Tag Archives: robert mittelstaedt

Amy-Hillman

W.P. Carey dean wants the world to know about school

Amy Hillman, a renowned management professor and noted researcher, replaced Robert Mittelstaedt as dean of Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business in March and became the school’s first female dean.

Az Business sat down with the leader of the W. P. Carey School, ranked in the top 30 among the best graduate business schools in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, to talk about her goals as dean and how her background as a researcher impacts her leadership.

Az Business: What is your biggest challenge as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business?
Amy Hillman: Keeping the school nimble as an organization. Technology is playing a transformative role in higher education. The skills and expertise needed to succeed in an organization change as a result. We have to stay close to our corporate partners to make sure we stay on the leading edge of business education.

AB: How has the transition from second in command to dean been so far?
AH: Great. In the second-in-command position, I focused internally. We have amazing students, faculty and staff, and we work with some great partners within ASU, outside of the business school. Now, I also get to spend time with alumni, corporate partners and donors. In addition, I interact a lot more with other business-school deans. It’s a full circle.

AB: What are the W. P. Carey School’s strengths?
AH: We have hard-working students, dedicated staff, a supportive community, and a really desirable and unusual faculty combination. It’s not that hard to find good teachers or good researchers, but our faculty members are both, and that’s much more difficult to achieve. They are world-class researchers on the cutting edge of new knowledge in their fields, as well as excellent teachers. Therefore, what they discover one day, they teach in class the next. Add to this, they care about the students’ success in school and future careers. We have a dynamite combination. That’s why we’re currently ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report for all of our marquee programs — undergraduate business, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA.

AB: What makes you an effective dean for the W. P. Carey School?
AH: I love my work. I value relationships, but also performance. It also doesn’t hurt to be a management professor with real-world managerial experience. We have a lot of stakeholders to manage.

AB: How has your background prepared you to educate the entrepreneurs and business leaders of the future?
AH: In addition to my decades of work as a management professor and then executive dean, I also originally got my MBA because I needed skills to be a better manager in retail, before I ever went into academia. What I learned one night in my classes, I would apply the next day on the job. I also come from a family of entrepreneurs, so innovation and practicality loom large. I think this helps me stay focused on what we need to do to advance the practice of business.

AB: What are your goals as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business?
AH: I’d like to build stronger — deeper and broader — corporate relations, increase lifelong value to our alumni, make our student experience a personal one, and make working at the W. P. Carey School of Business rewarding and fun. I’d also like to make sure the W. P. Carey School is no longer a “best-kept secret.” More people need to know all we do and how well we do it.

AB: What’s been the biggest change in education since you entered academia?
AH: I’d say one of the biggest changes to education as a whole — not specifically to business education — is the questioning of the value of education. This is unimaginable in developing nations like China. I was recently there with our executive MBA students in Shanghai. One of our speakers at an event was Nobel Laureate Ed Prescott, a W. P. Carey School of Business faculty member. Young kids wanted to have their pictures taken with him for his intellectual achievement. Sadly, I see too many people here in the United States who believe education isn’t the main driver of economic achievement.

AB: How has your background as a researcher impacted the way you educate the business leaders of the future?
AH: As a researcher, I’m strongly influenced by data, not anecdotes. So let’s analyze what’s happening before we jump to conclusions based on our personal observations. That said, most business research questions are big, complex ones without “one right answer,” so we need to train our students to look for patterns among data, but at the same time to embrace uncertainty. Make the best decisions with incomplete information. That’s the real world.

Amy-Hillman

New Carey School Dean Takes Over

One of the top business schools in the nation will have a new dean at the helm, starting tomorrow. Current Executive Dean Amy Hillman — a world-renowned management expert, popular teacher and noted researcher — will take over as dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University, effective March 1.

Hillman is the first-ever female dean of the school, which has undergraduate, full-time MBA, part-time MBA and online MBA programs all ranked Top 30 in the country by U.S. News & World Report. She is outlining a clear vision for the future.

