Tag Archives: quarles & brady

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Az Business honors Most Influential Women in Arizona

They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of industry.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2015, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media  Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

Members of the 2015 list will be recognized at the Most Influential Women in Arizona Cocktail Party on August 27, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Chateau Luxe. Click here to purchase tickets.

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2015 are:

Amy Abdo, director, Fennemore Craig

Jennifer Anderson, senior vice president and regional manager, Wells Fargo

Karen Anderson, researcher, ASU’s Biodesign Institute

Lauren Bailey, founder, Upward Projects

Glynis Bryan, CFO, Insight Enterprises

Rita Cheng, president, NAU

Judith S. Gordon, associate professor and associate head for research at the University of Arizona Department of Family and Community Medicine

Alisa Gray, shareholder, Tiffany & Bosco

Sue Hasenstein, BMO Harris Bank

Melissa Ho, Polsinelli

Bo Hughes, CFO and COO, Pinnacle Bank

Veronique James, CEO, The James Agency

Isabelle Jazo, senior vice president of strategy, LaneTerralever

Carolyn J. Johnsen, Dickinson Wright

Eileen Klein, Arizona Board of Regents

Rosey Koberlein, CEO, Long Companies

Becky Kuhn, executive vice president, Banner Health

Betsy Kuzas, chief operating officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Michelle Lawrie, economic development director, Goodyear

Nona Lee, SVP and general counsel, Arizona Diamondbacks

Hope Leibsohn, member, Sherman & Howard

Stacey L. Lihn, Gallagher & Kennedy

Tina Machado, president, CodeRed-I

Carol May, president, Wisdom Natural Brands DBA SweetLeaf

Sara McCoy, first female to manage a power plant for SRP

Erica McGinnis, president and CEO, AIG Advisor Group

Tammy McLeod, vice president, APS

Rose Megian, president and CEO, Health Net of Arizona

Dion Messer, general counsel – intellectual property, Limelight Networks

MaryAnn Miller, senior vice president, Avnet

Ioanna Morfessis, president, IO.Inc.

Harriet Mountcastle-Walsh,VP and General Counsel, Honeywell

Annette G. Musa, Arizona market president, Comerica Bank

Christine Nowaczyk, senior vice president, Bank of Arizona

Deborah Pearson, Arizona State Credit Union

Susan Pepin, president and CEO, Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust

Suzanne Pfister, president and CEO, St. Luke’s Health Initiatives

Christina Roderick, principal, REDW

Patricia Rourke, market president, Bankers Trust

Lisa Sanchez, COO, The CORE Institute

Adelaida V. Severson, president and CEO, Bushtex

Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-AZ 9th District

Sherri Slayton, Alliance Bank of Arizona

Wendi A. Sorensen, Burch & Cracchiolo

Molly Stockley, vice president of hospital growth, CTCA

Cathy Valenzuela, president, Arizona Business Bank

Kimberly Van Amburg, CEO, Casino Del Sol Resort

Cheryl Vogt, managing director, Marsh

Cynthia Walter, president, BAGNALL

Lori L. Winkelman, Quarles & Brady LLP

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Denyse Airheart, interim director of economic development, City of Maricopa

Jessica Benford, shareholder, Ryley Carlock & Applewhite

Dr. Ivana Dzeletovic, Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center

Stephanie Parra, executive director, T.W. Lewis Foundation

Teresa M. Pilatowicz, of counsel, Garman Turner Gordon

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

law

Trisha Baggs joins Fennemore Craig

Fennemore Craig, a leading Mountain West law firm, announced Trisha Baggs has joined the Estate Planning and Probate practice in the firm’s Phoenix office.

“We are pleased to welcome Trisha to the firm,” said Jim Lee, practice group chair of Fennemore Craig’s Estate Planning and Probate practice. “Her wide-ranging experience will further enrich the firm’s sophisticated estate planning practice and commitment to providing excellent service to clients.”

Before joining Fennemore Craig, Baggs practiced at Quarles & Brady and she will continue to assist clients with sophisticated estate planning, traditional bypass trust and marital deduction planning; life insurance trusts; charitable estate planning; due diligence and opinion letters related to major gifts; generation-skipping tax planning; succession planning for family businesses; and probate and trust administration. Baggs earned her J.D. and B.A. from Arizona State University.

Lauren Stein

UMOM New Day Centers elect Lauren Stine to board

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix partner Lauren Stine has been elected to the UMOM New Day Centers‘ board of directors.

Founded in 1964, UMOM is the largest homeless shelter for families in Arizona. The organization aims to prevent and end homelessness, and it works to give people opportunities to gain the skills they need to rebuild their lives and succeed when they leave.

Stine is a member of the firm’s Litigation & Dispute Resolution Practice Group. She represents health care providers and professionals, pharmaceutical wholesalers, and direct sales companies in cases involving contract disputes, alleged fraud, deceptive advertising, and general litigation matters. She also assists clients in special action and appellate proceedings in state and federal courts.

Stine received her law degree, magna cum laude, from Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University and her bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, from Arizona State University.

cybercrime

Data breach: Not if, but when, experts warn

“It will never happen to us.”

That misperception puts businesses at risk for data breaches, expert say.

“The most common mistake is assuming your company won’t be breached because you’re not a large, multi-national company similar to the ones whose breaches are covered by the national media,” says Ari Bai, shareholder at Polsinelli. “In reality, however, every company is a target. Hackers, be they individual vigilantes, criminal organizations or nation-states, look for any and all data, and often the most accessible is that in smaller companies. Plus, small companies make for good ‘practice’ for hackers. Thus, when a company ignores the risk and does not set forth the proper protocols for protection and response, it is essentially asking to be breached.”

The 2015 Association of Corporate Counsel (ACC) Chief Legal Officers Survey revealed that one quarter of general counsel report their companies have been hit by data breaches. And according to the 2015 Cyberthreat Defense Report, more than seven in 10 respondents said their networks were breached in 2014, up from 62 percent in 2013. The average cost of a data breach in 2013 for companies in the Unites States was $5.85 million. The scariest part about the threat of a data breach is that experts agree that there is no way to completely protect a business from becoming the victim of a data breach.

