Tag Archives: president

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

Top 5: Arizona Casinos - Experience AZ Fall-Winter 2012

Senators Urged to Preserve Future of Indian Gaming in Arizona

Congress has the power to intervene in a growing national practice and problem of ‘off-reservation gaming,’ or ‘reservation-shopping.’ The topic was at the heart of an oversight hearing before the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs today, titled, “Indian Gaming: The Next 25 Years,” and included discussion of H.R. 1410—the bi-partisan bill to solve the problem faced by the city of Glendale in Arizona, that will protect the integrity of Indian Gaming in the state, but would also be a beacon to cities and towns across the U.S. that find themselves in similar circumstances.

A prelude to a vote on H.R. 1410 by the U.S. Senate, today’s hearing included testimony from Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC) President, Diane Enos and City of Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers, excerpts from their testimony follow, full transcripts can be found at www.indian.senate.gov.

SRPMIC President, Diane Enos opened her remarks, by saying, “For over 20 years Arizona Indian Gaming has been stable, predictable, and successful. However, sadly, its future in Arizona does not look good. It is threatened by the actions of one tribe. H.R. 1410, the ”Keep the Promise Act,” which is pending before the Committee, will help protect Indian gaming in Arizona. We respectfully urge the Committee to pass it.”

SRPMIC President explained to the Senators that private non-Indian gaming companies were always hovering over Arizona looking for an opportunity, a loophole, to overthrow Indian Gaming exclusivity, but that today, that exclusivity, and the current Indian Gaming compacts were jeopardized from within, by the Tohono O’odham Nation:

“This plan by the Tohono O’odham of building an additional casino in the Phoenix-metro area directly violates promises that they made, that other Arizona tribes made, and that the Governor of Arizona made to citizens who approved our compacts in November 2002,” stated Enos. In 2002, then-Governor Jane D. Hull announced that the compacts she and 17 tribes had negotiated for two and a half years – if approved by the voters – would ensure there would be “no additional casinos allowed in the Phoenix metropolitan area”. This promise of “no additional casinos in the Phoenix-metro area” was made by Tribes and the Governor over and over to the voters, Enos said, “because we believed it.”

City of Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers addressed the powerlessness of local government in this situation, saying, “Our choice was not ideal: continue to fight and hope for action from this body, or give in to this casino being forced on us. It is frustrating to be a city of our size and have no voice on a casino proposed by a tribal government more than a hundred miles away.”

Weiers also spoke up about what this means for other cities, “Our sister cities know that unless Congress acts, they may be next. There are over 200 other county islands in the Phoenix metropolitan area. And the Tohono O’odham Nation attorneys have said the Tribe has the right to close its existing three casinos and open them on these county islands. We are a test case, but it is the start of a very slippery slope. If Congress does not act, the entire Phoenix area should be prepared for more off-reservation casinos.”

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Desert Schools Promotes Meshey to President

Desert Schools Federal Credit Union has announced the appointment of the organization’s new president, Jeff Meshey. Desert Schools’ current CEO and President, Susan Frank, will retain the title of CEO and remain in the foremost executive leadership position. A former senior executive vice president and veteran of Desert Schools, Meshey assumes the role following 20 years with the company, all of which have been under Frank’s tenure.

Meshey has long been a key contributor to Desert Schools’ immense success in the Arizona market, leading the charge to expand the organization’s presence across three counties. Prior to the economic downturn in 2008, he was instrumental in leading the growth of the credit union’s branch network, helping to move the organization’s area of service solely from school employees to a full community charter, now serving any member of the community who lives or works within the three counties that the branches occupy.

“I’m incredibly grateful for the opportunity to move further into a leadership role within Desert Schools and am humbled by the organization’s faith in me,” said Meshey. “I believe in being both a leader and a servant for our members and employees, and I look forward to continuing to make a difference in my new position.”

With $3.8 billion in assets, more than 300,000 members and 50 branch locations across Maricopa, Pinal and Gila Counties, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union assumes the title of largest credit union in Arizona.

aerospace

Arizona Aerospace & Defense Forum offers insight

Members of Arizona’s business community are invited to the July meeting of the Arizona Aerospace & Defense Forum hosted at the Phoenix office of international law firm, Greenberg Traurig.

Steven Shope, president of Sandia Research Corporation and a founder of the Cognitive Engineering Research Institute (CERI), will be the guest speaker at the July event. Shope will discuss CERI and the types of cognitive engineering research done at the not-for-profit institute in Mesa to solve critical human technology problems such as:
· RPA (Remotely Piloted Aircraft) human system integration
· Planning and resource allocation tasks (military, emergency response)
· Extreme environments
· Medical/hospitals/healthcare
· Emergency management
· Homeland and cyber security
· Mine safety

WHAT: The Cognitive Engineering Research Institute (CERI): Solving Critical Human-Technology Problems

WHERE: Greenberg Traurig, 2375 E. Camelback Rd., Suite 700, Phoenix, AZ 85016

WHEN: Tuesday, July 8, 2014; 7 – 7:30 a.m.: Registration/Continental Breakfast/Networking; 7:30 – 9 a.m.: Meeting

COST: A&D Forum Member: Free; Non-member: $40

RSVP: Members and non-members must register to attend. To register click here

SPEAKER: Steven Shope, president, Sandia Research Corporation

football

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Announces Board

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces its Board of Directors for Super Bowl XLIX. The board of directors is comprised of business leaders that volunteer their time to drive the state’s efforts for Super Bowl XLIX.