“We’re going to keep advancing what we do to help our students achieve career and life successes,” says Hillman, who has played a key role in the growth of the school in her four years as second-in-command/executive dean. “Our world-class faculty is full of researchers who teach cutting-edge skills. We want to use this knowledge and our excellent position in a major metropolitan area (the Phoenix area) to help support the business world. We plan to broaden and deepen our business partnerships to become a ‘go-to’ place for firms to come to advance their work force and get help with real-life projects. We’re also going to focus on providing even more value and connections throughout the world for our vast 80,000-plus alumni network.”

Hillman never had dreams of academia when she was younger. She actually got her MBA on evenings and weekends, while striving to improve as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business. However, several of her professors had such a profound influence on her that she realized she’d rather teach others about business than stay in her current job.

“As both an undergraduate and graduate student, I had individual faculty members who had a huge influence on my life,” says Hillman, who has been recognized with outstanding teaching awards every place she has worked. “I felt a sense that if I could make a difference for one student, like these faculty members did for me, then I would personally feel more accomplished than I did in the corporate world.”

Hillman has already made a clear mark on the W. P. Carey School in her decade-plus on the faculty as a management professor. She has championed entrepreneurship projects through the Spirit of Enterprise Center and helped to expand the school’s degree offerings to allow access to more students. (The school’s current total is more than 10,000 students). Recently, she was instrumental in the school introducing several new specialized master’s degrees to help undergraduates from other fields combine their passions with a solid business foundation. These include nine-month master’s programs in management and business analytics.

“I love ASU, and this opportunity to be a leader here, at a place that I love, is a real privilege,” says Hillman. “This is especially significant, since this year is the 10th anniversary of the gift from businessman/philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey that gave the school its name. We’ve come so far, thanks to this transformative gift, and we plan to go even further over the next 10 years.”

Hillman will preside over the opening of the new 129,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art McCord Hall this summer. The building will complement the two existing business-school structures, providing more classrooms for graduate and undergraduate honors students, technologically advanced team study rooms, a new career center, world-class conference facilities and outdoor assembly areas.

“This is a chance for us to really advance the science and culture of learning business,” says Hillman. “The way the building is set up, it will actually help our students to develop teamwork, communication and critical thinking skills.”

Hillman is also a strong supporter of the school’s research efforts. She is a renowned researcher in management, focusing on boards of directors, corporate political strategies, and how links between firms and their external contingencies improve financial performance. Her work has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report, among other venues. The journal Technovation recently ranked the W. P. Carey School No. 1 among all business schools worldwide for authoring research in the Top 45 academic business journals with the most global impact.

“What makes this school special, though, is the people,” says Hillman. “The faculty, staff and students are so amazing, supportive and encouraging of each other. At some older, established schools, there is a sense of complacency. The W. P. Carey School is like a nimble entrepreneur, seeking to constantly improve. That feeling permeates our culture, helping us to transform and advance lives, the school and the business world.”

Hillman takes over for current dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who is semi-retiring after 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the prestigious Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an experienced business co-founder, a board member of three public companies and author of two business books. He will continue to serve at ASU as an adviser to the president and provost, as well as work on a project focused on the business and technical issues facing electric utilities in the future.

For more information about the W. P. Carey School of Business and its programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

flinn scholars

W. P. Carey School Offers Free College Prep Program

High school students who want to know what it’s really like to attend one of the top business schools in the nation are about to get their chance. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is now accepting applications for its annual free Fleischer Scholars college-prep program.

This is the fourth year of the business program, which is being doubled in size to accommodate about 60 Arizona high school students. Economically disadvantaged students between their junior and senior years are encouraged to attend. Participants will spend a week with supervising mentors in Barrett, the Honors College at ASU’s Tempe campus, while learning business skills and preparing for college.

“The Fleischer Scholars Program is designed to help deserving students learn about business careers, college study skills, and application tips, including financial-aid advice,” explains Robert Mittelstaedt, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business, which has an undergraduate business program ranked Top 25 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. “Students will get to work with current W. P. Carey School students and faculty members, as well as local business leaders. We want to set them on the path to success.”