“Once we develop a way to protect ourselves from something, the hackers are already using a new technique,” Bai says. “This is why preparation is so important. Liability for lack of preparation can financially devastate a company. You are going to get hacked — with preparation, you don’t have to lose lawsuits.”

Being prepared

Like any potential business catastrophe, limit a business’ risk of becoming the victim of a data breach starts with preparedness, according to Paul Stoller, shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy.

“Every company should work with its legal professionals and IT staff to create and to implement a comprehensive data privacy and security plan, which will help to remove, or at least to reduce, the risk of many of the common causes of breach,” Stoller says.

Leon B. Silver, office co-managing partner at Gordon & Rees, says all companies, no matter their size, need to adopt data security as a core business practice throughout the organization and not look at it as something that is taken care of by one department or by an outside vendor.

“Policies on mobile devices, passwords and encryption are just part of an overall culture of data security awareness,” Silver says. “But be aware, a breach can happen.”

Heather Buchta, partner at Quarles & Brady says business leaders need to engage in some internal due diligence and ask themselves these questions:

• What internal policies are in place to protect data?

• Is there a policy against removing devices from the business location?

• Is there a policy to encrypt data?

• Even more basic, what kind of data does a company have?

“Risk of a breach increases as the volume of data a company has increases and oftentimes the data wasn’t even used by the business,” Buchta says, “which is creating an increased risk for no business purpose.”

Despite a company’s best efforts to lower its risk of a data breach, Buchta says today’s hackers are getting more sophisticated and businesses always have the added risk of employee error.

“The risk really lies in what was done ahead of time to try and prevent and breach and how the incident is handled afterward,” she says.

After the breach

While a business can be proactive in taking the appropriate steps to minimize risk and being well equipped to handle a loss or theft if data or information, there are no measures that provide a guarantee of security, Silver says.

“In fact, virtually every mid- to large-size company has already likely been breached, but the extent is either not known, or is not significant,” Silver says. “A big source of loss continues to be human error. That, coupled with continually evolving technology and more sophisticated theft/hacking measures equates to an ongoing need to stay ahead of the curve and simply arm yourself the best you can by adhering to and enforcing strict privacy policies following a thorough risk assessment.”

So what should you do if you’ve taken all the proper steps to reduce your risk of a data breach and your businesses is still victimized?

“The first thing is always to identify the source and to fix the issue that caused the breach so that there is not any further loss or theft of data,” Stoller says. “After that, the business needs to work with its IT professionals to investigate what caused the leak, to identify those persons who may be affected and to preserve evidence of what happened.”

Stella says it’s also imperative to work with legal professionals to determine a business’ legal obligations after a breach, including notifications to affected persons and government agencies.

“Don’t delay in investigating and don’t delay in calling in the experts,” Buchta says. “Businesses should have an incident response plan and that plan should identify the key players to investigate and manage a breach — legal counsel, IT forensics, operations/HR, public relations and the executive team.”

Because experts say a data breach is almost inevitable, it’s crucial for a business to develop and enforce sound privacy policies, including a response plan should a breach or loss occur, Silver says.

“Such policies will also need to evolve over time as technology continues to improve,” he says. “The bottom line is to expect the unexpected, think ahead, keep thinking ahead, and do your best to prepare.”

Advice from experts

Here is what Valley legal experts advise businesses to do to lower their risk of a data breach:

Ari Bai, shareholder; and Nick Verderame, associate, Polsinelli: “Start preparing now. Bring in technical and legal help to assess your data and risk levels, create technical protections, implement company procedures to protect against leaks, educate your employees and leadership, organize annual ‘fire drill’ tests and prepare a reaction and notification procedure.”

Heather Buchta, partner, Quarles & Brady: “Know your business. Know what data you have. Have an incident response plan in place in advance to facilitate the handling of an event when it occurs. Note I said, ‘when it occurs,’ not ‘if it occurs.’”

Leon B. Silver, office co-managing partner, Gordon & Rees: “Begin by assessing risk, including the availability of special ‘cyber risk’ insurance, which is not just for hacking and may provide coverage for both investigation and response costs, as well as defense and/or indemnity for third-party claims.”

Paul Stoller, shareholder, Gallagher & Kennedy: “The best practice for a business is to create and maintain a comprehensive data privacy and security plan. That begins with an audit of the business’s data and the development of policies and procedures to manage its confidential information. Then, it is essential to train employees on both the policies and procedure and the potential threats to the data’s security.”

gavel

Quarles & Brady’s Susan Brichler Trujillo earns spot

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP has announced that Phoenix partner Susan Brichler Trujillo has been elected as vice president of the Community Legal Services, Inc. (CLS) board of directors.  CLS is an Arizona nonprofit that provides legal assistance, advice, and representation to individuals that are below the federal poverty level. CLS assists survivors of domestic violence, victims of consumer fraud and abuse, and tenants against unlawful and unfair practices by landlords.

“I’m very honored to serve my community through this incredible organization and am looking forward to continuing to help low-income Arizonans who need legal assistance,” said Trujillo.

Trujillo serves as the Phoenix office’s chair of the Health Law Practice Group. Her practice includes representation of health care clients, including retail pharmacies, pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers and wholesale distributors, pharmacy benefit managers, hospitals, behavioral health providers, and nursing homes in the areas of regulatory compliance, contract disputes, licensing issues, and litigation matters.

She earned her law degree from the University of Notre Dame Law School and her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Arizona.

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2015 Positively Powerful Women Awards on June 5

Nicole Stanton

Nicole Stanton

This year, the 8th Annual Positively Powerful Women Awards Luncheon celebration will be a part of the Positively Powerful Leadership Conference, a day filled with outstanding local and national speakers who will empower and inform participants in an exciting, dynamic and uplifting environment. The Positively Powerful Leadership Conference will be held from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Friday, June 5 at the Ritz-Carlton, Phoenix. The Awards Luncheon will begin at 11:30 a.m.

“The speakers that we have selected this year exhibit this year’s theme of collaboration,” said Dr. Joel P. Martin, international trainer, speaker, coach, and creator of the Positively Powerful Woman Awards Program. “These speakers will invigorate and inspire participants to take action on their goals and purpose. When you attend this conference, I know you will leave with business, personal, professional strategies and transformational tools that you can use immediately.”

