Tag Archives: phoenix suns

Goran Dragic, Brandon Knight

Phoenix Suns, Skrillex, a film festival + more to do this weekend

10/8: Phoenix Suns vs. Rio de Janeiro Flamengo

After barely missing the playoffs last season, the Suns are opening the 2014 preseason against the Rio de Janeiro Flamengo. The Flamengo Basketball team is one of the most successful in Brazil, and the game should be a good kickoff for the Suns preseason.

US Airways Center, 201 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 7 p.m. $10-$125 

 


10/9: Skrillex

The EDM artist and DJ has picked up six Grammy awards during his time as a solo artist, including awards for Best Dance Recording and Best Dance/Electronica Album. Special guests A$AP Ferg, Branchez and David Heartbreak are joining Skrillex for the Mesa concert.

Mesa Amphitheatre, 263 N. Center Street, Mesa, Thursday, Oct. 9, Doors open at 4 p.m., show at 4:30 p.m., $38.50-$60 

 

10/9: Scottsdale International Film Festival Opening Night

The Scottsdale International Film Festival is now in its 13th year, and will be screening 40 different feature films as well as some short films. The festival is beginning with William H. Macy’s Rudderless at the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, but all other film screenings will be at Harkins Shea.

Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, 7380 Second St, Scottsdale, Thursday, Oct. 9, 7:30 p.m., more information

 

10/10-11: Arizona Dance Festival

Over 20 dance troupes, mainly from the Phoenix area but some from around the nation, are hitting the stage at the Tempe Center for the Arts to showcase their talents. Dances from tap to jazz and ballet to hip-hop will be featured in the two evenings of the festival.

Tempe Center for the Arts, 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway, Tempe, Friday and Saturday, Oct. 10-11, 7:30 p.m., $18 adult, $15 senior, $13 student

 

10/10-11: Margaret Cho

Comedian Margaret Cho has been performing for nearly two decades, since her first album came out in 1996. Cho is known for openly discussing personal issues laced with profanity. Outside of stand-up, Cho was in Dancing with the Stars and guest-starred on the sitcom 30 Rock as Kim Jong-Il.

Stand Up Live, 50 W. Jefferson St., Phoenix, Friday, Oct. 10 at 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 11 at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m., $ 30

 

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GCU naming business college after Valley icon Colangelo

Jerry Colangelo, Principal Partner, JDM Partners, CEO Lecture Series Grand Canyon University is renaming its business college after former Phoenix Suns and Arizona Diamondbacks executive Jerry Colangelo.

Officials at the for-profit Christian school announced Thursday that the Colangelo College of Business is intended to provide “real-world relevance” to future generations of “values-driven business leaders.

The 74-year-old Colangelo already was the namesake of GCU’s school of sports business.

He replaces Ken Blanchard, the business leadership author who had served as the namesake of the business school for a decade.

Colangelo is a former owner of the Suns, ex-managing general partner of the Diamondbacks and a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame. He currently is director of USA Basketball.

USAirwaysCenterNight

US Airways Center will be getting a name change

It looks like the Phoenix Suns and Phoenix Mercury won’t be playing in US Airways Center next season.

The Arizona Republic reports that American Airlines, which merged with US Airways, will not renew the naming rights with the expectation that the US Airways named will be phased out. US Airways’ 10-year contract, which began in 2005 after the merger of America West Airlines and US Airways, runs through Oct. 2015, but the airlines say the Phoenix Suns, which manages the arena, have the option to seek a new sponsor before then, the Republic report said.

US Airways Center opened in 1992 and is the home of the Suns, Mercury and Arizona Rattlers. The arena was known from its opening until 2006 as America West Arena, with naming rights having been sold to Tempe-based America West Airlines. In 2005, America West purchased rival carrier US Airways and assumed its name, with the naming rights agreement carried with it. The venue adopted its current name in 2006 after a rebranding, and is the second arena that US Airways has owned the naming rights for after Washington, DC’s Capital Centre, which was known as US Airways Arena from 1996 until 1997 after the company, which had been known as USAir prior to that, rebranded.

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

Gerald Green, P.J. Tucker

Fulton Homes Presents $76,500 to Suns Charities

Monday night just before tip-off of the Phoenix Suns-Memphis Grizzlies game, Fulton Homes Vice President Dennis Webb presented a $76,500 check to Suns Charities for the season-long “Proud to Own the 3-Point Zone” program. Throughout the season the Tempe-based homebuilder paid $100 each time a Suns player drained a three-point shot. Monies collected will go to support the U.S. Navy League, an organization that serves and supports all sea services of the U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard and Merchant Marines, the Joe Foss Institute and the Central Arizona Mountain Rescue Association (CAMRA).

For more than ten years Fulton Homes has partnered with the Suns to give back to a wide variety of charitable organizations. Last year through the 3-Point Zone program Fulton Homes donated $46,000, which was shared with the Youth Assistance Foundation and CAMRA.

“Fulton Homes is happy that the great success the Suns had this season will benefit the U.S. Navy League, the Joe Foss Institute and CAMRA,” said Fulton Homes CEO Doug Fulton. “Fulton Homes is dedicated to giving back to a community that has given so much to our family throughout the years.”

awards

Industry Leaders of Arizona take spotlight

Az Business magazine is proud to present the Industry Leaders of Arizona (ILoA) Awards, which recognize  the contributions and impact of Arizona‐based companies in five key industries — commercial real estate, education, entertainment, manufacturing and technology. The 30 finalists for this year’s ILoA Awards are profiled on the following pages. Winners will be recognized at the awards dinner that will be held Thursday, February 6 at The Ritz Carlton, Phoenix.

Arizona Diamondbacks
Leadership: Derrick Hall, CEO; Tom Harris, CFO
Address: 401 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: dbacks.com
What they do: The Diamondbacks strive to provide industry-leading entertainment in a family-friendly environment while making a positive impact on its fans and civic partners.
How they lead: The team offers the lowest Fan Cost Index in Major League Baseball. In the community, the Arizona Diamondbacks Foundation and the D-backs’ organization have surpassed the $33 million mark in charitable giving since their inception in 1998. The unique corporate culture of the D-backs led Yahoo! to deem the club as “the best workplace in sports.”

Arizona Summit Law School
Leadership: Scott Thompson, president; Shirley Mays, dean
Address: One N. Central Ave., Phoenix
Website: azsummitlaw.edu
What they do: The American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school offers traditional and non-traditional law students the opportunity to succeed through its student-focused curriculum and highly engaged faculty.
How they lead: The practice-ready curriculum equips graduates with the practical skills and ethical instruction, leadership, management and interpersonal skills necessary for career success. The school accommodates students’ diverse needs with options including full-time and part-time day and evening classes; trimester schedule for graduation in two years; and individualized bar-pass instruction through learning diagnostics and mentoring; and experiential learning opportunities via externships, internships and clinics.

Caliente Construction Inc
Leadership: Lorraine Bergman, CEO
Address: 242 S. El Dorado Circle, Mesa
Website: calienteconstruction.com
What they do: Caliente, founded in Arizona in 1991, is a female-owned commercial general contractor that provides construction management services tailored to meet the distinctive needs of its diverse clientele.
How they lead: By embracing the latest technology, Caliente is known as the contractor who can meet the challenge of any type of construction project. This has strengthened its industry position and given Caliente a competitive edge. Caliente has also shown continued growth.  In 2006, revenues were $23,500,000 with 30 employees. Today, revenues exceed $57,000,000 and Caliente employs 81.

Casino Del Sol Resort, Spa and Conference Center
Leadership: Jim Burns, CEO
Address: 5655 W. Valencia Rd., Tucson
Website: casinodelsol.com
What they do: Casino Del Sol Resort encompasses a spa, conference center, five award-winning restaurants, Sewailo Golf Course, Anselmo Valencia Tori Ampitheater, a 5,000-seat open-air concert venue and the Del Sol Marketplace, which includes a gas sttation, car wash, convenience store and smoke shop.
How they lead: In less than two years since opening its $100 million expansion, Casino Del Sol has earned a AAA Four Diamond designation and is the state’s only casino resort to earn the coveted Forbes Four-Star Award for its hotel and spa.

Entrepix, Inc.
Leadership: Tim Tobin, CEO; David Husband, CFO
Address: 4717 E. Hilton Ave., #200, Phoenix
Website: entrepix.com
What they do: Entrepix re-manufactures semiconductor fabrication equipment and develops products and services to significantly extend the lifespan of semiconductor manufacturing technology.
How they lead: Entrepix’ is defining a new class of supplier to the semiconductor industry —  a “technology renewal partner” — and has become the third-party leader in this space.  It launched the first ever foundry process center supporting remanufactured equipment.  The company was spotlighted for this on the cover of the industry’s largest publication, Semiconductor International, whose cover is normally occupied by game-changing innovations from companies such as Intel and Applied Materials.

