Tag Archives: prostate cancer

Affiliated Urologists

Affiliated Urologists Opens Third Location

Affiliated Urologists announced the opening of a new office in the Biltmore area. The expansion allows this locally and nationally recognized practice with a 40 year history of providing urologic care an opportunity to continue its tradition of excellence in other areas in the Valley.

Dr. Al Borhan and Dr. Mark Hong are heading the move to provide services in a growing area of the Valley. They have both been recognized as leaders in the Valley spearheading new procedures and techniques and trendsetters in the field. The new center is staffed by board-certified, fellowship-trained physicians who specialize in urological conditions including: kidney stones, prostate cancer, male infertility and bladder conditions to name a few.

“We are excited about the opportunity for our group to provide more accessible care to our patients. We have always had a very large referral base in the area and this allows us to concentrate our efforts in the area.” said Dr. Stephen Ponas, who has over 20 years with Affiliated. “We will definitely make an impact with our comprehensive urology care in that part of the Valley,” added Dr. Dan Jaffee, who heads the Female Urology division of the group.

The new office is located at 2222 East Highland Suite 400 in Phoenix near the Biltmore Fashion Park. The local medical practice has another office in downtown Phoenix and in the North Scottsdale/Desert Ridge area.

DerrickHall_js5

Hall joins CTCA’s Board of Directors

Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA) at Western Regional Medical Center announced Arizona Diamondbacks President and CEO Derrick Hall will be joining its Board of Directors.

“As a prostate cancer survivor, this is a cause very close to my heart,” said Diamondbacks President and CEO Derrick Hall, who recently launched his own non-profit organization, the Pro-State Foundation. “I’m looking forward to being a part of the Board of Directors for Cancer Treatment Centers of America and seeing how I can help further their mission of ‘Winning the Fight Against Cancer, Every Day®.’”

“We are incredibly fortunate to welcome Derrick to our Board leadership,” said Matt McGuire, President and CEO, CTCA® at Western. “Derrick’s business savvy and commitment to community leadership, coupled with his own journey of cancer survivorship, will greatly enhance our ability to provide our patients the best possible cancer care.”

Hall joins a list of distinguished leaders and respected professionals currently serving on the Board of Directors: Richard J Stephenson (Chairman), James J. Grogan, Esq. (President); Kenneth Bennett (Treasurer); Stephen B. Bonner, Esq.; Ernest Calderón, Esq.; Michael L. Gallagher, Esq.; Carrie Martz; Robert Mayo; Christa Severns; Dr. Christopher Stephenson and Candace Hunter Wiest (Secretary).

“As President of the Western Board, I know I am speaking for all of our members in expressing our sincere welcome to Derrick and our gratitude to him for committing his time and energy to our important mission,” said James Grogan, President, CTCA Western Board of Directors. “Derrick will bring a wealth of community knowledge and business experience to our patient-focused efforts as we work to help families fight this horrible disease. His personal fight with cancer has inspired many in our community and we are thrilled that he will be helping Western deliver the best possible, personal, integrative, cancer care to all of our patients.”

Prostate cancer

Proactive Prostate: Learn The Facts, Risks, Treatments Of Prostate Cancer

When it comes to prostate cancer and men, the statistics are sobering.

According to the American Cancer Society:

  • Other than skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men.
  • More than 240,00 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed in 2012.
  • More than 28,000 men will die of prostate cancer in 2012.
  • One in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime.

As we observe Prostate Cancer Awareness Month this September, why not take the time to learn the facts about this disease, risk factors and current treatments available?

It’s a Guy Thing

Fact – only men can get prostate cancer.

Simply put, ladies don’t have a prostate gland!

It’s an Age Thing

It is imperative to note that the majority of all prostate cancer – more than 70 percent – occurs in men age 65 and older. In fact, prostate cancer is almost completely nonexistent in men under the age of 40.