MaryLynn Mack copy

MaryLynn Mack

This year’s Positively Powerful presenters are:

  • Deborah Bateman, coach, author and Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors for National Bank of Arizona, will present “The Journey to Success Begins Within.”
  • Rev. Dr. Helen Hunter, Pastor of The Great Koinonia and President of the East Valley NAACP, will speak on “Being A Positively Powerful Spirit-Filled Woman.”
  • Loretta Love Huff, author and Owner, Emerald Harvest Consulting, will present “Talking Business, Taking Action, Being Strategic.”
  • Kristi Lee, Chief Sales and Marketing Officer, TruNorth Global and successful entrepreneur with Send Out Cards, will help “Turn Your Connections Into Collaborations & Contacts.”
  • Debbie Waitkus, author, business/golf networking consultant and President and Founder of Golf for a Cause, will talk about “How to Have It All As a Business Woman Without Losing It!”
    Dr. Duku Anokye

    Dr. Duku Anokye

    Joining the Positively Powerful presenters is the dynamic Suzan Hart, an inspirational speaker, author and master trainer. Hart has shared the stage with Jack Canfield, John Gray and Robert Allen and has trained on CDs with David Wood and Steven Covey. She is the founder of co-host of the “Fit is the New Sexy” blog talk radio show and will present “Branding and Marketing Sales Success!”

Closing the conference with “Reflections of the Day,” will be charismatic and inspiring Dr. George Fraser, Chief Executive Officer of FraserNet, Inc., Producer of the PowerNetworking Conference and author of five best-selling books. Upscale Magazine named him as one of the “Top 50 Power Brokers in Black America” and Black Enterprise Magazine called him “Black America’s #1 Networker.” He has received 350 awards and citations including induction into the Minority Business Hall of Fame and Museum.

Bonnie Lucas

Bonnie Lucas

During the 8th Annual Positively Powerful Woman Awards Luncheon, six extraordinary women will be honored for their professional accomplishments and their contributions to the community. This year’s honorees are:

  • Philanthropic Leadership Award: Nicole Stanton, Partner/Phoenix Office Managing Partner, Quarles & Brady LLP, First Lady, City of Phoenix and Founder, Stop Bullying AZ
  • Arts & Culture Leadership Award: Isola Jones, Internationally Recognized Mezzo-Soprano
  • Visionary Leadership Award: MaryLynn Mack, Deputy Director, Desert Botanical Garden
  • Entrepreneurial Leadership Award: Bonnie Lucas, President/CEO, Law Enforcement Specialists, Inc.
  • Educational Leadership Award: Dr. Duku Anokye, Director of International Initiatives for the ASU New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences
  • Spiritual Leadership Award: Rev. Delphine Rodriquez, Minister and Educator
    Rev. Delphine Rodriquez

    Rev. Delphine Rodriquez

    Emceeing this year’s luncheon is Terri Ouellette (Terri O), co-host of ABC15’s Sonoran Living Live. The awards presentation will include a keynote address by Dr. Martin, followed by a luncheon favorite, the honoree panel discussion. Each year, a nonprofit organization is highlighted during the luncheon. The 2015 non-profit organization is Achieving My Purpose. The mission of Achieving My Purpose is to inform, inspire and empower women to achieve their purpose through exposure to successful role models, resources, personal discovery and creation of an authentic life plan.

    Tickets for the luncheon and conference may be purchased at http://positivelypowerful.com/womanawards/register/.

    For event information, visit the Positively Powerful website at www.positivelypowerful.com. Sponsorship information: http://positivelypowerful.com/womanawards/1194-2/.

out smart the competition

Quarles & Brady sponsors mentorship program

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP has announced that its Phoenix Business Law Practice Group has signed on to sponsor the Vendeme tu Sueno (Pitch Us Your Dream) competition, a partnership between Seed Spot and Univision wherein entrepreneurs will compete for a chance at mentorship, office space, and capital. The program, which is part of Univision Contigo’s Hispanic Entrepreneurship Campaign, is targeted at Latino entrepreneurs and companies, but anyone can apply and compete for the chance to be one of three finalists.

Through the partnership, members of the Phoenix office’s Business Law Practice Group will serve as mentors to the 20 semi-finalists in Seed Spot’s five-day boot camp, then as mentors for the three finalists as they develop their concepts through Seed Spot’s 250-hour full-time venture program. This program, run by Seed Spot, will give the entrepreneurs access to education, networking, and mentorship to get their idea to production.

 

law

Quarles & Brady recognized in Chambers USA 2015

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that 10 attorneys from the firm’s Phoenix office have been ranked in the 2015 edition of the esteemed Chambers USA directory.

They are:

• Joseph A. Drazek – Environment (including water rights)              

• Steven P. Emerick – Corporate/M&A     

• Diane Haller – Real Estate            

• Don P. Martin – Litigation: General Commercial

• Brian K. Moll – Corporate/M&A

• Roger Morris – Healthcare          

• Jon E. Pettibone – Labor & Employment               

• Stephanie J. Quincy – Labor & Employment        

• James A. Ryan – Litigation: General Commercial               

• Derek L. Sorenson – Real Estate    

“We are honored to have our attorneys recognized for their excellence by Chambers,” said Kimberly Leach Johnson, firm chair of Quarles & Brady. “The rankings provide an affirmation of the firm’s sustained efforts toward excellence.”

Business Use by Quarles and Brady Only.  No personal use allowed.

Quarles & Brady attorney helps lead Special Olympics

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that David E. Funkhouser III, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has been appointed Chair of the Grants, Corporate Sponsorships and In-Kind Donations Committee for the Special Olympics Arizona (SOAZ) Development Team.

In this role, Funkhouser will focus on cultivating current relationships, as well as developing new partnerships between the business community in Arizona and SOAZ. The objective is to enhance the organization’s ability to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for all children and adults with intellectual disabilities. Funkhouser also serves as a member of the Leadership Council for the Special Olympics Advocacy Resource program.

Funkhouser handles complex commercial litigation matters, where he focuses his practice on trust, estate, and probate litigation and other business disputes. He also routinely represents financial institutions and servicers in all aspects of litigation. 

