Tag Archives: Rose Law Group

Habitat for Humanity

10 offices we’d love to work in

How many offices can boast a 15-foot spinning Jumbotron, an entire room devoted to playing golf, a bat pole for riding between floors, a hidden kitchen for creative break times? We can think of at least one! From football fields to double-decker buses, these are the offices we’d love to work in — for at least one day.


DBSI Inc.

DBSI Inc.


DBSI Inc.
Location:
6950 W. Morelos Pl., Chandler, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
DBSI, Inc.
About:
DBSI Inc. works with financial institutions to re-brand and transform their branch locations.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
With its high ceiling and open spaces, DBSI’s headquarters leaves plenty of room to promote creativity and fun at every corner. Some of DBSI’s office highlights include a room called the Ideation Center with a 15-foot TV “Wow Wall” that screens movies and broadcasts sports games while doubling as a secret door to a Collaboratory (aka a “test kitchen”), a golf simulator room and bat pole between floors for a rush of energy before employees return to work.

DIRTT Environmental Solutions

DIRTT Environmental Solutions


DIRTT Environmental Solutions
Location:
836 E. University Dr., Phoenix
Architecture/Design Firm:
Phoenix Design One
About:
DIRTT, short for Doing It Right This Time, is a company that creates customizable architectural interiors with tailored prefab for flexible building designs.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
There’s no such thing as a corner office at DIRTT’s factory environment. Not even the executive has a private office. Instead, people sit in the “Fish Bowl” in the heart of the DIRTT factory. Bordered on all sides with a Breathe Wall, employees gets to enjoy the greenery of live plants in addition to daylighting from skylights. Breakfast, lunch and breaks are catered by two full-time chefs in a cafeteria also used for presentations and networking events.

DRP Construction Phoneix Regional Office

DRP Construction Phoneix Regional Office


DPR Construction Phoenix Regional Office
Location:
222 N. 44th St., Phoenix
Architecture/Design Firm:
SmithGroupJJR
About:
DPR Construction is a national technical builder that specializes in sustainable projects.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
SmithGroupJJR turned a 28-year-old, 16,500 SF retail building into the first commercial office in Arizona (and second in the country) to achieve a Net-Zero Energy Building certification. The open-office environment has 58 work stations, nine conference rooms, a gym and locker facility and a zen room for quiet retreat. A Lucid Building Dashboard system shares building energy and utility usage in real time and has a “Vampire Switch” that, when pressed, turns off phantom plug-loads at the end of the day.

FITCH Phoenix Studio

FITCH Phoenix Studio


FITCH Phoenix Studio
Location:
16435 N. Scottsdale Rd., Ste. 195, Scottsdale, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
FITCH
About:
FITCH is a global design consultancy founded in 1972 in the UK.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
The FITCH studio, nestled in the Scottsdale Promenade, a shopping center that offers a unique architectural setting inspired by American architect Frank Lloyd Wright. What makes the LEED Silver office unique, inspiring and innovative is the group’s namesake. FITCH has a 1962 Route Master bright red double-decker London bus in its lobby. The bus was purchased in Los Angeles, dropped the engine and was completely restored by FITCH staff. The labor of love was completed with a fully functioning conference space on the lower portion and a lounge complete with television on the upper portion of the bus. It even hosts an annual British American Parliamentary Group meeting.

Godaddy

Godaddy


Godaddy
Location:
ASU Research Park, Tempe, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
Patrick Hayes Architecture, SmithGroupJJR (Interior)
About:
GoDaddy is an internet domain registrar and web hosting company.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
The GoDaddy project is full of unique and quirky design features. It has an indoor go-kart/bicycle track; a slide that goes from the second to first floor (and is rumored to be six-degrees steeper than Google’s slide); several game areas for employees to refocus; a yoga studio and fitness center; it has an innovative workspace layout with meandering walkways and wide open spaces; the break room features 12’ x 30’ glass doors that open up allowing the inside and outside spaces to flow; site amenities include a soccer field, several multi-purpose sport courts (including a shaded basketball court) and electric vehicle charging stations.

Habitat for Humanity

Habitat for Humanity


Habitat for Humanity
Location:
3501 N. Mountain Ave., Tucson, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
DKP Architecture
About:
An international, non-governmental and nonprofit organization dedicated to building homes that are affordable and address the issues of poverty housing.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
“Habitat for Humanity is a functional, pragmatic organization and its new Tucson office captures the same spirit,” writes Sundt Construction’s Kurt Wadlington. A repurposed 1940s grocery store, the working environment was created for Habitat’s employees, volunteers and community and with a design emphasis on collaboration. The office’s signature element is its “House with the House.” This freestanding indoor pitched roof structure greets visitors and provides a communal conference area. The office also includes a children play area and open office areas held below the roof structure to preserve the high volume bowstring wood trusses of the original structure.

InfusionSoft

InfusionSoft


InfusionSoft
Location:
1260 S. Spectrum Blvd., Chandler, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
Balmer Architectural Group
About:
Infusionsoft is a private company that offers an e-mail marketing and sales platform for small businesses, including products to streamline the customer lifecycle, customer relationship management, marketing automation, lead capture, and e-commerce.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
Infusionsoft’s headquarters, located in a 90KSF, two-story office building in the middle of Chandler’s tech hub, is anything but stuffy. The office is built around a 40-yard indoor football field that acts as a central gathering place for company-wide meetings, department chats and a place to throw around a Frisbee or football. With a design focus on company culture, Infusionsoft features a fully stocked cereal bar, massage chairs, a game room, gym and showers. One popular feature is in the auditorium, which has a removable wall made up of blocks that can be removed to connect the auditorium with the rest of the office space or placed to create intimacy and privacy.

