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Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: The Importance Of Team Dynamics

One rarely-recognized aspect of a small business that has a huge impact on the success of that business is team building. Knowing more about how teams function and what can be done to strengthen the team was the topic in this week’s Small Business Leadership Academy, led by Ruth Barratt, clinical assistant professor of management at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

“One of the elements of building a high-performance team is spending the time outside of work on another project or social activity,” comments Barratt. While budgets have been cut for many company-funded outside activities, there are ways to get creative and still accomplish this important task. One of this year’s attendees spoke about how her and her co-workers volunteer at a food bank. “It didn’t really cost the company any money, but the employees are already very excited to do it again,” Barratt says.

Any team, regardless of its size, goes through the same five stages: forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning. With each stage, there are certain emotions that team members will feel while they “find their place.”

  • Forming: Excitement, anticipation, anxiety, optimism
  • Storming: Reality sets in, frustration, dissatisfaction, adjustment anxiety
  • Norming: Shared goals, team cohesion, coping, acceptance
  • Performing: Teamwork, cohesiveness, leadership, performance
  • Adjourning: Separation anxiety, crisis, dissatisfaction, negativity

“Once you reach the performing stage, there is still a requirement to keep nurturing the idea of goals and keep everyone on the same path,” Barratt says. “When something goes well, celebrate that fact. When something goes wrong, have confidence in the team to sit down and follow up on it.”

Nurturing the team as a whole will result in a more productive and ultimately more successful team. Next week, attendees will discuss brainstorming and how to help employees to reach their full potential.


Listen to the Podcast:
The Importance of Team Dynamics


The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

 

Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: The Harvard Negotiation Project

The Harvard Negotiation Project has developed an effective and widely-used negotiating method that changes the game and often yields better results than old-style hard ball. Instead of focusing on winning the day for your position, the Harvard method enables you to operate on a deeper level where your true interests — and the interests of your customer/supplier — reside.

Alan Goldman, a management professor of practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business, is teaching the Harvard method in the negotiations class at the 2012 Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA). SBLA is presented by W. P. Carey School’s Center for Executive and Professional Development. Goldman is a disciple of the Harvard Negotiation Project and has taught university classes and coached corporate leaders on the method for years. This week, the small business owners in the SBLA class practiced some of what they have learned by role playing actual negotiating scenarios.

The exercise gave students an opportunity to try out one of the key components of the Harvard method: discovering options. This is the opposite of driving toward a position — the hallmark of old-school negotiating.

“Look at the bits and pieces; ask ‘what if this’ and ‘what if that,’ ” Goldman said. “This can be scary because it feels like you could lose control.” But at the end, exploring options can uncover a solution or deal that addresses the real, underlying interests of both sides.

The main principles of the Harvard Negotiation Project* include the following:

  • Separate the people from the problem (go easy on the people, hard on the facts)
  • Focus on interests, not positions
  • Invent multiple options looking for mutual gains before deciding what to do
  • Insist that the result be based on some objective standard

The next class in the Small Business Leadership Academy is “Building High Performance Teams,” taught by Ruth Barratt, clinical assistant professor of management at the W. P. Carey School.

*From “Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In,” Penguin Books

The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: Match Your Negotiating Style To Your Objective

“Playing hardball” is a phrase often used to describe negotiations. The point is the deal — there’s a winner and a loser — and the toughest side prevails.

Hardball is a good game plan under some circumstances — if it’s a one-time opportunity, for example. But what if the client or customer with whom you are negotiating has potential to bring you business long-term? In that situation, driving hard might not be your best approach.

Alan Goldman, a management professor of practice at the W. P. Carey School of Business, is teaching the negotiations classes in the 2012 Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) presented by W. P. Carey’s Center for Executive and Professional Development. Drawing lessons from the Harvard Negotiation Project, Goldman is helping students realize a more sophisticated approach to negotiating that goes beyond winner-take-all.

Key to the Harvard system is the theory that there are two broad approaches to negotiating: Theory X and Theory Y.

Theory X negotiators are the hardball players. The process is adversarial and focused on the deal and the bottom line. A Theory X negotiator dominates by wielding power, exploiting weakness and elevating the rational over emotions.

