Tag Archives: quarles & brady

healthcare

Az Business names Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists

Each year, AZ Business magazine hosts the Healthcare Leadership Awards to honor the women, men and institutions that bring excellence and innovation to Arizona’s healthcare sector.

Az Business is proud to announce the 2015 Healthcare Leadership Awards finalists, who were chosen by a panel of industry experts and will be recognized at the Healthcare Leadership Awards dinner and awards ceremony on April 9  at the Arizona Grand Resort. The finalists, in alphabetical order, are:

Robert J. Arceci, M.D., Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Arrowhead Hospital, Abrazo Health
Barrow Neurological Institute
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona
Tim Bricker, Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert
Rachel Calendo, Cardon Children’s Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center
Dedicated Health Solutions
Peter Fine, Banner Health
Michele Finney, Abrazo Health
Kathleen Goeppinger, Midwestern University
Dr. Mark Hong, Affiliated Urologists
Insys Therapeutics
Catherine Ivy, Ben & Catherine Ivy Foundation
Dr. David Jacofsky, The CORE Institute
Magellan Health
Richard Mallery, Snell and Wilmer
Tony Marinello, IASIS Healthcare
Medtronic
Roger Morris, Quarles & Brady
Radiant Research
Remuda Ranch
St. Joseph’s Medical Center, Dignity Health
Martin L. Shultz, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Sonora Quest
Southwest Behavioral Health
SynCardia
UnitedHealthcare
University of Arizona Cancer Center
Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare
VisionGate
Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, TGen
Dr. Glen Weiss, CTCA
Dr. David Wisinger, Maricopa Integrated Health System

technology

Growing tech firms reflect emerging Arizona business sector

Don Hawley is the quintessential product of Silicon Valley. He went to college at the University of California, Berkeley, became a serial entrepreneur and founded and developed many successful technology companies in the San Francisco Bay area.

So why is he doing business in Arizona?

“Arizona is infinitely more business friendly,” said the founder, chairman and CEO of Scottsdale-based Innovative Green Technologies, which creates environmentally friendly products that reduce emissions and save users money. “Favorable tax rates make it less costly to do business in Arizona compared with California, which is attractive to newer companies that have to watch their pennies. Arizona is also blessed with Arizona State University and the University of Arizona, which supply a constant stream of high-quality young talent, which is a great resource.”

Hawley isn’t alone. The recently expansions of Zenefits and Weebly into the Valley and the emergence of Valley-based WebPT and Infusionsoft as technology powerhouses reflect an exploding techn industry in Phoenix that is transforming the state’s economy.

“The technology ecosystem in Arizona has never been more robust and these recent business attractions are going to become more commonplace,” says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. “One of the vital attractions for startups in the Silicon Desert as compared with Silicon Valley is the drastically lower cost of living, especially in the area of housing. The word is getting out about Arizona.”

Valley economic developers are doing more than using lower tax rates and promises of sunshine to convince tech companies to relocate here, the state is building its home-grown success stories. A great example is WebPT, which launched its cloud-based physical therapy software in 2008 and has evolved from startup into one the fastest-growing software company in Arizona, creating more than 200 jobs in Phoenix.

“There are great incentive programs available to businesses looking to grow,” says Brad Jannenga, co-founder, chairman, president and chief technology officer at WebPT. “The Angel Tax Credit program offered by the state is a great opportunity for investors to have peace of mind when backing startups and knowing they can take a tax break when doing so. This was a major win for us when we went out for our Series A round back in 2010. Investors were lining up around the block partly because of the early stage success we had, but also largely because of the Angel Tax Credit.”

It’s the success of emerging companies like WebPT that are driving the robust growth of Arizona’s technology sector, says Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC).

“What we’ve done on the policy side was working with the legislature and governor so they understand that even though the headlines belong to Apple and Intel and companies like that, it’s the hundreds if not thousands of small and medium technologically based enterprises that have the chance to be the next GoDaddy,” Broome says. “Maybe you get lucky and you get a Google or a Microsoft or maybe an Infusionsoft becomes a Microsoft. Having the ability to get those small companies to go to scale and having the economic development programs and policies in place to help them are where we’ve been most helpful.”

Jannenga credits organizations like GPEC for helping the technology sector grow by tirelessly looking at new ways to diversify the economy and working closely with Arizona’s universities to produce the next wave of talent needed to feed the workforce demands of the technology industry.

But Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton put it simply: “WebPT is a game-changer, not only in terms of showing the growth in the tech sector in Phoenix, but growth in the warehouse district in downtown Phoenix.”

Experts say Arizona has actually done a number of things well to build a business environment that fosters innovation and an entrepreneurial spirit.

“The state has emphasized economic development through support of key economic development groups like the Arizona Commerce Authority and GPEC,” says Jacque Westling, partner at Quarles & Brady in Phoenix. “(Arizona) has created and maintained some key tax incentives, such as the Refundable Research and Development Credit and the Angel Investment Tax Credit Program, promoted tech transfer from the universities and supported emerging areas of strength such as biotechnology, data centers, energy and other areas.”

Zylstra says having facilities with ready-to-go infrastructure in desirable hot spots such as downtown Phoenix and downtown Scottsdale has been a major part in attracting technology companies to the Valley.
“Knowledge workers like the type of amenities available in these locations,” he says. “When you add Arizona’s ample workforce, low taxes and low cost of doing business, the foundation is very strong.”

Jannenga says the state’s deep awareness of the emerging technology sector and what it means to our state’s economic future has been helpful to WebPT and other early stage companies.

“I think when people began to recognize that we couldn’t rely on the traditional engines that had previously fueled our growth — tourism and migration from colder climates chief among them — to provide the type of jobs we need, it caused a basic shift in how progressive leaders thought about the future,” says Don Pierson, CEO of SpotlightSales, which has developed a sales performance optimization tool.

With the foundation for building a successful technology sector in place, Pierson says he has seen tremendous growth in the software industry and expects that growth to continue.

“I think biofuels are really interesting,” he says, “and I’m always amazed by what comes out of the biotech area.”

Greg Head, chief marketing officer at Infusionsoft, agrees with Pierson that Arizona quickly becoming a center for software businesses.

“Right now, there are thousands of entrepreneurs incubating new innovations, hundreds of software business growing and employing more people and several bigger software companies like GoDaddy, LifeLock, Infusionsoft and WebPT that are growing fast,” Head says. “The Arizona software community is growing up quickly.”

Experts agree that diversifying Arizona’s tech sectors will continue to power its growth. Zylstra expects aerospace and defense and semiconductor and electronics to continue to be strong, “but IT, especially software and data centers, healthcare, bioscience and alternative energy will help lead us into the future,” he says.