Recruiting.com & Jobing.com

Recruiting.com & Jobing.com


Recruiting.com and Jobing.com
Location:
1375 N. Scottsdale Rd., Ste. 300, Scottsdale, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
hayes/architecture interiors inc.
About:
Jobing.com is an employment website focusing on local recruiting in 18 U.S. cities. Recruiting.com offers companies software and technology that helps in the hiring process.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
This office space was a consolidation of Jobing.com and Recruiting.com’s headquarters with the end goal of a functional, motivating work environment. Want to have a meeting from a ceiling-suspended collaborative workspace? Park it in one of the two floating benches known as “huddles,” where you can host clients, video conferences or collaborative sessions. From the interesting wallpaper to the entertaining lighting and the collection of PEZ machines, Jobing.com’s space was designed to be as varied and diverse as its employees. From environments that cater to working out, napping, collaborating or working independently, there’s a spot for every kind of work style.

Rose Law Group

Rose Law Group


Rose Law Group
Location:
7144 E. Stetson Dr., Ste. 300, Scottsdale, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
Gensler
About:
A full-service business law firm based in Scottsdale, Ariz.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
Rose Law Group is one of a handful of law firms embracing modern office design. After Rose Law purchased a space with two pre-existing suites, it engaged Gensler to design a cohesive floor. The two suites were brought together with a circulation loop, the center of which holds a “collaboration lab.” Gensler also worked to maximize the number of private offices along the perimeter of the building and accomplished this by increasing the number of offices from 8 to 28. Salvaged materials during the process were re-used for other areas of the project, such as flooring, shelving and reception millwork.

ViaSat

ViaSat


ViaSat
Location:
2040 E. Technology Circle, Tempe, Ariz.
Architecture/Design Firm:
Gensler
About:
ViaSat is a global satellite technology company based in San Diego, Calif. It Tempe office will be used for operations.
THE HIGHLIGHTS:
Despite being designed around engagement, connection, familial culture and exterior amenities, ViaSat’s Tempe operations building will have a 95 percent closed office environment. The office, smaller than a standard space, is broken up into private work spaces with glass fronts. Every “team cluster” has a front porch, which is a collaborative space for individuals. The office has a large gathering space designed as a place for meetings and a connection to the basketball and sand volleyball courts as well as outdoor meeting spaces.
socialmedia_icons

Social Media Prenups Trending In Valley

First comes love, then comes marriage, the baby carriage, and, for many Americans, divorce. Even if a couple doesn’t have an estate to divvy, family matter lawyers are reporting emerging trends that may have couples wishing they had signed prenup.

As the director of family law at Rose Law Group, Kaine Fisher has prepared many high-profile pre- and post-nuptial agreements. Some have had unusual provisions, such as what happens if a spouse transmits a sexually transmitted disease or a clause that liquidates damages for infidelity. However, there’s a new trend he and other local lawyers are touting — social media clauses.

Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are the first places millions of people turn to share their thoughts, photos and lives. It’s where professional and personal relationships grow, thrive and, sometimes, end. And, when the inevitable happens, there’s a chance the scorned and burned feelings will turn up on social media platforms in the form of private or unflattering information or photos about the other person. This is where the expertise and intervention of attorneys is rapidly required.

“Over the past couple of years, I have noticed an explosion of requests by clients wanting to include what is more affectionately known as a ‘social media clause’ in their pre- and post-nuptial agreements,” Fisher says. “At the onset of a marriage, such provisions are effective in setting relationship boundaries. However, at the end of one, these provisions are are typically used as swords to achieve greater financial gain.” 

The American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers reported more than 80 percent of U.S. divorce attorneys say social networking is a rising topic in divorce proceedings. Social media has been a staple in divorce proceedings since MySpace was introduced in 2003, but Norma Izzo Milner, a litigator focusing in the areas of alternative dispute resolution, family law and domestic relations with Jennings, Strouss and Salmon Law Firm in Phoenix, is still surprised by how few clients still aren’t considering social media prenups.

“Once I provide some basic legal information about how social media can play a part in or impact either a relationship or the ending of one, they tend to take precautions and limit their social media activity,” she says.

People just can’t seem to help themselves, Fisher says, adding that they also don’t always have control over what hits the web.

“A jaded ex-girlfriend or a careless spouse can expose, either intentionally or intentionally, private photographs or videos of you that you  never wanted anyone to see,” he says.

“The reality is, most people connect through cyber space and report daily activities from what they are eating to how they are feeling. This can be a dangerous outlet for people facing the emotional challenges of a divorce or legal separation,” Milner says.

The amount of couples who enter into prenuptial agreements, despite a divorce rate of 3.6 per 1,000 people, is surprisingly low, says Milner. The two leading causes of getting a prenup, she says, is to protect an estate or to prevent the difficulty and costs of a divorce, based on previous experience.
“I find it surprising that the majority of people spend a large percentage of their daily time engaged in some form of social media, but do not think about how it might impact their lives long-term,” she says. “I generally have to bring the topic up for discussion with my clients.”

Social media prenups can be drafted as inclusive of existing and future platforms. In the event of being blocked from an ex’s social media pages, Milner says couples can include an term that enables access to personalized web content for a period of time after separation.

The family law group at Burch & Cracchiolo hasn’t used a social media clause in any of the prenups it has drafted, but recognizes it as something that’s on the horizon, says Marketing and Client Development Manager Chris Long.

Chris Ingle, an attorney at Rose Law Group who specializes in online defamation and protection of intellectual property, has not encountered a social media prenuptial case outside of the new articles and online buzz.

“I have to say that if somebody approached me with that idea, I’d recommend against that very strongly,” he says.

It’s a matter of a dispute escalating into a court battle that becomes public record and costs “a small fortune,” he says, adding, “It takes what started out as a disagreement and turns it into a full-fledged litigation war. I don’t think that’s in everyone’s best interest.”

Ingle recommends couples who are going their separate ways to write a non-disparagement clause, which promises couples won’t go out of their way to say anything bad about the other person or have anyone do that on their behalf.

It’s not necessarily the words that have many people preoccupied — there are images and the revenge porn industry to consider.

“If you’re going to let somebody take those photos and videos, you have to trust them implicitly,” says Ingle. “Once it gets out there (online), it’s difficult (to reverse).”