Funkhouser is also heavily involved in the local community, just recently being named to the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) Ambassador Steering Committee, which is focused on ensuring GPEC’s Ambassador Program aligns with the organization’s key objectives and mission. Funkhouser is also a Past-President of the Maricopa County Bar Association and a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation. He was selected for inclusion in the 2014 and 2015 Southwest Super Lawyers magazines and named to both the Phoenix Business Journal’s “40 under 40” and Richman Media’s “Leaders under 40” lists, respectively. Funkhouser is a founding member of Suns 88 Charities and a certified ambassador for the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. He also served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 2008–2009. Funkhouser earned both his law degree and undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa, and received the 2013 Recent Alumni Award from the College of Law in 2013.

Leonardo Loo

Black Chamber honors Leonardo Loo

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix partner and Business Law Practice Group chair Leonardo Loo was honored with the 2015 Chairperson’s Award by the Black Chamber of Arizona (formerly the Greater Phoenix Black Chamber of Commerce) at its 17th Annual Awards Banquet, which was held March 13, 2015, at the Phoenix Convention Center. The award is given each year to an individual making a positive economic impact across the state through his/her service to both the Black Chamber and the community-at-large. 

Loo volunteers on the boards of directors for the Black Chamber of Arizona and Asian American Bar Association, respectively, and also serves as general counsel for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. Loo, who focuses on mergers and acquisitions, commercial financing, international transactions, securities, and general corporate law involving clients in a wide variety of industries, is also currently serving as the chair of the board of directors for Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. (CPLC), a statewide community development corporation committed to building stronger, healthier communities as a lead advocate, coalition builder, and direct service provider. CPLC promotes positive change and self-sufficiency to enhance the quality of life for the benefit of those it serves.

Earlier this year, Loo was honored by Az Business Magazine as one of the top “Minority Leaders in Arizona.” In 2014, he was honored with the Community Leader of the Year Award from the Phoenix chapter of the National Association of Asian American Professionals for his devotion to the community and outstanding service to the Valley. Loo earned his law degree from the University of Chicago and his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University.

lawyer

Super Lawyers: ​Quarles & Brady

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that 22 of its attorneys have been named by Southwest Super Lawyers magazine as among the top attorneys in Arizona for 2015. Additionally, 16 attorneys were named to the 2015 Southwest Rising Stars list.

Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, is a rating service that recognizes outstanding lawyers who have gained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The annual, statewide selections are made using a multi-phased process that includes independent peer nominations, peer evaluations, and research. No more than five percent of total lawyers in a state are selected for inclusion in Super Lawyers.

The following attorneys from the Quarles & Brady Phoenix and Tucson offices were selected for inclusion in the 2015 Southwest Super Lawyers magazine:

Phoenix

Tucson

•  Craig H. Kaufman – Business Litigation

•  James F. Morrow – Banking

Super Lawyers Rising Stars recognizes the top up-and-coming attorneys in the state who are 40 years old or younger, or who have been practicing for 10 years or less. No more than 2.5 percent of total lawyers are selected for inclusion in the Rising Stars list.

The following Quarles & Brady attorneys from the firm’s Phoenix and Tucson offices were named to the 2015 Southwest Rising Stars list:

Phoenix

·         Sarah Anchors – Business Litigation

·         Krystal A. Fleischmann – Business Litigation

·         Heather Buchta – Intellectual Property

·         Michael S. Catlett – Business Litigation

·         Amy Cotton Peterson – Health Care

·         Isaac Crum – Intellectual Property Litigation

·         Jason D. Curry – Bankruptcy: Business

·         Michael A. McCanse – Business Litigation

·         Ryan S. Patterson – Business Litigation

·         Kelly E. Singer – Bankruptcy: Business

·         Lauren Elliott Stine – Business Litigation

·         James L. Ugalde  – Creditor Debtor Rights

·         Marian Zapata-Rossa – Employee Litigation: Defense

Tucson

·         Elizabeth Fella – Bankruptcy: Business

·         Nikia Gray – Intellectual Property

·         Marian LaLonde – Energy & Resources

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Valley Leadership announces 2015 CEO Advisory Circle

Valley Leadership, the region’s premier leadership organization, announced its 2015 CEO Advisory Circle membership.  The CEO Advisory Circle will help Valley Leadership hone its focus on meeting future leadership needs in a fast-paced, ever-changing landscape.

The nine 2015 CEO Circle leaders were selected from diverse industries for their expert perspective on leadership, and for their long-standing commitment to and understanding of the Valley.

“The CEO Circle goes beyond a traditional advisory board format,” said Don Henninger, CEO Advisory Circle facilitator, “These leaders are not only committed to the success of Valley Leadership, they are dedicated to leading the way in fostering and promoting strong leadership for our region’s future.”

Leaders will meet quarterly to discuss Valley Leadership’s programming and goals, and offer advice on how to meet the needs associated with changes in leadership.

“The opportunity to tap this level of experience and diverse perspective is important as Valley Leadership continues to lead the way in leadership development programming,” says Brad Vynalek, partner at Quarles & Brady LLP, Valley Leadership board director and alum. “Their advice will be invaluable to Valley Leadership and the greater community.”

Vynalek and Katie Campana, fellow directors and alumni, worked with Don Henninger to create the Circle on behalf of the Valley Leadership Board. 

“Valley Leadership is looking forward to receiving high-level advice from the members, which will be applied to the strategic work of the board,” said Campana, community affairs and community development officer for Wells Fargo.  “This is a key leadership project important to the future of the Valley.”

2015 Valley Leadership CEO Advisory Circle

Hon. Rebecca Berch, Arizona Supreme Court

Supervisor Steve Chucri, Arizona Restaurant Association

Dr. Michael Crow, Arizona State University

Derrick Hall, Arizona Diamondbacks

Sharon Harper, Plaza Companies

Edmundo Hidalgo, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc.

Eileen Klein, Arizona Board of Regents

Paul Luna, Helios Education Foundation

Ed Zuercher, City of Phoenix

Don Henninger, CEO Advisory Circle Facilitator

healthcare

Az Business names Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists

Each year, AZ Business magazine hosts the Healthcare Leadership Awards to honor the women, men and institutions that bring excellence and innovation to Arizona’s healthcare sector.

