Tag Archives: scottsdale airpark

ElementAtKierland, WEB

SheKnows leases 20KSF at Element at Kierland

CBRE has completed a 20,000-square-foot office lease at Element at Kierland located at 14614 N. Kierland Blvd. in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Luke Walker, Dave Carder and Eric Schultz with CBRE’s Phoenix office represented the landlord, Montana Avenue Capital Partners, LLC (MAC) of Santa Monica, Calif. The tenant, Scottsdale-based SheKnows, was represented by Clint Hardison with Keyser.

MAC has made significant investments to the property over the past several months with $1.3 million invested in upgrading the common areas and enclosing the breezeway, creating a new common lobby area at the main building entrance. The way office tenants are utilizing space is changing, and property owners like MAC recognize that,” said CBRE’s Walker. “The activity we’ve seen so far and the lease with SheKnows have reinforced the fact that Element at Kierland, and the type of space offered therein, will meet the demand for creative, modern, flexible workspace and offer the “lifestyle” type of work environments users want.”

The space at Element at Kierland will serve as SheKnows’ corporate headquarters. The Scottsdale-based women’s lifestyle media platform currently operates out of 16101 N 82nd Street. The move to Element at Kierland will offer the company a premier office suite with a mix of private meeting rooms and open-concept work space. The 20,000-square-foot space will also feature a custom studio space for the website’s many popular video series and test kitchen for a variety of cooking-related features.

Previously known as Kierland Fairways, MAC purchased Element at Kierland in February 2014 with the intent of bringing new life to the ±55,268-square-foot office building. The property, which is currently being renovated with plans to launch in November, offers high-end creative office space designed by Davis Architects with cutting edge architectural elements including polished concrete floors, LED lighting, and exposed ceilings and beams. The property will offer users spaces with a mix of open work environments and private offices, outdoor collaborative spaces and spectacular views of Kierland Golf Course. Located in the heart of Kierland and Scottsdale Airpark submarkets, the property also benefits from proximity to numerous amenities, including some of Scottsdale’s finest resorts, restaurants, golf courses, and shopping.

 

westmarc

WESTMARC Creates United Front To Boost West Valley

“You can’t just say you ‘support regionalism,’ you have to believe it.” Surprise Mayor Sharon Wolcott is talking about attitude in the West Valley.

Thirty minutes earlier in a separate conversation, Goodyear Mayor Georgia Lord made nearly the same comment. “We believe in regionalism and we put it into practice,” she says. “On this side of the Valley, it’s not just words, it’s real.”

District 5 Maricopa County Supervisor, Clint Hickman, points out the window of his 10th floor office. “They place us so when supervisors look out the window, we’re looking at our district,” he said. Gazing across West Phoenix, the dome of University of Phoenix stadium is clearly visible in front of the White Tank Mountains. “I was born and raised in the West Valley,” he continues. “As a business owner, a public servant, and West Valley native, I believe we’re stronger for working together.”

Talk to any business leader about the West Valley, and the words heard are “regionalism,” “working together” and “diversity.” Maricopa County districts 4 and 5, and 15 communities from Surprise to Gila Bend, Wickenburg to Phoenix are starting to flex economic development muscle. When the synergies are totaled, the sum is the United Cities of West Valley.

The spirit of cooperation west of Interstate 17 is a break from history. As recently as a decade ago, West Valley cities were clawing for territory, car dealers, and the next power center. Tens of thousands of families were driving to qualify for affordable homes popping up in dozens of sprawling tracts. Politically, there may as well have been walls running down city limit lines.

Then came the recession. The economic downturn had a chilling impact on the West Valley. Faced with abandoned neighborhoods, empty strip centers and vacant warehouses, municipal revenue streams dribbled to nothingness. What was the norm wasn’t working.

The change started quietly. “It all began shifting over the past three to four years,” recounts Lana Mook, mayor in El Mirage. “We, the area’s mayors and business leaders, realized we would be a lot stronger working together than working separately.”

The challenge was bringing together the region’s assets and promoting the area. The catalyst had been sitting there since 1990. The Western Maricopa Coalition (WESTMARC) was the one place where mayors, businesses and public officials connected. In 2011, the WESTMARC board appointed a former Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) senior vice president to the role of president and chief operating officer. Michelle Rider took the reins of an old organization with a new charge.

The regional development organization took on a new focus. Its board of directors and Rider decided to leave business recruitment to organizations like GPEC, Arizona Commerce Authority and individual cities’ economic development departments.

“We saw our role as creating a strong environment in which business can flourish,” she explains. “We focus on three priorities. Our efforts are to promote the West Valley, enhance economic development and increase member value. We partner with GPEC and Arizona Commerce; they have the recruitment resources. We need to ensure when a business comes knocking on our door, we’re ready.”

“Let’s say there are a lot of misunderstandings about the West Valley outside the West Valley,” muses Mayor Lord. “Many of those misunderstandings are because people’s only experience with the Valley is sitting in traffic on I-10 when returning from California. They haven’t stopped here to explore.”