FlipChip International
Leadership: David Wilkie, CEO; Gordon Parnell, CFO
Address: 3701 E. University Dr., Phoenix
Website: flipchip.com
What they do: FlipChip International is a leading supplier of wafer level packaging technologies to a diverse global customer base in the semiconductor industry.
How they lead: FlipChip was founded in 1996 by industry leaders in automotive technology and semiconductor integrated circuit assembly. Their strategy was primarily developing and licensing the technology. After new owners took over in 2004, manufacturing was expanded and new technologies were introduced. Today, FlipChip’s technologies can be found in a wide range of products in consumer, medical, industrial and automotive applications.

FNF Construction, Inc.
Leadership: Jed S. Billings, CEO; David James, CFO
Address: 115 S. 48th St., Tempe
Website: fnfinc.com
What they do: FNF provides heavy-highway construction and general engineering work, both as a general contractor, subcontractor and manufacturer/producer of aggregate and asphalt rubber binder.
How they lead: FNF’s ability to self-perform much of the work on its contracts allows the company to better manage and support its subcontractors and keep projects on schedule.  FNF supports its personnel with state-of-the-art equipment and in-house technical support which keep its workers safe and guides and educates employees on FNF’s innovative construction methods.

GlobalTranz
Leadership: Andrew Leto, CEO; Greg Roeper, CFO
Address: 5415 E. High St., #460, Phoenix
Website: globaltranz.com
What they do: GlobalTranz is a privately held, Phoenix-based logistics company specializing in freight management services, including less-than-truckload shipping, full truckload, supply chain management and domestic air/expedited shipping.
How they lead: By focusing on innovative technology, GlobalTranz optimizes the flow and storage of merchandise as the goods move within and throughout the customers’ supply chain. GlobalTranz has been recongnized as one of the fastest-growing companies in the country with annual sales of over $200 million. Globaltranz has doubled its revenue every year since its inception in 2003.

Grand Canyon University
Leadership: Brian Mueller, president and CEO; Dan Bachus, CFO
Address: 3300 W. Camelback Rd., Phoenix
Website: gcu.edu
What they do: GCU is a private Christian university that has graduated some of the Southwest’s best-prepared teachers, nurses and fine arts professionals.
How they lead: What was once a small, struggling university has come into its own as a world-class liberal arts institution. When escalating tuition made higher education nearly impossible for some students, GCU built a financial model that made earning a degree attainable and affordable. The model does not rely on taxpayer subsidies, yet keeps costs about two-thirds less than most private universities and lower than many public schools.

Great Hearts Academies
Leadership: Daniel Scoggin, CEO; Ward Huseth, CFO
Address: 3102 N. 56th St., #300, Phoenix
Website: greatheartsaz.org
What they do: Great Hearts Academies is a non-profit network of public charter schools dedicated to improving education in the Phoenix metropolitan area by developing a network of excelling preparatory academies.
How they lead: Great Hearts Academies has a 95 percent college placement rate, including many prestigious colleges and universities around the country. Students have an average SAT score of 1836 and ACT score of 27.4, which is 20 percent above the national average and higher than many private schools.

IDentity Theft 911
Leadership: Matt Cullina, CEO; Sean Daly, CFO
Address: 7580 N. Dobson Rd., Scottsdale
Website: idt911.com
What they do: IDentity Theft 911 is a provider of identity management solutions, identity theft recovery services, breach services and data risk management solutions. The company works with insurance carriers to provide identity theft services to individual personal lines policyholders and crisis data-breach services for commercial insurance policyholders.
How they lead: Founded in 2003, IDentity Theft 911 is a premier consultative provider of identity and data risk management, resolution and education services. The company serves 17.5 million households across the country and provides fraud solutions for a range of organizations.

Integrate
Leadership: Hart Cunningham, CEO; David Tomizuka, CFO
Address: 4900 N. Scottsdale Rd., #4000, Scottsdale
Website: integrate.com
What they do: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology platform—combining ad-serving tech and analytics, a paid media marketplace and full suite of marketing services.
How they lead: Integrate is the first closed-loop marketing technology provider to empower marketers and media buyers to plan, launch, analyze and optimize campaigns across performance, programmatic and traditional media. The Integrate AdHQ platform offers an end-to-end solution that supports the entire lifecycle of paid media campaigns in one intuitive dashboard.

Ipro Tech, Inc.
Leadership: Kim Taylor, president and COO; Bret Lawson, CFO
Address: 6811 E. Mayo Blvd., #350, Phoenix
Website: iprotech.com
What they do: Founded in 1989, Ipro is a global leader in the development of advanced software solutions used by legal professionals to streamline the electronic discovery process.
How they lead: Ipro pioneered the development of electronic discovery technology in 1989, when savings and loan scandals led to an abundance of paper documents needing immediate legal review. Ipro developed customized technology that greatly improved the process and speed in which litigation document collections could be produced and helped to establish the litigation technology industry as we know it today.

Jokake Construction Services, Inc.
Leadership: Casey Cartier, CEO; Dave Miller, CFO
Address: 5013 E. Washington St., #100, Phoenix
Website: jokake.com
What they do: Jokake is a full-service real estate solutions provider founded on delivering exceptional construction experiences through ground-up, renovation and tenant improvement construction for public and private clients.
How they lead: In June, Jokake launched its 30th anniversary celebration with a commitment to complete 30 community service projects in 12 months — one project for each year in business. Since the initial announcement, Jokake’s employees have advocated for great causes, most of which are with nonprofits that they have been personally invested in for many years.

Laser Options, LLC
Leadership: Jeffrey Masters, CEO
Address: 3758 E. Grove St., Phoenix
Website: laseroptions.com
What they do: Laser Options sells new and refurbished multi-function printers/copiers, provides managed print services to its clients and is a leading re-manufacturer of laser print cartridges.
How they lead: Since starting in 1993 as a re-manufacturer of laser printer cartridges and HP printer service, Laser Options has transformed itself into a full-service business technology organization. Since inception, Laser Options has put into place sustainability practices. Whether it is its manufacturing and recycling process, the cars it uses or the vendors it partners with, customers know they are “going green.”

MicroAge
Leadership: Jeff McKeever, CEO; Roger Rouse, CFO
Address: 8160 S. Hardy Dr., Tempe
Website: microage.com
What they do: MicroAge is a leading provider of technology products and services. They serve customers from the data center to the desktop with computer products from industry-leading manufacturers.
How they lead: MicroAge’s tech-savvy account executives are experts at assisting clients with selecting information technology solutions that best meet their unique requirements. MicroAge possesses a vast sourcing capability which enables us to deliver on the most challenging of procurement requests.  MicroAge continues to be a well-known name and a respected industry pioneer with a heritage of industry innovation spanning five decades.

Microchip Technology, Inc.
Leadership: Steve Sanghi, CEO; Eric Bjornholt , CFO
Address: 2355 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler
Website: microchip.com
What they do: Microchip Technology Inc. is a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions for thousands of diverse applications worldwide.
How they lead: Microchip is the semiconductor industry’s greatest Cinderella Story, having come a long way since its humble beginnings as a failing spinoff of General Instrument in 1989. Over that time, Microchip has had the most successful IPO of 1993, achieved the No. 1 ranking in 8-bit microcontrollers in 2002 and recorded its 91st consecutive quarter of profitability in June 2013.

Mountainside Fitness
Leadership: Tom Hatten, president; William Malkovich, CEO; Tracy Taylor, CFO
Address: 1230 W. Washington St., #111, Tempe
Website: mountainsidefitness.com
What they do: Mountainside Fitness is the largest locally owned health club in Arizona, striving to help its members incorporate exercise into their lifestyle.
How they lead: With 10 locations, including the newest location inside Chase Field, the fitness center provides more than 950 jobs. The company has experienced a 41 percent growth within the last three years, including employee growth of approximately 400. The expansion placed Mountainside among the recipients of the 2012 Inc. Hire Power Awards as one of the Top 10 private business job creators in the state of Arizona.

Phoenix Children’s Academy
Leadership: Doug MacKay, CEO; Paul Malek, CFO
Address: 8767 E. Via de Ventura, #240, Scottsdale
Website: pcafamilyofschools.com
What they do: Phoenix Children’s Academy operates a national network of 111 private schools, including preschools, elementary schools and middle schools in 15 states serving approximately 16,000 students.
How they lead: PCA is the sixth-largest company in its industry in the U.S. and the largest headquartered in Arizona. By developing centralized support functions to take the majority of the administrative burden away from its schools, PCA teachers and principals have more time to spend with children and parents. This has enabled PCA to tailor its educational services to the individual needs of the child.