Theory Y negotiators seek to build fruitful relationships. For them, the objective is agreement, so they work on establishing trust. They open with small talk. They’re empathetic, flexible and willing to yield for mutual benefit.

Each style has its place, says Goldman. If the objective is a one-time transaction, then driving Theory X-style for the best deal obtainable, no matter how hard-nosed you have to be, may be the best approach.

But sometimes the greater advantage — and profit — accrues across numbers of transactions. In that case you’d be doing yourself a favor to employ the tactics of a Theory Y negotiator.

Assigned reading in Goldman’s class is one of the classics of negotiating training, the bestselling “Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In.” Its lessons are valuable in your personal life as well as business.


Listen to the Podcast:
Match Your Negotiating Style To Your Objective


The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Strategic Procurement: Developing Supply Strategy

“Knowledge is power,” says Joseph Carter, the Avnet Professor of Supply Chain Management at the W. P. Carey School of Business, and leader of the Strategic Procurement section of the 2012 Small Business Leadership Academy.

For a small company looking to bring on a large company as a client, or keep a large company as a client, cost can be the main component of the relationship. “Price is only one part of the total cost,” Carter remarks. “The four general types of supply costs include purchase price, transaction costs, administrative costs and production costs. “

The large company will first define its category, putting information together, including the strategy for that category. Strategy can include searching out the lowest cost, the quickest response time or the least amount of risk, which relates to the external market complexity. This information should be available at the drop of a hat for the company.

One place the large company will try to squeeze their suppliers is by negotiating a lower purchase price. The purchase price is always important, but it isn’t as simple as just one number. The purchase price includes four distinct factors: profit, semi-variable costs, variable costs and fixed costs.

The large company knows that a very small percentage of its suppliers garner the majority of the purchase dollars. Purchases should be grouped into imperative categories with the understanding that 80 percent of dollars spent will be on 20 percent of the categories.

What does this all mean to the small business owner? Once they understand where they stand as a supplier, they can better understand the bidding processes that they must go through, as well as the pressures they will face. For the small business owner, knowledge is power.


Listen to the podcast.


The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about strategic procurement and/or the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: Understanding Strategic Procurement Practices

Strategic Procurement is a comprehensive, systematic business process to assure that an organization acquires the correct goods and services at the lowest total cost over the long-term of the business operation.

Small- and medium-sized companies can benefit from understanding how large companies approach their suppliers. Those smaller companies need to understand and be able to succinctly describe their value proposition in order to keep the business they have and win new business. In light of the continual push for the large company to lower their own costs, smaller companies may need to get creative to find ways to stay competitive.

“Today, the creation of value often requires careful coordination of activities across the boundaries between functions, business units and firms,” says Joseph Carter, the Avnet Professor of Supply Chain Management at the W. P. Carey School of Business, and leader of the Strategic Procurement section of the 2012 Small Business Leadership Academy.

Suppliers can get stuck concentrating on the day-to-day operations of their companies, ignoring or avoiding the important work of optimizing their existing relationships. It’s while nurturing those relationships that suppliers can discover ways to increase their value to the customer.

This means that just having the lowest price doesn’t always guarantee a contract. A lower price combined with a longer repayment period, plus a quicker fulfillment schedule, could push one company ahead of another. Determining what their value proposition is can be one of the most challenging parts of an RFP process for a small business owner.

Conversely, the large company has decisions to make as well. How many suppliers should they have for any one part? “Rationalize, rationalize, rationalize,” says Carter. “Rationalization doesn’t necessarily mean ‘fewer’; it just means being able to explain why you have the number of suppliers that you have, whether that ends up being more or less than what you have now.”

The supplier/client relationship is ever-evolving. Both parties are looking to lower costs and maximize profits while maintaining a strong and synergistic business relationship.


Listen to the podcast.


The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: Handling Dissatisfied Customers

If you are in business, you’ve had unhappy customers. No matter how excellent your services or products, at some point someone will have issues. Customers often experience buyer’s remorse — it’s a simple fact. And because nothing is perfect, even the best businesses make mistakes. So, how can business owners handle the inevitable?

Douglas Olsen, associate professor of marketing, says businesses often “abandon the customer after the sale” — that is, they don’t follow up. And because only four percent of dissatisfied customers speak up, chances are there are folks out there who interacted with your company and don’t feel warm and fuzzy about it.

