Tag Archives: price

Calfee06

Cassidy Turley Completes 69,471 SF Lease for 1st United Door Technologies

Cassidy Turley announced it completed a lease for 69,471 square feet for 1st United Door Technologies, LLC at Geneva Industrial, 1016 W. Geneva Drive in Tempe. Senior Vice President Bruce Calfee and Vice President Josh Wyss, of Cassidy Turley’s Industrial Group, represented the Tenant while Executive Vice Presidents Steve Sayre and Pat Harlan represented the Landlord, CLPF Geneva Industrial, LP (Phoenix).
1st United Door Technologies is a Tempe, Arizona based garage door manufacturer. The company specializes in steel and wood doors for both commercial and residential use. Ownership is comprised of the former owners and senior management of Anozira Door Systems. Since 1982, 1st United Door Technologies has been serving Homebuilders across the Nation with unique and distinctive garage doors that enhance the beauty and value of the Builders homes. With over 150 years of door installation and manufacturing experience, the management team is known for providing innovative and quality products at very competitive prices. The new Geneva Industrial location is part of a company expansion.
Built in 1981, Geneva Industrial is a ±69,471 square-foot, industrial manufacturing building. The property is part of the South Tempe Industrial Corridor and is in close to the I-10 and US-60 Freeways. The building is currently 100 percent leased.

ipo

Advantages and disadvantages of an IPO

The closing concludes and a company suddenly has $50 million cash in its bank account from the sale of its stock.  Champagne corks are popped and celebration ensues―for a brief period.  “Going public” is an exciting event for all involved and may provide many advantages to the company’s operations.  However, being a public company has certain disadvantages that should also be considered.

“Going public” refers to a sale of stock or debt in an initial public offering or IPO registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).  A “public company” refers to a company that has undertaken an IPO or is otherwise required to be a reporting company under the Securities and Exchange Act.  A “private company” typically has a limited number of owners or investors and is not required to file reports with the SEC.  This article discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of “going public.”

Advantages of an IPO

An IPO and the result of being a public company may provide significant advantages to the company and its stockholders.  These include cash infusion, ability to “mint coin,” easier future access to equity and debt markets, liquidity for pre-IPO stockholders and institutionalization of the company.  The common theme of these advantages is that a liquid market for its stock “unlocks” value that the company could not otherwise access.  By having publicly traded stock, the discount that is attached to stock of private companies no longer applies.

Cash Infusion The result of an IPO is a significant and immediate infusion of cash into the company.  This cash is typically “earmarked” for specific items described in the IPO disclosure documents, which can be for a variety of purposes.  For example, the company may use the proceeds of the IPO to expand its inventory, property and equipment base, reduce debt, further research and development or expand its services.

Minting of Coin. Having an established value and liquid market for its stock creates additional “coin” for the company through issuance of additional stock.  This “coin” may be used as consideration to acquire other business and to compensate both current and future employees.

The ability to utilize the company’s stock for an acquisition significantly decreases its cash needs and allows it to engage in transactions without tapping into its “war chest” of IPO proceeds, which can be put to use to fund future growth.  In addition, acquisitions using the company’s stock as consideration may be structured as a “tax-free” reorganization, which can allow the sellers to defer taxes on gains associated with the sale of their business.  Using stock as consideration for acquisitions also provides sellers an opportunity to participate in the future growth of the combined organization.

Another benefit of a liquid market for a public company’s shares is that its stock may be used to compensate both its existing and future employees through the grant of options or direct issuance of shares.  Grants of options or stock provide a means to share the company’s success and are a great tool for attracting talented management and employees.

Access to Capital Markets.  Being a public company enhances access to both equity and debt markets.  After the company has been a reporting company for 12 months, it may engage in follow-on offerings using a “short form” registration process.  The ability to use this process reduces both the time and expense of future equity financings.

As a reporting company, the transparency of its financial position and operations makes it better suited to obtain debt financings.  The infusion of cash from an IPO also enhances the balance sheet and makes the company a much stronger candidate for debt financings.