“We need to have all tech industries thriving in Arizona,” says Mike Auger, CEO and founder of PikFly, a technology-driven same day delivery network for local businesses. “A focus in one area puts us into a corner. Semiconductors have been great for our state, but that is really what we are known for — we need to be known for all types of tech.”

While Arizona’s growth in the technology arena is impressive, the state must tackle one major issue to maintain that positive trajectory.

“I spend more of my time as mayor in economic development recruiting and retention than I do anything else,” Stanton says. “The reality is this: the companies are concerned about workforce development. Do we have the pipeline of employees that they are going to need as their companies grow?”

Jannenga agrees that Arizona needs to invest heavily into all levels of our education system and diversify our skilled workforce.

“The places where we’re falling short is we’re not delivering the engineering talent necessary for the tech sector to really take off,” Broome says. “We need to make a big move on the production of engineers and make a big move on the production of information communication technology people.”
Broome says that big move can come from anywhere from community colleges to higher education to unique specialty certification programs that are putting students through six-month boot camps and producing a qualified workforce. He cites the Maricopa Corporate College as a unique training program that is developing and delivering customized workforces.

“You’re going to see continued movement in creating new educational options and a huge infusion of these intermediate training strategies to build the technology sector,” Broome says.

Creating a viable workforce to feed the needs is of the technology industry is a must to maintain the state’s robust growth and quality of life, experts say.

“We either grow the tech sector of the economy or we will fail,” Broome says. “That’s how important it is. It’s where the wages are. It’s where the high-end people are. It’s the part of the economy that is most sustainable. If you’re not building a tech sector, you’re relying on your current industries to remain relevant and we know from history that just doesn’t happen.”

Broome says the Valley has learned from companies like Motorola and General Motors than mature companies in mature industries contract and fade away, so it forces the business community to continually recycle its economic strategy around new industries.

“From my perspective, you’re looking at a make-it-or-break-it situation,” Broome says. “The reason the economy is so sluggish is because it’s waiting for consumption. It’s waiting for government spending and it’s waiting for retail spending and it’s waiting for construction and home buying. When your economy can only recover on that basis, you’re going to continue to have ebbs and flows and dips and falls. Even a place like San Francisco, which has a very difficult business climate because it’s expensive to the point of being unimaginable, its net year-to-year economic growth is much more robust than Phoenix and the rest of the country because its economy is built around talent, innovation and the high-tech sector. If we do a good job and build that out better, there’s no reason why Phoenix can’t be the most exciting community in the United States.”

David Funkhouser

Funkhouser Appointed to GPEC Ambassador Committee

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that David E. Funkhouser III, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has been appointed to the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) Ambassador Steering Committee, which is focused on ensuring GPEC’s Ambassador Program aligns with the organization’s key objectives and mission.  Members of the Steering Committee advise on the strategic direction of GPEC’s Ambassador Program, serve as a sounding board for emerging initiatives and support implementation of programs, and design activities relevant to and in support of GPEC’s mission.

Funkhouser handles complex commercial litigation matters. His litigation practice has an emphasis in real property disputes, trust, estate and probate litigation, and other commercial torts. Funkhouser also routinely represents financial institutions in all aspects of litigation.

He is also heavily involved in the local community, just recently completing his term as president of the Maricopa County Bar Association. Also in 2014, Funkhouser was named a Fellow of the American Bar Foundation, selected for inclusion in the 2014 Southwest Super Lawyers magazine and named to both the Phoenix Business Journal’s “40 under 40” and  Richman Media’s “Leaders under 40” lists, respectively. He is a member of the Leadership Council for the Special Olympics Advocacy Resource program, a founding member of Suns 88 Charities and a certified ambassador for the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. He also served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 2008–2009. Funkhouser earned both his law degree and undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa.

cybercrime

Quarles & Brady Launches Privacy and Security Blog

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP, which has three offices across Arizona in Phoenix, Scottsdale and Tucson, today announced that the firm’s Data Privacy & Security Team has launched Safe & Sound, a blog that provides a practical, business-focused discussion of the legal issues relating to the privacy and security of a company’s data. This blog will keep businesses aware of current events, news, and legislation in this area.

Margaret Utterback, chair of the firm’s Madison Business Law Group, said Safe & Sound will discuss current news about U.S. and international regulations associated with privacy. It will keep businesses abreast of what they need to know to protect their electronic information.

“Our clients are facing new concerns about how safe their data is in a changing privacy landscape. They want to know how best to protect their customers from a breach,” said John Barlament, chair of the Data Privacy & Security Team. “Our Quarles & Brady lawyers often step in to help companies stay on top of changing regulations and get up-to-speed on what they need to know to be prepared. This blog will offer a place for them to get a greater understanding of what the conversation in this area is focusing on and what they need to consider.”

There are so many unknowns right now about what is required since the regulations vary from state to state and from country to country, said Heather Buchta, chair of the firm’s Phoenix Intellectual Property Group. This blog, housed on LexBlog, will allow clients to get a quick snapshot of what they need to know and what questions they should ask their legal counsel.

To subscribe to the blog and get the latest information, visit http://safeandsound.quarles.com/.

lawyer

Quarles & Brady Adds 2 Partners in Tucson Office

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that two of its associate attorneys in Tucson have been admitted as partners as a result of excellent performance and the promise of generating strong future value for the firm and its clients.

They are:

Elizabeth Fella, who practices in the firm’s Bankruptcy & Creditors’ Rights Practice Group. She specializes in representing local and national companies in complex contract disputes, complex financial restructuring negotiations, and related litigation.

Yakov Sidorin, who practices in the firm’s Intellectual Property Practice Group, handling all areas of IP counseling for a variety of clients.

“Quarles & Brady has been around for almost 125 years, and we owe much of our success to attracting the best and brightest to join us and then investing in their professional development throughout their careers,” said Firm Managing Partner Fred Lautz, who supervises the partnership across the firm’s nine nationwide locations from its founding office in Milwaukee. “We see our future in the faces of these young and successful lawyers, and I’m confident that we’ll be around for at least another 125 years.”

“Given the intensely competitive nature of the modern legal industry, it’s more important than ever to promote associates with extreme care,” added Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “All new partners must be outstanding representatives of the profession, so we’re excited to add these 17 exceptional achievers to our ranks.”

The attorneys’ new status as partners became effective on October 1.

legal

Quarles & Brady Adds 4 New Phoenix Partners

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that four of its Phoenix associate attorneys have been admitted as partners as a result of excellent performance and the promise of generating strong future value for the firm and its clients.

The new partners are:

Michael Catlett, who practices in the Litigation & Dispute Resolution Practice Group and also is a member of the appellate practice subgroup.

Kathryn Moore, who practices in the Real Estate Practice Group, emphasizing the representation of financial institutions and the representation of local, national, and international lenders.