The Host Committee is a private, non-profit Arizona corporation. The mandate of the Host Committee is to galvanize local stakeholders in a united approach to hosting the largest single-day sporting event by maximizing positive media exposure, fueling the economic engine of Arizona and leaving a lasting legacy long after the excitement of the Big Game. The board was assembled in 2013 to begin planning and to garner local corporate support and sponsors.

Board members include:
● Board Chair David Rousseau, president, SRP

● Brad Anderson, executive vice president, brokerage office services, CB Richard Ellis

● Michael Bidwill, president, Arizona Cardinals

● Jose Cardenas, senior vice president and general council, Arizona State University

● David Farca, president, ToH Design Studio

● Jim Grogan, chief operating officer, International Capital Investment Company

● Michael Haenel, executive vice president, Cassidy Turley

● Mike Kennedy, partner, Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A. (chairman, Super Bowl XLII Host Committee in 2008)

● Dan Lewis, senior vice president, Sovereign Finance

● Jeffrey Lowe, president, MidFirst Bank

● Mary Martuscelli, regional president for the private client reserve, U.S. Bank

● Andrew McCain, vice president and CFO, Hensley Beverage Company

● Patrick McGinley, vice president of property management, Vestar

● Steve Moore, president and CEO, Greater Phoenix CVB

● Jodi Noble, partner, Deloitte

● Jay Parry, president and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

● Earl Petznick Jr., president and CEO, Northside Hay Company

● Ken Van Winkle, managing partner, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

● KJ Wagner, president and CEO, Willis of Arizona, Inc.

● David Watson, co-founder and managing partner, mybody and president and managing partner, Revolution Tea

● John Zidich, CEO, Republic Media Publisher, The Arizona Republic

“We have an impressive group of business leaders working together to meet the fundraising goals for Super Bowl XLIX and to maximize the opportunity to build the Arizona brand in this unparalleled global spotlight,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee chairman. “We want to promote Arizona as an ideal destination for businesses and tourists well beyond Super Bowl XLIX.”

Super Bowl XLIX is scheduled to be played at University Of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years. In Super Bowl XLII at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

For more information on the Board of Directors, please visit http://azsuperbowl.com/about-us/meet-the-team/

Rita Cheng

Cheng succeeds Haeger as NAU president

The Arizona Board of Regents has approved the selection of Rita Cheng as president of Northern Arizona University.

The vote came during a special board meeting Wednesday in Phoenix.

Cheng has been the chancellor of Southern Illinois University in Carbondale since mid-2010. She’ll begin as NAU’s 16th president on Aug. 15.

The regents will be looking to Cheng to increase enrollment at the university that serves 26,000 students at dozens of campuses statewide and online.

Cheng will earn an annual base salary of $390,000 under her three-year contract. She’ll also get yearly allowances of $10,000 for a vehicle and $50,000 for housing.

Cheng succeeds John Haeger, who served 13 years as NAU president. He plans to remain at the school as a professor in higher education leadership and governance.

RichEndicott

Endicott Appointed President of Biltmore Bank

Biltmore Bank of Arizona, a division of Grandpoint Bank, announced Richard Endicott has been appointed president, following the retirement of long-time Biltmore Bank president Jeffrey P. Gaia. Endicott brings four decades of experience to the role, and has been a member of the Biltmore Bank management team since 2008, most recently as president of its Scottsdale Airpark location. As president of Biltmore Bank, Endicott will oversee both the strategic and tactical directions of the organization including diversified loan, deposit and business service lines as well as marketing and other customer services.

“We are grateful to Jeff for his decade of leadership to this organization, not to mention his friendship,” said Richard J. Lehmann, Founder and Chairman of The Biltmore Bank of Arizona. “As we wish him well in retirement, we are pleased to appoint Richard to his expanded role within our organization. He has been a critical member of our team, especially through the economic turmoil of recent years. Together, and through our partnership with Grandpoint Bank, we are proud to continue to serve the needs of Arizona’s small and medium-sized businesses through personalized service and state-of-the-art technologies.”

Endicott attended both Kansas University and Duke University, and he has been working in the banking industry since 1981, including serving more than 20 years as an executive with Deutsche Bank. He lives in north Scottsdale with his wife of 28 years, Patricia, and has four grown children.

89444261

BMO Names Miller as President, Western U.S.

BMO Private Bank announced today that Matt Miller has been promoted to President, Western U.S. In this role, he will be responsible for the strategic development and delivery of wealth management services for high-net-worth individuals, family-owned businesses, endowments and foundations throughout the Western U.S.

Miller has nearly 30 years of experience in the financial services industry. He joined the organization in 2009 as Managing Director. During this time, he was responsible for organizing the western regional hub office and recruiting many of its senior managers and advisors.

“Matt is an ideal fit for this position. He is passionate about guiding his clients and helping them achieve their financial goals,” said Terry Jenkins, President and CEO, BMO Private Bank, U.S. “He leads by example, is focused on excellence and motivates his teams to success. We are confident the Western region will achieve even greater success in the years to come.”

Miller is headquartered at BMO Private Bank’s Scottsdale location, which also serves as the hub of Western regional operations. He will oversee a team of 75 financial professionals located in Arizona, Utah and Washington.