Olsen, who is teaching the marketing class in the W. P. Carey School’s Small Business Leadership Academy, says there are practical steps that any company can take to respond to customers who are unhappy with their experiences. Research — much of it pioneered at the Center for Services Leadership at W. P. Carey — shows that dissatisfied customers can be turned into loyalists if the service breakdown is addressed wisely.

For starters, Olsen recommends developing a system for keeping in touch with customers. This can be as simple as a phone call or email. Second, make sure customers you’re your policy on dispute resolution, and where and how to complain.

Here are a few things to remember when the news isn’t good — and handling dissatisfied customers:

  • Other stresses in your customer’s life are probably affecting his feelings about your business.
  • Listen actively: What are their thoughts? What’s their rationale? Focus on solutions.
  • Step outside yourself and don’t make assumptions; try to see the situation through your customer’s eyes. Be empathetic. Show your customer that he/she has your full attention.
  • Restate the problem so that you can be sure you have understood correctly.
  • Make sure your customer knows what the next step is, and when he/she will hear from you again.

Training may be needed to assure that your employees know how to handle an unhappy, sometimes angry, customer. They should have some flexibility to offer resolution, and they should know who is responsible for implementation. Olsen says there is rarely a reason to be defensive — a stance that only aggravates the situation.

A customer who lets you know that something is amiss gives you the opportunity to improve your business — and ultimately increase the number of happy loyal customers.
Looked it that way, Olsen says, a complaint is a gift!


Listen to the podcast: “Why Complaints are Good for Business”


The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

2012 Small Business Leadership Academy: A Fresh Look At Marketing

Management guru Peter Drucker said, “the aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him and sells itself.” Business owners in the 2012 Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) are taking a fresh look at marketing with guidance from Douglas Olsen, associate professor of marketing at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

The basis of marketing, he explained, is the knowledge of what customers want, need and will pay for. But many companies, Olsen added, start with a great idea and then expect the customers to find it. The problem is that many of the entrepreneurs never bothered to think about whether anyone needs their big idea. A product can be the best gizmo ever built, but if it doesn’t fulfill a customer’s desires or needs, it won’t succeed. In other cases, even if the product or service is great, the people so close to the product sometimes tend to talk too much about the features and the technical details — to a point where they do not truly convey to the customer the real benefits or identify needs being served.

Nonetheless, many successful companies have this figured out, Olsen said. Michelin famously used images of babies sitting in the middle of a tire as a way of saying that they were selling you safety for your family — not just a tire. Not a lot of jargon, just one very compelling message.

The Michelin ad demonstrates the effective use of segmentation. Once you understand your customers, Olsen said, you can use segmentation to target your marketing to them. Segmentation is the process of dividing the market into groups. Consumers may be grouped based on geography,  demographics, benefits, behaviors or psychographics.

Psychographics, for example, are personality characteristics. Olsen showed the group three ads for a certain style of watch. One featured a close-up of a physically imposing man. The second showed a man sitting alone, reading. The third was Pierce Bronson, leaning toward the camera in an impeccable jacket and tie. The ads exemplify psychographic marketing. The first ad with the macho figure appeals to a market segment of men who want to be physically strong; the second ad would appeal to the “self actualizer”; Pierce Bronson personifies the sophistication and daring that another group desires.

In next week’s class we’ll dive deeper into the competitive advantage that services may provide and students will share some of the blueprints that they developed to apply to their business.


Listen to the podcast on W.P. Carey’s website.


The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U.S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Ria Robles: Small Business Leadership Academy Past Participant

Ria Robles discusses how her participation in the Small Business Leadership Academy has benefited her and her business, B2B Delivery, LLC.


Small Business Leadership Academy Past Participant:

Ria Robles, B2B Delivery, LLCRia Robles
B2B Delivery, LLC

Tell us about your business: B2B Delivery specializes in same day, business-to-business deliveries throughout the state of Arizona and Las Vegas, NV. We provide expedited local deliveries, including time critical, hot shots, scheduled route work, mail runs, next-day deliveries, and less than truckload shipments.

