Tag Archives: Princeton Review

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New Global Rankings Laud W. P. Carey School

New rankings and ratings are out from three prestigious groups that examine the best business schools in the world. The Financial Times, The Economist and The Princeton Review all give the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University extremely high marks for excellence.

“The new rankings from The Economist and Financial Times show the W. P. Carey School is consistently recognized among the best business schools in the world,” says Robert Mittelstaedt, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The new book from The Princeton Review delivers high praise in the form of reviews from our own students. Recognition from highly regarded media outlets is gratifying, but acclaim from students who actually attend our school and learn from our stellar faculty also really validates our mission and accomplishments.”

In the new rankings out today from the Financial Times, the W. P. Carey School’s executive MBA program in China ranks as one of the Top 25 executive MBA programs in the world. The Financial Times is considered to be Britain’s equivalent of The Wall Street Journal. It specifically ranks the W. P. Carey School program in Shanghai as No. 21 globally and the No. 2 executive MBA program affiliated with any U.S. public university.

“Our students in the Shanghai program are senior-level executives at businesses and government agencies responsible for decisions influencing literally millions of people,” says Professor Buck K. W. Pei, associate dean of Asia Programs at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “The new Financial Times ranking speaks to the commitment of our faculty members and partners in China, who provide world-class management education for key members of the global business community.”

Students in the Shanghai program have included three vice mayors of China’s major provinces, six vice mayors of Shanghai, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange (the fifth-largest stock exchange in the world), several bank chairmen, the chairman of Shanghai Airlines, the chief executive officer of Baosteel, the deputy commissioner of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, and many other top leaders. The program includes high-level visits to some of the world’s biggest companies and classes taught by faculty members from both Arizona State University and other prominent universities.

The new rankings from The Economist, also released this month, review the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program in Arizona. This marks the first time the school has been invited to participate in the global rankings survey, and it debuted high on the Top 100, at No. 59. It is the only Arizona school on the entire list and Top 10 in the western United States. The full-time W. P. Carey MBA program is known for its small, personal classes and a high return-on-investment for tuition. The Economist, based in London, is renowned for its intellectual appeal and boasts a readership of 2.5 million.

The Princeton Review releases its new edition of “The Best 296 Business Schools” this month. The new book is based largely on student surveys and praises the W. P. Carey School for its peer network, cutting-edge classes, satisfied students, career services, and solid preparation in management and teamwork. The book gives the school a 96 rating for academic experience and a 93 rating for career (graduate employment/salaries), on a scale with a maximum of 99.

“All of these new reviews point to our consistence in striving for and achieving excellence,” says the school’s executive dean, Amy Hillman. “We’ll continue to educate many of the best students in the world, and we’re now unveiling a new scholarship program to help with that.”

The school is unveiling a new scholarship program called The Wm. Polk Carey Memorial Scholarship Fund this month. It will provide financial support for some of the highest-achieving individuals who apply to the W. P. Carey School of Business. The exclusive scholarship is named after the school’s benefactor, real estate investor and acclaimed philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey, who donated $50 million to the school in 2002/2003. No additional application is required for the new scholarship program; all successful full-time MBA applicants will be considered for the scholarships.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School, which also has highly ranked undergraduate business, evening MBA and online MBA programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

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ASU, Crayola & More Making Sustainable Impact

When it comes to sustainability, it’s a great time to be proud of Arizona.  This week we’ve gathered stories about ASU making the green honor roll, Phoenix being a top city for graduates and others.

Please feel free to send along any interesting stories you’d like to see featured in the roundup by e-mailing Shelby Hill.

Also visit AZ Green Scene for informative articles on sustainability endeavors in the Valley and state. Read the latest article here.

ASU Makes the Green Honor Roll
Arizona State University was one of the 18 colleges and universities that made The Princeton Review’s 2011 Green Rating Honor Roll.  ASU was chosen for leading the way in the sustainability movement. It established the first School of Sustainability in the U.S., and employs more solar panels than any other university in the country.

Phoenix is One of the Top Cities for Green Grads
Phoenix is No. nine on mnn.com’s top 10 cities for new grads seeking green jobs.  Sandwiched between Detroit and Houston, Phoenix’s solar capabilities and commitment to green endeavors make it one of the top.  One of Phoenix’s favorite Suns also has his city on the list.  Sacramento, Calif., whose mayor is Kevin Johnson, is No. six.

Yet Another Reason to Buy a Hybrid

Hybrid cars are almost never stolen.  Whereas gas guzzlers like the Cadillac Escalade should just have targets painted on them.  One in every 100 cars that is stolen is an Escalade.  Small cars like the Mini Cooper and the Saturn VUE are also low on a thief’s wish list.

Crayola Goes Green
A 15-acre solar farm could help crayola not just produce green (crayons) but also be green.  Funded in part by a federal stimulus, this farm could produce enough energy to help produce one-third of Crayola’s annual output of crayons.

Walmart and Seventh Generation Team Up
Seventh Generation, which produces environmentally-friendly cleaning products, will put its products in about 1,500 Walmart stores nationwide and online.  Previously Seventh Generation and Walmart haven’t been the best of friends.  But maybe they’re coming together for a greater good?