“I drive to work in the morning between two of the most beautiful mountain ranges in the state,” Supervisor Hickman says. “I look at the vast expanses of open land, the many homes, the business clusters we have, and realize, there’s a lot to offer.”

Site selection consultants look at many factors before plopping a business into a market. Key among those are similar firms, transportation and workforce. The West Valley has a well-kept secret. It is home to significant diversity in the three key siting factors. The region is home to a diverse collection of business sectors.

Mayor Wolcott lists the base: “Manufacturing and logistics, healthcare, advanced business services, aerospace and renewable energy businesses are located all over the region. We have the most diverse business and population base in the state.”

There’s another asset: Maricopa County west of I-17 has vast tracts of undeveloped, single ownership land.

“We learned from the rapid development in the East Valley,” explains Mayor Lord. “The cities in the West Valley have jealously guarded industrial land, Luke Air Force Base and our transportation corridors.”

One of the region’s major corridors has a significant cheerleader. Mayor Wolcott has pressed for improvements to Grand Avenue since she first took office. “This is a multimodal corridor that’s unique to the West Valley,” she says. “No other road in the state is like this. It connects ten cities and runs from the Capitol to Wickenburg; essentially, it runs all the way to Las Vegas.”

“The West Valley has an extraordinary mix of transportation modes,” echoes Mayor Mook. “We have both (Union Pacific) and (Burlington Northern) rail roads, a collection of spurs, (Loop) 303, I-10 and some day, I-11.”

The biggest asset in the region is its workforce. “Goodyear is the sixth fastest growing city in the United States,” Mayor Lord says with pride.
The rest of the West Valley is growing rapidly. In 2010, the region was home to 39 percent of the County’s population, according to the Maricopa Association of Governments. By 2040, MAG says the share will climb to 46 percent for the region.

“Every work day you can almost feel the land tilt,” says Mayor Wolcott. “The roads are filled with our residents driving out of our region to go to work. We have a significant, well-educated workforce who’d rather work closer to home.”

More than half the Northwest Valley’s workforce commutes into Deer Valley, Central Phoenix and the Scottsdale Airpark.

“We want our residents to stay closer to home, and we’re working as a region to make that happen,” Mayor Lord is emphatic about cutting the commutes.

Manufacturing, medicine, aerospace, renewable energy and advanced business services. These are the roots of the “West muscle” promoted by WESTMARC.

Rider is passionate about all of this. “We’re bringing our members together as a powerful force to make these assets known. There’s a story to tell, and we’re getting the word out.”

Linsalata Airpark Parcel

Runway parcel in Scottsdale Airpark sells for $8.3M

Scottsdale Airpark’s largest commercial land parcel on the runway, at 9.54 acres, sells to a local investment company for $8,325,000 or $20.03 per square foot.

Mark Linsalata

Mark Linsalata

Mark Linsalata, Bill Blake and Fred Darche, principals with Lee & Associates represented the seller, Phoenix Dragon FEI, LLC of Scottsdale. Linsalata represented the buyer, Boeing V, LLC, a private investment entity in Phoenix.

The 415,562 SF parcel was the largest remaining commercial parcel will runway access for sale in the Airpark. This highly sought after parcel on the south side of the airport’s runway, holds strong investment potential for future aviation and various commercial uses.

Scottsdale Airpark is one of the state’s largest employment core’s with close to 50,000 jobs within its boundaries. The area is strategically located in North Scottsdale and is surrounded by world class shopping, entertainment, recreational and hospitality venues.

The Airpark is surrounded by easy access to top transportation corridors such as the Loop 101, Scottsdale and Hayden roads and Frank Lloyd Wright Blvd.

Chauncey Professional Center, 6930 E. Chauncey Lane, Phoenix.

CBRE negotiates $11.1M sale of 2 office buildings

ViaWest Group has sold two premier class A office buildings in the Phoenix metro area for a total consideration of $11.1 million. CBRE negotiated the sale to Melcor Development of the ±24,154-square-foot Perimeter Parkview Corporate Center at 8355 E. Hartford Drive Scottsdale, Ariz. and the ±35,066-square-foot Chauncey Professional Center located at 6930 E. Chauncey Lane, in Phoenix, for a combined ±59,220-square-foot investment. The buildings commanded sale prices of approximately $4.1 million and $7 million, respectively.

Barry Gabel and Chris Marchildon with CBRE’s Phoenix office represented the seller, ViaWest Group of Phoenix. The buyer, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada-based Melcor Developments Arizona, Inc., was represented by Tom Swan with Amcal Southwest.

ViaWest originally purchased the properties in two separate transactions. The Chauncey property was purchased in December 2006 in shell condition and ViaWest was able to lease up the property from zero percent in late 2007 to 100 percent by mid-2009 during a very difficult leasing period. This was done through building spec suites of varying sizes, creative marketing approaches and unique lease structures. The Perimeter Parkway property was bought at a trustee sale in January 2011 with a portion of the property leased and the balance in shell condition. Within one year of purchase the property was 100 percent leased.

