical Group

Dr. David Winston has a long-standing commitment to medical research, and throughout his 35 years in medicine he has worked to develop a deeper understanding of the treatment and prevention of colon cancer and Hepatitis C.
Winston has been director of gastroenterology and hepatology at Cigna Medial Group in Sun City for nearly 20 years, and is a clinical investigator for the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

David Winston, MD, FACP, AGAF Director, Gastroenterology & Hepatology Cigna Medical Group, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

He has participated in 33 research studies, 18 of which he served as principal investigator. He has published 33 papers and lectured in 25 cities and five countries around the world about new advancements in GI treatment and research.

As a practicing physician, Winston treats patients daily for a wide variety of gastro and digestive needs, such as stomach pain, frequent indigestion, and chronic GI problems, and encourages patients to participate in clinical trials so science can progress in the areas of early cancer detection.


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