Tag Archives: Robert Meyer

molecular

Phoenix Children’s Hospital, TGen create Molecular Medicine Institute

Phoenix Children’s Hospital announced the creation of the Ronald A. Matricaria Institute of Molecular Medicine Tuesday, in a joint venture with The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and The University of Arizona’s College of Medicine.

The three organizations are joining forces with the hopes of unlocking genetic codes in child, adolescent and young adult cancer patients and develop drug therapies in real time to improve the outcome and treatment in these young demographics.

“Our goal is to bring genomics to the forefront of pediatrics,” said Robert L. Meyer, Phoenix Children’s president and CEO. “Research and development of novel treatments for pediatric diseases has fallen short over past decades.”

The reason why the Ronald A. Matricaria Institute of Molecular Medicine is focusing on young patients is because there have been hardly any new therapies introduced to this population in the past two decades. The new institute hopes that clinical studies on children will lead to a better understanding of specific differences between children and adults, which will hopefully lead to the development of safer, more effective and more age-appropriate drug treatments that can be provided in a faster amount of time.

“A challenge with existing molecular medicine programs is the amount of time it takes to develop a new drug or treatment,” Meyer said. “Our collaboration with TGen and University of Arizona opens the doors to making a portfolio of drugs and compounds available immediately.”

The institute will also focus their clinical studies based on underlying genetic and molecular functions of different pediatric cancers, rather than specifically on tumor type. Furthermore, physicians will then create various treatment plans specifically for each patient treated based on the drug therapy that will attack and correct the malfunctioning genes.

With the start of the new institute, a special team of physician scientists will be brought on board to help start out the genomic profiling: Dr. Timothy Triche, a pediatric pathologist and former director of the Center for Personalized Medicine at Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles; Dr. Robert Arceci, a pediatric oncologist from Johns Hopkins University; and Dr. Daniel D. Von Hoff, a medical oncologist at TGen.

“We are trying to figure out a way to have children get appropriate drugs,” said Dr. Robert Arceci. “We all want to know what causes diseases and how we can treat them and I think it takes a special team of people to do this and it takes a lot of unselfish commitment.”

A founding member from whom the institute gets its name, Ronald A. Matricaria, a member of the board of directors for the Phoenix Children’s Hospital, is excited and hopeful for what the new institute is capable of doing in the world of pediatric care.

“Based on my knowledge of the institute and many years of working in the medical field, I’m confident that we can chart a new course for addressing the unique needs of children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases,” Matricaria said. “We could have a huge impact on children’s live and what could be better than that.

 

childrens hospital

Phoenix Childrens Hospital Ranked Among Best Childrens Hospitals

Phoenix Children’s Hospital has been ranked in four specialties in U.S. News & World Report’s 2012-13 Best Childrens Hospitals rankings. The rankings feature 50 hospitals in each of 10 pediatric specialties: cancer, cardiology and heart surgery, diabetes and endocrinology, gastroenterology, neonatology, nephrology, neurology and neurosurgery, orthopedics, pulmonology, and urology.

In the Best Children’s Hospitals list, the following Phoenix Children’s subspecialties made the highly coveted list:

  • Nephrology
  • Neurology/Neurosurgery
  • Neonatology
  • Pulmonology

“It’s very gratifying to be listed among the best children’s hospitals across the country,” said Robert L. Meyer, President and CEO of Phoenix Children’s. “I offer sincere congratulations to the entire staff and physicians at the Hospital for their role in achieving this milestone. We’re delighted U.S. News & World Report recognized our outstanding team again this year.”

Now in its sixth year, the rigorous Best Childrens Hospitals survey asks hundreds of questions about survival rates, nurse staffing, subspecialist availability and many more pieces of critical information difficult or impossible for those in charge of a child’s care to find on their own. Then, U.S News takes this data from the survey and combines it with a reputation score based on a survey of pediatric specialists from across the country. Since the 2007 debut, the rankings have put an increasing emphasis on data that directly reflect hospitals’ performance over the opinions of physicians.

“Phoenix Children’s Hospital deserves high praise for its accomplishments,” said U.S. News & World Report Health Rankings Editor, Avery Comarow. “Phoenix Children’s has a reservoir of dedication and expertise that helps the sickest kids. Our goal at U.S. News is to identify and call attention to pediatric centers like this one.”

Phoenix Children’s is Arizona’s only licensed children’s hospital, providing world-class care in more than 47 pediatric specialties to children from throughout the state and region. Phoenix Children’s is in the midst of a major expansion to meet the needs of the Southwest’s rapid population growth. The signature element of the expansion is a new 11-story, 750,000-square-foot tower which will enable the hospital to grow from 365 licensed beds today to a total of 626 licensed beds once the project is complete.

The full rankings and methodology are available at www.usnews.com/childrenshospitals. The rankings will also be published in the U.S. News Best Hospitals 2013 guidebook, which will be available in August.

For more information on Phoenix Childrens Hospital, visit Phoenix Childrens Hospital’s website at phoenixchildrens.com.

Robert Meyers, president & CEO of Phoenix Children's Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz. - AZ Business Magazine July/August 2011

Robert Meyer, President And CEO Of Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Robert Meyer discusses his very first job, what he learned from it, who his biggest mentor is, and more.

Robert Meyer

Title: President and CEO
Company: Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Describe your very first job and what you learned from it.
I was a laborer in a forge shop in Toledo, Ohio, making leaf springs for trucks. The major lesson I learned from this job was the value of a college education. While the money was good, the work was very hard and dirty, and most importantly, the 50+ old guy next to me was making the same wages.

Describe your first job in your industry.
Medicare auditor for Blue Cross of Northwest Ohio. I learned early the complexity and nuances of Medicare reimbursement and its impact on hospital operations.

What were your salaries?
The forge shop was $7.50 an hour. Blue Cross was $12,000 annually.

Who is your biggest mentor?
My father, who gave me my work values and respect for integrity and honesty in dealing with people.

What advice would you give to a person entering your industry?
Take the time to learn all aspects of the business. Don’t be afraid to roll up your sleeves and get dirty.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I would love to be a business school professor preparing our next generation of leaders to be successful.

Robert Meyer

Arizona Business Magazine July/August 2011