Az Business is proud to announce the 2015 Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists, who were chosen by a panel of industry experts and will be recognized at the Healthcare Leadership Awards dinner and awards ceremony on April 9  at the Arizona Grand Resort. The finalists, in alphabetical order, are:

Abrazo Health — Arrowhead Hospital

Abrazo Health — Michele Finney

Affiliated Urologists — Dr. Mark Hong

Banner Health, Cardon Children’s Medical Center — Rachel Calendo

Banner Health — Peter Fine

Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation — Catherine Ivy

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck — Martin L. Shultz

Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center

CTCA — Dr. Glen Weiss

Dedicated Health Solutions

Dignity Health — Barrow Neurological Institute

Dignity Health, Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert medical centers — Tim Bricker

Dignity Health — St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

HonorHealth and TGen — Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff

HonorHealth – Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center

IASIS Healthcare — Tony Marinello

Insys Therapeutics

Magellan Health

Maricopa Integrated Health System — Dr. David Wisinger

Medtronic

Midwestern University — Kathleen Goeppinger

Quarles & Brady — Roger Morris

Phoenix Children’s Hospital – Dr. Robert J. Arceci

Radiant Research

Remuda Ranch

Snell and Wilmer – Richard Mallery

Sonora Quest Laboratories

Southwest Behavioral Health Services

SynCardia Systems

The CORE Institute — Dr. David Jacofsky

UnitedHealthcare of Arizona

University of Arizona Cancer Center

VisionGate

Vaught_R_hi

Robert G. Vaught joins Quarles & Brady

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Robert G. Vaught has joined the firm’s Phoenix office serving as of counsel in its Labor & Employment Practice Group.

Vaught’s practice includes counseling employers on matters involving the ADEA, FMLA, ADA, OSHA, Title VII, hiring and discipline, complaint investigations, and wage and hour issues. He also represents employers in related proceedings in state and federal courts, and before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Department of Labor, and state administrative agencies. Vaught also has significant experience handling trade secret, unfair competition and restrictive covenant matters throughout the United States, and representing employers in related court proceedings.

He received his law degree from the University of Kansas Law School and his bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas.

Qunicy_S_hi

Stephanie J. Quincy joins Quarles & Brady

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Stephanie J. Quincy has joined the firm’s Phoenix office as a partner in its Labor & Employment Practice Group.

Quincy consults and educates companies of all sizes on employment issues ranging from benefits, discipline, hiring, investigation of complaints, and termination, as well as the Fair Labor Standards Act, Family Medical Leave Act, and Title VII. She has represented employers in administrative matters that include discrimination and harassment charges and wage and hour complaints before state and federal agencies.

Quincy is recognized by her peers as a leading employment litigator in Chambers USABest Lawyers in America, and Ranking Arizona Magazine, and in 2014, she was selected to the list of “Top 25 Women” in Arizona by Southwest Super Lawyers. 

She received her law degree from the University of Kansas Law School and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas.

technology

Growing tech firms reflect emerging Arizona business sector

Don Hawley is the quintessential product of Silicon Valley. He went to college at the University of California, Berkeley, became a serial entrepreneur and founded and developed many successful technology companies in the San Francisco Bay area.

So why is he doing business in Arizona?

“Arizona is infinitely more business friendly,” said the founder, chairman and CEO of Scottsdale-based Innovative Green Technologies, which creates environmentally friendly products that reduce emissions and save users money. “Favorable tax rates make it less costly to do business in Arizona compared with California, which is attractive to newer companies that have to watch their pennies. Arizona is also blessed with Arizona State University and the University of Arizona, which supply a constant stream of high-quality young talent, which is a great resource.”

Hawley isn’t alone. The recently expansions of Zenefits and Weebly into the Valley and the emergence of Valley-based WebPT and Infusionsoft as technology powerhouses reflect an exploding techn industry in Phoenix that is transforming the state’s economy.

“The technology ecosystem in Arizona has never been more robust and these recent business attractions are going to become more commonplace,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “One of the vital attractions for startups in the Silicon Desert as compared with Silicon Valley is the drastically lower cost of living, especially in the area of housing. The word is getting out about Arizona.”

Valley economic developers are doing more than using lower tax rates and promises of sunshine to convince tech companies to relocate here, the state is building its home-grown success stories. A great example is WebPT, which launched its cloud-based physical therapy software in 2008 and has evolved from startup into one the fastest-growing software company in Arizona, creating more than 200 jobs in Phoenix.

“There are great incentive programs available to businesses looking to grow,” says Brad Jannenga, co-founder, chairman, president and chief technology officer at WebPT. “The Angel Tax Credit program offered by the state is a great opportunity for investors to have peace of mind when backing startups and knowing they can take a tax break when doing so. This was a major win for us when we went out for our Series A round back in 2010. Investors were lining up around the block partly because of the early stage success we had, but also largely because of the Angel Tax Credit.”

It’s the success of emerging companies like WebPT that are driving the robust growth of Arizona’s technology sector, says Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC).

“What we’ve done on the policy side was working with the legislature and governor so they understand that even though the headlines belong to Apple and Intel and companies like that, it’s the hundreds if not thousands of small and medium technologically based enterprises that have the chance to be the next GoDaddy,” Broome says. “Maybe you get lucky and you get a Google or a Microsoft or maybe an Infusionsoft becomes a Microsoft. Having the ability to get those small companies to go to scale and having the economic development programs and policies in place to help them are where we’ve been most helpful.”

Jannenga credits organizations like GPEC for helping the technology sector grow by tirelessly looking at new ways to diversify the economy and working closely with Arizona’s universities to produce the next wave of talent needed to feed the workforce demands of the technology industry.

But Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton put it simply: “WebPT is a game-changer, not only in terms of showing the growth in the tech sector in Phoenix, but growth in the warehouse district in downtown Phoenix.”

Experts say Arizona has actually done a number of things well to build a business environment that fosters innovation and an entrepreneurial spirit.

“The state has emphasized economic development through support of key economic development groups like the Arizona Commerce Authority and GPEC,” says Jacque Westling, partner at Quarles & Brady in Phoenix. “(Arizona) has created and maintained some key tax incentives, such as the Refundable Research and Development Credit and the Angel Investment Tax Credit Program, promoted tech transfer from the universities and supported emerging areas of strength such as biotechnology, data centers, energy and other areas.”