Both Chauncey Professional Center and Perimeter Parkview are presently 90 percent leased, with one suite in each property becoming available within the last month. Those suites total 3,708 square feet and 2,486 square feet, respectively.

“These two assets are excellent properties that are of great quality and extremely well-located. Melcor should have much success with them. As a local value-add operator, we will continue to redeploy capital into our strategies that generate opportunistic-type returns,” stated Steven Schwarz of ViaWest Group.

“The North Scottsdale/Airpark area has consistently outperformed the overall Phoenix market in net absorption of office space and is one of the top job-creating economies in the U.S.,” said CBRE’s Gabel. “In addition, these properties are both surrounded by first-class amenities, high-end executive housing and the Loop 101 Freeway making them very attractive to both current and prospective tenants, and solid investments for the buyer.”

The sale marks Melcor Developments Arizona, Inc.’s entrance into the Arizona market and ViaWest has been retained to continue management of both properties keeping its management portfolio in excess of 1.5 million square feet.

Built in 2007, Perimeter Parkview Corporate Center is a two-story, class A, multi-tenant office building situated in the Scottsdale Airpark submarket. The property has a high-quality tenant roll including Arizona State University’s WP Carey Graduate MBA Program, Interior Motives, Titus Brueckner & Levine PLC, BIC Distributors and Pro Sports Management. The property is located at the base of the McDowell Mountains, in the ±260-acre Perimeter Center Business Park. The business park is adjacent to the TPC Stadium as well as numerous residential and golf communities, resort hotels and an abundance of exciting dining and retail options.

Chauncey Professional Center, which was built in 2006, is located in the North Scottsdale Corporate Center master-planned commercial development. Tenants include Aspen Systems, Troche Fertility Clinic, Marcum Media, AZ Tech Finders, Nobis Technology Group, Landmark Management Group, MiCamp Solutions, Bottle & McInerney, Cadron Financial and Pogson Asset Management. Chauncey Professional Center is surrounded by first-class amenities, including the ±580,000-square-foot Scottsdale 101 retail power center, the ±200,000-square-foot Whole Foods anchored Shops at Chauncey Ranch, the ±465,000-square-foot Chauncey Ranch Autoplex, and a ±110,000-square-foot Lifetime Fitness. The property also benefits from proximity to high-end executive housing and the Loop 101 Freeway.

Perimeter Parkview Corporate Center, 8355 E. Hartford Drive, Scottsdale, Ariz.

Perimeter Parkview Corporate Center, 8355 E. Hartford Drive, Scottsdale, Ariz.

7400 E Tierra Buena, WEB

Jewelry design firm takes 30,500 SF of flex space in Scottsdale Airpark

South Hill Design Corp., a jewelry design and marketing firm has leased 30,500 SF of flex industrial space on a 5-year term at 7400 E. Tierra Buena Ln., Scottsdale.

Mark Linsalata

Mark Linsalata

The landlord, Hewson Development Corp. and GH Scottsdale I was represented by Mark Linsalata, Principal with Lee & Associates. John Quatrini with Shell Commercial secured the tenant. The newly leased space is for their corporate offices and a fulfillment center. South Hill Design Corp. is a direct sales jewelry company where clients create their own designs was started in 2012 and has grown to a nationwide entity.

The 66,057 SF fl ex building was built in 1998 and situated in heart of the Scottsdale Airpark on 1.49 acres, a half-mile from the Loop 101. The South Hill lease brings the building to 100% occupancy.

interior

Twisted Rose Winery and Eatery Now Open in Scottsdale Airpark

The owners of Casavino Winery in Fountain Hills have taken their passion for delectable eats and fine wines to the next level. Their latest venture, Twisted Rose Winery and Eatery is now open in the Scottsdale Airpark.

“I have an ongoing love affair with remarkable food and wine,” said Twisted Rose Co-Owner Frank Yaconis. “Twisted Rose brings to life my vision for a comfortable wine bar in a relaxed atmosphere that showcases my passion.”

Twisted Rose Winery and Eatery offers Casavino’s line of wines including Cabernet, Sauvignon Blanc, Moscato, Viognier and more for sale by the bottle or glass. Many of these wines will be crafted and aged on site in Twisted Rose’s winemaking room.

“The wine making groups from Casavino and Twisted Rose are in collaboration with some of the best winemakers in the world and have formed the ultimate team to provide world class wines at very reasonable price for our customers,” said Yaconis.

Wine tasting is available daily and for special events or private parties.women restroom

Executive Chef and Co-Owner Nick Schaus brings his culinary prowess to the team after years of high-end restaurant and catering experience. His culinary point of view is “twisted” as each dish on the menu has his signature spin.

Twisted Rose’s menu features happy hour specials like stuffed mushrooms, appetizers including grilled artichokes and an antipasto platter, open-faced sandwiches like caprese or honey-lime braised chicken, salads like the mediterranean chopped, entrees including maple-glazed salmon and a selection of desserts.

