Tag Archives: PricewaterhouseCoopers

health,informatics

Stat Doctors Hires 3 Executives to Support Expansion

Stat Doctors™, a leading eHealth solution providing 24/7/365 access to affordable quality care, added three senior-level executives to its growing staff to keep pace with the demand for convenient, high-quality telemedicine.

· Dyan Bymark joins as vice president of marketing. She is responsible for planning and executing marketing plans to achieve growth targets. A veteran marketer with more than 20 years of experience in health care and professional services, Bymark has held management and leadership roles with high-profile companies including Thomson West, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Kronos Optimal Health Company, CIGNA Healthcare and ScriptSave.
· John Wilson joins as vice president of sales. He is responsible for recruiting, training and leading a national sales team as the company implements an aggressive growth plan. Wilson brings 25 years of business development and sales leadership experience from his roles at global organizations including KPMG, Marsh, Mercer and UnitedHealthcare where he recently served as vice president of key accounts Arizona, sales and account management.
· Pamela Gould joins as vice president of payor sales. She is responsible for cultivating business development opportunities with regional payors throughout the country. A Registered Nurse with an extensive clinical background, Gould brings more than 20 years of experience in business development and sales, most recently serving as vice president of sales for Integra.

“We made incredible strides in the eHealth industry in just a few years, emerging as a national leader. These new executives have the skills, experience and passion to help us grow even further and meet the demand for Stat Doctors around the country,” said Dr. Alan C. Roga, M.D., F.A.C.E.P., founder and CEO of Stat Doctors. “In addition to deep expertise in their disciplines, they each have the vision needed to support Stat Doctors’ growth while maintaining our quality and integrity.”

Stat Doctors is available as an additional health benefit through employer-provided health insurance coverage and group plans. With an average wait time of six minutes, patients can be treated for minor illnesses and common medical conditions online and over the phone, 24/7/365.

The American Telemedicine Association estimates more than 10 million Americans directly benefited from telemedicine over the past year, and this number is expected to more than double by 2016. Additionally, a survey from global analytics firm Towers Watson says 37 percent of midsize and large employers anticipate offering telemedicine services in 2015 as a low-cost alternative to face-to-face visits for nonemergency issues.

“More companies and insurance carriers are adopting eHealth solutions to not only save money, but provide patients with increased convenience and quality care,” Dr. Roga added. “At Stat Doctors, we strive to continue our efforts to pioneer the way virtual health care is delivered, offering high-quality eVisits that replicate the traditional patient-doctor relationship, yet at a much more affordable rate.”

cronkite global initiative

2013 Global Summit on Negotiation and Trust

The only professional conference that directly makes the connection between negotiation, trust and achieving a sustainable outcome is the Global Summit on Negotiation and Trust, a three-day event that will take place November 8, 9 & 10, 2013 at the Thunderbird School of Global Management in Phoenix, Arizona.

This program is designed to help participants become better at forming and sustaining collaborative relationships; increase cross-cultural competence and trust in international negotiation settings; make trust a competitive edge through practical tools and techniques from proven experts; and deploy trust to resolve conflict more effectively and improve negotiation results.

Independent research has established a link between high trust and negotiation results, revealing how these characteristics contribute to improved productivity, higher employee morale, lower organizational conflict, faster decision-making, better teamwork and lower costs of litigation and failed partnerships. The conference will provide a road map for enhancing credibility, improving employee engagement, building commitment, loyalty, and a high performance culture. Additionally, participants will expand their personal and professional network while harnessing the collective wisdom of experienced practitioners, top scholars and executive peers.

Among the speakers will be:  Stephen MR Covey, Author of New York Times and Wall Street Journal #1 bestseller “The Speed of Trust”; Dr. Robert Cialdini, renowned Author of the NY Times Bestseller “Influence: Science & Practice”; Divya Narendra, CEO of SumZero and a co-founder of ConnectU, the predecessor to Facebook; Hon. Hlengiwe Mkhize, Deputy Minister of Economic Development, South Africa; Edgardo Pappacena, Global Business Model Transformation Leader for PriceWaterhouseCoopers; and a number of top scholars, leading practitioners, business leaders and Harvard luminaries.

Conference Chairman and event speaker Andre Bisasor, brings with him a legacy of successful events as the founder of the Negotiation & Leadership Conference. This Global Summit is the next iteration of preeminent conferences produced in the tradition of the previous gatherings held in Cambridge. The following leading authorities on the subject of negotiation in the field are scheduled to speak at the Global Summit.