High school counselors and teachers are asked to identify strong candidates interested in business to attend this summer. Students from the W. P. Carey School’s business magnet-school programs at Marcos de Niza High School in Tempe and Liberty High School in Peoria are among those who will consider this.

“These kids are in for a great week and an amazing experience,” says Sebastian Navarro, a past Fleischer Scholar, who now attends the W. P. Carey School of Business. “I can’t say enough how valuable this program was. I learned about the business school and did some incredible networking with the college staff. I also got a student mentor who still helps me plan out my classes, and I was able to choose a major based on what I learned. I got a feel for living in a dorm atmosphere and what college life is really like.”

The program is available in two different sessions this year: June 9-14 or 23-28. Applications are due April 1. For more information, go to www.wpcarey.asu.edu/summerscholar or call or e-mail Katie Cobos at (480) 965-5187 or Katherine.Cobos@asu.edu.

The entire program is sponsored by local entrepreneur Morton Fleischer and his wife, ASU alum Donna Fleischer. They want to educate young people about the opportunities and achievements freedom provide, so students can add to the legacy of American entrepreneurs.

paying_for_online_education

W. P. Carey’s Online MBA Program Ranks No.2 in Nation

For the first time ever, U.S. News & World Report is issuing complete numeric rankings of the country’s best online graduate business programs. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University comes in an impressive No. 2 on the list.

“We’re extremely happy to see U.S. News confirm we have one of the world’s best online MBA programs,” says Robert Mittelstaedt, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Increasingly, students are looking for the flexibility of an online program, but they don’t want to sacrifice the high quality of a top university. The W. P. Carey School was one of the first highly respected schools to get into the online arena – more than a decade ago — and we offer the same stellar faculty and degree in our online program as we offer in all of our other highly ranked MBA programs.”

In addition to the new online-MBA ranking, U.S. News & World Report already currently ranks the W. P. Carey School’s undergraduate business, full-time MBA and evening MBA programs among the nation’s Top 30 in their respective categories.

As far as online programs, last year, U.S. News & World Report only issued an “Honor Roll” of 14 graduate business choices and some rankings on subcategories, but the publication stopped short of giving a full, overall rankings list of the top programs. The W. P. Carey School did make the “Honor Roll,” but this year’s clear-cut No. 2 is more definitive. The new rankings are based on important criteria: student engagement, admissions selectivity, peer reputation, and faculty credentials and training.

“This means U.S. News & World Report looked at our accomplished students, renowned faculty, small class sizes, diverse online-learning technologies, prestigious accreditation, and reputation among peer schools, and they placed us among the two best online MBA programs in the entire United States,” explains Stacey Whitecotton, associate dean for W. P. Carey MBA programs.

Students serving in the military, starting their own businesses and traveling extensively for their jobs are among those who have chosen the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program. For example, NFL Pro Bowl kicker Billy Cundiff completed the program, even while attending NFL training camp. Lieutenant Colonel Scott Coulson, who was awarded the Bronze Star, a Purple Heart and a Combat Action Badge for his service and actions while leading combat missions in Iraq, participated in the program while serving in the U.S. Army in Afghanistan.

This past summer, QS, a Britain-based company that helps students select MBA programs, ranked the W. P. Carey School’s online MBA program among the Top 15 in the world. QS says there are at least 300 online MBA programs right now and that attention has boomed, going from just 4.4 percent of MBA students interested in 2008 to 15.6 percent interested in 2012.

The W. P. Carey School’s popular two-year online MBA program allows students to meet at a face-to-face orientation just once at the ASU campus, then complete the rest of the courses completely online. Students work in small, personalized teams with peers from other industries, focusing on one course at a time. This is also one of the few online MBA programs in which students can earn their degrees with an area of emphasis, such as finance, international business, marketing or supply chain management. Participants have a dedicated financial aid specialist and a career center to help them with job searches. For more information, go to www.wpcarey.asu.edu.