The broad menu utilizes wine as a key ingredient in a variety of dishes. From pulled pork with a merlot-based BBQ sauce and stuffed apples, to fettuccine alfredo with a chardonnay cheese sauce, to Schaus’ legendary bread pudding with brandied fruit and raspberries.

“I am using Casavino’s entire suite of wines in my dishes. We want the diner to experience these wines in every facet of their meal. Wine transcends simply sipping it from the glass,” said Schaus.

The winery and eatery is open Monday- Thursday from 11:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11:00- a.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Sundays from 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Casavino wines round out the happy hour menu Monday- Saturday for $5/glass from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Additionally, Twisted Rose Winery and Eatery serves craft beer and a selection of martinis.

About Twisted Rose Winery and Eatery: Co-owned by Frank Yaconis and Executive Chef Nick Schaus, Twisted Rose Winery and Eatery pairs hand crafted wines, beers and martinis with twisted up dishes that have a wine-centric focus.

For more information visit www.twistedrosewinery.com or call 480-398-7700.

rsz_gpe_1

GPE Closes on 98,930 SF Property at Scottsdale Airpark

GPE Commercial Advisors secured the sale of a 98,930 SF, 5.1-acre property that consists of two buildings, 14988 & 15010 N. 78th Way in the Scottsdale Airpark.

Southwest Jet Corporate Center sold for $9.6M.

“The Southwest Jet Corporate Center is a very unique property,” said Tim Phillips, Associate Vice President of GPE. “There are few properties that are almost 100,000 SF that are a mix of airplane hangar and office in The Scottsdale Airpark.

“We had a tremendous amount of interest from buyers all around the country from investors to owner-users. ”

Tim Phillips of GPE Commercial Advisors represented the seller, Southwest Jet Corporate Center, LLC. Jay LaRue of LaRue Business Group represented the buyer, Southwest Jet Center, LLC.

 

rsz_8388ehartforddr_ind_main

NAI Horizon Completes $4.375M Sale of Flex/Office Property

 

NAI Horizon announced the sale of a ±66,240 SF, high-end flex/office facility in the Scottsdale Airpark submarket within the Perimeter Center Development at 8388 E. Hartford Dr.

Helio Real Estate of Arizona acquired it for a total sales price of $4.375M.

Jeff Adams, Mike Myrick and Alexandra Loye with NAI Horizon represented H-B Perimeter, LLC., as the Seller. NAI Horizon has been retained as the leasing team for the property.

The property is currently 94% vacant.

 

Weekend Jetaway

Events That Give Back: Olive & Ivy Pink Light, Weekend Jetaway And More

Don’t believe the hype — good girls aren’t that into bad boys.

Given the choice, in fact, most women would choose George Clooney over Charlie Sheen any day of the week. Not to mention that all-time good guys Tom Hanks, Larry Fitzgerald and Phil Mickelson all look a lot happier than Nicolas Cage, Jesse James and Tiger Woods do these days.

So, why not show that special lady in your life just how good you can be by whisking her off to one of the many fabulous fall events focused on helping the local community?

Judging from these events, being a good boy has never looked so sexy.


Olive & Ivy Pink Light District — October 1 to 31

Pink Light District 2012Real men think — and drink — pink.

This October, as we celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Olive & Ivy is giving men throughout Scottsdale the chance to show their pinker side to the ladies in their lives with the addition of a “Pink Light District Menu” all month long.

“We have partnered with Belvedere Vodka and Chandon to create one of the most extravagant pink-themed menus in the Valley,” says Anita Walker of Fox Restaurant Concepts.

A portion of the proceeds from this menu throughout the entire month, including both fabulous food and delectable drink items, will be donated to the Arizona Institute for Breast Health’s Pink Light District, which glows just outside the restaurant patio each year starting on October 4.

“Throughout October, members of the Scottsdale community and beyond are invited to join the cause through this amazing menu, and can also sponsor their own pink light in honor of or in memory of a loved one touched by cancer as part of our annual Pink Light District too,” says Dr. Coral Quiet, co-founder of Arizona Institute for Breast Health, a local nonprofit organization headquartered in Scottsdale whose mission is to provide women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer a second opinion on treatment options completely free of charge.

Dinner under this pink glow of hope will soften any girl’s heart.

For more information about Olive & Ivy Pink Light District: aibh.org


The Weekend Jetaway — November 9

Weekend JetawayPrivate jet? Check!
Couture cocktails? Check!
Vegas vibe? Check!

This fall, set in a top-secret private jet hangar at the Scottsdale Airpark, is the first-ever Weekend Jetaway. The event will feature live music and gourmet food provided by some of Scottsdale’s top restaurants as well as cocktails, wine, beer and much more. During the glamorous evening, all guests will have the opportunity to try their luck with Vegas-style games of chance with one lucky group of winners earning the grand prize — an all-inclusive getaway on a private jet.