Ryan Patterson, who practices in the firm’s Product Liability Practice Group specializing in the areas of commercial litigation and product liability defense.

James Ugalde, who practices in the firm’s Commercial Bankruptcy & Creditors’ Rights Group and focuses on the representation of businesses and their needs for contract enforcement, restructuring, insolvency matters and related litigation.

“Quarles & Brady has been around for almost 125 years, and we owe much of our success to attracting the best and brightest to join us and then investing in their professional development throughout their careers,” said Firm Managing Partner Fred Lautz, who supervises the partnership across the firm’s nine nationwide locations from its founding office in Milwaukee. “We see our future in the faces of these young and successful lawyers, and I’m confident that we’ll be around for at least another 125 years.”

“Given the intensely competitive nature of the modern legal industry, it’s more important than ever to promote associates with extreme care,” added Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “All new partners must be outstanding representatives of the profession, so we’re excited to add these 17 exceptional achievers to our ranks.”

The attorneys’ new status as partners became effective October 1.

Quarles & Brady Managing Partner Nicole Standton, far left, firm Managing Partner Fred Lautz, Matt Dana and firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson attend a signing ceremony welcoming Dana to the team, effectively launching Quarles’ Scottsdale office.

Quarles & Brady Adds Dana Law Firm to Practice

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Matt Dana, a premier estate planning attorney in Scottsdale, will be joining the firm on November 1, along with two associates and two paralegals on his team. Their affiliation with Quarles & Brady will build on the work of Quarles & Brady attorney Trisha Baggs, a highly regarded estate planning attorney in the firm’s Phoenix office. With the addition of Dana and his team, Quarles & Brady will establish a presence in Scottsdale, its 10th location nationwide and third in Arizona. The new office will be located at 8817 E. Bell Road, Suite 201, Scottsdale, Arizona, 85260.

Dana Law Firm founder Matthew S. Dana will be joining Quarles & Brady as a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office. He will combine his highly developed Arizona trusts & estates practice with Quarles & Brady’s national practice, allowing the two firms to support and augment one another on a single platform, enhancing the new union’s ability to serve clients across Arizona and the country in general.

The new Scottsdale office will continue to serve local trusts & estates clients, but the service offerings at that location will multiply, as it delivers Quarles & Brady’s full range of business legal representations as a full member of the national network.

Also joining Quarles are associates Trevor Whiting and Todd Smith, and paralegals Jennifer Skubic and Kate Sieger. Whiting and Sieger will join Dana in the firm’s Phoenix office, while Smith and Skubic will work in the Scottsdale office.

“We’re gratified that our firm continues to grow at such a robust pace, especially because that growth is driven by solid opportunities,” said Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “We look forward to increasing our trusts & estates portfolio through the special strengths that Matt Dana and his team bring to the firm, and we’re also delighted to add Scottsdale to our national service network. It’s a win-win development.”

“My team and I have been providing our clients with premium trusts & estates services for many years, and now we have an opportunity, together with Trisha Baggs and the entire Quarles & Brady team, to offer them even more assistance, in many areas of law, with the power and reach of a national firm,” said Dana. “My team will continue to offer the same excellent estate planning services to our many former Dana Law Firm clients, but the chance to take it up another notch by joining Quarles & Brady is too good to pass on.”

“We are very pleased to have Matt Dana and members of his team join our Phoenix office and to be opening the firm’s third Arizona office,” said Phoenix Managing Partner, Nicole Stanton. “Partnering Matt with our own Trisha Baggs creates a powerhouse trusts & estates ensemble right here in Arizona, enhancing our on-the-ground presence and the width and breadth of our nationwide practice, allowing us to better serve our clients here and on a national scale.”

Quarles & Brady intends to be an active member of the Scottsdale community, as it has been in Phoenix, Tucson and its seven other locations across the country. The firm has a long history of enthusiastic social responsibility, embraced by civic-minded lawyers and staff members alike. The firm is committed to supporting and sustaining its local communities through its Quarles Cares program and pro bono services, reflecting an ongoing devotion to making communities the firm calls “home” better places to live. Matt Dana is himself a long-time, ardent supporter of Arizona State University and has been active in several of its programs and initiatives through the years.

About the Attorneys:

Matthew S. Dana, founding attorney of the Dana Law Firm, has spent last 25 years building one of the top estate planning practices in the state of Arizona. Dana practices exclusively in the areas of estate and asset protection planning. His clients range from modest estates to the extremely wealthy, including multimillionaires and other similarly situated clients, some of which have a net worth in excess of $50 million.

Trevor Whiting concentrates his practice on estate/gift tax planning and estate/trust income tax planning. Whiting’s strong background in tax law is beneficial to addressing the tax issues that arise while planning or administering an estate. He handles the estate and income tax issues related to dealing with out-of-state fiduciaries or trusts and estates owning property in multiple jurisdictions.

Todd Smith focuses his practice on estate planning, probate and trust administration, and business organizations. Smith has extensive experience with business organizations, including advising business owners and preparing buy-sell agreements for business succession planning as well as advising clients with substantial wealth in forming business entities like limited liability companies (LLC’s) and family limited partnerships (FLP’s) for asset protection and estate planning purposes.

Jennifer Skubic assists clients in estate planning, probate and trust administration. She has firsthand knowledge of how to execute trust documents and how to fund a living trust and works very closely with the attorneys to administer trusts and estates once someone has passed away.

Kate Sieger has extensive experience with helping clients attain their estate planning goals and enjoys working with a diverse group of clients. She works closely with attorneys, helping clients administer an estate after the death of a loved one.

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Az Business honors Most Admired Companies

BestCompaniesAZ and Az Business magazine honored 40 companies at the 2014 Arizona’s Most Admired Companies award reception on September 11, 2014 at the Westin Kierland Resort.

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Arizona’s Most Admired Companies are selected based on how a company has performed in the following areas: workplace culture, leadership excellence, corporate and social responsibility, customer opinion and innovation. Five companies were recognized with a “spotlight” award for each of the five categories.

CONGRATUALTIONS!

The five spotlight awards winners are:

Customer Opinion: Cresa
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Quality Leadership: Kitchell
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Social Responsibility: Vanguard
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Innovation: Laser Spine Institute
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Workplace Culture: GoDaddy
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“This is the most comprehensive and prestigious corporate awards program in Arizona because it recognizes the contributions and impact these ‘most admired companies’ bring to our state,’” says Denise Gredler, co-founder of the Most Admired Companies Program.

“These companies truly exemplify what it means to be a good corporate citizen,” says Cheryl Green, publisher of Arizona Business Magazine. “MAC winners consistently show strong leadership, a commitment to the communities in which they operate and concern for their employees and customers.”