Liquidity An IPO provides liquidity to the company’s founders, employees and pre-IPO investors holding the company’s stock.  While the liquidity may not be immediately realized due to “lockup” requirements imposed by underwriters and other SEC rules, being a public company provides a means for the pre-IPO stockholders to monetize the value of their stock at some point in the future.

Institutionalization.  Being  publicly traded  adds to a company’s stature as an institution, which can enhance its competitive position.  The IPO process itself generates publicity that may enhance the company’s recognition in the marketplace.  As a result, suppliers, vendors and lenders often perceive the company as a better credit risk and customers may perceive it as a better source of products or services.  The stature of a public company can also enhance its ability to attract top level executives and employees.

Disadvantages of an IPO

While going public provides significant advantages to a company and its stockholders, the requirements imposed by securities laws produce disadvantages to the company and its operations.  These include increased costs, securities law compliance, changes in corporate governance structure and becoming a “slave to the stock price.”

Costs.  The costs of an IPO include both the costs of engaging in the offering process and the future costs of being a reporting company.  Typical costs of raising $50 million through the IPO process can range from $3.5 million to $5 million.  Raising less money can increase the percentage of offering costs significantly.  These costs include underwriting commissions, legal and accounting fees, SEC and National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) filing fees, exchange fees, financial printing, travel and other miscellaneous costs related to the offering.  In addition to these initial costs, as a reporting company subject to securities laws, including Sarbanes-Oxley, and exchange listing requirements, the company will have significant ongoing costs associated with its operations.  These costs include outside directors’ fees and expenses, directors’ and officers’ liability insurance, accounting and legal costs, internal control costs, printing costs for stockholder reports and proxies and costs of investor relations.  According to a survey published by Foley & Lardner LLP, these costs average approximately $2.37 million per year, not including lost productivity costs, for public companies with revenue under $1 billion.

The costs are not just monetary.  The IPO process can take up to six months or longer.  During this period the company’s executive management team must devote substantial time and energy to the IPO.  This takes away from management’s time and ability to run the company’s business, and operations may suffer during the IPO process.

Securities Law Compliance A myriad of compliance issues results from an IPO.  The IPO process imposes severe restrictions on the company’s marketing and publicity activities during the “quiet period” preceding the filing of a registration statement.  The registration and reporting process involves the disclosure of significant information about the company that is readily available to the company’s competitors.  Following completion of the IPO, the company will be required to file quarterly, annual and current reports detailing its operations and announcing major events.  This disclosure includes detailed information about operations, executive compensation, financial results and significant customers and vendors.  Proxy statements must be filed with the SEC before a stockholders meeting can be called.  The company cannot release information on a selective basis and must be careful to assure that the information it releases is accurate and complete.  Company insiders and major stockholders also must comply with the Exchange Act requirements for reporting their stock ownership and prohibitions on short swing trading.  Finally, the exchanges where the company’s stock is traded have various listing standards that impose additional governance and disclosure requirements.

The changes to the securities laws resulting from the Sarbanes-Oxley Act have greatly increased the compliance issues that a public company must meet (with corresponding cost increases).  These include enhanced auditing and governance standards, additional responsibilities for the company’s independent directors, development and documentation of control procedures and certifications by the CEO and CFO.  The certification requirements are backed up by possible criminal sanctions for violations.

Change in Corporate Governance Structure A listing requirement of the major stock exchanges is that the company’s board be comprised of a majority of independent directors.  Independent directors cannot be officers, employees, major stockholders or outside service providers.  Independent directors must comprise the audit, compensation and corporate governance committees.  This means that the duties of selection and oversight of auditors, setting executive compensation and determining board candidates and litigation issues are taken away from management and given to “strangers” that may have little past experience with the company’s operations.  Another listing requirement is holding annual stockholder meetings.  Matters such as calling meetings and presenting proposals to stockholders must now be accomplished in compliance with SEC rules.