Some options, particularly for people whose images or videos are posted on a website by a third party (presumably an ex), include filing for copyright of the footage. It’s “cheap and easy,” says Ingle, to get a copyright. Unless your significant other challenges the claim, someone can generally submit a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) request to the hosting website and get the photo or video removed.

For couples who drafted their prenups pre-Zuckerberg, who, by the way, had a relationship agreement drafted up before his marriage to Priscilla Chan that required 100 minutes of alone time away from Facebook’s headquarters, Milner still suggests considering a dialog about social media in the relationship and, potentially, a post-nuptial agreement.

“It’s never too late to have the discussion and spell out expectations and healthy boundaries to avoid future problems,” she says.

Images Diverge, WEB

When Visions Diverge

When Visions Diverge: What Happens When Property Owners and Cities Want Different Land Use

The crack of the gavel thunders through the room over the buzz of hushed whispers. Alone at the podium, the property owner stands stunned by the city council action denying the vision for a property. The investment in preplanned designs, attorneys, consultants and engineering circles the drain.

Hanging above it all is the “vision.” A parcel of land, lines on a drawing, colors on a map and the ghost of a citywide vote. A document, called a general plan, presses down on the hope, the plan and the decision, “Motion to deny the development proposal passes. The council finds the project is not consistent with the general plan.”

Jordan Rose, founder of Rose Law Group

Jordan Rose, founder of Rose Law Group.

“During the recession, some investors looked at bargains and not zoning,” says Scottsdale land use attorney Jordan Rose, founder of Rose Law Group. “There was less diligence, and some acquired land without regard to what the general plan said about the property.”

Development plans have been stalled or blocked by recent Valley city zoning actions. Several cases―primarily in the East Valley―have brought the issue into greater focus. The recovery-driven interest in turning properties or resurrecting old plans causes some of the conflict.

In many ways, local governments are market-driven, but driven by a different market than commercial real estate. The Arizona legislature forces towns and cities to depend on sales tax for general fund revenues―the basic operating income for key community services. This in turn drives local governments to create retail and employment site opportunities through the general plan. Without revenue-generating undeveloped land, a city council is not going to have the wherewithal to fund future growth and the requisite public safety, parks and libraries.

The sales-tax dependence led to cities to be very protective of revenue-generating land set aside in the general plan. Retail business has significantly changed over the past decade, but local government funding mechanisms continue to use 20th century revenue models for a 21st century economy.

The General Plan
In Arizona, every city and county needs a general or comprehensive plan to provide a long-range blueprint of development patterns within current and future boundaries. Plans are supposed to be updated every decade and ratified by the voters. Several plans are slated for ratification this year―including Tempe, Scottsdale and Mesa.

“A general plan is a large and complex document, it carries a lot of implications that are not apparent when voting for ratification,” says Ralph Pew, member and manager, Pew & Lake, PLC, Mesa.

The comment “the plan can’t be changed because voters approved it” is often raised during a project hearing when there are proposals to amend the land use map. Pew says, “The plan itself contains the standards for approving major and minor amendments. Change is a planned part of the process.”

John Berry, founder of Berry Riddell & Rosensteel LLC, Scottsdale, says that preparation is the key, “When a client comes to us, we start with the staff, listen to neighbors and talk with elected officials to try to foresee any major issues. It’s incumbent on the developer to give the city the facts to support the project. Opinions and project economics alone are not going to gain an approval.”

Rose agrees, “We’ve seen clients with plans that just don’t fit with the general plan. This means a lot of work up front to move the project forward, but sometimes, we have to tell them, ‘it isn’t going to be approved.’”

Before the recession, development was moving so quickly that a zone change or general plan amendment denial just meant the developer moved on. “We don’t have a lot of land use litigation in Arizona,” says Pew. “Pre-recession, the pace of development and number of opportunities, made it possible for the developer to shrug off a denial and move on to the next project.”

It’s different in the planning pipeline now. “When the recession ended, we were tickled to get applications once again,” reminisces Mesa Planning Director John Wesley. “There was an appetite to make things happen, and most projects were approved. That’s different now.”

Developers are seeing the difference during the hearing process.

“Councils are busy and they don’t like controversy,” says Berry. “The key to success is to listen closely to any objections early in the process and eliminate as many issues up front. When I go before a city council, I want to be able to say we have many points of agreement and just a few points of disagreement, if any.”

Pew emphasizes that getting an approval requires more work on the facts up front, “The more information we can give a city with the application showing the need for change, the easier it is for the city council to ultimately say ‘yes.’”

All three attorneys say that they will provide economic analysis, traffic reports and other empirical facts to back up an application.

Wesley says that he’s seeing more of that too, “It used to be developers would come in and say the project doesn’t pencil without the changes being approved. That doesn’t show any benefit to the city, and today, the council is less likely to be persuaded.”

Converging Goals
Cities and developers are looking more closely at project and city objectives to see how the divergent goals can be brought closer together. “In Mesa, we had a pattern of putting commercial development on every major street corner. Recently, an owner showed us that the area was barely supporting existing commercial on two of the corners, and a third corner still had undeveloped commercial zoning. Their argument made sense and the city approved a residential rezone.”

Even with numbers and well-reasoned arguments, sometimes visions are irreconcilable. “There are some properties in cities where general plan amendments are just not going to be approved,” cautions Rose. “We see cities with long range plans for an area, and the council is not going to change their vision on a piece-by-piece basis.”

“In Mesa, we have some neighborhoods where there is flexibility, if an owner makes a case,” points out Wesley. “But there are some areas where we need to protect the city’s plans even if the land remains vacant for a while.”

A Need for Change
Some point to the success of the Price Corridor in Chandler where the city held firm on keeping land use for large corporate and single-tenant users. That is changing this year following a report by The Maguire Group the city commissioned. Changing economics and use patterns opened the door to maintaining the same corporate center feel, but now permitting smaller users and multi-tenant buildings. As soon as the amendment’s approval was imminent, the Douglas Allred Company filed plans for a hotel and mid-rise office on the Park Place campus.

Allred Park Place building five shell.

Allred Park Place building five shell.