Phoenix Suns
Leadership: Jason Rowley, president; Jim Pitman, CFO
Address: 201 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix
Website: suns.com
What they do: The Suns provide the finest in Arizona sports, entertainment and community leadership by striving to create sustained success on and off the court.
How they lead: Between offering a first-rate fan experience, giving back to Arizona children and families in need, and staying at the forefront of technology and innovation, the Suns have served as Arizona’s professional sports leader since our 1968 inception. Each year, Suns players and alumni make more than 1,000 community appearances and the Phoenix Suns Charities contributes more than $1 million annually to more than 125 local nonprofit organizations.

Rigid Industries LED Lighting
Leadership: Jason Christiansen, CEO; Seth Anderson, CFO
Address: 779 N. Colorado St., Gilbert
Website: rigidindustries.com
What they do: Rigid Industries’ patented Hybrid and Specter optics and forward projecting LED lighting and quality products are designed, engineered, and assembled in the United States.
How they lead: Rigid Industries recently ranked 150th on Inc. 500 magazines’ Fastest Growing Companies list for 2013. Additionally, Rigid leads the industry as the fastest-growing LED lighting manufacturer and the fifth-fastest-growing in overall manufacturing in the U.S., proving to be one of the most innovative companies of 2013. From 2009-2012, Rigid experienced an exponential growth rate of 2,528 percent.

Scottsdale Golf Group
Leadership: Shelby Futch, CEO
Address: 6210 E. McKellips Rd., Mesa
Website: scottsdalegolfgroup.com
What they do: Scottsdale Golf Group owns and manages four public and three private golf courses. Futch founded the John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies, with 12 locations across the USA and Canadian locations coming soon. John Jacobs Golf Schools and Academies is one of the oldest continuous  golf schools in the U.S. with more than 500,000 students instructed.
How they lead: Scottsdale Golf Group’s state-of-the-art teaching facilities utilize the finest computerized swing analysis equipment. Under the guidance of golf industry expert Futch, Scottsdale Golf Group has grown from the undisputed leader in golf instruction to become a master of club operations, management, and consumer marketing services as well.

Speedie & Associates, Inc.
Leadership: Gregg A. Creaser, CEO; Brett P. Creaser, CFO
Address: 3331 E. Wood St., Phoenix
Website: speedie.net
What they do: Speedie & Associates is a consulting engineering firm that specializes in geotechnical, environmental and construction materials testing and special structural inspection services.
How they lead: From its inception 33 years ago, Speedie & Associates has embraced and maintained a philosophy of providing a superior level of customer service to every one of its clients. The firm believes that listening to its clients, hearing the essence of what they’re saying, and fully understanding their expectations are the most important first steps in providing a superior service experience.

STORE Capital
Leadership: Morton H. Fleischer, chairman; Christopher H. Volk, president and CEO; Catherine Long, CFO
Address: 8501 E Princess Dr, Scottsdale
Website: storecapital.com
What they do: STORE Capital (the name stands for Single Tenant Operational Real Estate) is a leading provider of real estate lease capital for real estate intensive middle-market companies.
How they lead: STORE acquires customers’ commercial real estate they use to generate their profits and lease it back to them in a sale/leaseback transaction.  A real estate lease is not just a debt financing substitute for customers, but it’s both a debt and equity substitute, while also offering reduced monthly payments. This makes them less bank-dependent and more entrepreneurial, creating more efficient capitalization.

Sun Orchard™ Juicery
Leadership: Marc Isaacs, CEO; Jeff Anthony, CFO
Address: 1198 W. Fairmont Dr., Tempe
Website: SunOrchard.com
What they do: Sun Orchard™ is a national craft juice company offering an unmatched selection of exceptional juice products to food service businesses of all shapes and sizes.
How they lead: Sun Orchard built its business on freshness, taste, quality, people and being one step ahead. Sun Orchard’s family of experts’ tree-to-table mastery allows it to quickly turn emerging trends into cutting-edge juice products, giving its customers a quick-to-menu advantage and back-of-house efficiencies. Sun Orchard continues to work closely with its customers to help grow their businesses.

Synergis Education, Inc.
Leadership: Norm Allgood, CEO; Scott Wenhold, CFO
Address: 1820 E Ray Rd., Chandler
Website: synergiseducation.com
What they do: Synergis Education is a premium, full-service provider of educational services designed for college and university leaders who are not satisfied with the status quo.
How they lead: Synergis Education assists its partner institutions in gaining regional prominence, enrollment growth, and overall sustainability through continual improvement and best practices. Synergis is unique among education services providers in that it is positioned to work with the entire adult higher education market, remaining agnostic as to the delivery methods (online, face-to-face, blended, etc.).

University of Advancing Technology
Leadership: Jason Pistillo, CEO; Erika Garney, CFO
Address: 2625 W. Baseline Rd., Tempe
Website: uat.edu
What they do: University of Advancing Technology (UAT) is the technophile’s college experience — a community uniquely suited to provide students passionate about technology an ideal place to live and grow.
How they lead: UAT students graduate to become technological mavens, cyber warriors, elite game designers and advanced computer scientists. The university’s commitment extends far beyond its student body. UAT hosts a myriad of on-campus events, including the annual Avnet Tech Games, The Leonardo da Vinci Society for the Study of Thinking and many other various user groups.

WebPT
Leadership: Brad Jannenga, chairman, president and CTO; Paul Winandy, CEO; Jacob Findlay, CFO
Address: 605 E. Grant St., #200, Phoenix
Website: webpt.com
What they do: WebPT is the leading web-based electronic medical record (EMR) and practice management solution for physical therapists, occupational therapists, and speech-language pathologists.
How they lead: By creating an affordable, intuitive, and technologically sound cloud-based electronic EMR solution for rehabilitation therapists — practitioners excluded from the government’s meaningful use incentive under the HITECH Act — WebPT brought all the benefits of EMR to small, private therapy practices that would have otherwise fallen behind. WebPT has helped more than 24,000 therapists adopt EMR since 2008.

Wespac Construction, Inc.
Leadership: John Largay, CEO; Don Mann, CFO
Address: 9440 N. 26th St., #100, Phoenix
Website: wespacaz.com
What they do: Wespac is a commercial general contracting and construction management firm, offering a range of pre-construction and construction services in a variety of market sectors.
How they lead: Wespac has developed a specific system of project management tools to successfully complete the job. This comprehensive process is Wespac’s Systematic Building Approach™ (SBA™). The SBA™ is Wespac’s process to ensure constant communication, dedication, coordination and planning. Utilizing the SBA™, the team is able to ensure timely procurement of materials and equipment, keeping the build-out on track.

Wilson Electric Services Corp.
Leadership: Wes McClure, president; Todd Klimas, COO; Terry Oakes, CFO
Address: 600 E. Gilbert Dr., Tempe
Website: wilsonelectric.net
What they do: Wilson Electric is the Southwest’s leading, single-source provider of total facility solutions, including commercial construction, solar, and operations technology.
How they lead: Wilson Electric invests in each employee-owner’s success through a rigorous, in-depth corporate training program. The program begins with new hire orientation and continues throughout employment, blending in-house resources with industry experts. Topics range from effective project management and safety procedures to manufacturer certifications. Because of this, Wilson’s safety record is one of the best in the state.

radio

KTAR Sports 620 moves to FM dial

In a significant move to expand its audience reach and community impact, Arizona Sports 620 (KTAR AM) will today begin simulcasting on 98.7 FM, strengthening its multi-platform distribution.

“Putting Arizona Sports on FM is an opportunity too big to ignore,” said Scott Sutherland, vice president and market manager for station owner Bonneville Phoenix. “Our live, local and exclusive sports content has never been better. We have world-class local talk personalities who deliver powerful opinions and insights that engage, entertain and positively impact the communities we serve. We also have amazing team partners. And all of this attracts a passionate and loyal audience, which in turn, attracts a lot of marketing interest from small and medium business owners, major brands and C-Suite decision makers.”

Besides a stronger signal and better statewide broadcasting reach, Sutherland said more than 85 percent of radio listeners utilize the FM dial.

The move also brings to a close a decade-long run for The Peak (KPKX) music station. “We want to sincerely thank everyone at 98.7 The Peak for accomplishing great things over the past 10 years,” added Sutherland. With the move, Sutherland said 11 positions are being eliminated.