Zylstra says having facilities with ready-to-go infrastructure in desirable hot spots such as downtown Phoenix and downtown Scottsdale has been a major part in attracting technology companies to the Valley.
“Knowledge workers like the type of amenities available in these locations,” he says. “When you add Arizona’s ample workforce, low taxes and low cost of doing business, the foundation is very strong.”

Jannenga says the state’s deep awareness of the emerging technology sector and what it means to our state’s economic future has been helpful to WebPT and other early stage companies.

“I think when people began to recognize that we couldn’t rely on the traditional engines that had previously fueled our growth — tourism and migration from colder climates chief among them — to provide the type of jobs we need, it caused a basic shift in how progressive leaders thought about the future,” says Don Pierson, CEO of SpotlightSales, which has developed a sales performance optimization tool.

With the foundation for building a successful technology sector in place, Pierson says he has seen tremendous growth in the software industry and expects that growth to continue.

“I think biofuels are really interesting,” he says, “and I’m always amazed by what comes out of the biotech area.”

Greg Head, chief marketing officer at Infusionsoft, agrees with Pierson that Arizona quickly becoming a center for software businesses.

“Right now, there are thousands of entrepreneurs incubating new innovations, hundreds of software business growing and employing more people and several bigger software companies like GoDaddy, LifeLock, Infusionsoft and WebPT that are growing fast,” Head says. “The Arizona software community is growing up quickly.”

Experts agree that diversifying Arizona’s tech sectors will continue to power its growth. Zylstra expects aerospace and defense and semiconductor and electronics to continue to be strong, “but IT, especially software and data centers, healthcare, bioscience and alternative energy will help lead us into the future,” he says.

“We need to have all tech industries thriving in Arizona,” says Mike Auger, CEO and founder of PikFly, a technology-driven same day delivery network for local businesses. “A focus in one area puts us into a corner. Semiconductors have been great for our state, but that is really what we are known for — we need to be known for all types of tech.”

While Arizona’s growth in the technology arena is impressive, the state must tackle one major issue to maintain that positive trajectory.

“I spend more of my time as mayor in economic development recruiting and retention than I do anything else,” Stanton says. “The reality is this: the companies are concerned about workforce development. Do we have the pipeline of employees that they are going to need as their companies grow?”

Jannenga agrees that Arizona needs to invest heavily into all levels of our education system and diversify our skilled workforce.

“The places where we’re falling short is we’re not delivering the engineering talent necessary for the tech sector to really take off,” Broome says. “We need to make a big move on the production of engineers and make a big move on the production of information communication technology people.”
Broome says that big move can come from anywhere from community colleges to higher education to unique specialty certification programs that are putting students through six-month boot camps and producing a qualified workforce. He cites the Maricopa Corporate College as a unique training program that is developing and delivering customized workforces.

“You’re going to see continued movement in creating new educational options and a huge infusion of these intermediate training strategies to build the technology sector,” Broome says.

Creating a viable workforce to feed the needs is of the technology industry is a must to maintain the state’s robust growth and quality of life, experts say.

“We either grow the tech sector of the economy or we will fail,” Broome says. “That’s how important it is. It’s where the wages are. It’s where the high-end people are. It’s the part of the economy that is most sustainable. If you’re not building a tech sector, you’re relying on your current industries to remain relevant and we know from history that just doesn’t happen.”

Broome says the Valley has learned from companies like Motorola and General Motors than mature companies in mature industries contract and fade away, so it forces the business community to continually recycle its economic strategy around new industries.

“From my perspective, you’re looking at a make-it-or-break-it situation,” Broome says. “The reason the economy is so sluggish is because it’s waiting for consumption. It’s waiting for government spending and it’s waiting for retail spending and it’s waiting for construction and home buying. When your economy can only recover on that basis, you’re going to continue to have ebbs and flows and dips and falls. Even a place like San Francisco, which has a very difficult business climate because it’s expensive to the point of being unimaginable, its net year-to-year economic growth is much more robust than Phoenix and the rest of the country because its economy is built around talent, innovation and the high-tech sector. If we do a good job and build that out better, there’s no reason why Phoenix can’t be the most exciting community in the United States.”

David Funkhouser

Funkhouser Appointed to GPEC Ambassador Committee

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that David E. Funkhouser III, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has been appointed to the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) Ambassador Steering Committee, which is focused on ensuring GPEC’s Ambassador Program aligns with the organization’s key objectives and mission.  Members of the Steering Committee advise on the strategic direction of GPEC’s Ambassador Program, serve as a sounding board for emerging initiatives and support implementation of programs, and design activities relevant to and in support of GPEC’s mission.

Funkhouser handles complex commercial litigation matters. His litigation practice has an emphasis in real property disputes, trust, estate and probate litigation, and other commercial torts. Funkhouser also routinely represents financial institutions in all aspects of litigation.

He is also heavily involved in the local community, just recently completing his term as president of the Maricopa County Bar Association. Also in 2014, Funkhouser was named a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation, selected for inclusion in the 2014 Southwest Super Lawyers magazine and named to both the Phoenix Business Journal’s “40 under 40” and  Richman Media’s “Leaders under 40” lists, respectively. He is a member of the Leadership Council for the Special Olympics Advocacy Resource program, a founding member of Suns 88 Charities and a certified ambassador for the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. He also served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 2008–2009. Funkhouser earned both his law degree and undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa.

cybercrime

Quarles & Brady Launches Privacy and Security Blog

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP, which has three offices across Arizona in Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tucson, today announced that the firm’s Data Privacy & Security Team has launched Safe & Sound, a blog that provides a practical, business-focused discussion of the legal issues relating to the privacy and security of a company’s data. This blog will keep businesses aware of current events, news, and legislation in this area.

Margaret Utterback, chair of the firm’s Madison Business Law Group, said Safe & Sound will discuss current news about U.S. and international regulations associated with privacy. It will keep businesses abreast of what they need to know to protect their electronic information.

“Our clients are facing new concerns about how safe their data is in a changing privacy landscape. They want to know how best to protect their customers from a breach,” said John Barlament, chair of the Data Privacy & Security Team. “Our Quarles & Brady lawyers often step in to help companies stay on top of changing regulations and get up-to-speed on what they need to know to be prepared. This blog will offer a place for them to get a greater understanding of what the conversation in this area is focusing on and what they need to consider.”