“We’re starting to see cities, like Queen Creek, take a look at actual absorption rates and land use needs when considering general plan amendments,” says Pew. “Policy is starting to move away from the pre-recession rigidity that all commercial and employment lands needed to be preserved.”

Before the economy plunged, it was common for land owners to seek highest-and-best use zoning in order to better position the land for sale. The convergence of Internet shopping, the housing crisis and a push for infill development changed land use demand and affected patterns.

“Cities are becoming aware that we’re starting to run out of land area,” explains Wesley. “We’re looking more carefully at changes, because there is generally no going back.”

“As long as land remains undeveloped, it is possible and sometimes reasonable to change zoning again,” says Pew. “With the real estate market shift, owners start looking at what’s going to work. It’s possible cities are going to see requests to shift zoning to match market demand rather than market value.”

Finding Balance
Wesley talks about listening to developer ideas and goals, “Sometimes what’s wanted isn’t a perfect fit, but we’ve worked with owners to try and accomplish their objectives. We had a recent project where we mixed land uses so that both (Mesa) and developer goals were mostly achieved.”

“A lot of the time, the public is wed to the general plan,” reflects Rose. “The general plan is a vision for a community, it can’t just be simply dismissed. There are a lot of moving parts.”

In conversation with each of the three attorneys, one word is in their comments again and again: “understand.”

“Listen and understand what the neighborhood expects from a development,” Berry says.

Rose advises, “Understand what’s expected and be creative to bring ideas to the table.”

“Understanding the stakeholders and the project neighborhood is a big key to success,” counsels Pew.

Understanding city expectations can be the first step on the road to meeting an owner’s property objectives.

Jordan Rose

Jordan Rose – 50 Most Influential Women in Arizona Business

Jordan Rose – Owner, Rose Law Group

In 2000, Rose founded Rose Law Group, a fullservice law firm that that is known for its work in real estate, litigation, family, tax, estate planning, intellectual property and environmental issues. Rose Law Group is currently the largest law firm owned by a woman in the Southwestern United States.

Surprising fact: “I love listening to sports radio.”

Biggest challenge: “The recession hit and instead of prolonged pouting, I decided to use it as an opportunity for expansion and practice area diversification. We ended up growing during the downturn, expanding litigation and tax; and adding estate planning, criminal, intellectual property and family law practices.”

Fifty Most Influential Women in Arizona Business – Every year in its July/August issue Arizona Business Magazine features 50 women who make an impact on Arizona business. To see the full list, read the digital issue >>

legal

Top Lawyers list: Government relations

Az Business magazine’s 2013 top lawyer list was created after the editorial department asked Arizona law firms to nominate their two best attorneys from 16 different categories for consideration. Those nominees were put on a ballot and were voted on by their peers in the legal community and the readers of Az Business magazine to determine the exclusive 2013 Az Business Magazine Top Lawyers list.

Clare Abel
Burch & Cracchiolo, P.A.
602-234-9920
bcattorneys.com
Abel concentrates her practice primarily in the areas of real estate, zoning and condemnation Law. She is listed in Southwest Super Lawyers, Best Lawyers in America and Arizona’s Finest Lawyers.

S. David Childers
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4880
kutakrock.com
Childers served on the U.S. Secretary of Health & Human Services’ Task Force on Long-Term Health Care Policies, and the Governor’s Private Sector Task Force on Long Term Care and the University of Arizona College of Business & Public Administration National Board of Advisors.

Robert D. Dalager
Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A.
602-530-8540
gknet.com
Dalager practices governmental affairs and land use law.  Prior to joining Gallagher & Kennedy, Dalager was with the Arizona State Senate for nearly 10 years.

Gregory Y. Harris
Lewis and Roca LLP
602-262-0218
lrlaw.com
Harris has extensive experience appearing before state and federal agencies and in state and federal court, and appears regularly before the Arizona Legislature.

Yvonne R. Hunter
Fennemore Craig, P.C.
602-916-5386
fclaw.com
Hunter’s practice focuses primarily on government affairs. Hunter formerly served as an Assistant Arizona Attorney General in the Arizona Attorney General’s Office.

Joseph A. Kanefield
Ballard Spahr LLP
602-798-5468
ballardspahr.com
Kanefield’s practice is focused on government relations, civil and appellate litigation, public-private partnerships, administrative law, state and local tax matters, gaming, and election and campaign-finance law.

Timothy A. La Sota
Tiffany & Bosco, P.A.
602-452-2712
tblaw.com
La Sota practices in the areas of government relations, regulatory and administrative law, election law, land use and procurement.

Paige A. Martin
Kutak Rock LLP
480-429-4827
kutakrock.com
Martin, an AV Preeminent Peer Review Rated partner in the firm’s Scottsdale office, and primarily represents governmental entities and private employers.

Mary R. O’Grady
Osborn Maledon, P.A.
602-640-9352
omlaw.com
As a former solicitor general for the State of Arizona, O’Grady has a unique breadth of experience with public law issues. Her areas of expertise include election and campaign finance law and state constitutional law.

Jordan Rose
Rose Law Group
480-505-3939
roselawgroup.com
Rose practices in the areas of government relations, municipal issues, land use, zoning, administrative law, renewable energy, and lobbying.

John B. Shadegg
Steptoe & Johnson LLP
602-257-5204
steptoe.com
Shadegg, former U.S. Congressman, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in1994 and served eight terms before retiring from Congress in 2010.  He practices in Steptoe’s Government Affairs and Public Policy group.

David K. Udall
Udall Shumway PLC
480-969-3043
udallshumway.com
Udall has successfully represented a variety of clients with zoning and development issues before the City of Mesa, Maricopa County, Town of Gilbert, City of Chandler, and Casa Grande.

Dark Star Orchestra

Concerts Take The Center Stage At Musical Instrument Museum In April

Musical Instrument Museum marks the start of a series of events focusing on concerts, bringing performances by local and national artists to the Valley.