“Our aim was to model this after successful fly-away events being held across the nation,” says Dillan Micus, executive vice president of AXA Advisors, LLC – Southwest, title sponsor of the event. “And if you aren’t one of our lucky ‘jetaway’ winners, we’re also cooking up expansive silent and live auctions for everyone to leave feeling like a winner.”

The biggest winner of the evening, however, will be the Pat Tillman Foundation and other nonprofit beneficiaries of the event.

The second-biggest winner? You. At least, in your lady’s eyes.

For more information about the Weekend Jetaway: weekendjetaway.org


Play — November 10

Play at Salt River FieldsPlan now to Play all night with one of the Valley’s newest music and taste events. Set to kick off just after sunset at Salt River Fields, Play will feature a concert headlined by “Take Me Home Tonight” singer Eddie Money and will kick off with a sky full of fireworks. Plus, ultimate VIP tickets, which include access to an ultra-private post-event bonus concert, are also available. Hello, romance!

Restaurant and spirit vendors from all over the Valley will also offer a variety of gourmet foods and the opportunity to sample new wines from Butterfly Kiss, Rose’N’Blum and Stark Raving as well as premium spirits from Ketel One and Bulleit, among others. All event proceeds benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.

“Through events like this, our Clubs are able to raise critical funds needed to offer more than 100 youth development programs emphasizing five core areas: the arts; character and leadership development; education and career development; health and life skills; and sports, fitness and recreation,” says Steve Davidson, CEO of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale.”

For more information about Play: bgcs.org

Taste, Sip and Give Back: 3 Must-Attend Fall Events

Taste, Sip And Give Back: 3 Must-Attend Fall Events

Whether indulging on a selection of small bites or sampling some of Arizona’s finest wines, giving back has never tasted so good. As the weather cools, delicious giving opportunities designed to benefit some of the Valley’s most impacting nonprofit organizations will be hot, hot, hot!

With so many great, upcoming fall events, we had to narrow it down. Here’s some of the tastiest bites:

A Bite for Kids

Taste, sip and socialize with Arizona’s best chefs and restaurateurs for the 8th annual Phoenix Cooks celebration at The Westin Kierland Resort & Spa. This special event, taking place all day on September 1, 2012, will include everything from chef demonstrations and cooking classes to raffles and celebrity cooking challenges, with all proceeds benefiting the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Not hungry? Take a sip from 30 wine sampling booths, or try some beer from the Alaskan Brewing Company. A best bet for fun — my personal cooking workshop at 2 p.m., which will focus on simple sushi recipes you can make at home. You can purchase your tickets here.

Breast of Scottsdale

A Bite for Breasts

It is the pinkest party Scottsdale has ever seen! On Wednesday, September 12, Sapporo is pleased to be partnering with Belvedere Vodka to host the first-ever Breast of Scottsdale, benefiting the Arizona Institute for Breast Health (AIBH). During this special event, the community is invited to dress in their pink best and sip and sample sumptuous pink-themed food and drink menu items while enjoying great music, interactive photography and other surprises. A portion of the proceeds from these items, which will be officially available throughout October at Sapporo Scottsdale, will benefit Arizona Institute for Breast Health and its critical mission to offer Arizona women diagnosed with breast cancer a second opinion on their treatment options, completely free of charge. All proceeds from this event will benefit the organization’s Pink Light District. Pink attire is requested, and there will be prizes for the most fabulous, creative and innovative pink fashions of the night. The cost to attend is a $25 donation to the organization, which can be made by visiting AIBH’s website.

A Bite for Pat

On Friday, November 9, we at Sapporo are so proud to sponsor the Weekend Jetaway! This event, focused on raising funds for the Pat Tillman Foundation and Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale, respectively, will feature live music, culinary creations from leading Valley chefs (ahem!), cocktails and casino games in a private jet hangar within the Scottsdale Airpark.

In addition to sampling special treats from our and other leading chef’s fall menus, during the event guests will have the chance to win several fabulous prizes, including the grand prize — a luxurious all-inclusive, first-class trip on a private jet.

“It is through the generosity of our donors that we are able to directly impact the lives of Tillman Military Scholars by providing the financial and educational resources needed to prevent undeserved debt, increase economic stability and establish a foundation for greater career opportunities,” said Marie Tillman.

To purchase tickets, please visit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Scottsdale’s website.

Other events to chew on in coming months include: Taste of Hope, Corks & Chords, Dine Out with the Chefs, Play All Night, Russo and Steele, and AZ Wine & Dine.

Medical Marijuana, AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

Medical Marijuana Dispensary Operators Deal With Regulations, Landlords

Don’t look for medical marijuana dispensaries to pop up next door to your neighborhood drug store anytime soon.

Cities are wrestling with a host of issues to determine where the new businesses can set up shop, even as the Arizona Department of Health Services tries to figure out who can operate them and who can use them.

After publishing preliminary guidelines, followed by a period of public comment, ADHS issued start-up regulations on March 28.