Year of participation in SBLA: 2011

What was the most important thing you learned from SBLA? The most important thing I learned is that you should never stop learning!  It was invigorating to get back into the classroom and stimulate my brain again in a way I haven’t done since attending ASU in 1993.

How have you changed the way you do business based on what you learned during SBLA? It was great to learn from all of the other business owners in the class and get their views and opinions on different issues. I am much more open now as a result of the SBLA program and much more likely to seek others opinions and advice before making final decisions.

How has the SBLA alumni community been helpful to you since you went through the program? I still have occasional communication with some of my classmates. We have been able to network and do some business together.

What aspects of SBLA do you consider most valuable for other small business owners in Phoenix? The different topics of each session are truly relevant to us as business owners. The issues discussed are in direct correlation to what we are experiencing in our day-to-day lives running a business. To me, having information that is useful is the most valuable type!

For more information about the program, including admission requirements, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Brandon Taylor: Small Business Leadership Academy Past Participant

Brandon Taylor discusses how his participation in the Small Business Leadership Academy has benefited him and his business, CPR Savers & First Aid Supply LLC.


Small Business Leadership Academy Past Participant:

Brandon Taylor, CPR Savers & First Aid Supply LLCBrandon Taylor
CPR Savers & First Aid Supply LLC

Tell us about your business: CPR Savers & First Aid Supply is a distributor/manufacturer of CPR, first aid, AED, survival and medical equipment. We offer nationwide CPR/AED/first-aid training to corporate clients. We provide disaster preparedness supplies to government agencies.

Year of participation in SBLA: 2011

What was the most important thing you learned from SBLA? The need to work on my business to grow it instead of spending all my time on the day-to-day operations just to keep my business going.

How have you changed the way you do business based on what you learned during SBLA? To some degree, yes. It is difficult to allocate the time necessary to work on my business, but I have implemented many of the ideas learned in the SBLA classes.

How has the SBLA alumni community been helpful to you since you went through the program? To some degree, we have been in contact with a few of our peers and have met occasionally. I need to find the time to participate in some of the activities that have been provided by the SBLA.

What aspects of SBLA do you consider most valuable for other small business owners in Phoenix? The information provided is very helpful for business owners to learn how to grow their business to the next level. It will help you generate new ideas and encourage you to learn more about the subjects that interest you most. One surprising benefit of the SBLA entrepreneurship class is to participate with like-minded peers who are in the same position and want to help one another and share their knowledge.

The next Small Business Leadership Academyprogram will begin Wednesday, August 29, 2012.

For more information about the program, including admission requirements, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Rebecca Koury: Small Business Leadership Academy Past Participant

Rebecca Koury discusses how her participation in the Small Business Leadership Academy has benefited her and her business, Prudential Cleanroom Services.


Small Business Leadership Academy Past Participant:

Rebecca Koury
Prudential Cleanroom Services

Tell us about your business: We are a cleanroom laundry providing uniforms for controlled environments.

Year of participation in SBLA: 2011

What was the most important thing you learned from SBLA? There is so much that I learned. People: How to apply autonomy in relationships and how to empower people. Marketing: How to identify your product to sell. Negotiations: Building good relationships with vendors and how to get the best fair price. Strategy: How to organize your business and processes step-by-step to understand strengths and weaknesses.

How have you changed the way you do business based on what you learned during SBLA? I’m more focused and motivated when I use the tools I learned.

How has the SBLA alumni community been helpful to you since you went through the program? I learned so much in a peer setting. I realized I was not on a island by myself. Although our businesses are different, we face many of the same challenges. We were able to brainstorm together and to help each other with ideas and solutions. Really a compliment to the program.

What aspects of SBLA do you consider most valuable for other small business owners in Phoenix? I like the support the small businesses are being given through this program. It helps small businesses to re-evaluate and look at how to become better at what we do. It allows us the opportunity to grow in the community and to create jobs locally.

The next Small Business Leadership Academy program will begin Wednesday, August 29, 2012.

For more information about the program, including admission requirements, please visit SBLA’s website.

Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: Building High Performance Teams (Part II)

Small Business Leadership Academy: Building High Performance Teams (Part II)

Ria Robles, owner of B2B Delivery LLC, was spending the lion’s share of a couple days a week checking and re-checking the complex bills she sends to customers. She reached a point where she asked herself, “Why am I doing accounting?” So, Robles turned the job over to her accountant, but not until the two worked side-by-side, going through the pricing details and the way she scoured the invoices for mistakes.