A major change brought about by Sarbanes-Oxley was empowerment of the independent directors.  Previous “best practices” of having a majority of independent directors are now mandated by exchange listing requirements.  The independent directors are charged with oversight of the company’s management and auditors.  For most companies, particularly where the founders are executive management, the change in corporate governance structure resulting from being a public company may take some adjustment.

Becoming a Slave to the Stock Price It is often said that a professional baseball pitcher is only as good as his last outing and that a CEO of a public company is only as good as her company’s last quarter.  While a fluid and liquid market in a company’s stock unlocks value, a public company’s stock price is frequently subject to rapid fluctuation.  The stock price can be affected by a variety of factors, over which management may have little or no control.  Reporting of quarterly earnings can lead to decision making based on the short term result when a longer term perspective would be better for the company.  The close ties between executive compensation and their personal net worth to operating results enhances the dilemma of seeking short-term results at the sacrifice of long-term perspective.  Wall Street can be impatient and, as with baseball pitchers, may have a tendency to look only to immediate past results rather than the big picture.

A loss of stock value can lead to dire consequences, such as stockholder lawsuits, loss of confidence in management and possible hostile takeovers.  Lawsuits can stem from a sudden decline in stock price.  A stockholder lawsuit can be very costly and distract management from running the business.    Recently stockholder activism has been on the rise and dissatisfaction with directors (including executive management on the board) has been evidenced by stockholders withholding approval of directors.  Various proposals, such as mandatory removal of directors that do not win a majority of stockholder approval in elections, are increasing the pressures on management to perform on a quarterly basis.  If a company loses favor with analysts and stockholders, its stock may suffer additional devaluation, which could lead to it becoming attractive to a hostile takeover bid.  A successful takeover, particularly a hostile takeover, could result in the company’s founders being removed from management positions.

Conclusion

While going public can have many positive effects on a company and its operations, these positive effects must be balanced against the disadvantages.   Going public drastically changes a company’s culture and has an ongoing impact on business operations.  Determining if going public is the right course for a company to pursue is a major decision and must be carefully considered by management before this course is taken.

 

Thomas Morgan is a partner in Lewis and Roca’s (www.lrlaw.com) Phoenix office in Phoenix, Arizona. He practices securities, corporate and tax law with an emphasis in public and private securities offerings, private equity fundings, mergers and acquisitions, regulatory compliance, and general tax planning. He can be reached at 602.262.5712  or TMorgan@LRLaw.com

Apple

Apple’s iPad Mini priced at $329

Apple Inc. is refusing to compete on price with its rivals in the tablet market — it’s pricing its new, smaller iPad well above the competition.

On Tuesday, the company revealed the iPad Mini, with a screen that’s about two-thirds the size of the full-size model, and said it will cost $329 and up.

Apple starts taking orders for the new model on Friday Oct. 26, said marketing chief Phil Schiller at an event in San Jose, Calif. Wi-Fi-only models on Nov. 2. Later, the company will add models capable of accessing “LTE” wireless data networks.

The price fits into the Apple product lineup between the iPad 2 at $399 and the latest version of the iPod touch at $299. But company watchers had been expecting Apple to price the iPad Mini at $250 to $300 to counter the threat of less expensive tablets like Amazon.com Inc.’s Kindle Fire, which starts at $159. Barnes & Noble Inc.’s Nook HD and Google Inc.’s Nexus 7 both start at $199.

Apple shares fell $14.83, or 2.3 percent, to $619.20 when the price was announced. Shares of Barnes & Noble Inc. jumped 91 cents, or 6.3 percent, to $15.35.

Shares of Amazon.com Inc. were down 12 cents, or less than 0.1 percent, at $233.66 while the rest of the stock market was in retreat.

Use Amazon to help you shop this holiday season

Amazon And Twitter Are Resources For Savvy Shoppers This Weekend

There are many Web resources for the frugal shopper, like Groupon, LivingSocial, SocialBuy and BuyWithMe, but there are still ways to save on the Web without printing a coupon.

Amazon

Amazon’s daily Gold Box deals were intensified this week with the addition of Black Friday Week Lightning Deals. Everything from atlases to car seats were available at an immensely discounted price for a short period of time and in limited quantities.