This year’s presenting sponsors included Dignity Health of Arizona, National Bank of Arizona and Thunderbird International School of Global Management. Additional Event Sponsors include Charles Schwab, Progrexion, Ryan and Shutterfly.

The 40 companies named Most Admired Companies for 2014 were:

Adolfson & Peterson Construction
Alliance Residential Company
American Express
Arizona Diamondbacks
AXA Advisors
Banner Casa Grande Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America
CBRE, Inc.
Charles Schwab
Cresa Phoenix
Desert Diamond Casinos and Entertainment
DIRTT Environmental Solutions
Fennemore Craig
GoDaddy
Goodmans Interior Structurs
Grant Thornton
Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort
Homeowners Financial Group
Hyatt Regency Phoenix
Infusionsoft
International Cruise & Excursions, Inc.
Kitchell
LaneTerralever
Laser Spine Institute
Mayo Clinic
Miller Russell Associates
National Bank of Arizona
Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Quarles & Brady
Rider Levett Bucknall
Ryan, LLC
Scottsdale Lincoln Health Network
Shutterfly, Inc.
Sonora Quest Laboratories
Sundt Construction
The CORE Institute
Telesphere
UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
University of Advancing Technology
Vanguard

Nicole France-Stanton, office managing partner, Quarles & Brady.

29 Quarles & Brady Attorneys make ‘Best Lawyers’

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that 29 of its Phoenix attorneys – and a total of 169 Quarles & Brady attorneys nationwide – have been selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2015.

Quarles & Brady Phoenix attorneys distinguished for excellence in their practice areas are:

• Scott M. Berg (Banking and Finance Law)
• Brian R. Booker (Commercial Litigation / Product Liability Litigation – Defendants)
• Joseph A. Drazek (Environmental Law / Litigation – Environmental / Natural Resources Law)
• Steven P. Emerick (Corporate Law / Equipment Finance Law / Securities / Capital Markets Law)
• Nicole France-Stanton (Commercial Litigation / Legal Malpractice Law – Defendants)
• Jeffrey B. Fugal (Tax Law)
• Jeffrey L. Gage (Real Estate Law)
• Diane M. Haller (Real Estate Law)
• John A. Harris (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law / Litigation – Bankruptcy)
• Robert P. Harris (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law)
• Christian J. Hoffmann III (Corporate Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Securities / Capital Markets Law / Securities Regulation)
• Eric B. Johnson* (Employment Law – Management)
• Don P. Martin (Commercial Litigation / Legal Malpractice Law – Defendants / Litigation – Banking and Finance / Litigation – Real Estate)
• Matthew Mehr (Banking and Finance Law)
• Roger N. Morris (Health Care Law)
• P. Robert Moya (Corporate Law / Leveraged Buyouts and Private Equity Law / Mergers and Acquisitions Law / Securities / Capital Markets Law)
• Daniel L. Muchow (Environmental Law / Natural Resources Law)
• John Maston O’Neal (Commercial Litigation)
• Jon E. Pettibone (Administrative / Regulatory Law / Employment Law – Management / Labor Law – Management)
• James A. Ryan (Bet-the-Company Litigation / Commercial Litigation / Tax Law)
• Edward Salanga (Commercial Litigation / Litigation – Construction)
• Brian Sirower (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law / Litigation – Bankruptcy)
• Derek L. Sorenson (Real Estate Law)
• Peter A. Terry (Banking and Finance Law)
• James A. Ullman (Franchise Law)
• C. Bradley Vynalek (Commercial Litigation)
• Jacque N. Westling (Banking and Finance Law / Corporate Law)
• Lori L. Winkelman (Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law)
• Jeffrey H. Wolf (Franchise Law)

* Lawyers who are listed for the first time in Best Lawyers.

AZ Big Media honors Most Influential Women

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They are the best business minds in Arizona. They are innovators, trailblazers and leaders of men.

They are Az Business magazine’s Most Influential Women in Arizona Business for 2014, as selected by the editorial team at Az Business magazine and a panel of industry experts. The Most Influential Women were honored Thursday at a reception at The Venue in Scottsdale.

“While their resumes and career paths may differ, the women we selected have all procured influence in their respective fields through hard-earned track records of profitability, business ethics and leadership,” said AZ Big Media Publisher Cheryl Green. “Az Business magazine is proud to congratulate the women who earned the right to call themselves one of the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business. They are changing the face of Arizona business.”

The women selected to this prestigious list for 2014 are:

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D, senior vice president and chief research officer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Trish Bear, president and CEO, I-ology
Dr. Amy Beiter, president and CEO, Carondelet St. Mary’s Hospital and Carondelet Heart & Vascular Institute
Janet G. Betts, member, Sherman & Howard
Kristin Bloomquist, executive vice president and general manager, Cramer-Krasselt
Delia Carlyle, councilwoman, Ak-Chin Indian Community
Luci Chen, partner, Arizona Center for Cancer Care
Mary Collum, senior vice president, National Bank of Arizona
Kathy Coover, co-founder, Isagenix International
Janna Day, managing partner, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck
Karen Dickinson, shareholder, Polsinelli
Michele Finney, CEO, Abrazo Health
Susan Frank, CEO, Desert Schools Federal Credit Union
Leah Freed, managing shareholder, Ogletree Deakins
Deborah Griffin, president of the board of directors, Gila River Casinos
Mary Ann Guerra, CEO, BioAccel
Deb Gullett, senior specialist, Gallagher & Kennedy
Diane Haller, partner, Quarles & Brady
Maria Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost, Maricopa Community Colleges
Catherine Hayes, principal, hayes architecture/interiors inc.
Camille Hill, president, Merestone
Chevy Humphrey, president and CEO, Arizona Science Center
Heidi Jannenga, founder, WebPT
Kara Kalkbrenner, acting fire chief, City of Phoenix
Lynne King Smith, CEO, TicketForce
Joan Koerber Walker, CEO, Arizona Bioindustry Association
Karen Kravitz, president and head of conceptology, Commotion Promotions
Deb Krmpotic, CEO, Banner Estrella Medical Center
Jessica Langbaum, PhD, principal scientist, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
Georgia Lord, mayor, City of Goodyear
Sherry Lund, founder, Celebration Stem Cell Centre
Teresa Mandelin, CEO, Southwestern Business Financing Corporation
Shirley Mays, dean, Arizona Summit Law School
Ann Meyers-Drysdale, vice president, Phoenix Mercury and Phoenix Suns
Marcia L. Mintz, president, John C. Lincoln Health Foundation
Martha C. Patrick, shareholder, Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
Stephanie J. Quincy, partner, Steptoe & Johnson
Barb Rechterman, chief marketing officer, GoDaddy
Marian Rhodes, senior vice president, Arizona Diamondbacks
Joyce Santis, chief operating officer, Sonora Quest Laboratories
Gena Sluga, partner, Christian Dichter & Sluga
Beth Soberg, CEO, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona
Scarlett Spring, president, VisionGate
Patrice Strong-Register, managing partner, JatroBiofuels
Sarah A. Strunk, director, Fennemore Craig, P.C.
Marie Sullivan, president and CEO, Arizona Women’s Education & Employment
Nancy K. Sweitzer, MD, director, UA’s Sarver Heart Center
Dana Vela, president, Sunrise Schools and Tots Unlimited
Alicia Wadas, COO, The Lavidge Company
Ginger Ward, CEO, Southwest Human Development