The state agency divided Arizona into 126 community health analysis areas, or CHAAs, based on population density. The agency will issue a maximum of 124 dispensary licenses, with no more than one license within a CHAA, says Will Humble, ADHS director.

State regulators will start taking applications on June 1 and will dole out licenses starting in August after vetting the sites and the potential business owners, Humble said.

If more than one acceptable application is submitted within a CHAA’s boundaries, a lottery will decide who gets the license, he added. The first dispensary in the state could debut by fall. Humble said he expects to issue 90 to 100 licenses within the first full year of start-up. After that, ADHS will revisit the rules to determine if some tweaking is necessary.

“By the end of a year, we’ll know where the qualified patients are,” he says.

Proposed dispensary sites must comply with the zoning requirements of the municipalities they fall into, so cities have been scrambling to get zoning in place and start vetting potential locations, otherwise, they risk the state issuing licenses in unsuitable areas, says Thomas Ritz, Glendale senior planner.

Glendale passed zoning guidelines on Feb. 22, and the rules are similar to those of most cities in regard to type of site, such as office or industrial. In addition, a dispensary must be 1,320 feet from schools, 500 feet from residences, and one mile from another dispensary, Ritz says.

Scottsdale will allow medical marijuana dispensaries on campuses, and within 2,000 feet of another dispensary. Tucson will allow them to do business in retail centers, as long as they are the required distance from schools and residences.

Tucson, among the first off the block to embrace the new businesses, completed its zoning rules in November, says Craig Gross, Tucson’s deputy director for planning and development. But Gross pointed out the complexities of working within the state’s guidelines.

Tucson has 10 CHAAs within its city limits, he added, but because CHAAs are based on population density irrespective of municipality boundaries, nearly all are partly in other cities, towns or even unincorporated county land.

“That makes it interesting,” Gross says.

Tucson has a handful of applications and a dozen or so serious inquiries in some stage of processing, Gross said, but he doesn’t know if there are sites also in process by other government agencies for the same CHAAs.

And in Scottsdale, which houses two CHAAs but has about the same number of applicants or pre-applicants in the pipeline as Tucson, most of its potential operators are opting for the Scottsdale Airpark area, says Kira Wauwie, project coordinator for the city’s dispensary rollout.

Meanwhile, Glendale is bracing for a deluge of dispensary operator wannabees.

“We had a neighborhood meeting, and we had about 35 people learning, listening — a healthy stream of people asking questions,” Ritz says. “We’ll see how many turn in applications.”

But first those hopeful applicants have to snag sites that conform to state and city regulations. And even in this high-vacancy real estate market, potential landlords are leery of housing dispensaries.

“I’m surprised that individuals are finding it tough to get into a building they like,” Gross says. “Property owners don’t necessarily want to rent to them.”

Arizona real estate brokers confirm that many building owners are reluctant to lease space for dispensaries, despite the numerous hoops the potential business owners need to jump through to get a license.

Gross says building owners are slow to the table because the process is so new, and he thinks more will opt in now that ADHS rules have been set in stone — or at least for a year.

For more information about medical marijuana dispensaries, visit the Arizona Department of Health Services’ website at azdhs.gov.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2011

 

Adaptive Reuse - AZRE Magazine July/August 2010

Waste Not Want Not – Successful, Sustainable Adaptive Reuse

Adaptive Reuse

In this economy, it isn’t surprising that everyone is looking to get more for less. Whether you are an owner, representative or a member of the commercial real estate industry, the importance of delivering value has never been greater. Naturally, clients are looking to reduce cost per square foot, but they are also searching for more value in that square footage by making their spaces more efficient and reducing energy costs. Adaptive reuse of an existing building can be a viable marriage of these philosophies, for companies and brokers alike.

According to the Urban Land Institute (ULI) and PricewaterhouseCoopers’ 2010 Emerging Trends in Real Estate report, projects of the future are trending toward “infill, urbanizing suburbs and transit-oriented development.” The populace is looking for convenience, shorter commutes and reduced energy expenses — at home, in their vehicles and in their businesses.

Applications

Tina Burger, a principal at Excel Commercial in Scottsdale, agrees with the report and points to the Scottsdale Airpark area as a good example of these trends, and how they can affect redevelopment and reuse. Burger is on the Scottsdale Airpark Advocacy Subcommittee, and assists both the Chamber and the City of Scottsdale with their General Plan on redevelopment. In the Scottsdale Airpark area, she says there is a vast amount of vacant, functionally obsolete space that could be sustainably adapted to accommodate a variety of tenants. The Advocacy Subcommittee is working toward a plan for the Airpark area that provides a roadmap for development.

Using an existing structure, as opposed to building new, is a sustainable solution. From an environmental vantage, there is an opportunity to reduce waste in construction and be more efficient with the space. This efficiency can be realized by utilizing sustainable design philosophies and innovative products.