  • Dr. Robert Cialdini (Renowned Author of the NY Times Bestseller “Influence: Science & Practice”);
  • Michael Wheeler (Harvard Business School Professor);
  • Bruce Hay (Harvard Law School Professor);
  • Divya Narendra (CEO, SumZero and An Originator of the Facebook idea at Harvard College);
  • Chris Voss (Former Head of the FBI International Hostage Negotiation Unit; Former Subject Matter Expert on Hostage Negotiation For G-8 and White House; Former Lecturer at Harvard);
  • Leonard Kopelman (Lecturer on Management & Law at Harvard University; Renowned Expert in international & diplomatic law)
  • Dr. Lakshmi Balachandra (Professor, Babson College; Former Lecturer on Negotiation at Harvard and MIT)
  • Hon. Hlengiwe Mkhize (Deputy Minister of Economic Development, Govt. of South Africa);
  • Dr. Karen Walch (Professor at Thunderbird School of Management);
  • Edgardo Pappacena (Global Business Transformation Leader & Former Chief Strategy Officer, PriceWaterhouseCoopers);
  • Clark Freshman (UCLA Law Professor; Expert in Lie Detection in Negotiation);
  • And many more

Pricing begins at $1,395 USD with an Early Bird registration special of $995 USD for registration before October 15, 2013. Student tickets are deeply discounted at only $150 USD for Early Bird, or $295USD at the regular rate.

To register, go to  http://globalsummitonnegotiation.com/registration-page/

Early registrants, who also follow on twitter at @globalsummitAZ, qualify for giveaways including: one complimentary 8-week, 100% online Executive Certificate course from the Executive Certificate in Global Negotiations, a value of $1,980 USD, as well as one complimentary admission to the on-campus program, Communicating & Negotiating with a Global Mindset, at the Glendale campus with a value of $3,800 USD.

The conference also includes a concurrent youth program that provides a limited number of high school students ( including those from under-resourced communities) the chance to attend the event for free.

Additional information on the Global Summit is available at http://globalsummitonnegotiation.com/

Diane Costantino - 50 Most Influential Women in AZ Business

Diane Costantino – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane CostantinoManaging partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers

Costantino has been managing partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers since June 2004. She helps her clients with acquisition structuring, global expansion and other complex tax matters. She also gives back to the community through her involvement in Boys and Girls Clubs and United Way. She also received the Spirit of Philanthropy Award for her work with the Arizona’s Children Association. She is a Graduate of the University of Arizona.

Surprising fact: “I love being outdoors, am an avid hiker and have hiked the Grand Canyon numerous times.”

Biggest challenge: “To succeed as the managing partner required seeking advice from accomplished leaders, prioritizing what I wanted to achieve, collaborating
with my partners and developing a winning strategy.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

Adaptive Reuse - AZRE Magazine July/August 2010

Waste Not Want Not – Successful, Sustainable Adaptive Reuse

Adaptive Reuse

In this economy, it isn’t surprising that everyone is looking to get more for less. Whether you are an owner, representative or a member of the commercial real estate industry, the importance of delivering value has never been greater. Naturally, clients are looking to reduce cost per square foot, but they are also searching for more value in that square footage by making their spaces more efficient and reducing energy costs. Adaptive reuse of an existing building can be a viable marriage of these philosophies, for companies and brokers alike.

According to the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and PricewaterhouseCoopers’ 2010 Emerging Trends in Real Estate report, projects of the future are trending toward “infill, urbanizing suburbs and transit-oriented development.” The populace is looking for convenience, shorter commutes and reduced energy expenses — at home, in their vehicles and in their businesses.

Applications

Tina Burger, a principal at Excel Commercial in Scottsdale, agrees with the report and points to the Scottsdale Airpark area as a good example of these trends, and how they can affect redevelopment and reuse. Burger is on the Scottsdale Airpark Advocacy Subcommittee, and assists both the Chamber and the City of Scottsdale with their General Plan on redevelopment. In the Scottsdale Airpark area, she says there is a vast amount of vacant, functionally obsolete space that could be sustainably adapted to accommodate a variety of tenants. The Advocacy Subcommittee is working toward a plan for the Airpark area that provides a roadmap for development.