In addition to the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business, Az Business also selects five “Generation Next” women who are making an impact on Arizona, even though they are less than 40 years old. Those women selected for 2014 are:

Anca Bec, 36, business development officer, Alliance Bank of Arizona
Alison R. Christian, 32, shareholder, Christian Dichter & Sluga, P.C.
Jaime Daddona, 38, senior associate, Squire Patton Boggs
Nancy Kim, 36, owner, Spectrum Dermatology
Jami Reagan, 35, owner, Shine Factory Public Relations

To select the best and brightest women to recognize each year, the editor and publisher of Az Business magazine compile a list of almost 1,000 women from every facet of Arizona’s business landscape — banking, law, healthcare, bioscience, real estate, technology, manufacturing, retail, tourism, energy, accounting and nonprofits. Once that list is compiled, we vet the list, narrow it down to about 150 women who we feel are most deserving, and then submit the list to 20 of their peers — female leaders from a variety or industries — and ask them to vote. If they want to vote for someone whose name is not on the list of those submitted for consideration, voters are invited to write in the names of women who they think deserve to members of this exclusive club.

Az Business also does not allow a woman to appear on the list most than once.

Diane Haller

Quarles & Brady’s Haller Named Lawyer of the Year

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that Phoenix partner Diane Haller is one of 14 Quarles & Brady attorneys nationally to have been selected as a “Lawyer of the Year” in The Best Lawyers in America®.

Each year, Best Lawyers compiles its list of “Lawyers of the Year,” in which only a single lawyer in each practice area and designated metropolitan area is honored. Lawyers with this designation are chosen based on peer-review assessments conducted with thousands of leading lawyers each year. Receiving this honor reflects the respect a lawyer has acquired among other leading lawyers in the same practice areas throughout the same communities.

Haller is at the center of many major development projects in Phoenix, not only as a lawyer, but as an advocate of smart development. She is a board member of Habitat for Humanity, as well as a member of the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, and serves as vice-chair on the board and executive committee of the Phoenix Community Alliance.

Haller has been named among the Top 25 Female Lawyers in Southwest Super Lawyers and honored as the Most Influential Women in Arizona Business by AZ Business Magazine. She serves as the national chair of Quarles & Brady’s Real Estate & Land Use Practice Group and is Martindale-Hubbell AV Peer Review Rated.

Nicole France-Stanton, office managing partner, Quarles & Brady.

Stanton named ‘Woman Worth Watching’

The law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Phoenix Office Managing Partner Nicole Stanton has been selected by Profiles in Diversity Journal to be honored at its 13th Annual Women Worth Watching® Awards. Stanton will join trailblazing female leaders from across the country in this honor and will be featured in the September/October issue of the magazine.

“Women Worth Watching award winners are role models to young women beginning their careers, and an inspiration to women in the pipeline,” says Profiles in Diversity Journal editor, Kathie Sandlin. “We are proud to tell their stories on lessons learned and obstacles overcome.”

In addition to her position as office manager partner at Quarles & Brady LLP, Stanton is a member of the firm’s Commercial Litigation Group. Her experience includes defense of local and national law firms in legal malpractice actions and other business litigation disputes.

In the Phoenix community, Stanton serves as a founding board member and past president of the Women’s Metropolitan Arts Council of the Phoenix Art Museum as well as a member of Chart 100 Women. She also is an adjunct professor at Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, teaching professional responsibility. A graduate of Valley Leadership Class XXIX, Stanton was the YWCA of Maricopa County’s 2011 Tribute to Women honoree, in the Business Leader category. She also was honored as one of the “50 Most Influential Women in Business” by AZ Business Magazine.

Stanton recently has been appointed to serve as a member of the Business Court Advisory Committee, newly established by order of Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch, which is examining current processes for resolving business cases in the Superior Court of Arizona as well as reviewing business court models, processes, rules and procedures in other jurisdictions.

Stanton received her law degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Arizona and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Utah.

diane_haller

Diane Haller – Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Diane HallerPartner, Quarles & Brady
Haller is national chair of Quarles’ Real Estate and Land Use Practice Group; vice-chair of the Phoenix Community Alliance; and was named one of the Top 25 female lawyers in Arizona in 2014 by Southwest Super Lawyers.

Greatest accomplishment: “Pro bono work I’ve done for Habitat for Humanity and being part of a firm that supports pro bono work in a big way.”

Surprising fact: “I am a kindergarten dropout.”

Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue, Az Business Magazine celebrates the amazing women who make an impact on Arizona business.

Click here to see all of the 2014 Most Influential Women.

Nicole France-Stanton, office managing partner, Quarles & Brady.

Stanton Appointed to Business Court Advisory Committee

The law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that Phoenix office managing partner, Nicole Stanton, has been appointed to serve as a member of the Business Court Advisory Committee. This is a newly established committee, by order of Chief Justice Rebecca White Berch, which is dedicated to examining current processes for resolving business cases in the Superior Court of Arizona, as well as reviewing business court models, processes, rules, and procedures in other jurisdictions.

In addition to her position as office manager partner at Quarles & Brady LLP and now serving on the Business Court Advisory Committee, Stanton is a member of the firm’s Commercial Litigation Group. She also serves as a founding board member and past president of the Women’s Metropolitan Arts Council of the Phoenix Art Museum, as well as a member of Chart 100 Women.

Her experience includes defense of local and national law firms in legal malpractice actions and other business litigation disputes. She is an adjunct professor at Arizona State University Sandra Day O’Connor College of law, teaching professional responsibility.

As a graduate of Valley leadership Class XXIX, Stanton was the YWCA of Maricopa County’s 2011 Tribute to Women honoree in the business leader category. She was honored as one of the 50 most influential women in Arizona. She received her law degree, magna cum laude, from the University of Arizona and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Utah.

lawyer

10 Quarles & Brady Attorneys Earn Distinction

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that 10 attorneys from the firm’s Phoenix office – and a total of 48 attorneys nationwide – have been ranked in the 2014 edition of the prestigious Chambers USA directory.