Distributed on FM and AM radio, on desktop, tablet and mobile devices via ArizonaSports.com, and through Apple and Android apps, Arizona Sports is the leading sports media brand in the Southwest.

Arizona Sports is the flagship broadcaster for the Phoenix Suns, Arizona Cardinals, Arizona Diamondbacks, Phoenix Coyotes, Arizona State University and broadcasts Arizona Interscholastic Association prep sporting events from around the state.

Dennis - Suns Check

Fulton Homes, Suns Reunite for 3-Point Program

This season, the only thing standing between the Phoenix Suns and a patriotic gesture is a white line 23 feet nine inches away from the basket.

For the second year in a row Tempe-based Fulton Homes is uniting with the Phoenix Suns for the Fulton Homes “Proud to own the Three-Point Zone” program. This season when a Phoenix Suns player drains a three-pointer, Fulton Homes will write a $100 check to the U.S. Navy League. This year’s sponsorship includes both home and away games broadcast on Fox Sports Arizona, a minimum of 75 games.

Founded in 1902, The Navy League of the United States is an organization that serves, supports all the sea services – U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Coast Guard and U.S.-flag Merchant Marine. The Navy League is comprised of 46,000 civilians in more than 250 councils around the world working to support sea service members and their families. For more, visit: http://navyleague.org.

Last year alone, through the Three-Point Zone program, Fulton Homes donated $46,000 between the Youth Assistance Foundation and the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Mountain Rescue. In previous seasons, Fulton Homes has donated more than $206,000 over to local charities through Phoenix Suns Charities.

“Fulton Homes is really excited to partner again with the Phoenix Suns to benefit the U.S. Navy League,” Doug Fulton, CEO of Fulton Homes, said. “As the Suns keep improving their three-point game, we will be able to support the U.S. Navy League and the good work they do for military families and youth through programs such as the Naval Sea Cadet Corps, Junior ROTC and Young Marines.”

Ray Headshot

Artigue Agency Expands Growing Sports Practice

Local marketing communications firm, The Artigue Agency has announced the addition of several new clients to its growing sports practice.  Led by sports marketing veteran Ray Artigue, the firm’s new clients include Junior Golf Association of Arizona (JGAA), Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame, former Phoenix Suns star and NBA veteran Eddie Johnson, Patriot All-America at Wigwam Arizona and QR Gameplan.

“The growth of the agency represents the need for additional staff and expanded offices and I’m flattered by the market’s demand for our professional services,” said agency principal Ray Artigue.  “As we evolve and expand our sports offering, our greatest marketplace differentiator remains our people.  Our team comes from a variety of backgrounds, bringing diverse skills and extraordinary expertise in their respective specialty areas, ensuring that we’ll continue to deliver successful PR and marketing programs.”

The Artigue Agency recently moved to a larger office in Biltmore-area of Phoenix to be closer to new and existing clients and to accommodate its growing team.  The firm has also added two new two senior account executives, Casaundra Donahoe and Ian La Cava.

Donahoe brings nine years of experience in brand strategy, creative development, media relations and communications planning. Prior to joining The Artigue Agency, Donahoe worked for Park & Co. where she served as strategic counsel for brands like Goodwill, Girl Scouts, Expect More Arizona, METRO Light Rail, Coca-Cola and many others.

La Cava has five years of experience developing and executing public outreach campaigns and strategic initiatives on behalf of several clients in the sports industry. Prior to joining The Artigue Agency, La Cava worked for Niner Sports Marketing where he managed talent procurement, endorsement deals and social media for marquee athletes.

The Artigue Agency works with emerging and established companies in several markets with extensive experience in the sports, entertainment and lifestyle, healthcare, financial, legal and environmental industries.  Current clients include Arizona Broadcasters Association, Arizona Public Service (APS), Arizona Biltmore Golf Club, Abrazo Health Care, Cardon Global, Gallagher & Kennedy, BMO Private Bank, JDM Partners, Scottsdale Tourism Development Council, Wigwam Golf Club and Waste Management, among others.

Mayor Elaine Scruggs

Suns Co-Owner Shares Keys to Happiness

In his years as a successful entrepreneur creating and selling corporations to the likes of Coca-Cola and Kimberly-Clark, Richard Jaffe, one of the owners of the Phoenix Suns, found a few constants to guide him in business and in life.

“Love myself; live my values, and learn to give back,” says Jaffe, who gained respect as an inspirational leader.

The most important of these and the key to happiness, he says, is learning to love himself. It’s a recurring theme in the poetry he’s been writing for decades and recently published in, “Inner Peace & Happiness: Reflections to Grow Your Soul.”

“I’ve found that loving myself is fundamental to my happiness,” he says. “The one person I have a relationship with for my entire life is myself, so it’s essential to make that relationship my priority. When I have the inner peace that comes from loving myself, I don’t have to look to others to fill my emotional needs and wants.”

How does one learn to love him- or herself and to be happy? For Jaffe, it came from living and acting on his values in business and in his personal life, whether he was struggling or succeeding.

“These are the things that have worked for me,” he says. “Values guide my choices, and my choices affect how I feel about myself and how I interact with others.”

These are some of the values and tenets that have helped make Jaffe an exceedingly happy man.

• Find your passion and indulge in it. Jaffe has been expressing himself through poetry for 30 years – that is one of his greatest passions. “Poetry helps to provide me balance in life between work, family and other external commitments,” he says. “When I allow myself time to indulge in my passion, I recharge my spirit, my mind and my body.”

• Remember – givers gain. Even when he was a broke young entrepreneur, Jaffe and his wife of 28 years, Ann, always made sure to give to the community, to their temple, to charity. “Give even when you have nothing,” he says. “It always comes back to bless you, though sometimes from a different source.”

• Don’t rely on anyone else to make you happy. It doesn’t work, Jaffe says. When your happiness is dependent on your love for someone else, they control your happiness.  Love doesn’t always stick around – sometimes it comes into our lives in order to teach us how to care. We have to rely on ourselves.

• Be the very best you can be at whatever you do. Don’t compare yourself to your competition, to history, to anyone else. Instead, raise the bar on yourself. “Even if I get knocked down at something, I can be happy when I know I gave it my very best effort,” Jaffe says. “I don’t always succeed, but I can give an even better effort the next time because I will have learned from being knocked down. Defeat is being knocked down; failure is the unwillingness to get back up!”

• Control your thoughts and keep them positive. “My kids used to come to me to complain when they were unhappy about something,” Jaffe says. “I would tell them, ‘If you do not like the way you feel, just change the way you think!’ It drove them crazy!” But they did eventually understand that their negative thoughts were making them feel bad. Jaffe says beware — thinking positively is habit-forming, at least for him.

Jaffe is one of the owners of the Suns, a successful business leader and longtime philanthropist. Most recently the CEO of Safe Life Corp., a medical technology company, he also founded Safe Skin Corp., a latex glove manufacturer (acquired by Kimberly-Clark Corp.) and Nutri-Foods International, a frozen dessert company (sold to the Coca-Cola Co.) He is a member of the U.S. Golf Association’s Presidents Council and a supporter of numerous charitable projects.

St. Mary's

Suns cut ties with general manager

The Phoenix Suns parted ways Monday with general manager Lance Blanks after the second-worst season in franchise history, the team said.

“Lance has been a trusted friend and colleague,” said Suns President of Basketball Operations Lon Babby. “I thank him personally and professionally for his hard work on behalf of the Suns. We will continue to prepare for the offseason even as we look for his replacement.”

Blanks had served as general manager since Aug. 5, 2010, joining the team at a time when he was considered one of the league’s top up-and-coming executives. But this season was a harsh one as the Suns struggled to adjust after trading away two-time league MVP Steve Nash and letting former All-Star Grant Hill leave to kick off a rebuilding effort.

The Suns finished 25-57, the second-worst record in franchise history behind their 16-66 effort in their inaugural season in 1968-69.

A first-round pick out of Texas by the Detroit Pistons in 1990, Blanks had an undistinguished playing career. He played 142 games over two seasons with Detroit and Minnesota, then closed out his career with stints in the CBA and overseas.

Blanks had better luck in the front office, spending five years in the scouting department of the San Antonio Spurs, who won two NBA titles and drafted the previously unheralded Tony Parker. He spent the five seasons before joining the Suns as vice president of basketball operations and assistant general manager for the Cleveland Cavaliers, who won 66 percent of their games during his tenure.

Dennis - Suns Check

Fulton Homes’ 3-Point Zone helps nonprofits

While Monday night was fan appreciation night for the Phoenix Suns, thanks to Fulton Homes the Youth Assistance Foundation and the Central Arizona Mountain Rescue Association (CAMRA) will now divide up $46,000.