The W. P. Carey School also offers other online graduate business programs: a weekend/online hybrid MBA, a 16-month online Master of Science in Information Management, and a newly announced 21-month Master of Science in Supply Chain Management and Engineering.

Amy-Hillman

Hillman Named Dean of W. P. Carey School of Business

Amy Hillman has been named dean of Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business, effective March 1, 2013. The school’s current executive dean, Hillman has served as second-in-command at the school since 2009, playing a key role in its growth and success.

U.S. News & World Report currently ranks the school Top 30 in the nation for undergraduate business, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs.

Hillman succeeds retiring dean, Robert Mittelstaedt, who helped vault the W. P. Carey School of Business into one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the world, with more than 10,000 students. He will remain at ASU as dean emeritus and professor of management.

“Amy Hillman is a devoted teacher, a noted researcher and a gifted administrator,” said ASU President Michael M. Crow. “She has been an integral part of the W. P. Carey School management team that has had so much success during the past decade. We are fortunate that Amy has agreed to move into the school’s deanship to further enhance the school’s excellence.

“I wish to thank Bob Mittelstaedt for his leadership of the W. P. Carey School, and I am delighted that Bob will continue to serve ASU by doing special projects and advising me and the provost.”

Said Executive Vice President and Provost Elizabeth D. Phillips, “Amy Hillman is a top scholar in her field, and she is a creative and flexible administrator well-suited to lead the W. P. Carey School in a time of very rapid change in higher education.”

Hillman is a world-renowned management professor and holds the Rusty Lyon Chair in Strategy at the W. P. Carey School. She has won numerous national awards as an outstanding reviewer and researcher. She was editor of Academy of Management Review, the world’s top management journal in terms of citation impact, and her research has been featured in USA Today, The Washington Post and U.S. News & World Report.

“I’m excited to have the opportunity to lead a terrific group of faculty, staff, students, alumni and our friends in the business community forward,” said Hillman. “The W. P. Carey School of Business is on a steep trajectory toward becoming one of the world’s finest institutions committed to making meaningful contributions to the lives of our stakeholders and also to the future of business practice.”

Students and colleagues consider Hillman to be an exceptional teacher, having honored her with two Outstanding Professor Awards and two Outstanding Teacher Awards. She was also voted one of the most popular professors in Businessweek’s rankings of MBA faculty in 1998.

Before her impressive tenure in academia, Hillman worked as general manager of a small retail and manufacturing business, and she now plays a key role in promoting entrepreneurship at the W. P. Carey School. For example, she helps to advance the school’s Spirit of Enterprise Center, which helps hundreds of businesses each year.

Hillman previously taught at the University of Western Ontario, Michigan State University, Johannes Kepler University in Austria, Texas A&M University and Trinity University. She has a Ph.D. from Texas A&M, where she was also named Outstanding Doctoral Alumni.

Mittelstaedt joined the school in 2004 and will semi-retire after spending about 40 years in academia, including various leadership positions at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School.

education.business

W. P. Carey School Offers New Scholarship Program

If you’ve ever thought about going back to school to try to advance your career and make more money, the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University offers some of the best values in education. In particular, its full-time MBA program has consistently been recognized as one of the best in the nation for “return on investment.” Recently, the school announced it’s adding a new scholarship program to make it even easier for some of the best students in the country to get an MBA through that program.

“We recently introduced the Wm. Polk Carey Memorial Scholarship Fund to help successful applicants for the full-time MBA program cover the costs of education,” says Robert Mittelstaedt, dean of the W. P. Carey School of Business. “Last year, Bloomberg Businessweek ranked our full-time MBA program among the Top 20 in the world and the Top 10 in the U. S. for ‘return on investment,’ indicating superb value. However, we still wanted to push even further to help more deserving students access a highly ranked MBA program.”

The Bloomberg Businessweek article pointed out that students completing the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program could see an annual pay increase of about $40,000. It also indicated that it would likely take less than five years for a W. P. Carey full-time MBA student to recoup all the costs of getting an MBA, including the salary the student gives up to go back to school full-time.