A fourth-generation Arizonan, Miller is an active leader in local business and civic communities. He currently serves on the board of directors for Teach for America Arizona, Valley of the Sun United Way Financial Stability Council and volunteers regularly at JAG (Jobs for Arizona Graduates). He previously served on the board of the University Medical Center in Tucson for 12 years. Miller earned a Bachelor of Science in Finance and Accounting from the University of Arizona.

“This is an exciting time to lead an organization that is poised for significant growth,” said Miller. “The caliber of our team is second to none, and our clients benefit from industry-leading planning tools that enable us to provide the best in financial planning and analysis.”

BMO Private Bank has Arizona locations in Scottsdale, Phoenix and Tucson. For more information about services and operations, visit www.bmoprivatebank.com.

Executive Q&A: Jim Belfiore

Jim BelfioreJim Belfiore
President, Belfiore Real Estate Consulting

Years in CRE: 21
Years at Belfiore: 8

What first attracted you to commercial real estate?
The diversity in real estate attracted me to the business. No two properties are the same; every project differs because locations differ, the characteristics of structures often differ, and amenities, whether natural or man-made, differ, too. These differences keep the work fresh and fun.

How has the industry changed since you started?  
Finance is really different today than it was 20 years ago. If you look deep into how projects take form, in the beginning they are heavily influenced by finance because without financing they are never built. The biggest single influence over growth in the housing market over the next three years will be driven by changes in the finance industry.

What are three qualities of a great executive?  
To me, a “great” executive is a great leader. To be a great leader, you must show you are willing to make the tough decisions when they come up. Leaders are charged with determining the direction of the company, creating a productive and healthy company culture and recognizing when a need to change course arises. Great executives are willing to roll up their sleeves and pitch in at every level; they must demonstrate a constant willingness to pitch in to make the company successful, and this means getting their hands dirty. Finally, I believe great leaders know their business better than anyone. They study their competitors, are in touch with their clients and are always looking for the next opportunity. They are working on the next “big thing” because they are always a student of the business.

Of what professional achievement are you most proud?
I’m proud that I have built this company, Belfiore Real Estate Consulting, through one of the most difficult recessions this country has ever faced. Of course, I’m fortunate to have had my family, great friends, absolutely phenomenal employees and a core of close clients that helped me do it.

What’s one of the biggest market changes or areas of growth you predict happening in Phoenix’s near future?
I believe people are going to be thoroughly surprised at how fast the residential market grows in the next few years. More than 40,000 new jobs are being created in Phoenix annually, driving population gains of 100,000+ each year. These people will need places to live. Last year, homebuilders constructed 12,500 homes; over the course of the next five years, I think the residential market is going to go from 12,500 new homes annually to more than 30,000. This growth is going to create a wonderful opportunity for those in real estate.

What’s the most influential professional advice you’ve received?
Hard work can get you through anything. My mother worked her way out of every bind she had while I was growing up; she has been the single-greatest influence on my life, fighting through every challenge (there were many!) that came her way.  While in high school, the hard work theme was further kneaded into my fabric by some close family friends I worked with. These friends, the Taylors, owned an RV park, small motel and restaurant that catered to summertime tourists. Laying concrete, replacing roofs, painting hotel rooms and waiting tables, I learned that hard work and “doing it right the first time” was the clear path to success.

phoenix

University of Phoenix names new president

University of Phoenix announced that the institution’s board of trustees has named Timothy P. Slottow as the new president of the University.

Slottow’s distinguished career spans 30 years at public and private organizations throughout the U.S. He currently serves as executive vice president and chief financial officer at the University of Michigan, where he is responsible for operations and finance. Since 1998, Slottow’s work at the University of Michigan—one of the nation’s largest public universities—has helped the institution fulfill its academic mission and strategy on behalf of 61,000 students and 44,000 faculty and staff. He will assume office at University of Phoenix on June 20, 2014.

“Tim Slottow’s leadership at the University of Michigan amplifies what he has done throughout his accomplished career: delivering measurable results to public and private organizations as they embrace the principle of continuous advancement and transition to reach ambitious goals,” said Merrilee Lewis Engel, Ph.D., Chair of the University of Phoenix board of trustees.

“After a comprehensive national search, we are honored to have Tim Slottow join us from one of the world’s most respected higher education institutions,” said Gregory W. Cappelli, member of the University of Phoenix board of trustees, and CEO of Apollo Education Group, Inc. “Tim shares our commitment to the mission of University of Phoenix, and to delivering a quality education that helps students achieve academic and personal success to meet their individual and professional goals. I am confident that his focus on connecting students’ talents, skills, and educational achievement to employers’ ever-increasing human capital needs will help differentiate University of Phoenix and deliver genuine value to its students.”

“For decades, University of Phoenix has pioneered change throughout U.S. higher education, and I am honored to lead this groundbreaking and innovative university through its latest and most significant transformation,” said Slottow. “I am committed to furthering the University’s important work to deliver high quality, career-relevant educational programs that help all students achieve—and exceed—their professional goals.”

In his current position at the University of Michigan, Slottow supervises and is responsible for the university’s $6.3 billion annual operating revenues and more than $16 billion in financial and physical assets.

“Tim Slottow has played an integral role in the University’s growth and financial stability throughout the recession, ensuring the University of Michigan’s academic excellence as he worked in partnership with our academic and university leaders,” said University of Michigan president Mary Sue Coleman.