It’s a Sneaky Thing

When you have cold, you sneeze.

When you have a sinus infection, it is hard to swallow.

But, unfortunately, there are no easy-to-detect signs of early prostate cancer. It isn’t until the more advanced and difficult-to-treat stages that one might notice trouble urinating, blood in the urine and bone/pelvic pain.

It’s a Testing Thing

Because symptoms of the disease may not be present until later stages, proactive prostate screening is imperative. The best method is two complimentary tests. First is the digital rectal examination, which should be done once a year during a regular annual physical after age 50.

Sure, it is uncomfortable, but it is critical in helping us detect prostate cancer as well as a litany of other issues, including growths, pelvic pain, bleeding and even colorectal cancer.

There is also a second critical screening involving the blood, which tests the prostate-specific antigen (PSA), that doctors should use to compliment the rectal exam as well.

It’s a Curable Thing

Taking the proper prevention methods to assist in prostate health, participating in routine testing and getting the proper treatment are all part of prostate protection. If the right measures are taken, experts would agree that prostate cancer is preventable, if not curable, for most men.

Just some of the treatments available today include:

  • Active surveillance – essentially watchful waiting, this option may be best for those in very early stages or with very slow growing cancer
  • Prostatectomy – surgical removal of the entire prostate gland and some surrounding tissue
  • Radiation Therapy – directed radioactive exposure that kills the cancerous cells and surrounding tissues
  • Hormone Therapy – also known as androgen-deprivation therapy or ADT, prostate cancer cell growth relies the hormone testosterone as the main fuel; ADT removes that fuel
  • Chemotherapy – the use of chemicals that kill or halt the growth of cancer cells

As science progresses, studies have demonstrated that radiation treatment — delivered externally and internally — is as effective in treating the disease as surgical removal of the prostate. But, side effects can include bladder and bowel issues.

As a result, nearly 100 medical centers throughout the country have adopted a new system, called Calypso, which enables physicians to determine the exact location of the prostate in real time during radiation therapy. Armed with this information, radiation to the surrounding healthy tissue can be avoided and side effects can be minimized.

For more information about prostate cancer, please visit canceraz.com.

Health Screenings 101

Be Proactive: Health Screenings 101

Everyone has heard it: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

This oft-used quote from the one-and-only Benjamin Franklin could not be truer for anyone more than seniors.

From arthritis to Alzheimer’s, Scottsdale residents need to take control of their health and wellness at the most proactive level possible. Among the most important ways to become proactive is to simply taking part in recommended health screenings.

Annual physical

Certainly, an annual exam is a must, including a blood pressure check, cholesterol screening and potentially even a diabetes screening. Ideally, this should occur each year no matter one’s age; but, for even the healthiest of individuals turning 50, this is a must-do.

Mammograms

For women, mammograms should be a given. In fact, according to Dr. Luci Chen at Arizona Breast Cancer Specialists, new screening guidelines recommend mammograms as early as age 40 for all women, even those with no history of the disease in their families. This is an update from the former age of 50 to begin such tests.

But, Dr. Chen adds that a stunning number of women often don’t begin getting regular mammograms until retirement — or after.

Prostate screenings

Prostate cancer is the most common form of non-skin cancer in America — and rampant among senior-age men. According to Dr. Gregory Maggass of Arizona Radiation Oncology Specialists, one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, with likelihood increasing with age.

“Without a doubt, the best chance for a positive outcome, including early diagnosis and less-invasive treatment, is a regular screening starting at age 50,” Dr. Maggass says. “The best bet: Getting a prostate-specific antigen as well as a digital rectal exam, which sounds bad but is much more comfortable than cancer.

Colonoscopies

“As Katie Couric has taught us, both men and women should get their first colonoscopy by age 50, and should repeat the process as doctors request, usually once every five to 10 years,” Dr. Maggass says.

Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer can ensure a 100 percent cure.