The story is an important lesson about delegation, explained W. P. Carey clinical assistant professor Ruth Barratt, who taught two classes on how to build high performance teams in the Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) where Robles is a student.

SBLA, taught by W. P. Carey School of Business faculty, is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona.

If you want to build highly effective teams, you must know how to delegate tasks, according to Barratt.

Here are some concepts and pointers from last night’s class:

  • Think carefully about the task and who might shoulder it. Provide lots of background: paint a picture of a successful outcome if you can. Identify the key points of the project.
  • Encourage employees to give you regular progress reports. These are the junctures where the business owner or manager can provide feedback.
  • Be prepared to accept the fact that someone else probably will not do the job exactly the way you would. If you nitpick your employees will be reluctant to do the task again.

 

Robles followed the steps when she delegated the billing. Last night, she reported that the accountant does an even better job than she did, and it’s clear that the accountant enjoys ferreting out errors and saving the company money.

Alex Zuran, owner of Phoenix National Laboratories, Inc. described himself as “the guy who does it right.” A self-admitted perfectionist, Zuran performed many of the tasks at his company personally in the past; not any longer.

“Instead of being the guy who does it right, I’m the one who makes sure it’s done right,” he said. His employees can’t always perform the work as fast as he does, and that does affect profitability, but Zuran says employees do master the tasks, and “it’s pretty cool when it happens.”

Zuran said that delegating has “totally changed his role” at the firm, freeing him to build the business. Robles, smiling, said, “I got my Tuesdays and Wednesdays back!”

Last night’s class was the final session in the 10-week course of study. Students came to the W. P. Carey School every Wednesday for four hours of instruction. Next week they graduate.

Keep an eye on the Small Business Leadership Academy’s website for information on next year’s program.

[stextbox id=”info”]The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U. S. Bank. Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students. For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.[/stextbox]

 

Small Business Leadership Academy

Small Business Leadership Academy: Understanding Corp Procurement Practices (Part I)

Small Business Leadership Academy: Understanding Corporate Procurement Practices (Part I)

If you are the owner of a small or medium-size business interacting with a big corporation, you need to know how that company thinks about procurement. That’s what students in the 2011 Small Business Leadership Academy are learning from Joseph Carter, the Avnet Professor of Supply Chain Management at the W. P. Carey School of Business.

Typically, suppliers concentrate on the internal operations of their companies, Carter says, but if that’s their predominant focus, they will miss out on the advantages of optimizing their relationships with the companies that are their customers. Jeffrey Campbell of Western Truck Equipment Company, Inc. had the right idea when he asked, “What can I learn to better service the companies that we work with?”

“Today, the creation of value often requires careful coordination of activities across the boundaries between functions, business units and firms,” Carter explains. “In short, organizations that learn how to leverage procurement collaboration can obtain speed, innovation, dependability, flexibility, cost and/or quality benefits that go far beyond those potentially realized from solely optimizing a single firm’s internal operations.”

Carter is one of the top scholars worldwide in the field of supply management. He has published 60 articles about sourcing and supply management issues, and he has shared his expertise with firms all over the world.

Students are learning to understand strategic sourcing and their role as suppliers. To begin, they need to understand the importance of developing a collaborative relationship with a customer and how to manage it efficiently. Carter is taking the students “inside” their client companies by explaining the various roles and functions of a procurement department.

“Business owners need to understand the primary importance of sourcing when developing their strategy,” Carter says. “We’ll be talking about what they need to know in order to drive success for the buyer’s company as well as their own.”

Each week we will bring you a few salient points from each class as well as comments from the professors themselves and the impact the information has had on the students.

For more information about the Small Business Leadership Academy, please visit SBLA’s website.

[stextbox id=”grey”]The Small Business Leadership Academy (SBLA) is an intensive executive education program designed to strengthen the business acumen of small business leaders in Arizona. The program was jointly developed by the W. P. Carey School of Business and the Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding sponsor. Other seat sponsors this year include: Arizona Lottery, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, Hahnco and U. S. Bank. [/stextbox]