It’s all part of the Fulton Homes “Proud to Own the Three-Point Zone” program, a partnership between the Tempe-based homebuilder and the Phoenix Suns.  With each three-point basket made during the season, the Youth Assistance Foundation and CAMRA shared in the $100.  The program began in late October with the opening game tip-off and concluded with a victory Monday night at home against Houston. Fulton Homes Vice President Dennis Webb presented the check to Phoenix Suns officials during the game.

The Youth Assistance Foundation helps to prevent youth violence and promotes positive interactions with law enforcement. CAMRA, along with the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office Mountain Rescue (MCSO-MR) team, is an all-volunteer and expertly trained technical rescue team dedicated to saving lives through search and rescue operations, wilderness emergency medical services and outdoor safety programs.

“Partnering up with the Phoenix Suns for this program will aid both of the organizations,” Doug Fulton, Fulton Homes CEO, said. “The Youth Assistance Foundation promotes youth health and wellness programs, while CAMRA aids those who find themselves in life and death situations. Fulton Homes is proud to give back to a community where we live and work.”

Fulton Homes reunited this season with the Phoenix Suns to revive the Fulton Homes “Proud to Own the Three-Point Zone” program. In previous seasons, Fulton Homes has donated more than $206,000 over five years to local charities through Phoenix Suns Charities. This year’s partnership included all 80 home and away regular season games broadcast on Fox Sports Net.

rsz_phoenix_childrens_southwest_valley_center-1

Kitchell Completes Phoenix Children’s Southwest Valley Center

 

Kitchell completed construction of the Phoenix Children’s Southwest Valley Center in Avondale, a new specialty and urgent care center serving West Valley communities and featuring Phoenix Children’s special brand of pediatric care.

The 35,3550 SF urgent and pediatric clinic is a precursor to long-term plans for a larger, more comprehensive facility that doubles the medical space and includes a 48-bed, full-service children’s hospital.

The $14.7M facility includes 27 patient rooms, two treatment rooms, x-ray, ultrasound, three infusion bays and on-site lab services. The Center complements children’s health care services already in the West Valley, with specialties include hematology/oncology, gastroenterology, neuro-psychology evaluations, testing, orthopedics/sports medicine, neurology, psychiatry, pulmonology, urology, dermatology, developmental pediatrics, endocrinology, diabetes education, special needs, ultrasound, radiology, fluoroscopy, lab, and rehabilitation services including occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech therapy and infusion services.

Located just north of Interstate 10 on Avondale Boulevard, the Phoenix Children’s – Southwest Valley Center received strong support from the West Valley communities including the mayors of Avondale, Tolleson, Litchfield Park, Goodyear and Buckeye.

The facility is the fourth Phoenix Children’s specialty and urgent care center. Others are located in East Mesa, Northwest Phoenix/Glendale and Scottsdale.

 

Alvin Gentry

Suns part ways with Gentry

The Phoenix Suns say the team and coach Alvin Gentry have “mutually agreed to part ways.”

Gentry had coached the Suns since replacing the fired Terry Porter at the All-Star break of the 2008-09 season, compiling a 158-144 record. His 2010 squad, led by Steve Nash, went 54-28 and advanced to the Western Conference finals.

But Nash left and the team underwent what has been a disastrous rebuilding effort. The Suns have lost 13 of 15 and four straight at home. Their 98-94 loss to Milwaukee on Thursday night snapped the Bucks’ 24-game losing streak in Phoenix.

The Suns’ 13-28 record is the worst in the Western Conference and fourth-worst in the NBA. Only Cleveland, Charlotte and Washington are worse.

The Suns said in a news release that an interim coach would be named within the next 24 to 48 hours.

Gentry, who was in the final year of his contract, has been in coaching for three decades, including stints as head coach of the Detroit Pistons, Los Angeles Clippers and Miami Heat.

He came to the Suns as an assistant to then-coach Mike D’Antoni, then stayed on the staff of new coach Terry Porter when D’Antoni left for the New York Knicks. After Porter was fired, Gentry was named interim head coach, immediately restoring the up-tempo style that D’Antoni had championed.

Phoenix, under the ownership of Robert Sarver, never recovered when power forward Amar’e Stoudemire turned down a deal to return to the Suns and left for the Knicks.

When Nash became a free agent after last season and, in a mutual decision with the Suns management, signed with the Los Angeles Lakers, Phoenix blew up its roster under the leadership of Lon Babby, vice president of basketball operations, and general manager Lance Blanks.

The rebuilt team lacked a go-to scorer and struggled with depth as Gentry continuously tried new lineups. He had said recently that the team, with the season obviously headed south, might simply turn to its younger players and look to the future.

Meanwhile, crowds at the once boisterous US Airways Center have grown meager.

The Suns don’t play again until Wednesday, when they face the Kings in Sacramento.

Untitled

Valley Leadership announces Man & Woman of the Year

Valley Leadership announces Tom Ambrose and Ambassador Barbara Barrett as the organization’s 2012 Man & Woman of the Year. The pair will be honored for their distinguished service to the community at an awards luncheon in March.

Ambrose is well known in the greater Phoenix Metropolitan area as a community leader for nearly four decades. He joined the management team at Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Arizona (BBBSAZ) as Executive Director in June, 2010.  Prior to that, Ambrose spent 37 years with the Phoenix Suns working in public relations, marketing, advertising and foundation management roles. For 17 years, he was the executive director of Phoenix Suns Charities.
Under his leadership, the Phoenix Suns Charities grew from a good idea in 1988, to a high impact community grant-maker by raising and distributing over nine millions dollars in grants and scholarships over the years

“Tom’s commitment to our community has impacted dozens of organizations across the Valley,” said Jerry Lewkowitz, co-chair of this year’s Selection Committee.  “The nonprofit landscape is filled with landmarks to his efforts.”

Barbara Barrett is President and CEO of Triple Creek Guest Ranch, perennially ranked among the top hotels in the world.  Until November 2012, she was also Interim President of Thunderbird School of Global Management, the world’s #1 school for international management.  Previously, she was Ambassador to Finland, Senior Advisor to the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, CEO of the American Management Association, a Fellow teaching Leadership at Harvard and Chairman of the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.

“Starting with her participation in Valley Leadership Class I, Barbara has proven her commitment to our community over many years of leadership,” Sue Glawe, Selection Committee co-chair, said.   “Her list of accomplishments is a shining example for our community.”

Ambrose and Barrett join a prestigious list of past Man and Woman of the Year award recipients spanning 63 years.  U.S. Sen. Barry Goldwater was honored as the inaugural Man of the Year and most recently Sue Glawe and Jerry Lewkowitz were recognized as the 2012 recipients.

The newest inductees will be formally recognized at a luncheon on March 21, 2013, at the Arizona Biltmore. For more information or to purchase seats or sponsorships, call the Valley Leadership office at (602) 952-6760.

legends

Legends district partners with Southwestern Eye Center

The Legends Entertainment District, a first-of-its-kind joint venture between the Arizona Diamondbacks and Phoenix Suns, announced a new partnership with Southwestern Eye Center that features the District’s first static super graphic with a 3-D embellishment. The announcement was made by Legends Entertainment District General Manager Judd Norris.

“The Legends Entertainment District continues to break the mold of traditional ‘billboard’ advertising by bringing to life its first three-dimensional concept,” said Norris. “Southwestern Eye Centers challenged us to do something unique and memorable. Taking that into account, we were able to bring their already recognizable glasses campaign to life on a 36’ x 42’ super graphic. The glasses are so unique that the creator of the image, BlueMedia, has submitted the design into several marketing concept competitions.”

The first-of-its-kind graphic is located on the Phoenix Convention Center Garage at the corner of 5th Street and Jefferson, across from Chase Field. It is one of 36 static signs in the District that also features four LED signs, six window graphics and five custom signs.

“As a locally based company celebrating 30 years in business, we are excited to be part of something that hasn’t been done before,” said Southwestern Eye Center Vice President and General Counsel Shane Armstrong. “We value the opportunity to work with Legends on this advanced project and to be part of the revitalization efforts downtown.”

Celebrating 30 years in business this year, Southwestern Eye Center, founded in 1982, is dedicated to providing the best possible care for patients seeking or in need of LASIK, cataract surgery, retinal surgery, cosmetic surgery or glaucoma evaluations and treatment throughout the Metro Phoenix area and rural communities of Arizona. With several accomplished specialists in the areas of LASIK, cataracts, retina, glaucoma and cosmetics, Southwestern Eye Center is able to provide patients in Arizona and New Mexico with improved vision by using some of the most advanced and sophisticated techniques and technologies available today. There are 23 Southwestern Eye Center locations in Arizona and three in New Mexico. For more information, visit www.sweye.com.