The school’s full-time MBA program is known for high quality. It is currently ranked among the Top 30 “Best Graduate Schools” for business in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report. It was one of the two least expensive programs in the entire Top 30 this year. In addition, it’s recognized for its personalized feel, with small class sizes. Students can specialize in multiple areas of emphasis, including finance and supply chain management, a field in which the W. P. Carey School consistently ranks Top 10 in the nation. This year, 89 percent of the school’s full-time MBA students were employed within 90 days of graduation.

The new scholarship fund is named after the school’s benefactor, real estate investor and acclaimed philanthropist Wm. Polk Carey, who donated $50 million to the school in 2002/2003. Carey passed away in January, but his generosity continues to be felt by students. Now, every applicant to the W. P. Carey School’s full-time MBA program will be considered for the scholarship money, which could completely cover the program’s costs for the very best students. No additional application is required.

For more information on W. P. Carey MBA programs, visit www.wpcarey.asu.edu/mba.

deal

ASU program helps leaders of small businesses

The fifth annual Small Business Leadership Academy at the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU helps small business owners and executives learn how to improve efficiency, streamline operations and raise profits.

“Classes are held just one night per week, so they fit right into busy executives’ schedules,” said Dawn Feldman, executive director of the W. P. Carey School of Business Center for Executive and Professional Development, which hosts the program. “Participants not only take away great business knowledge, but also a new support network of peers that will exist long after the program is over.”

Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding co-sponsor, offers a number of scholarships to its current suppliers and small business customers.

“The academy offers an outstanding opportunity for small business owners to gain knowledge from highly acclaimed professors and establish lasting relationships with other community small business owners,” said Carrie Young, senior director, corporate operations services for SRP. “The partnership we have with ASU, coupled with the sponsorship and scholarships we offer to the academy, is a natural fit for SRP in supporting economic development within our own community.”

As part of a larger partnership with ASU focused on small business support, JPMorgan Chase is also a top sponsor, providing 15 scholarships to the academy.

“As Arizona’s number one SBA lender, we know how important small businesses are to our economy,” said Joe Stewart, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase in Arizona.

Participants must come from companies that have been in business for at least three years; have annual revenues between $1 million and $10 million; and have fewer than 100 employees.

For more information, call (480) 965-7579, e-mail wpcarey.execed@asu.edu or visit wpcarey.asu.edu/sbla.

speakers

Hear from Top Business Leaders in the New ECP Season

Top leaders from Sam’s Club, Intel, the United Services Automobile Association (USAA), and the Arizona Diamondbacks are among those taking the stage during the current season of the Economic Club of Phoenix speaker series. Every year, Phoenix-area audiences are invited to attend the club’s luncheons and hear from some of the biggest names in the business world.

“We want Valley businesspeople to be able to hear from the heads of major local companies and top executives from international firms,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “This series brings leaders from a variety of industries to talk about what’s happening in their own companies, as well as in the business arena as a whole.”

The Economic Club of Phoenix (ECP) was founded by a group of prominent business executives called the Dean’s Council of 100, in conjunction with the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. The club is now the preeminent Arizona forum for the exchange of ideas about business and the economy. Its monthly luncheons and other activities offer business leaders and others opportunities to network and engage.

This season’s speaker lineup (subject to change) is:

Thursday, Nov. 8 – William Toler, chief executive officer, AdvancePierre Foods; Matt Wilson, managing director, Oaktree Capital Management
Wednesday, Jan. 23 – Derrick Hall, president and chief executive officer, Arizona Diamondbacks
Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2013 – Charles Redfield, executive vice president of merchandising, Sam’s Club
Tuesday, March 19 – Doug Davis, vice president and general manager, Arizona fab/sort manufacturing site, Intel Corporation
Thursday, April 25 – Maj. Gen. Josue Robles Jr., president and chief executive officer, United Services Automobile Association (USAA), Dean’s Council of 100 Executive of the Year
Thursday, May 16 – Annual Economic Outlook Luncheon

All luncheons run from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The November event will take place at JW Marriott’s Camelback Inn in Scottsdale, with the rest of the locations still to be announced.