“Quarles attorneys work hard to establish reputations for excellence,” said Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “Chambers provides an excellent independent validation of our efforts.”

The Phoenix attorneys are:
Joseph A. Drazek – Environment (including water rights)
Steven P. Emerick – Corporate/M&A
Diane Haller – Real Estate
Christian Hoffmann – Corporate/M&A
Leezie Kim – Corporate/M&A
Don P. Martin – Litigation: General Commercial
Matthew Mehr – Real Estate
Jon E. Pettibone – Labor & Employment
James A. Ryan – Litigation: General Commercial
Derek L. Sorenson – Real Estate

Quarles & Brady Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson

Quarles & Brady Named to Law360 Ceiling Smashers List

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that it has been included in the Law360 inaugural class of Ceiling Smashers, the 25 U.S.-based law firms out of nearly 400 surveyed that have the highest percentage of female partners. The firm was also noted as being one of seven “biglaw” firms with a woman chair.

According to the Glass Ceiling Report, based on a survey of more than 380 law firms, women make up 43 percent on nonpartner ranks at U.S. law firms, but only 21 percent of partnerships are composed of women. At Quarles & Brady, 29.5 percent of the partners are women, placing the firm well above the national average. Further, Quarles is one of only six firms on the list with more than 450 attorneys in its ranks, placing it among the top 10 firms with the most women partners in raw numbers.

“Diversity was a core value at Quarles well before it became an industry imperative,” says Firm Chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “We are part of the Ceiling Smashers because inclusiveness is culturally engrained in the firm’s DNA, not because we arbitrarily promoted women to hit some sort of target.”

Quarles & Brady years ago adopted family-friendly work policies, such as flex-time partnership opportunities and phased return-to-work schedules for mothers following maternity leave, as well as establishing a Woman’s Forum to ensure unobstructed paths to professional success for all women. The firm similarly has developed programs designed to help law students and attorneys of color overcome barriers to upward mobility.

“It’s no coincidence that we are the only large law firm in the country to have had an African-American chairman, immediately followed by a chairwoman, and that half of our offices are led by diverse managing partners,” adds Johnson. “We hire based on ability and organizational fit, regardless of diversity status, but we’re an enthusiastically inclusive business, dedicated to seeing every attorney succeed, so we expect our woman partners and leaders to increase in number, year-in and year-out.”

Arizona’s 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders

What would you do it you opened the pages of this magazine and saw Jerry Colangelo listed as one of the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona? You’d do a double take, but it’s not out of the realm of possibilities.

Consider this: Among 439,633 Arizonans under age 5 in 2012, this is how the Census broke down those numbers:

• Hispanic: 196,776 (44.8 percent)
• Non-Hispanic white: 171,888 (39.1 percent)
• American Indian and Alaska Native: 22,198 (5 percent)
• Black: 18,617 (4.2 percent)
• Asian: 11,311 (2.6 percent)
• Two or more races: 18,088 (4.1 percent)
• Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 755 (0.17).

If you combine numbers like that with the fact that 91.7 percent of the nation’s population growth between 2000 and 2010 was attributed to racial and ethnic minorities, with the largest segment of population growth occurring in the Hispanic community, lists like this — the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona of 2014 — could become obsolete in our lifetimes.

Until we get there and as our state’s minority population moves toward majority status, it’s important to notice that the state’s most dynmanic business leaders have helped fuel our economic recovery and growth … and many of them just happen to be minorities. And while the future looks bright, we still have work to in overcoming outdated perceptions. According to a 2012 Minority Business Enterprise Report commissioned by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Phoenix MBDA Business Center, a significant portion of minority-owned businesses in Arizona have had problems earning the trust of their customers, suppliers, peers and lenders and need support from within the business community to help break down some of these misconceptions and stigma.

The 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona, whom you will meet below, have changed that perception.


Benito AlmanzaBenito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Heritage: Mexican-American
A graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara, Almanza has been with Bank of America for 34 years. He is a member of the Teach for America Arizona Board.
His hope for professional legacy: “Working every day with great teammates to make our community better and surrounding myself with strong leaders and developing them to replace me.”

Glynis BryanGlynis Bryan
CFO
Insight Enterprises Inc.
Heritage: Jamaican
Bryan is responsible for setting the company’s financial strategies; ensuring the company has the appropriate financial and operating controls and systems in place to support future growth; and serving as a financial and business advisor to the leadership team.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Setting a standard of excellence in an organization and helping teammates reach their full potential.”

Debbie CottonDebbie Cotton
Director
Phoenix Convention Center
Heritage: African American
Cotton manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Throughout my career, I’d like to be remembered for adhering to high ethical standards and inspiring individuals to pursue careers within public service.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Heritage: Peruvian and Mexican
De la Melena, who directs the state’s leading advocate representing more than 60,000 Hispanic business enterprises, has 20 years of global brand management, business development and Latino marketing experience gained from conducting business in more than 30 countries.
His hope for professional legacy: “For helping the lifeblood of our economy, small businesses, prosper – especially minority-owned businesses, now one-fourth of Arizona’s total. Our future global competitiveness depends on it.”

Diane EnosDiane Enos
President
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community
Enos is the 23rd president of the Salt River Community and the second women elected to the office. Enos is the first member of the Community to become a lawyer and practiced in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office for 11 years.
Heritage: Onk Akimel O’Odham, or one of the River People otherwise known as Pima
Her hope for professional legacy: “The top qualities I’d like to be remembered for is someone who was unafraid to try something new and to do it with integrity for the good of my people.”

rufusRufus Glasper
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges
Heritage: African American
As the CEO of one of the nation’s largest systems of community colleges, he is leading MCCCD to address the community’s education and workforce training needs.
His hope for professional legacy: “An educator who focused on human rights and education for first-generation college students, quality healthcare, workforce and jobs, and re-framing an institution for the future.”

Deborah GriffinDeborah Griffin
President of the board of directors
Gila River Casinos
Heritage: Gila River Indian Community member and Mexican-American
Griffin leads Arizona’s largest minority-run business with more that 2,500 employees.
Her hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered for creating a legacy of self-sufficiency and volunteerism in my community. My Tribe needs only to seek within themselves and have confidence in the beauty of their abilities to continue this legacy.”