Southwestern Eye Center joins a growing list of partners for the Legends Entertainment District, including APS, Anheuser-Busch, Chevrolet, Fox Sports Arizona, Fry’s Food Stores, Gila River Casinos, AZ Family, MillerCoors, AZ Pain Centers, Cox Communications, Dodge and the Arizona Rattlers, among others.

The Legends Entertainment District offers customized, larger than life out of home opportunities that run 18 hours a day, 365 days a year. The project was designed to encompass landmark downtown facilities, extending from 1st Avenue to 7th Street and Washington to Jackson Street.

In addition to the corporate partnership signage, the Legends Entertainment District provides digital informational programming in the form of LED news tickers and other relevant content that can change on a moment’s notice.

Nearly two billion individual LED lights are used to illuminate the Legends Entertainment District, which includes 13 screens for a total of 6,819 square feet of LED and over 50,000 square feet of static signage. The fiber optic cable laid end to end is 228 miles in length, which is equal to the distance driving from Phoenix to the Grand Canyon. The Legends Entertainment District includes nearly 100,000 pounds (50 tons) of steel and more than 140,000 feet of electrical wire.

Downtown Phoenix attracts more than eight million visitors annually at over 700 events, while 57,000 office workers are based out of the area. For more information about the Legends Entertainment District, visit www.legendsentertainmentdistrict.com.

Goran Dragic, Brandon Knight

Fulton Homes’ 3-Point Zone raises $10,500

That swish from the arc is beginning to add up.   Through the first month of the season, the Phoenix Suns have hit 105 three-pointers, banking a cool $10,500 for the Youth Assistance Foundation.  With five months of the season remaining, they are on course to raise more than $60,000 for the non-profit.

It’s all part of the Fulton Homes “Proud to own the Three-Point Zone” program, a partnership between the Tempe-based homebuilder and the Phoenix Suns.  With each three-point basket made, the Youth Assistance Foundation receives $100.

“Fulton Homes is dedicated to local charities like the Youth Assistance Foundation and recognizes the good work they do to prevent youth violence, promote good role models and positive interactions with law enforcement,” Doug Fulton, CEO of Fulton Homes, said.

Fulton Homes reunited this fall with the Phoenix Suns to revive the Fulton Homes “Proud to own the Three-Point Zone” program. In previous seasons, Fulton Homes has donated more than $206,000 over five years to local charities through Phoenix Suns Charities. This year’s partnership includes all 80 home and away regular season games broadcast on Fox Sports Net.

Shannon Brown

Fulton Homes, Suns Reunite For Three-Point Zone

Twenty-three feet, nine inches is the distance that makes Fulton Homes, the Phoenix Suns and local charities a winner this season.

Tempe-based Fulton Homes is reuniting with the Phoenix Suns to revive the Fulton Homes “Proud to own the Three-Point Zone” program, which in years past has provided tens of thousands of dollars to Phoenix Suns Charities. When a Phoenix Suns player drains a three-pointer this season, Fulton Homes will write a $100 check to Phoenix Suns Charities. This year’s sponsorship includes both home and away games broadcast on Fox Sports Net.  With 80 televised games on the schedule, and a Suns average of 6.7 three-point shots per game last season, Phoenix Suns Charities could slam dunk some serious donations.

“Fulton Homes is really excited to partner again with the Phoenix Suns to benefit Phoenix Suns Charities,” Doug Fulton, CEO of Fulton Homes, said. “If the Suns keep their three-point game up, we could be giving quite a bit to worthy causes.”

Phoenix Suns Charities is the cornerstone of the team’s charitable giving.  The organization offers grants to non-profits that serve children and youth in the areas of education, health and human services, the arts, sports, and recreation and rehabilitation.

smartphone mobile app suns

Suns Launching New Smartphone Mobile App

Just in time for the 2012 NBA Draft, the Phoenix Suns have joined with Verizon Wireless to launch their first-ever smartphone mobile app, available for Android, iOS and BlackBerry operating systems. Fans that download the free smartphone mobile app before 9 p.m. on draft night, June 28, 2012, can enter to win a personal phone call from the player the Suns select in the first round.

Fans can download the smartphone mobile app by visiting Suns.com/app on their compatible smartphone’s mobile browser, or by searching for “Phoenix Suns” in iTunes, Google Play or BlackBerry App World. The app is also accessible by scanning the attached (or below) QR Code with their smart phone’s reader.

The official smartphone mobile app features the latest Suns news, blog posts, photos and on-demand video, from the producers of Suns.com. Verizon Wireless customers with Android or BlackBerry operating system smartphones will have access to additional exclusive video content using the app.

Social media users can get the latest Suns Facebook updates, Instagram photos and aggregated tweets from the team’s front office and players, and send tweets and post comments from within the app, as well as “check-in” via Foursquare or Facebook Places while attending games.

The official Suns app will be a must-have for fans on game nights, whether at US Airways Center, at home in front of their TV, or for those out-and-about looking to keep tabs on all of the action. With real-time scoring, box scores, play-by-play and shot charts, the Suns’ app is loaded with live statistics. Fans within Arizona will also be able to listen to the Suns’ radio broadcasts, featuring Al McCoy and Tim Kempton.

Fans attending games, concerts or events at US Airways Center can quickly find the nearest restroom, concession stand or team shop via the app’s map functionality.

“We are always exploring new ways to connect with fans,” said Jeramie McPeek, Suns Vice President of Digital. “Working hand-in-hand with Verizon Wireless and our developer, YinzCam, we believe we have built an app that will enhance the experience of being a Phoenix Suns fan.”

The Suns plan to introduce a tablet version of the app during the 2012-13 season for both Android and iOS platforms, as well as new game elements, contests, special offers and video replays for fans in-arena. The Suns were the first NBA franchise to fully integrate wireless tablet technology into both their business and basketball operations in February of this year.

For more information on the Sun’s smartphone mobile app, visit the Sun’s website at www.nba.com/suns/fans/mobile_app.

carey school - graduate

More Than 2,000 Will Graduate From W. P. Carey School

More than 2,000 students will graduate from Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business next week. This is one of the biggest graduation classes ever for the school, known as one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the country. The president of the Phoenix Suns, a group of executives flying in from China, and a student who already started a nonprofit to help foster teens will be part of the ceremonies.

“We have another fantastic graduating class this year,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “These students exemplify why our undergraduate, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs are all ranked Top 30 by U.S. News & World Report. It’s another batch of high achievers.”

The school’s graduate-level convocation will include more than 900 students, most of them receiving MBAs, but others getting master’s degrees in accountancy, tax, information management, real estate development and health systems management. The event will be held Friday, May 4 at 5 p.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe. The featured speaker will be Brad Casper, president of the Phoenix Suns basketball team, who is known for his community involvement and heavy focus on area schools.

In addition, about 20 of the 120 executives graduating from the school’s executive MBA program in Shanghai are traveling to Phoenix to participate in the Tempe ceremony. The Shanghai program educates some of the highest-level business and government leaders in China and is currently ranked among the Top 20 executive MBA programs in the world by the Financial Times, Britain’s equivalent of The Wall Street Journal. Past students have included the CEOs of Baosteel and Shanghai Electric, three vice governors of China’s major provinces, six city mayors, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange, several bank chairmen and the chairman of Shanghai Airlines.

At the undergraduate level, more than 1,100 students are eligible to walk the stage, and more than a dozen different types of business degrees will be awarded. The undergraduate convocation is set for Thursday, May 3 at 8 a.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena. The main speaker will be Chris Spinella, chief executive officer of Apriva, which develops and advances smart-card technology and wireless applications for payment processing and secure mobile communications.

The graduates at this ceremony will include the winner of the spring 2012 Turken Family Outstanding Graduating Senior Award, Christos Makridis. He co-founded the Quanta Foundation LLC, an educational services company that connects high school students with high-profile university projects to produce research and multimedia materials. Makridis is also a McCord Scholar, an economics teaching assistant, chairman of the business school’s Dean’s Advisory Council and editor in chief of an international undergraduate-research journal on science policy at ASU.

Another finalist for the Turken Family award, Priya Nathan, co-founded a nonprofit to benefit young people. Partnered for Success helps foster and orphan youth successfully transition out of the foster care system in the Phoenix area. The program has been recognized by Fast Company magazine and was selected as an ASU Innovation Challenge grant winner twice.

“Many of these graduates are already making their mark well beyond the classroom,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Executive Dean Amy Hillman. “We have students who are small-business owners, working moms, members of the military and lots of others already making us proud. We look forward to their continued success.”