Finding the Right Space

When exploring adaptive reuse, it is important to keep a few things in mind:

  • Appropriate space selection is vital to achieving success.
  • Warehouses and big box retail spaces can provide valuable flexibility, and accommodate a variety of functions and amenities.
  • Look for types of facilities that provide ample ceiling height and large floor plates.

From a design perspective, high ceilings allow for ease of installing and maintaining building systems by providing several feet of space above the ceiling. This extra space enables the mechanical ducts, plumbing lines and light systems to be stacked, instead of being packed into a more typical space of only about 18 to 20 inches. This allows for less expensive maintenance and increases the space’s flexibility.

Conversely, ceiling height may be an acoustical challenge for open work spaces, private offices or conference rooms in which noise will be a distraction. However, several design techniques are available to mitigate these issues. Interior designers and space planners work with individuals and firms to position heavily trafficked areas away from conference rooms and private offices. Individual work spaces can allay these issues by installing clouds, or lower hanging acoustical tiles, to reduce noise and increase privacy without compromising the collaboration that open-office plans seek to nurture.

Buildings that lend themselves to reuse:

  • Warehouses
  • Theaters
  • Cafeterias
  • Large retail centers

Property types with larger floor plates allow for greater flexibility, and the potential for a larger benefit from expert space planning. Work stations can be planned in the most beneficial and efficient layout for the client. Critical relationships between staff can be placed together in a neighborhood, while communal areas such as copy rooms, break rooms and restrooms can be centralized. These layouts reduce waste through unnecessary duplication of services, and allow for future office reconfigurations that do not require demolition.

Designing Spaces

When choosing to adapt a large space, it is important to create appropriate degrees of scale for the comfort of users. By designing and planning effective lighting, ceiling treatments, furnishings and color finish palette, these adapted spaces can provide creative, inviting, comfortable meeting and work spaces on an appropriate scale for large and/or small groups.

Lack of natural daylighting is an obstacle to overcome when adapting an existing space. Those concerned with energy efficiency and productivity understand the importance of natural daylight. To increase daylighting, additional windows, skylights or solar tubes can be installed. Solar tubes increase the amount of daylight that can be introduced deep into a structure’s interior. New technologies may also be incorporated into existing windows, to reflect light deeper into a space while avoiding glare. This technique’s effectiveness may be increased by incorporating a white ceiling during the conversion.

On the other hand, should the desired end result of adapting a structure be a computer training classroom, a worship center or a theater — the lack of natural daylighting available in a warehouse or large retail center may be a positive, money-saving advantage.

Another added benefit of big box retail and warehouse adaptation is the increased floor load capacity. This can provide for further flexibility, particularly for computer-intensive businesses, or the incorporation of amenities such as a fitness center or rock-climbing wall.

Green Spaces

Although some adaptive reuse spaces provide adequate electrical loads and HVAC capacity, it is not unusual to have to add additional capacity. This upgrade process is an ideal time to install equipment that will improve indoor air quality, increase electrical efficiency or add photovoltaic collectors. These steps can decrease energy expenses and, according to a response included in ULI’s report, will “’fetch a bigger price than comparable space without green features” when owners choose to sell. Choosing to have an adapted space certified by the U.S. Green Building Council is objective verification that the space stands apart, offering energy efficiency and heightened productivity.

Burger agrees, adding, “The biggest reason for an owner to upgrade their property is to preserve the asset’s value today and in the future.” Many energy-efficient upgrades have reasonable payback periods.

An organization’s culture also is a significant factor in choosing to adapt an existing building. A site might be chosen for its historical significance, location or prestige. Other institutions appreciate the anonymity that an adapted building can offer, while other owners may need a larger space and chose to reuse rather than rebuild.

There are many reasons to choose adaptive reuse and, if done wisely in partnership with a design professional, such a choice can be cost-effective, sustainable and successful.

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Article written for AZRE by H. Joshua Gould, AIA, LEED AP,  who is the chairman and CEO of RNL; and Carl Price, AIA, LEED AP, who is a principal at RNL. www.rnldesign.com

www.pwc.com
www.scottsdaleaz.gov
www.uli.org

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AZRE Magazine July/August 2010

Steve Koeppelle, Owner, Scottsdale Jean Company - AZ Business Magazine June 2010

Steven Koeppel, Owner Of Scottsdale Jean Company, Comes Out On Top By Selling Bottoms

Steven Koeppel
Scottsdale Jean Company
Title: Owner
Est: 2005  |  www.scottsdalejc.com

“You can never learn too much and you can never be too smart – ask a lot of questions.” – Steven Koeppel, owner of Scottsdale Jean Company

When it comes to battling with the best in the retail clothing world, Scottsdale Jean Company is Arizona’s largest, successful independent retail store, standing strong against big guys like Macy’s and Nordstoms.

Despite its name, Scottsdale Jean Company carries more than jeans. While jeans make up 55 percent of the business, men’s and women’s clothing collections, jewelry, accessories, and sunglasses make up the rest. More than 100 designer brands, including Michael Stars and True Religion, fill the 10,000-square-foot store in the Scottsdale Airpark. The store also carries the exclusive line of skin, hair and body products, Kiehl’s.