Non-members are welcome for a $75 luncheon fee. Funds in excess of the cost of lunch are used to support scholarships and faculty research at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

For more information about the club or to reserve seats, call (480) 727-0596, e-mail wpcarey.ecp@asu.edu or go to www.econclubphx.org.

leadership workshops

W. P. Carey School Offers Leadership Workshops

Want to learn key business skills without going back to school for a full degree? The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is unveiling brand new half-day leadership development workshops designed for exactly this purpose. The workshops — focused on concepts that immediately strengthen leadership capabilities — will make lessons taught at the highly ranked W. P. Carey School even more accessible to businesspeople and companies.

“As the economy recovers, we’re hearing from more companies that want to send managers, team and project leaders, those being promoted into management, and those without a lot of formal management education to get a crash course in certain areas,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “They want to beef up leadership skills and effectiveness in a short time frame, and this is a great solution. They also want to reward crucial employees who helped get them through the recession, to help advance their careers.”

The new workshops will be run by some of the top faculty members who also teach in the school’s full-time and evening MBA programs, both ranked Top 30 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. The four-hour workshops will be personal, limited to 50 or fewer students. They will also be very interactive, often including simulations, case studies and other strong student involvement, not just lectures.

“For example, participants in the class on effective negotiations will go through an actual role-playing process,” says Dawn Feldman, executive director of the Center for Executive and Professional Development at the W. P. Carey School of Business. “All of the classes are designed so students can immediately use their new skills on the job. They’re also aimed at helping to create a more effective and motivated group back in the workplace.”

The first five workshops will be held at ASU Research Park in south Tempe. They will each run on a Friday morning between July and November. Subjects include:

  • Driving employee engagement – July 13
  • Effective negotiations – Aug. 17
  • Inspiration and motivation as leadership tools – Sept. 7
  • Harvesting knowledge from frontline employees – Oct. 26
  • Leading effective team processes – Nov. 9

Each workshop is $550 per person. However, discounts are available for groups, ASU alums and members of the Economic Club of Phoenix.

For more information on leadership development workshops, call (480) 965-7579 or go towww.wpcarey.asu.edu/ldw.

carey school - graduate

More Than 2,000 Will Graduate From W. P. Carey School

More than 2,000 students will graduate from Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business next week. This is one of the biggest graduation classes ever for the school, known as one of the largest and highest-ranked business schools in the country. The president of the Phoenix Suns, a group of executives flying in from China, and a student who already started a nonprofit to help foster teens will be part of the ceremonies.

“We have another fantastic graduating class this year,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “These students exemplify why our undergraduate, full-time MBA and part-time MBA programs are all ranked Top 30 by U.S. News & World Report. It’s another batch of high achievers.”

The school’s graduate-level convocation will include more than 900 students, most of them receiving MBAs, but others getting master’s degrees in accountancy, tax, information management, real estate development and health systems management. The event will be held Friday, May 4 at 5 p.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena in Tempe. The featured speaker will be Brad Casper, president of the Phoenix Suns basketball team, who is known for his community involvement and heavy focus on area schools.

In addition, about 20 of the 120 executives graduating from the school’s executive MBA program in Shanghai are traveling to Phoenix to participate in the Tempe ceremony. The Shanghai program educates some of the highest-level business and government leaders in China and is currently ranked among the Top 20 executive MBA programs in the world by the Financial Times, Britain’s equivalent of The Wall Street Journal. Past students have included the CEOs of Baosteel and Shanghai Electric, three vice governors of China’s major provinces, six city mayors, the chief executive officer of the Shanghai Stock Exchange, several bank chairmen and the chairman of Shanghai Airlines.

At the undergraduate level, more than 1,100 students are eligible to walk the stage, and more than a dozen different types of business degrees will be awarded. The undergraduate convocation is set for Thursday, May 3 at 8 a.m. at the Wells Fargo Arena. The main speaker will be Chris Spinella, chief executive officer of Apriva, which develops and advances smart-card technology and wireless applications for payment processing and secure mobile communications.