Prior to his work at the University of Michigan, Slottow oversaw strategic business planning and finance at Amtrak in Washington, D.C.; served as director of policy and planning for the City of Seattle; and was a manager at Accenture (formerly Andersen Consulting). He earned a master’s degree in business administration from University of Washington and a bachelor’s degree from University of California, Berkeley.

As the seventh University of Phoenix president, Slottow succeeds Bill Pepicello, Ph.D., who began his tenure at the University in 1995 and announced his intention to retire in September 2013.

Virtual Schools, Online Education

Pima Community College gets interim director

The retired president of a New Mexico community college has been named the interim director of a two-year college campus in Arizona.

Former Santa Fe Community College President Sheila Ortega said she starts her job at Pima Community College on Monday.

The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that Ortega will be paid $173,000 a year as interim president of the college’s Community Campus, which focuses on adult basic education, workforce training and online learning.

Ortega is under contract to serve in the job through June 2014.

The college in Tucson has six locations throughout Pima County.

Ortega retired as president of the community college in Santa Fe in 2012, after a nearly 30-year career at the two-year school.

quayle

Quayle elected to TGen Foundation Board

Former U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle, who served under President George H.W. Bush from 1989-93, was elected today to the Board of Directors of the TGen Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the non-profit Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Vice President Quayle attended grade school and high school in Phoenix and Scottsdale and he and his wife, Marilyn, are now residents of Paradise Valley. He brings to the TGen Foundation his vast career experience in politics and financial investment.

“It is my honor to be selected to be a part of TGen and the phenomenal work this biomedical institute is doing to find better treatments for the most serious diseases affecting humanity,” said Quayle, who also is a former U.S. representative and senator from Indiana, and who today is chairman of Cerberus Global Investments, a private equity company with $25 billion under management.

TGen Foundation Board Chairman Bennett Dorrance welcomed Quayle, noting that he is instantly one of the best known among a cadre of top-flight Arizonans who serve on the non-profit panel.

“Today we welcome Vice President Dan Quayle to our TGen family with high expectations and confidence that he will further enhance our philanthropic reach across the nation and help fuel TGen’s genomic research of the world’s most pressing diseases,” Dorrance said. “We welcome his involvement, his extraordinary relationships and his business acumen.”

Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director, also welcomed Quayle, whose term as Vice President (1989-1993) coincided with Dr. Trent serving as Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

“In 1990, the NIH and the Department of Energy joined with international partners in a quest to sequence all 3 billion letters in the human genome. Vice President Quayle is acutely aware of the importance of this public effort, and remains an advocate for genomic research and what is means for our patients,” Dr. Trent said.

TGen Foundation President Michael Bassoff said that the addition of Quayle to the TGen Foundation Board of Directors would undoubtedly be of huge importance to the future of the institute.

“He brings a powerful internationally recognized voice to advance TGen’s scientific research,” Bassoff said.

Quayle graduated from DePauw University in 1969, and received his law degree from Indiana University in 1974.

He was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1976 at age 29; to the U.S. Senate in 1980 at age 33; and Vice President of the United States in 1988 at age 41, during which he made official visits to 47 nations and served as chairman of the National Space Council. He has authored three books, including Standing Firm, a vice-presidential memoir, which was on The New York Times best-seller list for 15 weeks.

Quayle also was a distinguished visiting professor of international studies at Thunderbird, The American Graduate School of International Management in Glendale, Arizona.

At Cerberus, one of the world’s leading investment firms, he has been actively involved in new business sourcing and marketing in North America, Europe and Asia. His extensive global network of public and private sector decision-makers, combined with his investment expertise, has significantly contributed to the growth of Cerberus.

Tumbleweed Logo

Tumbleweed Center Relocates Phoenix Headquarters

Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development will expand and relocate its headquarters from Downtown Phoenix to Siete Square II, 3707 N. 7th St. in Midtown, according to Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona, Inc.

Tumbleweed was established in 1972 with a mission to provide a safe space for collaborating with youth and young adults in the community who are vulnerable or experiencing homelessness.  The organization serves more than 3,000 young people each year, ages 12 to 25 years.

“Tumbleweed made a very shrewd decision to expand and relocate its headquarters at this time, locking in to today’s historically low rates.  This allowed us to lower occupancy costs over the long term,” said Paul Andrews of Cushman & Wakefield.  “This strategy cut thousands of dollars in future rent expense that now can be redirected back into the organization’s much needed programs that serve Metro Phoenix’s teenage youth.”

The local non-profit has leased 13,047 square feet at the garden office complex and will locate from 1419 N. 3rd Street in fall of 2013.

Siete Square II is one of four buildings within the larger Siete Square garden office complex.  The Indiana Farm Bureau owns Siete Square II.  Paul Andrews of Cushman & Wakefield of Arizona, Inc. represented Tumbleweed Center for Youth Development in its lease negotiations.

Phil Breidenbach and Lindsey Carlson of Colliers serve as exclusive leasing agents for Siete Square II, representing the Indiana Farm Bureau.