Edmundo HidalgoEdmundo Hidalgo
President and CEO
Chicanos Por La Causa
Heritage: Mexican-American
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the community. The Hispanic community is at a breakaway point because of our demographics and the opportunities we establish for our youth will have a tremendous impact on our state. As the Hispanic community goes, so will the State of Arizona. My focus has always been in support of education and ensuring that young people get the opportunities I received as I was beginning my career. I am blessed to have been mentored by many individuals who were willing to invest in me and I have the responsibility to do the same.”

leezieLeezie Kim
Partner
Quarles & Brady
Heritage: Korean-American
Kim returned to Quarles & Brady after four years of service as a White House appointee to the U. S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano.
Her hope for professional legacy: “As a trusted counselor to and partner with leaders in business, government and politics who found new ways to get things done that make life a little better for us all.”

david_kongDavid Kong
President and CEO
Best Western International
Since he was named president and CEO in 2004, Kong has guided Best Western International through a brand resurgence, winning numerous awards for training, social media and ecommerce initiatives. Brand Keys ranked Best Western No. 1 in customer loyalty for four consecutive years.
Heritage: Asian
His hope for professional legacy: “I’d like to be remembered for having made a positive difference – in Best Western, in the industry and the lives of all our associates and our hotel staff.”

paulPaul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”

steve_maciasSteve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias serves on the Governor’s Council on Small Business and is co-chair of the Supply Chain/Buy Arizona Committee, which is exploring ways government can help promote Arizona businesses.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “Someone who made a positive impact in promoting manufacturing as a worthwhile and valuable industry that provides quality jobs to the community.”

louis_manuelLouis J. Manuel, Jr.
Chairman
Ak-Chin Indian Community
Heritage: Tohono O’odham Nation and Ak-Chin Indian Community
Manuel has diversified his Community’s economy with Ak-Chin Farms, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, Santa Cruz Commerce Center and a partnership with the Super Bowl Host Committee.
His hope for professional legacy: “That my decision making gave value and sustainability in promoting a strong future and self-reliance for the people I serve.”

clarenceClarence McAllister
President and CEO
Fortis Networks
Heritage: Black Latino
McAllister was born in Panama and earned degrees in electrical engineering from ASU and an MBA from Nova Southeastern University. In 2000, he and his wife Reyna started Fortis, a certified 8a and HUBZone government contractor specialized in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an immigrant who came to this country in search of the American Dream, and built a business that employs more than 100 Americans.”

alfred_molinaAlfredo Molina
Chairman
Molina Jewelers
Heritage: Hispanic
Molina went from fleeing Cuba as a boy without a change of clothes to rocking the jewelry world by selling the Archduke Joseph diamond for $21.5 million, the most ever paid at auction for a colorless diamond.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference. I believe that every individual is a precious jewel and it is my commitment and social responsibility to ensure they become brilliant.”

rodolfo-pargaRodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
Heritage: Mexican
Parga has been named in multiple editions of Southwest Super Lawyers®, including in 2014. He also serves on the doard of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading nonprofit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as always trying my best to do the right thing, and being fair and loyal.”

Dan PuenteDan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Heritage: Hispanic
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck and has built it into the largest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an individual who created a company that set industry standards, gave back to an industry generous with opportunity and helped people grow personally and professionally.”

terry_ramblerTerry Rambler
Chairman
Arizona Indian Gaming Association
Heritage: San Carlos Apache Tribe
In addition to his AIGA leadership role, Rambler is chariman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe and president of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “Strong vision, consistent oversight, yet humble leadership that helped build successful partnerships in economic development, cultural preservation, and the expansion of tribal sovereignty.”

Terence-RobertsTerence Roberts, M.D., J.D.
Radiation oncologist
Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center
Heritage: African-American
Roberts specializes in stereotactic radiosurgery and tumors of the brain, spine, and prostate. He also received a law degree from Stanford University and practiced corporate law in the Silicon Valley for start-up companies.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered professionally as compassionate, knowledgeable and having integrity. Also as someone who innovated in an era of health care reform.”

Steve SanghiSteve Sanghi
Chairman, CEO and president
Microchip Technology
Heritage: Indian
Sanghi, named president of Microchip in 1990, CEO in 1991 and chairman in 1993, is the author of “Driving Excellence: How The Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader.”
His hope for professional legacy: “For building Microchip Technology into one of the most successful semiconductor companies, which achieved an unprecedented 100 consecutive profitable quarters in a brutally competitive industry.”

roxanne_song_ongRoxanne K. Song Ong
Chief presiding judge
Phoenix Municipal Court
Heritage: Chinese American
Song Ong, who chair the Arizona Supreme Court Commission on Minorities, was the first Asian female judge in Arizona and first minority to be named as Phoenix chief judge.
Her hope for professional legacy: “It would be my great honor to be remembered for three primary things: (1) my work in judicial and civics education, (2) the promotion of cultural competency and diversity in the judicial and legal profession, and (3) promoting access to justice for all Arizonans through legal services and education.”

Charlie-ToucheCharlie Touché
Chairman and CEO
Lovitt & Touché, Inc.
In 2004, Touché became chairman and CEO of one of the largest insurance agencies in the United States, with nearly 200 employees in three offices and more than $300 million in total premiums.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “I’m proud to say that during this entire century, we’ve remained a client-driven, hands-on kind of company with people who will roll up their sleeves and jump in the trenches to help those we do business with.”

lisa_uriasLisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
Heritage: Mexican
Urias has built an award-winning advertising, marketing and public relations agency that specializes in the diverse markets of the American Southwest, particularly the Hispanic market.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Having a nationally-known agency that successfully connects corporations to multicultural markets through ad campaigns, public relations and community outreach for mutual benefit and respect.”

lonnie_williamsLonnie J. Williams, Jr.
Partner
Stinson Leonard Street LLP
Heritage: Black
The Yale graduate’s practice focuses on commercial business and employment-related matters. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in America.
His hope for professional legacy: “Martin Luther King said, ‘if it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.’ Professionally, I would like to be remembered like that street sweeper.”

kuldip_vermaKuldip Verma
CEO
Vermaland
Heritage: East Indian
Vermaland, founded by Verma, holds more than 24,000 acres of land in Arizona with a portfolio valued at $500 million. Nabha, the tiny Indian village Verma was born in, could fit many times into the acreage he now controls in the desert Southwest.
His hope for professional legacy: “I saw a dream and pursued it. Success without humility is a curse, but Success with your values intact is a blessing.”

Anchors color

Quarles & Brady Earns PHX Renews Corporate Partner Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that it has been selected to be the recipient of a “PHX Renews Corporate Partner” award from Keep Phoenix Beautiful for its pro bono work on the PHX Renews and Keep Phoenix Beautiful projects.

The award recognizes an organization for its dedication, leadership and passion for PHX Renews and Keep Phoenix Beautiful. Quarles & Brady and especially Sarah R. Anchors, an attorney in the firm’s Phoenix office and a member of the Keep Phoenix Beautiful board, have been instrumental in moving the project forward and making a fundamental change to an important high-profile vacant lots in central Phoenix and surrounding communities. The firm will be honored at the awards program on April 10 in Phoenix.