Black Friday deals at Amazon include ridiculously cheap DVDs, diamond earrings and even a Martha Stewart electronic cake cutting system – as if you didn’t already have one of those.

After Thanksgiving’s shop-till-you-drop marathon, Amazon’s Gold Box deals are available every day. You can sign up to receive daily e-mails or texts about the Gold Box deal, or you can follow the deal on Twitter.

Twitter

Twitter is another resource for shoppers this weekend.

If you’re a little behind the game and are still looking for Black Friday deals, try searching #blackfriday. No doubt people will be tweeting about their finds and stores will probably still be tweeting about their promotions.

Search #cybermonday and you’ll find people tweeting about deals. Check out the following Twitter pages for links to some great Cyber Monday deals.


If you still want to save after the holiday weekend, Twitter can still be a great resource.

For example, @RetailMeNot shares coupons for more than 65,000 retailers worldwide. You can also visit the Web site if you’re looking for a specific coupon.

Willing to search through thousands of tweets to find a deal? CheapTweet.com is the right place for you. The site indexes the deals on Twitter and allows you to search for deals by category and store.

If you’d like to learn more about how to use Groupon, read AZNow.Biz’s Groupon article.

medianpricenotfullstory

Median Price Not Full Story For Phoenix Market

The median price for resale homes in the Phoenix area has been edging up for several months. Does this signal that the market is approaching normalcy? Jay Butler, associate professor of real estate and author of the Realty Studies report from the W. P. Carey School of Business, talks about the factors affecting median price, including the still high number of foreclosure-related sales. It’s tempting to declare a market up-tilt based only on median price, he says, but because of that foreclosure activity, Phoenix is still far from a normal market. (13:09)

Executive gadgets

Cool Gadgets For The Cool Executive

 

Getting a shiny new toy for the office doesn’t always have to be justified by how much money it will save or how much more productive it will make you (unless you’ve got one of those CFOs). Sometimes you just want cool gear. Here are some fun gadgets just out that get business execs into the cool zone.

We all know a hand talker. Those ever expressive types who accentuate any conversation with their hands waving about. If you have one of these in your office, put those hands to good use with the Air Mouse Elite. Using your own natural hand movements, this uber-sensitive mouse turns into a master presentation controller. You can walk freely and flail your hands every which way while giving a killer presentation. The cursor even turns into a highlighter, laser pointer or pen. You can even gently swipe it in mid-air to activate embedded media and other special effects. It works with both PCs and Macs, retails for $79.99, and it’s carried at a slew of retailers, including Amazon.

 

Keep your laptop and hand-held devices juiced up wherever you go with this slick new universal charger from Targus. The Targus Premium Laptop Charger is smaller and lighter than other universals, and it lets you charge your notebook, plus one low-power device, at the same time.  The charger comes with nine “tips” the enable the connection between the charger and most laptop brands on the market, so you’re likely to find one that works with your laptop.  It also includes a mini-USB tip and an Apple iPod/iPhone/iTouchcharging tip. Power up in the wall or in your car with both AC and DC plugs. $149.99 at www.targus.com.

 

 

Are you fairly certain you’re wasting time in meetings? Want to know exactly how much is being wasted? Not time — money. The Time Is Money (TIM) clock shows you exactly what you’re tossing in terms of cash as every minute passes on the clock. You simply enter your hourly rate, the number of people in the meeting, hit start, and as your team blah, blah, blahs you can see very clearly what it’s costing the company. Now if only they could somehow integrate this with Facebook … This little guy is $24.99 at www.bringtim.com.

 

 

If you’re one of the millions of people who use their iPad for business, then you probably enjoy carrying it around in a stylish case. Why not let your case do more than just protect the device inside? The M-Edge Method Portfolio, while pricey, is a multi-functional, modern portfolio that lets you organize and carry your business wares in the same swanky sleeve as your iPad. This portfolio is designed with a sleeve that holds the iPad in place, four credit cards slots, a clear ID window, and a business envelope/boarding pass pocket. Two leather pockets are sized to fit your smart phones (up to two). A handy zipper pocket keeps all of your other incidentals. $119.99 at www.medgestore.com.