Using an existing structure, as opposed to building new, is a sustainable solution. From an environmental vantage, there is an opportunity to reduce waste in construction and be more efficient with the space. This efficiency can be realized by utilizing sustainable design philosophies and innovative products.

Finding the Right Space

When exploring adaptive reuse, it is important to keep a few things in mind:

  • Appropriate space selection is vital to achieving success.
  • Warehouses and big box retail spaces can provide valuable flexibility, and accommodate a variety of functions and amenities.
  • Look for types of facilities that provide ample ceiling height and large floor plates.

From a design perspective, high ceilings allow for ease of installing and maintaining building systems by providing several feet of space above the ceiling. This extra space enables the mechanical ducts, plumbing lines and light systems to be stacked, instead of being packed into a more typical space of only about 18 to 20 inches. This allows for less expensive maintenance and increases the space’s flexibility.

Conversely, ceiling height may be an acoustical challenge for open work spaces, private offices or conference rooms in which noise will be a distraction. However, several design techniques are available to mitigate these issues. Interior designers and space planners work with individuals and firms to position heavily trafficked areas away from conference rooms and private offices. Individual work spaces can allay these issues by installing clouds, or lower hanging acoustical tiles, to reduce noise and increase privacy without compromising the collaboration that open-office plans seek to nurture.

Buildings that lend themselves to reuse:

  • Warehouses
  • Theaters
  • Cafeterias
  • Large retail centers

Property types with larger floor plates allow for greater flexibility, and the potential for a larger benefit from expert space planning. Work stations can be planned in the most beneficial and efficient layout for the client. Critical relationships between staff can be placed together in a neighborhood, while communal areas such as copy rooms, break rooms and restrooms can be centralized. These layouts reduce waste through unnecessary duplication of services, and allow for future office reconfigurations that do not require demolition.

Designing Spaces

When choosing to adapt a large space, it is important to create appropriate degrees of scale for the comfort of users. By designing and planning effective lighting, ceiling treatments, furnishings and color finish palette, these adapted spaces can provide creative, inviting, comfortable meeting and work spaces on an appropriate scale for large and/or small groups.

Lack of natural daylighting is an obstacle to overcome when adapting an existing space. Those concerned with energy efficiency and productivity understand the importance of natural daylight. To increase daylighting, additional windows, skylights or solar tubes can be installed. Solar tubes increase the amount of daylight that can be introduced deep into a structure’s interior. New technologies may also be incorporated into existing windows, to reflect light deeper into a space while avoiding glare. This technique’s effectiveness may be increased by incorporating a white ceiling during the conversion.

On the other hand, should the desired end result of adapting a structure be a computer training classroom, a worship center or a theater — the lack of natural daylighting available in a warehouse or large retail center may be a positive, money-saving advantage.

Another added benefit of big box retail and warehouse adaptation is the increased floor load capacity. This can provide for further flexibility, particularly for computer-intensive businesses, or the incorporation of amenities such as a fitness center or rock-climbing wall.

Green Spaces

Although some adaptive reuse spaces provide adequate electrical loads and HVAC capacity, it is not unusual to have to add additional capacity. This upgrade process is an ideal time to install equipment that will improve indoor air quality, increase electrical efficiency or add photovoltaic collectors. These steps can decrease energy expenses and, according to a response included in ULI’s report, will “’fetch a bigger price than comparable space without green features” when owners choose to sell. Choosing to have an adapted space certified by the U.S. Green Building Council is objective verification that the space stands apart, offering energy efficiency and heightened productivity.

Burger agrees, adding, “The biggest reason for an owner to upgrade their property is to preserve the asset’s value today and in the future.” Many energy-efficient upgrades have reasonable payback periods.

An organization’s culture also is a significant factor in choosing to adapt an existing building. A site might be chosen for its historical significance, location or prestige. Other institutions appreciate the anonymity that an adapted building can offer, while other owners may need a larger space and chose to reuse rather than rebuild.

There are many reasons to choose adaptive reuse and, if done wisely in partnership with a design professional, such a choice can be cost-effective, sustainable and successful.