There are so many unknowns right now about what is required since the regulations vary from state to state and from country to country, said Heather Buchta, chair of the firm’s Phoenix Intellectual Property Group. This blog, housed on LexBlog, will allow clients to get a quick snapshot of what they need to know and what questions they should ask their legal counsel.

To subscribe to the blog and get the latest information, visit http://safeandsound.quarles.com/.

lawyer

Quarles & Brady Adds 2 Partners in Tucson Office

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that two of its associate attorneys in Tucson have been admitted as partners as a result of excellent performance and the promise of generating strong future value for the firm and its clients.

They are:

Elizabeth Fella, who practices in the firm’s Bankruptcy & Creditors’ Rights Practice Group. She specializes in representing local and national companies in complex contract disputes, complex financial restructuring negotiations, and related litigation.

Yakov Sidorin, who practices in the firm’s Intellectual Property Practice Group, handling all areas of IP counseling for a variety of clients.

“Quarles & Brady has been around for almost 125 years, and we owe much of our success to attracting the best and brightest to join us and then investing in their professional development throughout their careers,” said Firm Managing Partner Fred Lautz, who supervises the partnership across the firm’s nine nationwide locations from its founding office in Milwaukee. “We see our future in the faces of these young and successful lawyers, and I’m confident that we’ll be around for at least another 125 years.”

“Given the intensely competitive nature of the modern legal industry, it’s more important than ever to promote associates with extreme care,” added Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “All new partners must be outstanding representatives of the profession, so we’re excited to add these 17 exceptional achievers to our ranks.”

The attorneys’ new status as partners became effective on October 1.

legal

Quarles & Brady Adds 4 New Phoenix Partners

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that four of its Phoenix associate attorneys have been admitted as partners as a result of excellent performance and the promise of generating strong future value for the firm and its clients.

The new partners are:

Michael Catlett, who practices in the Litigation & Dispute Resolution Practice Group and also is a member of the appellate practice subgroup.

Kathryn Moore, who practices in the Real Estate Practice Group, emphasizing the representation of financial institutions and the representation of local, national, and international lenders.

Ryan Patterson, who practices in the firm’s Product Liability Practice Group specializing in the areas of commercial litigation and product liability defense.

James Ugalde, who practices in the firm’s Commercial Bankruptcy & Creditors’ Rights Group and focuses on the representation of businesses and their needs for contract enforcement, restructuring, insolvency matters and related litigation.

“Quarles & Brady has been around for almost 125 years, and we owe much of our success to attracting the best and brightest to join us and then investing in their professional development throughout their careers,” said Firm Managing Partner Fred Lautz, who supervises the partnership across the firm’s nine nationwide locations from its founding office in Milwaukee. “We see our future in the faces of these young and successful lawyers, and I’m confident that we’ll be around for at least another 125 years.”

“Given the intensely competitive nature of the modern legal industry, it’s more important than ever to promote associates with extreme care,” added Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “All new partners must be outstanding representatives of the profession, so we’re excited to add these 17 exceptional achievers to our ranks.”

The attorneys’ new status as partners became effective October 1.

Quarles & Brady Managing Partner Nicole Standton, far left, firm Managing Partner Fred Lautz, Matt Dana and firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson attend a signing ceremony welcoming Dana to the team, effectively launching Quarles’ Scottsdale office.

Quarles & Brady Adds Dana Law Firm to Practice

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Matt Dana, a premier estate planning attorney in Scottsdale, will be joining the firm on November 1, along with two associates and two paralegals on his team. Their affiliation with Quarles & Brady will build on the work of Quarles & Brady attorney Trisha Baggs, a highly regarded estate planning attorney in the firm’s Phoenix office. With the addition of Dana and his team, Quarles & Brady will establish a presence in Scottsdale, its 10th location nationwide and third in Arizona. The new office will be located at 8817 E. Bell Road, Suite 201, Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260.

Dana Law Firm founder Matthew S. Dana will be joining Quarles & Brady as a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office. He will combine his highly developed Arizona trusts & estates practice with Quarles & Brady’s national practice, allowing the two firms to support and augment one another on a single platform, enhancing the new union’s ability to serve clients across Arizona and the country in general.

The new Scottsdale office will continue to serve local trusts & estates clients, but the service offerings at that location will multiply, as it delivers Quarles & Brady’s full range of business legal representations as a full member of the national network.

Also joining Quarles are associates Trevor Whiting and Todd Smith, and paralegals Jennifer Skubic and Kate Sieger. Whiting and Sieger will join Dana in the firm’s Phoenix office, while Smith and Skubic will work in the Scottsdale office.

“We’re gratified that our firm continues to grow at such a robust pace, especially because that growth is driven by solid opportunities,” said Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “We look forward to increasing our trusts & estates portfolio through the special strengths that Matt Dana and his team bring to the firm, and we’re also delighted to add Scottsdale to our national service network. It’s a win-win development.”

“My team and I have been providing our clients with premium trusts & estates services for many years, and now we have an opportunity, together with Trisha Baggs and the entire Quarles & Brady team, to offer them even more assistance, in many areas of law, with the power and reach of a national firm,” said Dana. “My team will continue to offer the same excellent estate planning services to our many former Dana Law Firm clients, but the chance to take it up another notch by joining Quarles & Brady is too good to pass on.”

“We are very pleased to have Matt Dana and members of his team join our Phoenix office and to be opening the firm’s third Arizona office,” said Phoenix Managing Partner, Nicole Stanton. “Partnering Matt with our own Trisha Baggs creates a powerhouse trusts & estates ensemble right here in Arizona, enhancing our on-the-ground presence and the width and breadth of our nationwide practice, allowing us to better serve our clients here and on a national scale.”

Quarles & Brady intends to be an active member of the Scottsdale community, as it has been in Phoenix, Tucson and its seven other locations across the country. The firm has a long history of enthusiastic social responsibility, embraced by civic-minded lawyers and staff members alike. The firm is committed to supporting and sustaining its local communities through its Quarles Cares program and pro bono services, reflecting an ongoing devotion to making communities the firm calls “home” better places to live. Matt Dana is himself a long-time, ardent supporter of Arizona State University and has been active in several of its programs and initiatives through the years.