Arizona State University Named Green School by Sierra Magazine

Arizona State University Is Lucky #13

Just a few weeks after being named one of the “greenest” universities by the Princeton Review, Arizona State University has racked up another green recognition.

Sierra Magazine, a publication of the Sierra Club, the oldest and largest grassroots environmental organization in the U.S., has released their list of the nation’s top 20 “coolest” schools and ASU has been named as lucky number 13.

 

Arizona State UniversityThe schools were recognized for their sustainable efforts based on questionnaires addressing a variety of categories including: academics, administration, efficiency, energy, food, purchasing, transportation, and waste management. Schools could earn up to ten points in each category with an additional five bonus points if they had extra green initiatives.

Again, ASU was in some pretty elite company with Yale, Harvard, New York University and others. The University of Colorado at Boulder may have taken the top spot but for ASU this is another notch on its green belt of accomplishments. Being sustainable is no small feat and this type of national recognition gives Arizonans not only a reason to be proud, but also motivation to keep the mission going.

For the full list of school’s check out the Sierra Club’s website.

schoolofsustainability.asu.edu

Arizona State University

Arizona State University Makes The Green Honor Roll

“Go Green” indeed! Arizona State University has been named one of the nation’s “greenest” universities by the Princeton Review. For the second year in a row, ASU has made the 2010 Green Rating Honor Roll rating of environmentally-friendly institutions. And we’re among some pretty elite neighbors: Harvard, Berkeley and Yale to name a few.

The Princeton Review began its Green Ratings last year with the help of ecoAmerica, a nonprofit environmental organization that participates in the project. The schools are measured on a scale of 60 to 99 and the schools that made the 2010 Green Rating Honor Roll (go ASU!) received the highest possible score of a 99.

“At Arizona State University, sustainability is a fundamental precept underlying its teaching, learning, research and business missions. ASU President Michael Crow is co-chair of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment. The Tempe campus has the largest collection of energy-providing solar panels on a single U.S. university campus.
Established in 2007, ASU’s School of Sustainability, the first of its kind in the U.S., offers transdisciplinary degree programs that advance practical solutions to environmental, economic and social challenges. The school has over 60 faculty representing over 40 disciplines and offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs along with a professional certificate. ASU subsidizes bus and light rail passes for all students and employees and offers car-sharing and a carpool program with special parking privileges. A student-run bicycle co-op offers low- or no-cost bike repairs and free bike rentals.”— The Princeton Review

The Princeton Review names these areas as the criteria for the ratings:

  • Whether the school’s students have a campus quality of life that is healthy and sustainable.
  • How well the school is preparing its students for employment and citizenship in a world defined by environmental challenges.
  • The school’s overall commitment to environmental issues.  The institutional survey for the rating included ten questions on everything from energy use, recycling, food, buildings, and transportation to academic offerings (availability of environmental studies degrees and courses) and action plans and goals concerning greenhouse gas emission reductions.

And there’s more good news. The publisher of the Princeton Review said that this year there was a 30 percent increase in the number of colleges participating in the Green Rating survey. The Princeton Review has also dedicated a special resource area on its Web site for students that are serious about the environment and are interested in learning more about attending a green college.

As an alumni of ASU I couldn’t be prouder of this achievement. The School of Sustainability is already making a huge step forward and this accomplishment only adds to the school’s ongoing commitment to greener living. This also brings the issue of the environment to the forefront and grabs the attention of a younger audience that will hopefully be motivated to do something about it. Dedication to sustainability is no easy task, but such sizable schools as ASU can certainly make a positive impact on the movement.

Criteria for The Princeton Review Green Rating of Colleges


The Princeton Review tallied the Green Rating scores based on institutional data it obtained from the colleges during the 2008-2009 academic year in response to ten survey questions that asked:

1) The percentage of food expenditures that goes toward local, organic or otherwise environmentally preferable food.

2) Whether the school offers programs including free bus passes, universal access transit passes, bike sharing/renting, car sharing, carpool parking, vanpooling or guaranteed rides home to encourage alternatives to single-passenger automobile use for students.

3) Whether the school has a formal committee with participation from students that is devoted to advancing sustainability on campus.

4) Whether new buildings are required to be LEED (environmental certification of equipment/appliances) Silver certified or comparable.

5) The school’s overall waste diversion rate.

6) Whether the school has an environmental studies major, minor or concentration.

7) Whether the school has an “environmental literacy” requirement.

8) Whether the school has produced a publicly available greenhouse gas emissions inventory and adopted a climate action plan consistent with 80 percent greenhouse gas reductions by 2050 targets.

9) What percentage of the school’s energy consumption, including heading/cooling and electrical, is derived from renewable sources (this definition included “green tags” but not nuclear or large-scale hydropower).

10) Whether the school employs a dedicated full-time (or full-time equivalent) sustainability officer.

*Source: The Princeton Review

asunews.asu.edu
www.princetonreview.com/green-honor-roll
www.princetonreview.com/green/
www.ecoamerica.net