VladimirPleshakov&ElenaWinther_April26_MIM

Mini Music Makers Series
Mondays and Wednesdays in April (1, 3, 8, 10, 15, 17, 22, 24)
9:30-10 a.m. for children ages 0-18 months
10:15-10:50 a.m. for children ages 18 months-3 years
11-11:45 a.m. for children ages 3-5 years
Tickets: $12 per class or $40 for all four
Introduce your child to the wonderful world of music! MIM’s Mini Music Makers Series, an early childhood music-education program, aims to enrich children’s lives by providing a safe, interactive and engaging environment for children to explore a variety of music from around the world. Each class is structured around developmentally appropriate activities for children to interact with and create their own music. This session’s classes will focus on the sights and sounds of African music. Reservations required. To reserve a space, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

 

 

Dark Star Orchestra: Continuing the Grateful Dead Concert Experience
Monday, April 1, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $36.50-$39.50
Performing Grateful Dead classics in the same way that an orchestra interprets music of classical composers, Dark Star Orchestra selects from among the nearly 2,500 shows that the Grateful Dead performed during their 30-year tenure as fathers of improvisational rock. The composer spirit is derived and channeled as the musicians capture the excitement and innovation of the original performances and compositions. On most performances, Dark Star Orchestra presents the complete original set list, song by song and in consecutive order, while adapting their phrasing, voice arrangements, and specific musical equipment for the various eras of the Grateful Dead shows that they perform.

Colin Hay
Tuesday, April 2, 7 p.m. (SOLD OUT)
Wednesday, April 3, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $34.50-$39.50
Colin Hay wrote some of the quirkiest pop hits of the early 1980s as the principal songwriter of the Australian-based Men at Work (“Down Under,” “Overkill,” “Who Can It Be Now?”), which became an international pop sensation, seemed to dominate early MTV, and garnered a Grammy Award for Best New Band. As the band’s guitarist and lead singer, Hay’s voice and appearance are still familiar to millions. The past 20 years have found him quietly yet tenaciously reintroducing himself to new generations of fans. In the process, he’s become a respected songwriter whose stage humor and storytelling are nearly as renowned as his music. He’s now enjoying life as a masterful writer and vocalist who is at the peak of his craft.

Alpin Hong
Friday, April 5, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $37.50-$42.50
Whirlwind American tours and performances across the globe have earned pianist Alpin Hong the reputation as a modern-day Pied Piper. His combination of stunning technique, emotional range, and rare humor continues to bring audiences young and old to their feet. The New York Times lauded his “crystalline energy . . . clear and persuasive ideas . . . and remarkable breadth of coloration,” and called him “a pianistic firebrand” in a review of his standing-room-only New York recital debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall.

Arizona Opera Up Close Series: Double Entendre
Thursday, April 11, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $37.50-$42.50
Enjoy this rare opportunity to hear the two lead couples from both casts of “The Marriage of Figaro” as they share the spotlight on stage for one night only at the MIM Music Theater. With an impressive collection of debuts and accolades spanning the globe, the quartet will perform from their signature operatic roles and other selections from a variety of genres. Featuring Sari Gruber, Jo駘le Harvey, Jason Hardy, and Daniel Okulitch with Arizona Opera Head of Music Allen Perriello on piano.

MIM Homeschool Day: Compass Guided Tour and Signature Workshop (West African Percussion and Dance)
Monday, April 15
Tickets: $10 per student, $10 per chaperone above the 1:5 ratio
Led by docents, this exciting “trip around the world” introduced students to the diversity of the world’s musical traditions, ranging from an Indonesian gong workshop to a re-created workshop featuring Martin acoustic guitars. Students learn ways that instruments have changed over time, as humans move around the globe and interact with each other. Content and curriculum align with Arizona State Standards in science, social studies, and music education. Students will also participate in a Signature Workshop on West African Percussion and Dance where they will be introduced to different drumming styles and traditions from several cultural groups in Ghana, Mali and Guinea. Students will play along using the djembe, agogo double bell and shekere. There will also be a family-friendly menu available at the MIM Caf・ Best for grades 3‒12. To register, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

I Am AZ Music: The Best of the Valley: Open Mic Showcase
Tuesday, April 16, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $10
Featuring Andrew Duncan Brown, Ruca (Haley Grigaitis), Tim Allyn, Amanda Morgan and Jason Messer for an evening of local and diverse music.

Bang a Gong: Balinese Gamelan Workshop Series
Saturday, April 20, 10:30 a.m.
Tickets: $12 per class ($10 per class when purchased with museum admission)
Learn to play a gong – and all the other instruments that make up the sounds of a Balinese gamelan at MIM’s workshop! Led by assistant curator Colin Pearson, these bimonthly workshops include an introduction to Indonesian culture and music and easy lessons to play authentic Balinese instruments. No experience is required, and musicians and non-musicians alike will enjoy this unique musical form, so come join us! Please note that each workshop is an introductory class but participants are welcome to register for more than one session and hone their musical skills. Best for ages 8 and older. To register, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

The Klezmatics
Sunday, April 21, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $39.50-$47.50
The Klezmatics take one of the wildest approaches to klezmer, the traditional dance music of Eastern European Jews. Although their music is heavily influenced by the recordings of Abraham Ellstein and Dave Tarras in the 1940s and 1950s, their lyrics comment on a wide variety of political and social issues and have led the group to be labeled “the planet’s radical Jewish roots band.”

I Am AZ Music: Local Singer-Songwriters in the Round
Tuesday, April 23, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $15
Five Arizona singers sitting on stage trading stories and songs. It’s like being invited into the living room with some of Arizona’s best musical talent. Featuring Hans Olson, Walt Richardson, Jesse Valenzuela and the Zubia Brothers.

MIM Musical Interludes Series Featuring ASU: French Chamber Music
Wednesday, April 24, 10:30 a.m.
Tickets: Free with museum admission or $7 performance only
Elizabeth Buck, playing flute, with Lynne Aspnes, playing harp, will perform both delightful and triumphant French chamber music in honor of “La Marseillaise,” national anthem of France, which was composed on April 24, 1792.