About the Attorneys:

Matthew S. Dana, founding attorney of the Dana Law Firm, has spent last 25 years building one of the top estate planning practices in the state of Arizona. Dana practices exclusively in the areas of estate and asset protection planning. His clients range from modest estates to the extremely wealthy, including multimillionaires and other similarly situated clients, some of which have a net worth in excess of $50 million.

Trevor Whiting concentrates his practice on estate/gift tax planning and estate/trust income tax planning. Whiting’s strong background in tax law is beneficial to addressing the tax issues that arise while planning or administering an estate. He handles the estate and income tax issues related to dealing with out-of-state fiduciaries or trusts and estates owning property in multiple jurisdictions.

Todd Smith focuses his practice on estate planning, probate and trust administration, and business organizations. Smith has extensive experience with business organizations, including advising business owners and preparing buy-sell agreements for business succession planning as well as advising clients with substantial wealth in forming business entities like limited liability companies (LLC’s) and family limited partnerships (FLP’s) for asset protection and estate planning purposes.

Jennifer Skubic assists clients in estate planning, probate and trust administration. She has firsthand knowledge of how to execute trust documents and how to fund a living trust and works very closely with the attorneys to administer trusts and estates once someone has passed away.

Kate Sieger has extensive experience with helping clients attain their estate planning goals and enjoys working with a diverse group of clients. She works closely with attorneys, helping clients administer an estate after the death of a loved one.

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Az Business honors Most Admired Companies

BestCompaniesAZ and Az Business magazine honored 40 companies at the 2014 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies award reception on September 11, 2014 at the Westin Kierland Resort.

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Arizona’s Most Admired Companies are selected based on how a company has performed in the following areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, corporate and social responsibility, customer opinion and innovation. Five companies were recognized with a “spotlight” award for each of the five categories.

CONGRATUALTIONS!

The five spotlight awards winners are:

Customer Opinion: Cresa
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Quality Leadership: Kitchell
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Social Responsibility: Vanguard
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Innovation: Laser Spine Institute
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Workplace Culture: GoDaddy
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“This is the most comprehensive and prestigious corporate awards program in Arizona because it recognizes the contributions and impact these ‘most admired companies’ bring to our state,’” says Denise Gredler, co-founder of the Most Admired Companies Program.

“These companies truly exemplify what it means to be a good corporate citizen,” says Cheryl Green, publisher of Arizona Business Magazine. “MAC winners consistently show strong leadership, a commitment to the communities in which they operate and concern for their employees and customers.”

This year’s presenting sponsors included Dignity Health of Arizona, National Bank of Arizona and Thunderbird International School of Global Management. Additional Event Sponsors include Charles Schwab, Progrexion, Ryan and Shutterfly.

The 40 companies named Most Admired Companies for 2014 were:

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Alliance Residential Company
American Express
Arizona Diamondbacks
AXA Advisors
Banner Casa Grande Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America
CBRE, Inc.
Charles Schwab
Cresa Phoenix
Desert Diamond Casinos and Entertainment
DIRTT Environmental Solutions
Fennemore Craig
GoDaddy
Goodmans Interior Structurs
Grant Thornton
Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort
Homeowners Financial Group
Hyatt Regency Phoenix
Infusionsoft
International Cruise & Excursions, Inc.
Kitchell
LaneTerralever
Laser Spine Institute
Mayo Clinic
Miller Russell Associates
National Bank of Arizona
Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Quarles & Brady
Rider Levett Bucknall
Ryan, LLC
Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network
Shutterfly, Inc.
Sonora Quest Laboratories
Sundt Construction
The CORE Institute
Telesphere
UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
University of Advancing Technology
Vanguard

Nicole France-Stanton, office managing partner, Quarles & Brady.

29 Quarles & Brady Attorneys make ‘Best Lawyers’

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that 29 of its Phoenix attorneys – and a total of 169 Quarles & Brady attorneys nationwide – have been selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2015.

Quarles & Brady Phoenix attorneys distinguished for excellence in their practice areas are:

• Scott M. Berg (Banking and Finance Law)
• Brian R. Booker (Commercial Litigation / Product Liability Litigation – Defendants)
• Joseph A. Drazek (Environmental Law / Litigation – Environmental / Natural Resources Law)
• Steven P. Emerick (Corporate Law / Equipment Finance Law / Securities / Capital Markets Law)
• Nicole France-Stanton (Commercial Litigation / Legal Malpractice Law – Defendants)
• Jeffrey B. Fugal (Tax Law)
• Jeffrey L. Gage (Real Estate Law)
• Diane M. Haller (Real Estate Law)
• John A. Harris (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law / Litigation – Bankruptcy)
• Robert P. Harris (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law)
• Christian J. Hoffmann III (Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Securities / Capital Markets Law / Securities Regulation)
• Eric B. Johnson* (Employment Law – Management)
• Don P. Martin (Commercial Litigation / Legal Malpractice Law – Defendants / Litigation – Banking and Finance / Litigation – Real Estate)
• Matthew Mehr (Banking and Finance Law)
• Roger N. Morris (Health Care Law)
• P. Robert Moya (Corporate Law / Leveraged Buyouts and Private Equity Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Securities / Capital Markets Law)
• Daniel L. Muchow (Environmental Law / Natural Resources Law)
• John Maston O’Neal (Commercial Litigation)
• Jon E. Pettibone (Administrative / Regulatory Law / Employment Law – Management / Labor Law – Management)
• James A. Ryan (Bet-the-Company Litigation / Commercial Litigation / Tax Law)
• Edward Salanga (Commercial Litigation / Litigation – Construction)
• Brian Sirower (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law / Litigation – Bankruptcy)
• Derek L. Sorenson (Real Estate Law)
• Peter A. Terry (Banking and Finance Law)
• James A. Ullman (Franchise Law)
• C. Bradley Vynalek (Commercial Litigation)
• Jacque N. Westling (Banking and Finance Law / Corporate Law)
• Lori L. Winkelman (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law)
• Jeffrey H. Wolf (Franchise Law)

* Lawyers who are listed for the first time in Best Lawyers.

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.