Tag Archives: safety

phoenix

Report: Arizona is 7th Least Safest State

With June being National Safety Month,the personal finance social media network WalletHub decided to follow up on its analysis of 2014’s Best & Worst Cities for Families with an in-depth look at the Safest States to Live In.

WalletHub compared each of the 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia based on 26 key metrics. The data is broken down into categories that include workplace safety, emergency preparedness, home and community stability, traffic safety and, of course, financial security. By doing so, families and individuals can easily factor safety among their considerations when comparing prospective locations to lay down roots. Below is a brief overview of WalletHub’s findings.

Safety Conditions in Arizona:

35th – Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter per Capita
38th – Fatalities per 100 Million Vehicle Miles of Travel
41st – Employer Health Insurance Coverage Rates
35th – Public Hospital Rankings
23rd – Sex Offenders Per Capita
31st – Assault per Capita
37th – Percentage of Population Without Health Insurance Coverage
37th – Percentage of People Who Spend More Than They Make
50th – Annual Consumer Savings Account Averages
17th – Number of Climate Disasters (over 1 billion in damage)

For the full report, visit http://wallethub.com/edu/2014s-safest-states-to-live-in/4566/.

Safety First

Safety First: The Cost of Slip-and-Fall Accidents Infographic

Did you know that 95 million work days per year are lost due to slip-and-fall injuries?

Accidents involving slips and falls are the leading cause of workers’ compensation claims, costing an average of $20,000 per accident and sending 9 million people to the hospital every year.

A few facts:

  • 55%: Wet walking surface is the top cause of falls at 55%
  • 38 days: Average time lost to a fall accident
  • Top occupations for days missed due to occupational injury: Police officer, Janitor, Nurse, etc.

Find out more on what you as a business owner can do to protect your business and your employees in our latest infographic (created for BOLT by Infographic World) and learn about the costs of not being protected.

The Cost of Slip-and-Fall Accidents Infographic
Via: BOLT Insurance

Palo Verde Photo 5

Palo Verde Power Plant recognized for safety

The Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health (ADOSH) Consultation Department recently acknowledged the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station as a “STAR Site” through the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP).  Companies who are awarded the STAR designation demonstrate exemplary and comprehensive, safety and health management systems.

VPP is the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) highest program of recognition across all United States OSHA organizations. It recognizes employers and workers in private and federal workplaces who have exemplified effective safety and health management systems to achieve injury and illness rates more than 50 percent below the national average.

“We thoroughly inspected Palo Verde and found the most rigorous of safety standards were being upheld,” said Jessie Atencio, assistant director and consultation and training program manager for ADOSH. “Their team should certainly be proud of the strides they have made in order to ensure a safe working environment.”

ADOSH representatives conducted the audit of Palo Verde’s safety practices at the 4,250-acre plant site, located 55 miles west of downtown Phoenix. Palo Verde was presented with a STAR Status flag that was raised ceremoniously.

To qualify, employers must submit an application to OSHA and undergo an onsite evaluation by a team of safety and health professionals. VPP participants and sites earning the “STAR Site” designation are re-evaluated every three to five years in order to remain in the programs. VPP participants are exempt from OSHA programmed inspections while they maintain their VPP status.

head.injury

TGen and Riddell Announce Partnership

Head protection plays a vital role in the health and safety of any athlete participating in helmeted sports.  In a move that could help revolutionize football player safety, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), and Easton-Bell Sports through its Riddell brand, announced today it would work together on a study designed to advance athlete concussion detection and treatment.  Information gathered through the study will also be used to develop new football headgear and further refine updates to player monitoring technology.

“TGen welcomes this remarkable opportunity to join Riddell in a major research study with the goal of helping to objectively monitor a player on the field (with microelectronics combined with nucleic acid sequencing),” said Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director. “TGen’s work over the past several years in the area of head trauma is accelerating new insights to the critical study of concussion injury.”

The genesis of this potentially groundbreaking study is to merge a player’s genetic information with real-time microelectronic information captured by Riddell’s Sideline Response System (SRS). A highly sophisticated, data-intensive system, Riddell SRS provides researchers, athletic staff and players with a wide range of valuable information on the number and severity of head impacts a player receives during games and practices.  Employed since 2003 by several well-respected research institutions, Riddell SRS has captured 1.8 million impacts from youth to elite football competition, and its data has led to impactful changes to rules, how the game is played and coached, and has informed new helmet designs.

“As the industry leader in football head protection, Riddell has the unique opportunity to advance TGen’s groundbreaking medical research into the brain as we work together towards identifying a way to accurately and quickly diagnose concussions in football players,” said Dan Arment, President of Riddell. “With Riddell’s commitment to player protection and history of innovation, we are hopeful that our collaboration with TGen will help us better protect athletes and lead us to meaningful advancements in helmet technology that move the game of football forward.”

A key question the study seeks to answer is: are the effects of sub-concussive hits identifiable through blood-based molecular information? “Based on our current information, we believe this study will have the unique ability to provide a molecular ‘risk’ and ‘recovery’ score, enabling physicians to better identify when a player might be expected to recover from the effects of the concussion and get back on the field,” said Dr. Kendall Van Keuren-Jensen, TGen Assistant Professor, whose technique for studying molecular information at a micro level will drive the research.

While the joint study will begin with football, the Riddell-TGen partnership has the potential to improve sports equipment manufactured by brands in the broader Easton-Bell Sports portfolio, including headgear for hockey, baseball, cycling, snowsports, and powersports. “As the awareness of head injury grows across all sports, supporting science like this will help us offer a more protective helmet solution to the athlete,” said Arment.

Local Institutes and Advocate to Join Study

As part of the study, TGen will work with the Barrow Neurological Institute whose B.R.A.I.N.S. (Barrow Resource for Acquired Injury to the Nervous System) program treats patients who have sustained a traumatic brain or spinal cord injury.

“Combining our neurological expertise and the information from our B.R.A.I.N.S. program, with TGen’s genomic knowledge and Riddell’s helmet technology, will provide great insight into how we measure concussions and how they affect the human brain,” said Dr. Javier Cárdenas, a neurologist and brain injury expert with Barrow Neurological Institute. “The genomic data could aid in the treatment process and will greatly add to the growing body of knowledge we’re acquiring about head injury patients.”

Joining Barrow will be athletic trainers from A.T. Still University and SAFE Football, which teaches alternative game-play techniques that reduce the number of head impacts while increasing competitiveness.

“Our partnerships with Barrow Neurological Institute, A.T. Still University, and Safe Football provide a multifaceted approach to identifying athletes in need of medical attention, to educating athletes on concussion and brain injury, to reducing the risk of injury through development of better techniques, and to improving treatment outcomes,” said Dr. Matt Huentelman, TGen Associate Professor and a co-investigator on the study.

BORDER GOVERNORS

Brewer signs photo radar bill

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer has signed a bill requiring state transportation officials to confirm there’s a legitimate safety need before they allow cities to put photo enforcement cameras on state highways.

A Senate amendment to House Bill 2477 passed by the Legislature softened a requirement that cities show photo enforcement has improved safety if they want to renew their state permits every three years. The bill Brewer signed into law Wednesday allows non-renewal only if it can’t be shown the cameras are maintaining a “positive impact” on public safety.

Eight cities and towns now use photo radar on stretches of state highways, and Casa Grande and Sierra Vista are working with the Arizona Department of Transportation to add them.