WellsFargoLogo

Wells Fargo Plans 410,000 SF Expansion in Chandler

By Eric Jay Toll, Senior Correspondent for Arizona Builder’s Exchange |

Special to Arizona Commercial Real Estate magazine

 

Wells Fargo unveiled its 410,000-square-foot Chandler campus expansion to a neighborhood meeting in the East Valley September 16. Arizona Builder’s Exchange broke the story Monday night that the bank filed a rezoning application with the city to allow a pair of four-story buildings on the northwest corner of Price and Queen Creek roads in the Price Corridor.

More than 2,500 additional employees will work in the new Wells Fargo buildings, bringing campus employment to more than 5,000 workers.

The bank has selected an architect, but has not named the contractor for the project. A formal announcement with construction schedule is expected shortly. AZBEX reports sources saying the project could cost as much as $90 million.

The building shapes, design and materials are intended to mirror Phase I of the campus. The offices will rise to 64 feet. Three more buildings and parking garages are projected for future phases. The city has not set a hearing date for the zoning. Wells Fargo has not yet announced its construction schedule.

Read the original story here.

 

Eric Jay Toll is the senior correspondent for Arizona Builder’s Exchange. His freelance work appears in a number of regional and national publications, including upcoming stories in AZRE and AZ Business.

Maria-1

New president joins Everest College Phoenix

Everest College Phoenix announced that Maria Walters has been appointed as president of the Phoenix campus. Walters, a veteran of the United States Air Force, has extensive experience as a leader, educator and certified interpreter. In her new position, Walters has responsibility for overall leadership and management of academic, administrative and fiscal operations of the Phoenix campus.

“We are honored to welcome Maria to our team. Everest College Phoenix will most certainly benefit from her extensive leadership skills and diverse experience ranging from the United States Air Force flight chief and college instructor to logistics manager and academic dean,” said Edward Johnson, Ph.D., president of Everest College Phoenix. “Maria’s background and dynamic leadership style will be great assets as the Phoenix campus continues to excel in preparing students for careers in in-demand occupations.

Prior to joining Everest College Phoenix, Walters served as the academic dean at Universal Technical Institute (UTI) for more than five years. She also served in the United States Air Force as a fighter squadron flight chief where she managed daily flying and maintenance operations including the supervision of 35 fighter aircraft mechanics.

Walters earned her bachelor’s degree in Spanish teaching, English as a Second Language from Weber State University in Ogden, Utah. She also holds a master’s degree in Peninsular Spanish Literature from the University of Utah.

Evening on the Diamond Presented by University of Phoenix

D-backs’ CEO Honored By PRSA

Arizona Diamondbacks President & CEO Derrick Hall was honored with the prestigious Phoenix Award by the Phoenix Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). The honor recognizes a CEO, business leader or community leader who has elevated the best practices of public relations.

“I am deeply honored, humbled and moved by this award,” said Hall. “This is really a reflection on the Diamondbacks organization and all of our employees for the great way in which we relate to the public and work closely with our fans, media members and clients.”

The Chapter has only bestowed the Phoenix Award 17 times in its history, with other legendary names such as Lou Grubb, Jerry Colangelo and last year’s winner Phil Pangrazio of Arizona Bridge to Independent Living.

Hall received the award during the event themed “Mastering the PR Puzzle” which took place at The Clayton on the Park in Scottsdale.

The Phoenix Chapter also awarded Abbie S. Fink, vice president and general manager of HMA Public Relations, with the Percy Award, which honors a professional who has demonstrated excellence in the practice of public relations, is an active supporter of PRSA Phoenix, and had made positive contributions to the Phoenix community. Christie Poole, PRSSA student with the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Arizona State University — of which Hall is a member of the Hall of Fame — was awarded the Phoenix Chapter Student Scholarship.

Hall began his career in public relations, initially working for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ minor league affiliate in Vero Beach, FL before joining the Major League team as Assistant Director of Public Relations. He became one of the youngest PR directors in MLB history in 1996 and eventually became the league’s first Sr. Vice President of Communications in 2000, a position he held with the D-backs in 2005.

Evening on the Diamond Presented by University of Phoenix

D-backs' CEO Honored By PRSA

Arizona Diamondbacks President & CEO Derrick Hall was honored with the prestigious Phoenix Award by the Phoenix Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). The honor recognizes a CEO, business leader or community leader who has elevated the best practices of public relations.

“I am deeply honored, humbled and moved by this award,” said Hall. “This is really a reflection on the Diamondbacks organization and all of our employees for the great way in which we relate to the public and work closely with our fans, media members and clients.”

The Chapter has only bestowed the Phoenix Award 17 times in its history, with other legendary names such as Lou Grubb, Jerry Colangelo and last year’s winner Phil Pangrazio of Arizona Bridge to Independent Living.

Hall received the award during the event themed “Mastering the PR Puzzle” which took place at The Clayton on the Park in Scottsdale.

The Phoenix Chapter also awarded Abbie S. Fink, vice president and general manager of HMA Public Relations, with the Percy Award, which honors a professional who has demonstrated excellence in the practice of public relations, is an active supporter of PRSA Phoenix, and had made positive contributions to the Phoenix community. Christie Poole, PRSSA student with the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications at Arizona State University — of which Hall is a member of the Hall of Fame — was awarded the Phoenix Chapter Student Scholarship.

Hall began his career in public relations, initially working for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ minor league affiliate in Vero Beach, FL before joining the Major League team as Assistant Director of Public Relations. He became one of the youngest PR directors in MLB history in 1996 and eventually became the league’s first Sr. Vice President of Communications in 2000, a position he held with the D-backs in 2005.