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Article written for AZRE by H. Joshua Gould, AIA, LEED AP,  who is the chairman and CEO of RNL; and Carl Price, AIA, LEED AP, who is a principal at RNL. www.rnldesign.com

www.pwc.com
www.scottsdaleaz.gov
www.uli.org

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AZRE Magazine July/August 2010

Arizona's venture capital market receives boost

Arizona’s Venture Capital Market Receives Boost

Venture capital is still out there, but startups remain starved for investors

Arizona’s venture capital market has received a welcome boost, but startups and early-stage businesses are still looking for financial angels. Experts in the field say a new wave of venture capital is vital if the state’s economy is to continue growing at the pace it has been in recent years. Because Arizona is an attractive place to do business, experts expect to see an increase in interest by venture capitalists, perhaps later this year. They also believe that the flagging national economy is not a factor.

Yet, a PricewaterhouseCoopers’ report shows slippage in 2007, when Arizona companies received $200.7 million in venture capital compared to $262.6 million in 2006. Providing some relief in 2008 is the recent formation of the Translational Accelerator LLC (TRAC), a private Arizona-based, $20 million bioscience venture capital group. TRAC plans to invest between $500,000 and $2 million in any one company devoted to developing diagnostics, services, prevention agents and treatments directed to cancer and central nervous system diseases, including Alzheimer’s and multiple sclerosis.

Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, calls the TRAC fund “an example of the investors’ commitment in taking the needed risk to help drive Arizona’s economy.”

Broome says reports indicate that virtually all of Arizona’s recent venture capital funding is in late-stage activity, funding mergers and acquisitions of built-up companies.

“The key component is getting a venture-capital model more aggressively focused around seed and startups,” he says. “That’s where you’re going to get long-term economic benefits.”

Venture capital peaked in 1999-2000 with the telecommunications industry and Internet-based companies. But since the dot-com bust, venture capital has yet to recover.

“People took big losses on them,” Broome says, “and subsequently there was a cooling of venture capital.”

Terree Wasley, director of entrepreneurial services at Arizona State University, sees gradual improvement in the venture capital arena, with no huge moves forward or back.

“Things are on a slow but steady incline going forward,” she says. “But if we’re looking at some sort of downturn in the economy, I’m not sure what impact that might have.”

Wasley says ASU Technopolis, which hosted the Invest Southwest Capital Conference in December, and ASU entrepreneurial services strive to train entrepreneurs who are worthy of investments.

“Our mantra is: ‘Good ideas always find funding, even in tougher times,’ ” she says.

Arizona’s venture capitalists often partner with out-of-state firms.

“They’re looking for good deals,” Wasley says. “They hear about them from other investors. Arizona is turning out a lot of good local talent. Investors look for that.”

Investors also look to stay within their geographic area, which bodes well for Arizona’s potential to attract some of the many venture capitalists in California.

“It’s an advantage for Arizona,” Wasley says.

Dee Harris, senior managing director at Alare Capital Securities LLC, an investment banking firm, doesn’t blame the economy for a shortage of venture capital.

“The primary problem is that venture capital firms in Arizona are basically fully invested,” Harris says.

Being fully invested is a two-sided coin.

“It’s a good sign in that they were able to find some good investments,” Harris says. “But, presumably, it’s a bad sign, because until they raise their next fund — which could take months — they’re not going to be much of a player in Arizona.”

Most of the interest is in life sciences, which means venture capitalists are not investing in technology information and semiconductor companies, Harris says.

Bob Morrison, executive director of Desert Angels in Tucson, says angel investors are not necessarily swayed by the general economy. Angels typically invest their own money, unlike venture capitalists who manage the pooled money of others in a professionally-managed fund.

“It’s a fairly small percentage of their total net worth,” he says. “Generally speaking, it’s their mad money. Nobody puts their lifetime savings into very many of these ventures that can be so risky.”

He dismisses suggestions that venture capital is drying up.

“For ventures that are well conceived and have a reasonable prospect for success, there is ample money,” he says.

But angel investors are reluctant to invest in biotech, he says, because it often takes a long time to make money, especially if the project requires approval from the Food and Drug Administration.

What can the state do to improve the venture capital climate? Broome says Arizona could dedicate 1 percent of the state’s pension fund for early-stage investment, as other states have done.

“If well managed, the use of 1 percent, or even one-half of 1 percent, of the pension fund into a venture strategy would be a major source of capital,” he says.

Wasley says angel investment tax credits also could help.

“Anything that gives investors any kind of incentive to invest in Arizona versus someplace else would be welcome,” she says.

For more information visit the following websites,
asuresearch.asu.edu
gpec.org