Scottsdale Jean Company began when Koeppel sold his automobile business in the New York City area in 2004. He then moved to Arizona with a few ideas, but saw a void in the market for the business he has since established.

Even though moving from cars to clothes may have been a difficult transition, Koeppel learned that “business is business.” His experience running a large chain in New York proved to be invaluable when opening up Scottsdale Jean Company. Koeppel self-funded his Arizona business from the beginning and was successful from day one.

“If you have a good foundation you can do anything,” Koeppel says.

Although the company closed a second store in Peoria, Scottsdale Jean Company has 18 employees and is still staying profitable during this economic downturn.

“We have a very well-run, viable business. It is just a matter of waiting through these times, doing what we have to do, and wait for things to turn,” Koeppel says.

Plans for the future consist of expanding the store out of state and rebuilding the company website.

“We are now one of the premier stores in the country and we put a great name in the industry. We do sizeable business online and we ship all over the world, which has helped us to develop and build a name not just in Arizona, but everywhere,” Koeppel says.

The company’s website features a personal shopper and live, online help to answer any questions while visitors browse the site. The website is a marketing tool that can track where most of the traffic is coming from and how it got there. According to Koeppel, this is a great way to gear specific advertising toward that market.

“The most important thing in Internet marketing and online sales is people finding you. We optimize keywords and are getting about 1,000 visitors a day at this point,” Koeppel says.

When all is said and done, Koeppel’s No. 1 advice to fellow business owners is to “make sure you have a thorough business plan. Not everyone opens their doors and is successful the moment they open.”

Arizona Business Magazine June 2010

Baker Scottsdale

Baker Scottsdale Enters The Arizona Market With A Diverse Selection Of Quality Home Products

The Netherlands — a place of supreme diversity — is home to the Dutch, a people known for their spirit of exploration. Like the inquisitive and adventurous people from this area, Siebe Baker was no different. Baker embarked on his own pilgrimage when he immigrated to the U.S. and started his own company in 1890. More than a century later, the nationwide store now known as Baker Knapp and Tubbs is known for its craftsmanship classic furniture, custom-selected materials and fine detailing.

The company’s products are best recognized for their classic style and quality. Materials are separately chosen for each individual product, resulting in superior features and characteristics. Sophisticated artisans use traditional techniques such as carving, hand planing, upholstery, inlay, marquetry and veneering. All products have a signature finish that is painstakingly applied by hand coloring.

It is only appropriate this level of quality furniture be housed in an equally superior showroom that’s truly like no other. Baker joined forces with its sister company, McGuire, to open Baker Scottsdale, a new location in the Scottsdale Airpark. An arched doorway unites the two stores to form a resource-rich hub for furniture, exclusive textiles and leathers all under one roof.

The 3,783-square-foot showroom’s black flooring and cream-colored walls provide a simple backdrop for the impressive array of furniture, lighting and accessories on display. Creatively exhibited in lifestyle categories — contemporary, casual and traditional — the displays feature one of the largest retail presentations of Baker products in the country, housing more than 20 in-house and designer collections, as well as an assortment of complementary items.

“The items selected for the Scottsdale location reflect a combination of our newest and most fashion-forward designer collections balanced by an assortment of the distinctive, classic looks long associated with Baker and McGuire,” says Lee Russ, business development manager for Kohler Interiors.

With the customer always in mind, staff members offer floor planning assistance and can visit customers’ homes for design consultations. For more complicated projects, customers are referred to independent design professionals who have access to the showroom.

“Together with (the collections) and the ability of our staff to special order any item, finish or option in the entire product range, (this) makes Baker Scottsdale a premier venue for two of America’s premier furniture brands,” Russ says.

Marta Szwaya, vice president of showrooms and stores for Baker Knapp and Tubbs agrees. 

“Previously, our retail customers simply haven’t been exposed to things like our lighting gallery and our proprietary accessories,” she says.  “Together with an innovative new resource area and many custom finish options, all of this promises to finally put the creative experience on the level of the brand.”

The company has high hopes the new location will be a popular shopping destination.

“Scottsdale is a very affluent and quality-focused city, with tremendous support for architecture and the performing arts,”  says Rachel D. Kohler, group president of Kohler Interiors. “This is a place where people have a passion for their home.”

The opening of the new store brings to life Kohler Interiors’ long-term goal to showcase a full range of its businesses at one location and create a truly pragmatic shopping destination. Flanking the Baker Scottsdale showroom will be the final two businesses under the Kohler Interiors umbrella with the opening of McGuire and Ann Sacks, which carries tile, stone and luxury plumbing products.

Baker Scottsdale’s mission statement sums it up to a tee: “Each day we strive to inspire and fulfill a higher level of gracious living for our customers, through design that distinguishes, quality that endures, and service that delights.

www.bakerfurniture.com