BannerEstrellaMedicalCenter

Banner Estrella celebrates construction topping-off

Banner Estrella Medical Center, recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the Valley’s top 10 hospitals, celebrated a major construction milestone today with a topping-out ceremony for the $161 million new patient tower.

Construction of the six-story, 279,000-square-foot tower at Banner Estrella, located at 9201 W. Thomas Road in Phoenix, will deliver 178 additional private patient beds to serve the growing West Valley, bringing the total number of beds at Banner Estrella to 392 at build-out. The lower level through fourth floor will be completely built out, and the fifth and sixth floors will be shelled for future build-out as needed by the community. The new tower will also contain additional obstetrical suites, additional neonatal intensive care unit capacity, new cardiac catheterization labs and a new endoscopy suite. The second tower is anticipated to open to patients in March 2014.

“When we opened in 2005, we promised residents that we would grow our services to meet the growing health care needs of the community,” said Deb Krmpotic, chief executive officer of Banner Estrella. “This project demonstrates our commitment to that promise and to the community we are honored to serve.

“We believe this project will strengthen our position as the leading provider of care in the Southwest Valley by providing our community much-needed inpatient beds, maternity beds, surgical treatment capacity and emergency room capacity to care for both children and adults,” she added.

Banner Estrella’s new patient tower is the first hospital structure in metro Phoenix to be built using concrete since the early 1980s. Aside from being more cost-effective, using concrete enabled the tower expansion to be completed earlier than a steel structure. Concrete also provides structural advantages of dampening vibration and, with medical equipment becoming more sensitive to movement, concrete offers important advantages long-term.

“Topping-out of the growing campus is an important milestone to achieve, marking our progress towards the successful completion of the hospital’s campus expansion that will serve the west Valley community,” said Bo Calbert, president of McCarthy Building Companies’ Southwest Division. “Thanks to collaboration with our partners, the choice to use concrete for the tower structure provides for easily adapting to the community’s long-term health needs, and allowed us to fast-track the project in order to meet demands sooner.”

During the topping-out ceremony, the final beam, signed by Banner Estrella staff and members of the design and construction team, was placed atop the tower. A mesquite tree was also lifted atop the structure, which is a tradition of recognizing project milestones achieved without injury. The mesquite tree will later be planted on campus.

roosevelt row arts district

Scottsdale Cultural Council CEO Resigns

Scottsdale Cultural Council President and CEO William H. Banchs has announced his resignation from the nonprofit organization effective August 31. Banchs plans to return to Miami to pursue new professional opportunities.

“During Bill’s five-and-a-half-year tenure he worked successfully to completely restructure and reorganize the Cultural Council’s governance and management, and to strengthen its development programs,” remarked Ellen Andres-Schneider, chair of the board of trustees.

“This was all done in accordance with a new strategic plan he helped to create. These positive developments took place during an unprecedented recession, which occupied the majority of Bill’s tenure. On behalf of the board of trustees, I want to thank Bill for his persistence and determination in bringing about these positive outcomes, which have helped pave the way toward a bright future for the Cultural Council,” Andres-Schneider added.

“I have been very fortunate to have served one of the most comprehensive cultural organizations in the nation. The artistic experiences I have had at the Scottsdale Cultural Council have been on par with the best I have ever seen or heard anywhere,” noted Bill Banchs. “I particularly wish to thank the City of Scottsdale for its commitment to the arts, the Cultural Council staff for its dedication to such high standards of artistic excellence, and the board of trustees for its active engagement and participation in our efforts to strengthen the organization and broaden its audiences and base of private-sector support.”

Banchs began his position with the Scottsdale Cultural Council in January 2008. He previously served as president of the Miami-based National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts for 17 years.

The Cultural Council will appoint an interim CEO and begin a national search for a new president and CEO.

The Scottsdale Cultural Council is contracted by the City of Scottsdale to manage the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts, Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art (SMoCA) and Scottsdale Public Art.

Greg Guglielmino

Investment Specialist Greg Guglielmino Joins Colliers' Phoenix Office

 

Colliers International in Greater Phoenix announced that Greg Guglielmino, senior associate, has joined the Phoenix office.

Guglielmino specializes in the acquisition and disposition of single- and multi-tenant office and medical investment properties for private and institutional clients. He partners with Marcus Muirhead, associate vice president of investments. Guglielmino is also a member of Colliers’ National Healthcare Services Group.

“Greg is a skilled professional and a great addition to our team,” said Bob Mulhern, managing director of Colliers. “His experience in office and medical investment sales will complement and enhance the capabilities of our established investment professionals. We are pleased to welcome Greg to Colliers.”

Guglielmino has more than 5 years of experience as an investment specialist, focusing on medical office property sales. He is an expert in financial modeling, property evaluation, detailed market research, and submarket trend analysis.

His experience includes working on behalf of private investors and institutional lenders in the sale of REO assets and investment properties involving closed listings and buyside opportunities. Prior to joining Colliers, Guglielmino was an investment associate with Marcus & Millichap’s Phoenix office.

“There are a lot of great individuals at Colliers and Marcus Muirhead is one of those individuals,” Guglielmino said. “With our similar investment backgrounds and the team approach encouraged within the organization, it is a natural fit to team with him. Together, our abilities and skill sets will add value for our clients and expand on Marcus’ positive track record for success and client satisfaction.”