Molly Ringwald
Wednesday, April 24, 7 p.m.
Tickets: $37.50-$42.50
American actress, singer, dancer, and author Molly Ringwald is frequently named the greatest teen star of all time. The daughter of jazzman Bob Ringwald and the leader of the Great Pacific Jazz Band, Ringwald, will soon be releasing her new CD featuring the talents of Clayton Cameron (Tony Bennett, Nancy Wilson, B.B. King) Winston Byrd (Natalie Cole, Roy Hargrove, Charles Tolliver), Trevor Ware (Hubert Laws, Jimmy Heath) and Allen Mezquida (Brad Mehldau, Bill Charlap).

Music In Motion: Dry River Yacht Club
Thursday, April 25, 6-8:30 p.m.
Tickets: Free with museum admission or $7 performance only
Groove to the sounds of Arizona under the stars and take a musical journey around the world in MIM’s galleries! The last thing one would think of when it comes to Arizona would be yacht clubs. Yet, in the heart of the Valley of the Sun, the dry riverbed of the Salt River winds its way through the metropolis. If you follow it east, straight to the waters of Tempe Town Lake, a yacht club most certainly exists: the Dry River Yacht Club (DRYC). The band, using no amplification, plays an eclectic mix of instruments, including a bassoon, violin, tuba, accordion, acoustic guitar, and bass clarinet, to create a unique combination of gypsy, Western, folk and rock music.

Hayes Carll
Thursday, April 25, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $19.50-$24.50
Texas singer and songwriter Hayes Carll received his first guitar at age 15 and almost immediately began writing songs, influenced by the likes of Bob Dylan, John Prine, Kris Kristofferson, Dead Poets Society and the Beat novels and writings of Jack Kerouac, all of which continued to reverberate in his mature songwriting style. In 2002, he signed with Compadre Records and released his debut album “Flowers and Liquor,” which garnered him favorable comparisons to Townes Van Zandt. His song “Another Like You” was named #1 on AmericanSongwriter.com’s Top 50 Songs of 2011, and is now firmly established in the Van Zandt/Guy Clark/Ray Wylie Hubbard style of maverick country-folk.

Vladimir Pleshakov & Elena Winther: Rachmaninoff Anniversary Concert
Friday, April 26, 7:30 p.m.
Tickets: $27.50‒$37.50
Vladimir Pleshakov and Elena Winther, husband-and-wife pianists, have been hailed by the Russian press as “European heirs to the great Russian pianistic tradition.” Playing two nine-foot Steinway pianos, they will masterfully convey the history, drama and passion of the last great romantic composer.

Get the Beat! World Drumming Series: Rhythms of the Middle East
Saturday, April 27, 2:30‒3:30 p.m.
Tickets: $12 per class (museum admission may be purchased separately)
Join the circle and get the beat! Each month, Frank Thompson, founder of AZ Rhythm Connection, offers a chance to experience community drumming for all levels, from absolute beginners to enthusiastic professionals. Each fun, relaxing and family-friendly session will highlight a new culture or genre, plus provide plenty of time for making music and jam sessions. Guest artists and MIM curators will stop in to demonstrate or share information about instruments, cultures or rhythms. Bring your own drum or use one provided. To register, please contact Annabel Rimmer at 480-245-6919 or grouptours@MIM.org.

 

Rendering of the amphitheater at the Great Park at Eastmark.

Eastmark Grand Opening Set For June 1 With Full Day of Activities

 

The first new large-scale integrated community to launch in Metro Phoenix in 10 years will hold a grand opening from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on June 1 to showcase its first phase of residential homes and the first phase of the Eastmark Great Park.

Eastmark, located in the heart of the East Valley, is a new community focused on creating a connected life for its residents, employers and visitors.

To debut Eastmark to the public, DMB is planning a day of festivities that will include music throughout the parks system, family games and entertainment and activities for all ages to encourage the community to discover the lifestyle at Eastmark.

Tours of 14 new home models from seven homebuilders will be available to guests. Every home design in Eastmark features a new floorplan designed for this community.

Eastmark’s phase one builders are:

>> Maracay Homes

>> Mattamy Homes

>> Taylor Morrison

>> Woodside Homes

>> Ryland Homes

>> Standard Pacific Homes

>> Meritage Homes Corporation

At the grand opening, visitors will be able to explore The ‘Mark, Eastmark’s Visitors and Community Center; enjoy the first 10 acres of the Eastmark Great Park; 11 neighborhood parks, piazzas and plazas; and landscaped, tree-lined streets and parkways.

Trollies and pedicabs will take guests around the community to enjoy outdoor concerts, kite flying and other demonstrations, food trucks and refreshments throughout the day.

“Eastmark is one of the most thoughtfully designed communities in the country. In our planning, we’ve artfully blended residential areas, employment cores, recreation and commerce to complement each other,” said Dea McDonald, DMB’s Senior Vice President and Eastmark’s General Manager.

“Eastmark’s grand opening will give guests an opportunity to engage in ‘Life in Motion’ and enjoy fun, family-friendly activities and exciting looks at this community which is unlike anything else in Arizona.”

If you go 

WHAT: Eastmark’s Grand Opening – Life in Motion

WHEN: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, June 1, 2013

WHERE: Ray and Ellsworth Roads in Mesa

COST: Admission is Free

 

Environmental Legal Issues - AZ Business Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Faces Environmental Legal Issues To Grow ‘Green’ Movement

Though Arizona may be working to reach a higher standard of sustainability, a myriad of environmental legal issues will be seen as these changes are implemented. Arizona Business Magazine spoke with the state’s top law firms and industry experts to find out the most important environmental legal issues the state can expect to face in the next decade.

Particulate Matter-10

Attorney Megan Lennox of Bryan Cave LLP says, “The single biggest environmental legal issue Arizona will be facing for the foreseeable future is the regulation, implementation and enforcement of regulations concerning Particulate Matter-10, also referred to as PM-10, which is essentially “dust.”’