Hearing screenings

“Aside from continuous exposure to loud noise, age is the most common cause of hearing loss,” says Sherri Collins of the Arizona Commission for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing. “Physicians can test for hearing loss in a general health assessment, but it is rare, making it imperative for seniors to take the initiative to be tested.”

Collins adds that advancements in technology and services in recent years have provided the ability to live a completely full and productive life if one is experiencing hearing loss — and catches it early.

Vision screenings

While these are recommended as early as age 30 and repeated about every five years, it is imperative to begin a relationship with an optometrist or ophthalmologist, as diabetes-released eye diseases as well as glaucoma and cataracts are common issues among seniors.

For more information on general health screenings, please visit cdc.gov.

Prostate Cancer Prevention, Treatment

Prostate Cancer And You: Get Educated

Prostate cancer is the most common form of non-skin cancer in America. It is the second leading cause of death among males in the United States. The American Cancer Society estimates that 29,412 men died from prostate cancer in 2008.

During the month of November, men nationwide went the extra mile to raise awareness of the disease by dubbing the month as “Movember” and growing mustaches for prostate cancer charities.

According to the Prostate Cancer Foundation, one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, with likelihood increasing with age.

Got your attention yet?

Good – now get educated.

Prostate Screenings

Without a doubt, the best chance for a positive outcome is getting a regular screening so potential problems are caught early. The best bet – getting prostate-specific antigen, or PSA, blood test and digital rectal exam (DRE) yearly starting at age 50. For those with family history or other risk factors, screening should begin at age 45.

Diagnosis and Treatment

If you or someone you love is diagnosed with prostate cancer, there are a variety of options for treatment. Each should be explored thoroughly with a qualified physician to decide the best method for the patient.

These options include, but are not limited to:

  • Active surveillance — Essentially watchful waiting, this option may be best for those in very early stages or with very slow growing cancer
  • Prostatectomy — Surgical removal of the entire prostate gland and some surrounding tissue
  • Radiation Therapy — Directed radioactive exposure that kills the cancerous cells and surrounding tissues
  • Hormone Therapy — Also known as androgen-deprivation therapy, or ADT, prostate cancer cell growth relies on the hormone testosterone as the main fuel; ADT removes that fuel.
  • Chemotherapy — The use of chemicals that kill or halt the growth of cancer cells

As science progresses, studies have demonstrated that radiation treatment — delivered externally and internally — is as effective in treating the disease as surgical removal of the prostate. Although there are side effects associated with radiation, patients who choose this treatment often cite the risks — most notably incontinence and impotence.

One of the biggest issues doctors face in delivering radiation, however, to the prostate tumor is organ motion, a natural and commonly-occurring bodily function. Clinical studies have documented that organ motion is both unpredictable and variable.

As a result, nearly 100 medical centers throughout the country have adopted a “GPS for the Body®” treatment using the Calypso System, which enables physicians to determine the exact location of the prostate in real-time during radiation therapy.

Other breakthroughs also continue to occur, including the use of the TrueBeam system, which can deliver treatments up to 50 percent faster with a dose delivery rate of up to 2,400 monitor units per minute, double the maximum output of earlier, industry-leading systems. This makes it possible to offer greater patient comfort by shortening treatments and to improve precision by leaving less time for tumor motion during dose delivery.

The precision of a TrueBeam system is measured in increments of less than a millimeter. This accuracy is made possible by the system’s sophisticated architecture, which establishes a new level of synchronization between imaging, patient positioning, motion management, beam shaping and dose delivery technologies, performing accuracy checks every 10 milliseconds throughout an entire treatment. Over 100,000 data points are monitored continually as a treatment progresses, ensuring that the system maintains a “true isocenter,” or focal point of treatment.

And armed with regular testing, early detection and knowledge of the wide variety of treatment options, most experts agree that prostate cancer is treatable and highly curable.

For more information about prostate cancer prevention, treatment and more, visit canceraz.com.