For more information on W. P. Carey School of Business, visit W. P. Carey School of Business’ website at wpcarey.asu.edu.

aps green night

Phoenix Suns Host ‘APS Green Night’ Against Lakers

The atmosphere at US Airways Center always feels a little different when the Phoenix Suns host the Los Angeles Lakers. There is a sense of passion, excitement and energy that only occurs when a long-time rival such as the Lakers comes to town.

It will be no different on Saturday, April 7, except for the energy. Not the energy from the fans or the players, but the kind powering the arena. One hundred percent of the electricity used at US Airways Center during Saturday night’s Suns-Lakers matchup will come from renewable energy provided by Arizona Public Service.

Phoenix Suns “APS Green Night” is being held in conjunction with NBA Green Week 2012, a league initiative running April 4-11 encouraging fans to “Go Green.” Tip-off is set for 7 p.m., with doors scheduled to open at 5:30 p.m.

Throughout the game, the Phoenix Suns and APS will communicate “Green Tips” both in-arena and during the Suns TV and radio broadcasts, in addition to giving away 1,000 compact florescent light bulbs (CFL’s) to two lucky ticket sections.

APS and the Phoenix Suns will also celebrate the newly dedicated APS SunsPowered Solar Structure, a 227-killowatt solar system located on the roof of the US Airways Center parking garage. The APS-owned system utilizes 966 solar panels, covers approximately 17,000 square feet and produces 378,000 kilowatt-hours of energy each year – enough to power 20 game days each season for the Suns.

A limited number of tickets are still available for the Suns-Lakers matchup on Saturday night. Fans can purchase theirs today at Suns.com or by calling 1-800-4NBA-TIX.

Arizona Commerce Authority - AZ Business Magazine September/October 2011

Arizona Commerce Authority Aims To Bolster The Business Environment

The new kid on Arizona’s economic development scene is poised to shake things up. The Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA), a public/private entity, is not merely a name change, a rebranding of the Arizona Department of Commerce that over the years received its share of praise and an increasing level of criticism. And it’s not just a committee of top-shelf business leaders.

“It’s more than that,” says Don Cardon, president and CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority. “It’s really a call to arms.”

Created by Gov. Jan Brewer through an executive order a year ago, and formally established by the Arizona Legislature early this year, the Arizona Commerce Authority is the cornerstone of the Arizona Competitiveness Package, a mix of tax benefits and incentives targeting quality job growth. The Arizona Commerce Authority’s leadership board consists of 17 of Arizona’s top CEOs who provide oversight and valuable input, with House Speaker Andy Tobin and Senate President Russell Pearce as ex officio members. Brewer chairs the Arizona Commerce Authority, and sports entrepreneur Jerry Colangelo serves as co-chairman.

The state’s university president, chair of the Rural Business Advisory Council and other committee chairs round out the balance of the 31-member ACA board.

The leadership board’s focus is on growing and diversifying Arizona’s economy and creating quality jobs throughout the state. The ACA works closely with such key partners as the Science Foundation Arizona, the three state universities, regional economic development groups and local communities.

The ACA is targeting these key base industries — aerospace and defense, renewable energy, science-technology, and small business and entrepreneurship. It is funded through existing payroll withholdings under an annual operating budget of $10 million, plus a so-called deal-closing fund of $25 million, some of which will be allocated for job training.

Michael Manson, an ACA board member and founder/executive chairman of Motor Excellence in Flagstaff, says he thinks the quasi-public agency will produce results for a number of reasons.

“By involving business leaders as we have and funding it by government we are removing some of the politics, enabling more performance and quicker response to commercial opportunities,” says Manson, who also founded PETsMART. “The pendulum swung a little far before the recession toward government regulations, but we need to get back to being more oriented toward entrepreneurial commercial opportunities.”

Mary Peters, president of Mary E. Peters Consulting Group, says the ACA draws from the successful endeavors of other states.

“We now have a mindset that Arizona is open for business,” says Peters, a former federal highway administrator with the U.S. Department of Transportation and former director of the Arizona Department of Transportation. “We’ll do what we can, especially in the aerospace and defense industries. If we’re not out there working to bring them to Arizona, other states will.”

Under the deal-closing Arizona Competes Fund, a company will need to achieve certain performance measures including average employees’ wages above the county’s average wage, health insurance coverage minimums and other requirements similar to the state’s existing job-training program. Backers say the fund will spur investment in projects in the targeted industries.

It replaced the inactive Commerce and Economic Development Council deal-closing fund, is controlled by CEO Cardon, and puts Arizona among the top one-third of states with aggressive economic development programs, supporters say.

Funds provided to growth projects must result in a net benefit to the state, consistent with the Arizona Constitution’s gift clause. In addition, an economic impact analysis by an independent third party will be conducted on all projects to determine potential return on investment benefits to the state. Furthermore, funding will be awarded with contractual provisions for performance and “claw-back” of funds for non-performing projects.

The Competitiveness Package extends the existing job-training program, a reimbursable grant program for job-specific training plans for employers creating new jobs or increasing the skill and wage levels of current employees.

Arizona’s Enterprise Zone Program is replaced with a new Quality Jobs Tax Credit for new job creation statewide. This tax credit is performance based on net new job creation and capital investment with specific eligibility qualifications for urban and rural businesses.

The tax credit for each new quality job created is $3,000 per year for three years and is limited to 400 new jobs per employer, per year. The program is capped at 10,000 new jobs per year. Experts say the program will increase Arizona’s competitiveness ranking to No. 3 from No. 9 in the Mountain West.

On the tax side of the equation, the electable sales factor for multistate corporations increases to 100 percent from 80 percent in equal increments from 2014 to 2017. A corporation that conducts business both in-state and out-of-state must apportion its income from business activity based on the ratio of property, payroll and sales in

Arizona compared to the corporation’s property, payroll and sales everywhere.

The corporate income tax rate is reduced by 30 percent to 4.9 percent from 6.97 percent in equal increments from 2014 to 2017. The change is expected to improve Arizona’s national ranking from 24th to No. 5, and from No. 6 to No. 3 in the Mountain West.

Arizona Commerce Authority

Under personal property, depreciation schedules are further enhanced for prospective acquisitions of commercial personal property on or after 2012.
Colangelo, partner of JDM Partners, explains his determination in agreeing to serve as co-chairman of the Arizona Commerce Authority.

“We will eliminate all distractions in pursuit of the ultimate goal — restoring economic vitality and stability to our state,” says Colangelo, former top executive of the Phoenix Suns and Arizona Diamondbacks. “Our new structure automatically eliminates the agency’s culture of entitlement and political sloth, and we have introduced what I believe to be a ferocious approach to both retaining and attracting business for the benefit of Arizonans, their families and our children.”

For more information about the Arizona Commerce Authority visit www.azcommerce.com.

Rick Welts, president and CEO, Phoenix Suns - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Rick Welts, President And CEO, Phoenix Suns

CEO Rick Welts discusses how the recession has affected the professional sports industry, the sports industry’s role in economic development, the Phoenix Coyotes, and more.

Rick Welts
Title: President and CEO
Company: Phoenix Suns


How did the recession affect the professional sports industry?

It certainly put pressure on pricing. The Suns haven’t raised prices in three years now and certainly didn’t feel like we were in a position to. The types of products that we tried to create for ticket buyers, I think, were reflective of the economy and understanding that we’re probably going to sell more partial full-season tickets than we are our traditional season ticket. … We have our own market for resale tickets for people who own tickets and want to sell them to other people, which was an opportunity for people to recoup some of the investment they’d made on season tickets. And I think we saw that across all the teams in the Valley.

Are you seeing any positive changes in the economy?

Our television ratings were up significantly this past year, and I think one of the trade-offs between people coming to the arena and the television broadcast was that we actually had more people that were part of our audience there. We’re unique among the Valley sports teams in that we produce and sell all of our own television games. … I think definitely last season we saw an upturn in ad spending, which is important to us because it’s a big part of our revenue on our television broadcast.

What role do pro-sports teams play in economic development?

I’m a huge believer that we are the greatest brand ambassadors for Phoenix that exist out there. … So, when we have games on national television coming from Phoenix, Arizona, and you have beauty shots of our incredible community, it’s really a two-and-a-half hour commercial for our region, for the city of Phoenix.

What about the rift between the Goldwater Institute and Glendale over the Phoenix Coyotes?

It’s really an important topic that cities are going to have to wrestle with, and our city is going to have to wrestle with. … The economics of our business are not such that sports teams by themselves can afford to build a multi-purpose facility … But how we pay for that, what’s the appropriate investment, what’s the right way to go about doing it is a very fair discussion to have out there between sports teams, the public and our elected officials.