According to an Aug. 25, 2011, press release by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality stressing a high pollution advisory: “State and county agencies measure PM-10 and PM-2.5 which are extremely small solid particles and liquid droplets found circulating in the air. PM, or particulate matter, comes from either combustion (cars, industry, woodburning) or dust stirred up into the air. High levels of PM are typically created when the air is especially stagnant or especially windy. PM-10 stands for particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less. PM-2.5 stands for particulate matter measuring 2.5 microns or less. To put this in perspective, one strand of human hair is 70-100 microns in size.”

“Over the summer, we saw a number of High Pollution Advisory (HPA) warnings issued by the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ) relating to PM-10, particularly in connection with the haboobs (dust storms) we’ve been having in the Valley this summer,” Lennox says. “But what is not as commonly known is that, even without a haboob, Arizonans face real health threats caused by common everyday dust generating activities.

“Indeed, the EPA has not been satisfied with what the Arizona has done in the way of dust control thus far, and because Arizona continues to exceed federal air quality standards for PM-10, we are now facing a very real possibility that the EPA will push the Arizona regulators aside and step in with their own plan to reduce PM-10.

“The real issue of concern is that, if the EPA is required to step in, Arizona will stand to lose over a billion dollars in federal highway funds,” Lennox says. “This translates to further loss of jobs, no new transportation projects, and likely intense regulation and economic impact to the construction industry — all of which will be decidedly detrimental to Arizona’s economy overall.”

Lennox says that Arizonans must prepare and prevent this from happening by doing their part, which includes refraining from leaf blowers, no fires in the fireplace, driving down dusty roads and joining forces with regulators “toward the common goal of reduction of PM-10 and maintenance of federal funding – both of which, everyone should be able to agree, are critical for the long-term health and prosperity of the Valley.”

Michelle De Blasi, partner at Quarles & Brady agrees: “Serious nonattainment areas must demonstrate PM-10 emission reductions of five percent per year until the standard is attained.  The state and local governments have instituted many measures to make these reductions.  To reach attainment, three years of clean data are needed at all PM-10 monitors… The state and local governments have instituted many proactive control measures to try to limit excesses at the monitors caused by dust.”

Utility Deregulation

As the state continues to develop renewable energy, several legal issues can arise. Court Rich, an attorney at Rose Law Group states that: “As renewable energy prices come down its implementation will grow quicker.  At some point the technology involved in distributed roof top solar energy is going to allow people not only to produce energy during the day but to store energy for power at night.”

If people are able to produce the energy they need, should they pay a utility company for its electricity service? These are the types of questions Arizona may face as renewable energy production grows.

“The State has previously looked into forms of utility deregulation…(and) could review forms of deregulation that may set up a better environment for future competition among energy providers ultimately providing lower cost electricity to all Arizonans and providing greater choices to the consumer,” Rich adds.

Balancing environmental protections with economic impacts

“Implementing more protective environmental regulations must be balanced with their economic impacts,” says Matt Bingham, attorney at Lewis and Roca.

Sometimes, small improvements that can be made come at a significant cost and may not be worthwhile for the state to pursue.

“(Government) agencies have accomplished A LOT since environmental laws were first enacted,” says Bingham, “but at some point, the costs of making further improvement are going to outweigh the benefits.  Agencies need to adequately consider industry’s concerns when developing stricter environmental standards to ensure that the benefits outweigh the costs.  Failing to do so will prolong Arizona’s economic recovery.”

Growth of renewable energy

“In Arizona, regulated utilities are expected to get 15 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2025 (in 2011, the goal is 3 percent),” says Bingham, attorney at Lewis and Roca. “This will require a massive expansion of our renewable energy capabilities over the next 10-15 years.”

As Arizona tries to catch up on renewable energy growth compared with some of its sustainability-driven neighboring states, many environmental impacts will need to be addressed. These include land use, water use, and effects on wildlife, endangered species and several others.

“The growth of renewable energy in the state also involves policy choices by the legislature and the Arizona Corporation Commission,” says Bingham.

Some examples:
➢    Requiring utilities to procure renewable energy.
➢    Increasing demand for solar by providing incentives.
➢    Providing tax incentives for companies who locate manufacturing and other facilities in the state and create jobs.

Arizona has essentially decided that it wants to be a hub of the growing solar industry and has made some good moves in that direction but it needs to continue pursuing an effective, comprehensively designed strategy while assuring companies that this support will not fade,” Bingham adds.

Enforcement of regulatory policies:

Since 61 percent of land in Arizona is either managed or controlled by federal agencies, many policies involving land use have a disproportionate impact upon our state, says Jeff Littell, principal geologist at Brown & Caldwell.

“By far, the greatest environmental issues facing Arizona will arise from federal agencies and their imbalanced enforcement of existing regulatory policies or the increased promulgation of new rules and regulations,” Littell says.

The state should apply balanced and measured responses to difficult environmental issues while empowering state agencies and the Legislature to defend Arizona against misapplied federal actions, Littell adds. “The results of their interaction with county and state agencies will have a profound impact on the long term success of Arizona, the diversity of our economy, and our ability to emerge from the current economic situation.”

For more information about environmental legal issues and other environmental issues, visit www.valleyforward.org.

 

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

Valley Partnership, AZRE May/June 2011

Valley Partnership: Carlyn Oberholtzer

As zoning lawyer with Rose Law Group, Carolyn Oberholtzer meets regularly with municipal employees and elected officials, as well as real estate developers, landowners and clients. As a member of Valley Partnership for the past seven years, she says she believes the organization has benefited her career through its positive connection to different real estate professionals.

“(Valley Partnership) is meaningful not just because of who you associate with, but how you associate with them,” Oberholtzer says. “It really brings the parties of the industry together, who are often working opposite one another, toward a common goal.

“Through those relationships, you are able to accomplish things that really benefit the industry at large from an advocacy standpoint.”

Valley Partnership Friday Morning Breakfast’s

One of Oberholtzer’s favorite aspects of Valley Partnership is its monthly Friday Morning Breakfasts. The breakfast speakers cover specific topics as they pertain to the commercial real estate industry.

A recent Friday Morning Breakfast dealing with economic development in Arizona was especially memorable for Oberholtzer.