He adds that the strong camaraderie within Colliers provides a positive, collaborative environment that reflects a commitment to achieving clients’ goals.

“The Colliers’ culture, management and people are refreshing and I am excited to be a part of the team.”

Guglielmino holds a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Small Business and Psychology and graduated Magna Cum Laude from Arizona State University.

 

asu skysong collaborates with Taiwan's ITRI

Crow explores potential of new educational technologies

Arizona State University President Michael M. Crow is among more than a dozen leaders from a diverse group of colleges and universities examining the disruptive potential of new educational technologies, such as massive open online courses (MOOCs), to boost the number of Americans earning a college degree. The launch of the Presidential Innovation Lab was announced recently by the American Council on Education, the nation’s largest higher education organization.

“I look forward to helping lead a national dialogue about how newer educational innovations could be used by particularly older, post-traditional students, low-income young adults and other underserved students toward degree completion,” Crow said. “This opportunity aligns directly with our ASU vision as the model for a New American University – measured not by who we exclude, but rather by who we include and how they succeed.”

According to ACE, the Presidential Innovation Lab will bring together higher education leaders to engage in proactive thinking about this new learning space. The lab is part of a wide-ranging research and evaluation effort examining the academic potential of MOOCs announced by ACE in November 2012.

Initially, the lab will meet July 21-23 at the Institute for the Future in Palo Alto, Calif., an independent, nonprofit research organization that will help guide the work of the university leaders. A second two-day meeting is scheduled for October 2013 in Washington, D.C.

The new think tank of higher education CEOs will consider questions such as how newer educational innovations could be used by students toward degree completion and the potential impact of such innovations on the fundamental design and delivery of instruction. The lab participants also will examine how institutions recognize learning and which financing models underpin all of higher education.

Findings from the lab will be shared with ACE membership, policymakers and the media. Its work is being supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

In addition to Crow, other higher education leaders taking part in the lab include the following:

•           Joseph E. Aoun, president, Northeastern University (Massachusetts)
•           Chris Bustamante, president, Rio Salado College (Arizona)
•           Scott S. Cowen, president, Tulane University (Louisiana)
•           John F. Ebersole, president, Excelsior College (New York)
•           Renu Khator, president, University of Houston, and chancellor, University of Houston System (Texas)
•           Robert W. Mendenhall, president, Western Governors University (Utah)
•           Mohammad H. Qayoumi, president, San Jose State University (California)
•           Vincent Price, provost, University of Pennsylvania
•           L. Rafael Reif, president, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
•           Kevin P. Reilly, president, University of Wisconsin System
•           Clayton Spencer, president, Bates College (Maine)
•           Linda M. Thor, chancellor, Foothill-De Anza Community College District (California)

Kristen Rosati, a shareholder at Polsinelli in Phoenix, is president of the American Health Lawyers Association.

Rosati leads American Health Lawyers Association

Attorney Kristen Rosati, a shareholder of the national law firm Polsinelli, has assumed the office of President of the American Health Lawyers Association (AHLA). The AHLA has more than 12,000 members and is the nation’s largest educational organization devoted to legal issues in the health care field.

Rosati is a member of the firm’s Health Care Practice which is the fourth largest in the country according to the AHLA and Modern Healthcare. She’s a national thought leader in the electronic health industry and will use her term to advance outreach to younger members; increase support for existing programs in the areas of leadership, training and mentoring; expand the use of technology and social media in providing benefits to members; and continue the tradition of collegiality for which the organization is known.

“I am excited to assume the role of President of AHLA at this important juncture in health care law.” said Rosati. “Creating a strong foundation for the next generation of lawyers as well as continuing to support the unique programs that distinguish AHLA as the leading health care organization for lawyers in the country, is an honor that I am proud to accept.”

Rosati has been an active member of AHLA for many years, serving on the organization’s Board of Directors and Executive Committee, and as Chair of the Programs Committee, Chair of the Finance Committee, Chair of the Professional Resources Committee, Chair of the Quality Council, Chair of the Health Information and Technology Practice Group, and Chair of the HIT Think Tank.

“Kristen has enormous respect among the healthcare bar because of her deep expertise in health information and technology, her prodigious work ethic, and her commitment to collegiality among her peers,” said Chief Executive Officer of the American Health Lawyers Association Peter Leibold. “Kristen is leading the Association in a direction that will provide significant benefit to members and continue the organization’s recent membership growth.

In her legal practice at Polsinelli, Rosati heads up the “Big Data” initiative. She plays a key role in assisting hospitals, physicians and other health care providers migrating to electronic health records as they tackle the legal complexities associated with HIPAA compliance, electronic health records roll-outs, health information exchange, data sharing for research and clinical integration initiatives and ACO’s, and clinical research compliance and clinical trials contracting.

“Kristen’s leadership in AHLA will not only benefit the organization, but it will also serve as a model for all of Polsinelli’s lawyers as we look for ways to be more in tune with our clients and the industry generally,” said Polsinelli’s Health Care Practice Chair Matt Murer.

MayorHR13

Mesa mayor leads US Conference of Mayors

Mesa Mayor Scott Smith has been sworn in as 71st president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

The outgoing USCM president is Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter.

Nutter appointed Smith as head of the nonpartisan organization during its 81st annual meeting Monday in Las Vegas.