87787264

Falling Prices, More Foreclosures Plague The Valley’s Housing Market

The housing market in the Phoenix metro area continues to tread through troubled waters.

According to a new report from the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, the median price for an existing home in the Valley fell for the third straight month. Making matters worse, foreclosures continue to weigh down activity in the existing-home market.

The median home-resale price for last month was $135,000 — $3,000 less than August 2009. In fact, existing-home prices have been falling steadily since May, when the median price was $144,000. The median price was at $143,000 in June, and $137,500 in July.

“Although current interest rates and home prices are very attractive, homeowners don’t seem to be motivated to buy,” says Jay Butler, an associate professor of real estate at ASU. “This lack of motivation can be attributed to anemic economic and job recovery, low consumer confidence and stricter underwriting guidelines, among other factors.”

Home sales last month were particularly sluggish, with 4,800 homes re-sold. That’s down from almost 5,100 in July. In August 2009, almost 6,000 homes were re-sold. The numbers aren’t expected to improve anytime soon as home sales traditionally slow down after the summer season.

“As the year comes to an end, median prices often decline in response to holiday and school activities that allow little time or desire to buy a home,” Butler says. “Beyond the impact of foreclosure activity, the absence of a strong move-up market, will also limit any growth in home prices.”

The other barometer of the Valley’s existing home market — foreclosures — fared just as badly in August. Foreclosures accounted for 45 percent of the existing-home market last month, the highest percentage since January.

“When you add in re-sales of previously foreclosed-on homes, all of this foreclosure-related activity represents a full two-thirds of the market’s transactions in August,” Butler says.

About 4,000 foreclosures were recorded in Maricopa County in August, up slightly from about 3,900 in July. In August 2009, 3,100 foreclosures were reported.

light reflecting off gold bars

Don’t Count On The Current Gold Rush Lasting

The recent economic recession forced society to relook at what we consider to be financial norms. What was considered reasonable several years ago is now unjustifiable based on today’s new standard.

The comfort of having money in an actual wallet is greater than having a pricey purse to carry it in.

It is possible that the same fear that shifted people’s spending habits is what has driven the price of gold to an all-time high.

In my book, “Financial Intelligence,” I show the historical volatility of the price of gold per ounce. Ten years ago this July, gold was trading at approximately $288 per ounce. Today, gold is now trading just shy of $1,200 per ounce. That is a near 15 percent compound rate of return per year over the last 10 years, while the stock market has gained no ground.

Now that the economy is slowly stabilizing, will gold continue to be a profitable investment? Only time will tell, but history suggests that there most likely will be a decline in price. Everything in this modern economic world is cyclical and vulnerable to corrections.

I am amazed about how many people assume that because gold is a tangible asset, it does not carry any risk. Despite what the late-night infomercials say, there is risk in gold and you should consider that risk before investing in it.

In my opinion, when you start to see repetitive get rich quick TV commercials, you should begin to doubt that “investment.” Remember in the late 1990s when TV commercials were touting that through day-trading stocks you could retire in your 4’s? Or the real estate gurus that told you that you could make millions in real estate if you attended their workshops? Today you can’t watch TV without seeing some type of commercial encouraging you to buy gold.

Given the economic environment that we just experienced, it makes sense that gold appreciated in value. Gold historically has increased in value during times of great uncertainty, but the tide is slowly changing. If the global economy can avoid a double-dip recession, we may see the price of gold revert back to its historical mean.

Apart from winning the lottery, there is no such thing as a get rich quick strategy. It always takes longer that you originally hoped and there are always setbacks.

It is always a wise move to invest in an asset that you feel meets your long-term investment objective and that enhances your diversification. Don’t try to time the market or try to get in on the next big thing; you could do more damage than good.

Bottom line, if you had a crystal ball, you should have invested in gold 10 years ago. Now it may be too late.