Why was it important to publicly announce that you’re gay?

We really want to have an open discussion about sexual orientation within this industry, which is a very difficult topic for us to get to. For whatever reason, we’re a little out of step with where most of our society is today in having that discussion and feeling comfortable having it. The purpose was to hopefully facilitate more of that discussion, which I can promise you has been the case. What I also said is that I wanted to at least have a person out there who young people could identify with who might give them a little hope that pursuing their passion, if it’s team sports, wasn’t something that was out of reach just because of who they were. … I’m at the very beginning of what’s going to be a very interesting journey for me on this. … I’m going to let the experience guide me.

Vital Stats: Rick Welts

    • Worked for the Seattle SuperSonics from 1969 to 1979 starting as a ball boy and ending as director of public relations
    • Started his tenure in the NBA league office in 1982 as director of national promotions for NBA Properties
    • Credited with the creation of the NBA All-Star Weekend concept in 1984
    • In 1998, Brandweek magazine named him Marketer of the Year for his role in creating and launching the WNBA
    • Left the NBA office in 1999 as the league’s executive vice president, chief marketing officer and president of NBA Properties
    • Joined the Suns as president and COO in 2002
    • Named president and CEO of the Suns in 2009

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011

Jerry Colangelo discusses Arizona's economic future and more. - AZ Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010

CEO Series: Jerry Colangelo

Local businessman Jerry Colangelo talks basketball, Arizona Commerce Authority, the recession and more.

Jerry Colangelo
Title: Principal Partner
Company: JDM Partners

Did you always aspire to be in business or was it circumstances that put you on this path?
I transferred universities for basketball reasons, originally. I went to (University of) Kansas for a semester to play with Wilt Chamberlain. When he transferred — when he quit school — I transferred to (University of) Illinois. I had taken business courses in Kansas and when I transferred I brought those credits with me. But then I went into education. I thought I would teach and coach. But I had some business background and I was always a little bit of an entrepreneur, in terms of trying to make a dollar as a young kid, little businesses, etc. So it all kind of came together and I ended up being in the sports business, which means that I was being prepared all along.

How would describe the Valley’s business environment for entrepreneurs?
I think it is a good place, but it has evolved. I came to the Valley 40-plus years ago, when things were kind of wide open and there were many more opportunities, at least from my perspective. You had the ability to get things done because it was still a small town, to some degree. I’ve seen it quintuple in size, if you will, and we’ve had our ups and our downs in the Valley, but we’re trying to re-identify who we are and what our future holds. But there will always be room for entrepreneurs. There’s no question about that. I still believe in the Valley and the business climate, and it’s going to get better as our economy gets better, so there’s room.

How will the new Arizona Commerce Authority help the state’s economy?
I think the Commerce Authority is coming at exactly the right time. We have the opportunity to re-do how we do business in this state. It’s very important to retain the businesses that we have and it’s very competitive out there. The states are competing for big business and small business. We need to create a climate that is truly conducive for small and big business to come to Arizona. I think that with the people, the manpower that we will have on this authority, we have a chance to make that happen.

I’ve been a little outspoken about the fact that we need the Legislature to help with the funding — there’s no question about that — but at that point they need the business community to conduct the business of commerce. That’s what they know best. And if we can kind of separate that, we have a great opportunity to go out and be competitive. We’re going to need some things from the Legislature. Incentives — that seems to be a dirty word to some people, but it’s reality. That’s what’s happening in other states. That’s why they’ve had so much success. We have the models to look at.

For me, coming from the world of sports and every day you’re competing, it’s another game, it’s going for another win. This is a classic example of taking something that needed to be restructured, a little like my USA Basketball experience of late, when I took over the program and it was back on its heels. Today, we’re the defending gold medalists in every category, men’s and women’s, every age bracket. We have a chance with the Commerce Authority to basically do the same thing. We need to win a gold medal. We need to go out and compete with all the other states, because we have a lot to offer in this state. We just need some incentives. We need to look people eyeball-to-eyeball and sell them on why it’s important to come here, why they will enjoy not just the quality of life. We need to improve our education, we need to make it a better community in which it is conducive to do business here. If you get people jumping on the bandwagon, we have a chance.

How did the recession affect the sports industry in general and in the Valley in particular?

The recession has hit everyone and every segment of the marketplace. It’s interesting; when things are really bad economically, people still want to be entertained. … Vicariously, people follow sports teams because they once played, they have some affiliation, they love the association when their teams are winning. When teams are losing, that’s when they jump off the bandwagon. … We took a hit here in the Valley big time. Because we have so much emphasis on the construction industry, we were hit harder than other parts of the country — in the Southwest. No. 2, we are saturated right now with sports teams — no question about that. Everyone was affected. If we had continued with our growth, because we were on an incredible growth curve, we would have grown into maturity with all of our sports teams. What we have gone through have been some real challenges. But the good news is that the sports franchises have adjusted. They’ve had to adjust their policies, their attitudes toward discounts, etc. And that’s one of the things I’ve noticed in sports in the last two years is that they’ve made adjustments to deal with what’s taken place with the recession.

You are still involved in sports, but you’ve also moved on to real estate development. Some would say that’s a risky move. How do you respond to that?
People say when you make money in real estate is when you buy appropriately. There are a lot of deals out there to buy in — they say cash is king. Well, there are a lot of financial institutions sitting on a lot of cash, but they’re not really willing to let the consumer have that cash. So everyone is very hesitant right now. There is great opportunity in real estate. You have to be more specific about residential, commercial. My partners and I are involved in some iconic properties: the (Arizona Biltmore Golf & Country Club), the (Wigwam Golf Resort & Spa). In taking that step with distressed properties, we were able to take these properties out of bankruptcy. We believe we made a good buy at the time. We are making an investment in those properties, because we believe in the future. We believe things will get better over a period of time and that the real estate marketplace will continue to get better over a period of time. We’re sitting on 37,000 acres of property on the west side of Phoenix that have the ability and the approval to build a city of over 300,000 people. But this isn’t the time to start that project — that’s in Buckeye, Ariz. Do I think someday that will happen? Maybe in some way, shape or form; maybe not the way it was visualized five years ago, but are people going to continue to come here? I believe so. But back to the Commerce Authority; we have to bring jobs to Arizona. So by being creative and being aggressive going out to bring companies here — with high-paying jobs, not just service jobs — then we will continue with the growth pattern, because we have so many wonderful things to offer in terms of quality of life out here in the Southwest.

What advice do you have for entrepreneurs who are ready to take their companies to the next level?
Don’t be afraid to fail. … You have to take calculated risks. You have to be willing to step out on that board knowing you might get pushed, fall off. The worst thing that could happen is you do — you get up and you start over again. One of the things that has probably marked my career is that I started with nothing and I was never afraid to go back to nothing, but I was going to enjoy the ride. And so as it relates to my mix of experiences. Being competitive as an athlete prepared me for the business world, which was another competition. No one has batted 1,000 percent. Hall of Famers hit .300 — that’s only three out of 10. So why is it any different in business? You’re going to make mistakes, you’re going to learn from your mistakes. You can’t be afraid to fail, you have to be willing to take that kind of calculated risk. I’ve seen so many people, again in my lifetime, who have complained and whined about never getting an opportunity. And I would say to them, “Opportunity walked by you three or four times, but you never recognized it, because you’re so busy whining.” Get out there, don’t be afraid to compete and believe in yourself.

    Vital Stats




  • Became general manager of the new NBA franchise Phoenix Suns in 1968
  • Coached the Suns in the 1969-1970 and 1972-1973 seasons
  • Purchased the Suns for $44.5 million in 1987
  • Founder and owner of the Arena Football League’s Arizona Rattlers from 1992-2005
  • Played a key part in moving the NHL’s Winnipeg Jets to Arizona in 1996
  • Launched the WNBA’s Phoenix Mercury in 1997
  • Launched the MLB Arizona Diamondbacks in 1998
  • Served as chairman and CEO of the 2001 World Champion Diamondbacks
  • Chairman of the NBA’s Board of Governors from 2001-2005
  • Sold the Suns, Mercury and Rattlers to an investment group headed by Robert Sarver in 2004
  • Sold his controlling interest in the Diamondbacks to a group of investors in 2004
  • Elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 2004
  • March 26, 2004 proclaimed Jerry Colangelo Day in Phoenix
  • Named director of USA Basketball in 2005
  • Received the Spirit of Caring award in 2005 from the Valley of the Sun United Way
  • Inducted into the Suns’ Ring of Honor in 2007

Arizona Business Magazine Nov/Dec 2010