The graduates at this ceremony will include the winner of the spring 2012 Turken Family Outstanding Graduating Senior Award, Christos Makridis. He co-founded the Quanta Foundation LLC, an educational services company that connects high school students with high-profile university projects to produce research and multimedia materials. Makridis is also a McCord Scholar, an economics teaching assistant, chairman of the business school’s Dean’s Advisory Council and editor in chief of an international undergraduate-research journal on science policy at ASU.

Another finalist for the Turken Family award, Priya Nathan, co-founded a nonprofit to benefit young people. Partnered for Success helps foster and orphan youth successfully transition out of the foster care system in the Phoenix area. The program has been recognized by Fast Company magazine and was selected as an ASU Innovation Challenge grant winner twice.

“Many of these graduates are already making their mark well beyond the classroom,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Executive Dean Amy Hillman. “We have students who are small-business owners, working moms, members of the military and lots of others already making us proud. We look forward to their continued success.”

For more information on W. P. Carey School of Business, visit W. P. Carey School of Business’ website at wpcarey.asu.edu.

W.P. Carey

ASU Business School Community Mourns The Loss Of W.P. Carey

The Arizona State University and Phoenix business communities are mourning the loss of a great benefactor, philanthropist and businessman. William Polk Carey, one of the nation’s most prominent real estate investors and the major donor behind the W. P. Carey School of Business at ASU, has passed away at the age of 81.

“The ASU family mourns the loss of our benefactor and friend Bill Carey,” says ASU President Michael M. Crow. “Bill Carey was not only a great business leader and philanthropist, but also a visionary. He knew that metropolitan Phoenix needed a first-rate business school to advance in the 21st century and saw in ASU the potential to develop that school. Through his generous investment in ASU almost a decade ago, the school that bears his name has become world-class and will continue to educate future business leaders for many generations to come.”

The New York-based banker, founder and chairman of W. P. Carey & Co. LLC donated $50 million from his educational and philanthropic W. P. Carey Foundation to ASU in 2003. In recognition of his extraordinary support, ASU renamed the university’s business school in his honor, and the gift has been instrumental in helping the W. P. Carey School to become one of the world’s top business schools. U.S. News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal and the Financial Times all now rank W. P. Carey School programs among the Top 30 nationwide.

At the time, Carey’s generous donation was the second-largest gift ever to a U.S. business school. Carey’s family has deep connections to Arizona State University. His grandfather introduced legislation that created the university in 1886. Carey also had an honorary Doctor of Science degree from ASU.

Carey has said of his gift to the business school, “The key to future economic growth is quality education, and this school will be dedicated to producing our country’s next generation of business leaders.”

The school’s leadership agrees.

“Bill gave us the ability to dramatically advance the quality and status of the school much more rapidly than would have been possible otherwise,” says W. P. Carey School of Business Dean Robert Mittelstaedt. “He was a philanthropist who believed a primary way to advance our country was through education, and he helped a number of schools, including ours. He was also a student of economics and a great admirer of top-tier economists.”

Mittelstaedt also says Carey was a smart businessman who pioneered a way for smaller investors to participate in large real estate projects with consistent top-tier returns. Carey had an incredible 60-plus-year career in the finance industry and will be remembered as a visionary leader with fierce loyalty and abundant generosity.

For more information about the W.P. Carey School of Business, visit wpcarey.asu.edu.

alan mulally ford

Executive Of The Year: Alan Mullaly, Ford Motor Company

Alan Mulally, president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Company, was honored recently as Executive of the Year by the Dean’s Council of 100, a group of prominent business executives who advise the W. P. Carey School of Business. In presenting the award, W. P. Carey School Dean Robert Mittelstaedt noted Mulally’s exceptional leadership in turning Ford around without requesting government bailout money. Here is Mulally’s speech and the question period that followed. (47:30)