More than 200 mayors met to discuss a broad range of policy issues impacting the nation’s cities including the economic health, immigration, school safety, energy efficiency, housing and help for returning military veterans.

As conference president, Smith will set the organization’s agenda, appoint committee and task force chairs and serve as the national spokesperson for the term that runs through next June.

Smith was the organization’s vice president over the past year.

Brewer

Brewer's Medicaid expansion plan secured

Arizona lawmakers have endorsed a key element of President Barack Obama’s health care law in a huge political victory for Republican Gov. Jan Brewer, after a lengthy fight over Medicaid expansion that divided the state’s Republican leadership.

The expansion that will extend health care to 300,000 more low-income Arizonans came after months of stalled negotiations, tense debates and political maneuvering as Brewer pushed the Medicaid proposal through a hostile Legislature.

She secured her victory Thursday after lawmakers passed Brewer’s $8.8 billion state budget that included the Medicaid expansion provided under a key provision of the Affordable Care Act. The Legislature’s Republican leadership called it “Chicago politics” and labeled Brewer a puppet master, but Brewer remained undeterred as she prepared to sign the measures into state law.

“The day has been a red-letter day for the people of Arizona,” Brewer told reporters after the budget votes Thursday. “It was a win, win, win all the way around.”

Brewer, an early critic of the Affordable Care Act, surprised the nation when she acknowledged the Medicaid expansion as the law of the land in her State of the State address in January. She noted that rejecting an expansion would mean Arizona taxpayers would subsidize care for those in other states while receiving no benefits themselves.

The expansion is expected to help reduce the amount of uncompensated care hospitals must absorb and help cut what Brewer called a hidden health care tax that people who buy insurance pay, through higher premiums, to cover others’ care.

After the Legislature secured her political win, Brewer softened her support for the health care law.

“Medicaid was here long before Obama health care. I have never liked Obama health care,” she told reporters after the vote. “It has nothing to do with Obama health care.”

The expansion is optional under last year’s Supreme Court decision upholding the health care law, and many Republican governors rejected it.

In all, 23 states plus Washington, D.C., are moving ahead with the expansion, while 15 states have turned it down. Another 12 states are still weighing options.

Nearly all the states refusing are led by Republicans. Several of the states accepting have Republican governors, but most are led by Democrats.

Washington will pick up the entire cost of the expansion for the first three years and 90 percent over the longer haul. It’s estimated that less than $100 billion in state spending could trigger nearly $1 trillion in federal dollars over a decade.

In Arizona, Republican leaders in the Legislature called the expansion a massive government overreach that would drive the federal government deeper into debt. They predicted the government promises of paying for the expansion would turn out to be false.

“This is the biggest mistake we’ve made in the Arizona Legislature this year and maybe ever,” said Republican Sen. Kelli Ward, of Lake Havasu City.

Republicans control the Legislature and all statewide elected offices in Arizona, but the Medicaid fight highlighted internal fractures between those who want smaller government and others who, like Brewer, who said broader health care access is good for the state.

“The bottom line here is greed,” said Sen. Al Melvin, a Tucson Republican who is running for governor and voted against the Medicaid expansion. “The people who want this know in their hearts that Obamacare is going to collapse under its own weight.”

A newly formed coalition of Democrats and moderate Republicans worked closely with Brewer to stand up to the conservative leaders who had blocked debate on the Medicaid expansion for six months. Lawmakers worked through the night Wednesday to get the plan through the House, and the Senate vote came hours later Thursday afternoon.

“I’ve never seen the case where a governor has rolled over her own party because she was throwing a temper tantrum,” said Republican Rep. Eddie Farnsworth, of Gilbert.

Senate President Andy Biggs said lawmakers had little information about what was in the budget before passing it.

“I am deeply and profoundly disappointed at the manner at which this came down,” he said.

Brewer dismissed the insults, predicting that all would be forgiven and Republican leaders would move forward together.

“Tomorrow they’ll probably say ‘I’m sorry’ or we will just forget it,” she said. “I just try to listen and let it go.”

It was a year of wins and losses for Arizona’s GOP.

The Legislature voted to adjourn its 2013 session early Friday morning after passing a slew of other bills, including an election overhaul that could make it more difficult for voters to obtain and return mail ballots. Biggs had to beg for extra votes to get the measure opposed by Democrats and voter outreach groups passed in the Senate.

Among the bills left on the floor was a proposal that would have prohibited abortion clinics from using Medicaid dollars to fund administrative costs and allowed for unannounced inspections, a top GOP priority.

Still, Brewer signed more than 100 bills advanced by conservative Republicans throughout the marathon session, including a measure that bars cities and counties from destroying guns turned over to police at community buyback events and instead requiring that they be resold. She also signed bills that will wildly increase campaign finance limits for state candidates and require unemployed workers to present documents showing they were fired before they can receive benefits.

Through it all, Brewer made it clear that the Medicaid expansion was her top priority. She held multiple rallies featuring low-income patients on the Arizona Capitol lawn and during the final month of the session, Brewer refused to sign any other bills until lawmakers passed a budget that included the health care expansion.

The Medicaid plan would cover people making between 100 percent and 138 percent of the federal poverty level and restore coverage to more than 100,000 childless adults who lost Medicaid coverage because of a state budget crunch. About 1.3 million Arizonans already are covered by the state’s plan.