“It has been a pleasure to work with Keep Phoenix Beautiful for the past few years,” said Anchors. “They have been doing incredibly important work, sustaining a city to be proud of.”

Leonardo Loo

Loo Earns Community Leader of the Year Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Leonardo Loo, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, received the Community Leader of the Year Award from the Phoenix chapter of the National Association of Asian American Professionals.

Loo received the award for his devotion to the community and outstanding service to the valley. The award was presented to him at the organization’s annual dinner event on January 11.

Loo is a member of the firm’s Corporate Services and China Law practice groups. He practices in the areas of mergers and acquisitions, commercial financing, international transactions, securities and general corporate law involving clients in a wide variety of industries. He is also a member of the boards of directors of several organizations, including the Arizona Asian American Bar Association, Chicanos Por La Causa, Inc. and Greater Phoenix Black Chamber of Commerce, and he also serves as general counsel for the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Loo earned his law degree from the University Chicago and his bachelor’s degree from Stanford University.

Lizzie Kim

Kim Named to ASU Center for Emergency Management

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Leezie Kim, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has been named to the ASU Center for Emergency Management and Homeland Security Advisory Council.

The ASU Center’s advisory council executives provide extensive expertise from all sectors of emergency management and homeland security. The council advises the center regarding solution innovations and research, and affords insight into emerging trends, needs and requirements such that the center is at the forefront of solution delivery, innovation, research and academic preparation.

Kim is a partner in the Quarles & Brady Corporate Services Group. Her practice focuses on helping clients navigate the laws of national security and international business transactions as well as health care and restaurant business transactions. She returned to the law firm following four years of service as a White House appointee to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Governor Janet Napolitano.

While serving as deputy general counsel for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in Washington, D.C., Kim became involved with aviation security, border entry matters and customs issues at airports, including the federal response to the 2009 Christmas day airline underwear explosive attempt and the implementation of the new airport security procedures thereafter. In 2012, Kim was appointed to the Phoenix Aviation Advisory Board by Mayor Greg Stanton and the City Council.

Kim earned her law degree from the University of Virginia and her undergraduate degree from Rice University.

Quarles & Brady's Funkhouser earns award from Iowa

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that David E. Funkhouser III, a partner in the firm’s Phoenix office, has received the Recent Alumni Award from the University of Iowa College of Law.

The Recent Alumni Award is granted to alumni of the College of Law, within the first 10 years of their graduation from law school, for significant achievements in their area of practice and for their service to the college, community, state or nation.  Funkhouser received his award during the University of Iowa College of Law Reunion Weekend on October 26, 2013.

Funkhouser handles complex commercial litigation matters. His litigation practice has an emphasis in real property disputes, trust, estate and probate litigation, and other commercial torts. Funkhouser also routinely represents financial institutions in all aspects of litigation.

He is also heavily involved in the local community, just recently completing his term as President of the Maricopa County Bar Association, is a member of the Leadership Council for the Special Olympics Advocacy Resource program, is a founding member of Suns 88 Charities, and is a certified ambassador for the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. He also served in the Arizona House of Representatives from 2008–2009. Funkhouser earned both his law degree and undergraduate degree from the University of Iowa.

Quarles' Sirower Named to National Post

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP today announced that Brian Sirower has been named national Commercial Bankruptcy, Restructuring and Creditors’ Rights Practice Group chair, succeeding John A. Harris, a partner in the firm’s Milwaukee office who has led the group since 2008.

“Quarles is elated that Brian will be chairing one of the firm’s largest practice groups,” said firm chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “We are confident that he will continue to lead the group successfully and build on the great leadership that both John provided. We thank John for his role in leading the group for the past several years.”

“I am honored to be chosen as chair of the firm’s Commercial Bankruptcy, Restructuring and Creditors’ Rights Practice Group,” said Sirower. “I am excited to work with my colleagues on a deeper level to continue the group’s successes.”

Brian Sirower has been a member of the firm’s Phoenix office since 2000. He concentrates his practice on workouts, bankruptcy, and commercial litigation, with a focus on all forms of creditor representations.  Sirower also has extensive experience in distressed leasing matters, preference and fraudulent conveyance defense, committee representations, and commercial debtor representations. Sirower received his law degree, with honors, from The Ohio State University, Michael E. Moritz College of Law and his undergraduate degree from the College of William and Mary.

Arizona Real Estate Trends Conference

Wolf Named to Who’s Who of Franchise Lawyers 2013

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that Phoenix partner Jeffrey H. Wolf, a DC Ranch resident, has been named to The International Who’s Who of Franchise Lawyers 2013 by Who’s Who Legal. He is one of less than 400 attorneys worldwide selected for the honor. This is his third consecutive time being named to the prestigious list.

Who’s Who Legal identifies the foremost legal practitioners in several areas of business law around the world. Nominees are selected based upon comprehensive, independent surveys with both general counsel and private practice lawyers worldwide. Only specialists who have met independent international research criteria are listed.

Wolf is a member of the firm’s Commercial Litigation and Franchise and Distribution Groups. His national litigation practice focuses on representing franchisors in complex cases, including the defense of class actions. Wolf has handled a variety of franchise litigation cases involving termination, transfers, rights of first refusal, the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, trade secrets, trademark infringement, franchisee associations, and unfair competition.

diversity

Quarles & Brady Earns Inclusive Workplace Award

The national law firm of Quarles & Brady LLP announced that the firm’s Phoenix and Tucson offices received the Inclusive Workplace Leader Award for a medium-size company from Diversity Leadership Alliance (DLA) at their Annual Conference on Friday, November 1.

The DLA award is designed to recognize companies that are leaders in the area of Diversity & Inclusion and model the mission of DLA. In particular, they create an environment where individuals are treated and respected equally, and they are considered an “Inclusive Workplace Leader.”

“We’ve worked long and hard to create an environment in which any productive person can succeed,” says firm chair Kimberly Leach Johnson. “It’s satisfying to see that our efforts have not gone unnoticed, and the workplace we’ve created is its own reward as well.”

Quarles & Brady makes diversity a central component of its strategic plan. The firm is a recognized industry leader in mentoring and developing outstanding diverse attorneys, routinely ranking above average and among the best law firms for women and diverse attorneys. The firm has women and diverse attorneys heading four of the firm’s eight offices and offers family-friendly policies, informal training and other initiatives that promote a diverse workplace.

In addition, the firm’s Executive Committee appointed a Diversity & Inclusion Committee that consists of representatives from offices across the country and includes partners, associates and staff to ensure that diversity is a part of the organization. The firm also created the position of Director of Employee Relations, Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility, held by Darlene M. Austin, to provide firm leadership on diversity efforts.