“That was a great one because it really helped to frame the issues for what will make our state successful from an economic development perspective,” says Oberholtzer, who is a member of Valley Partnership’s City/County Committee, and the State Legislation and Federal Affairs Committee. Last year she was a member of the Events Committee.

“Our organization is made up of people who develop,” she says. “It’s critical that we know what the market will need so that our developer clients can provide for that demand.”

Despite the recent economic upheaval, Oberholtzer has stayed positive about the future of the real estate industry.

“Where there’s a will, there’s a way,” she says, “and this industry has a lot of will.”


PTK Top Industry Leaders 2010

People To Know’s Top Industry Leaders Of The Year Announced

AZRE: Arizona Commercial Real Estate Magazine’s latest edition of Top People to Know (PTK) in Commercial Real Estate has just been published, and last night the winners of the PTK Top Industry Leaders were announced at a special event.

PTK showcases the most influential people working in commercial real estate in Arizona in the categories of developers and investors, brokers, architects and engineers, general contractors, sub-contractors, financiers and accountants, attorneys, city planners, property managers, and economic developers.

A committee of CRE professionals and the editorial staff of AZRE picked the people profiled in the 2010-2011 edition of PTK. Of those selected to be in the publication, the committee chose one person in each category as a Top Industry Leader.

A full profile on each of the Top Industry Leaders will be published in the January/February edition of AZRE.

Developers &Investors  Mike Ebert Managing Partner, Development RED DevelopmentDevelopers &Investors

Mike Ebert
Managing Partner, Development
RED Development



Brokers  Mike Haenel Executive Vice President Cassidy Turley | BRE CommercialBrokers

Mike Haenel
Executive Vice President
Cassidy Turley | BRE Commercial



Architects & Engineers  John F. Kane, AIA Partner ArchitektonArchitects & Engineers

John F. Kane, AIA
Partner
Architekton


General Contractors  Bryan Dunn, LEED AP Senior Vice President Adolfson & Peterson ConstructionGeneral Contractors

Bryan Dunn, LEED AP
Senior Vice President
Adolfson & Peterson Construction


Sub-Contractors  Tim Drexler President & CEO Ace Asphalt of ArizonaSub-Contractors

Tim Drexler
President & CEO
Ace Asphalt of Arizona


Financiers & Accountants  Mark Winkleman Chief Operating Officer ML ManagerFinanciers & Accountants

Mark Winkleman
Chief Operating Officer
ML Manager


Attorneys  Jordan Rich Rose Founder & President Rose Law Group pcAttorneys

Jordan Rich Rose
Founder & President
Rose Law Group pc


City Planners  Chris Anaradian Community Development Director City of TempeCity Planners

Chris Anaradian
Community Development Director
City of Tempe


Property Managers  Afton Trail Managing Director CB Richard EllisProperty Managers

Afton Trail
Managing Director
CB Richard Ellis


Economic Developers  Barry Broome President & CEO Greater Phoenix Economic CouncilEconomic Developers

Barry Broome
President & CEO
Greater Phoenix Economic Council

hr_director_sm_biz

2009 Small Business HR Director Of The Year Finalists


Jerrie MartinezName: Jerrie Martinez-Palombo, M. Ed., SPHR
Title: Human Resource Manager
Company: Jaburg & Wilk P.C.

Years with company: 2
Years in current position: 2
Company established: 1984
Employees in AZ: 70
Employees in HR department: 2
www.jaburgwilk.com

Jaburg & Wilk P.C., has a significant investment in its employees. That’s why the law firm places a strong emphasis on mentoring and other techniques to help employees integrate into the company and remain on the job.

Human Resource Manager Jerrie Martinez is involved in the firm’s mentoring and law clerk programs, which are designed to help attorneys develop specific skills and enhance their work experience. Each new attorney hired at Jaburg & Wilk is placed in mentoring. Each mentoring pair works toward at least three goals, one of which is a balance between work and personal life. Mentors also help younger attorneys attain partnerships.

For support staff, Martinez established what the firm calls a “guide team” that was patterned after the formal attorney mentoring program. The team helps integrate new staff into the organization, provides a variety of resources and offers informal mentoring. In addition, Martinez was instrumental in establishing a customized, on-demand training program to help support staff with their professional development.

Jaburg & Wilk also believes in offering unusual activities so employees can have fun. Martinez spearheads Speed Chatting, which is much like speed dating. Employees spend five minutes getting to know each other before they move on to the next person. Last January, employees rode the light rail system to Downtown Tempe, where they participated in a scavenger hunt. Employees also pay $5 for the privilege of wearing jeans to work, and the employee of the month selects his or her favorite charity to receive the money. The firm matches the contribution.



Hopi SlaughterName: Hopi Slaughter
Title: Human Resources and Legal Assistant
Company: Rose Law Group pc

Years with company: 3
Years in current position: 3
Company established: 2005
Employees in AZ: 25
Employees in HR department: 1
www.roselawgroup.com

As Rose Law Group pc goes about its business of providing legal services, there is a concerted effort unfolding behind the scenes to make the Scottsdale firm a great place to work.

The company focuses on identifying internal problems before they mushroom into issues that might prompt employees to seek jobs elsewhere. Hopi Slaughter, human resources and legal assistant, is charged with making that happen. She is known for her open-door policy; any employee can talk to her about any topic. Also, partners who notice employee conflicts alert Slaughter and she intervenes.

Rose Law Group is committed to being a true family and Slaughter helps with numerous efforts that are undertaken to make that a reality. Celebrations out of the office are common when an attorney wins a large case or someone fulfills a major company goal. Awards are given for hours billed and bonuses are handed out for positive reviews.

Weekly newsletters and updates recognize employee accomplishments and hard work. Those successes also are discussed at weekly team meetings. Monthly get-togethers are held for team-building exercises and simply to have some down time. At monthly brown-bag lunches, an employee gives a presentation on a topic so that, over time, employees have a better understanding of what the law firm does as a business and the areas in which it specializes.

Employees also receive tuition reimbursement for approved classes, along with a flexible work schedule so they can attend the classes. They are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars on any topic, as well.