Tag Archives: Scottsdale Healthcare

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Scottsdale Leadership Expands Partnerships, Creates Legacy Model for Other Nonprofits

Scottsdale Leadership partnered with Valley experts last Saturday to host a one-day workshop featuring topics that directly impact the youth at the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Scottsdale. Because of the initial success of the one-day workshop, organizers are using their diverse experience to create a legacy model to help encourage other nonprofits.

IMG_6744Professionals with an inspiring story that resonates with children were recruited by Scottsdale Leadership’s Class 27 for their “Life in a Box” workshop. The workshop empowered youth at the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Scottsdale with real-life skills they will need as they enter adulthood. Topics included financial literacy, self-defense, social media skills, interview skills and healthy eating habits.

The first “Life in a Box” workshop was headlined by keynote speaker Andrew Walter, former NFL quarterback for the Oakland Raiders and Arizona State University star athlete.

Scottsdale Leadership also partnered with other Scottsdale leaders – Founders of Why Teens Fail, Goodwill of Central Arizona, Scottsdale Healthcare and City of Scottsdale Teen Employment Program – to guide the Valley’s youth as efficiently and effectively as possible.

IMG_6784“We were thrilled with the attendance and engaged participation from the youth of the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Scottsdale,” stated Mike Binder of Scottsdale Leadership Class 27. “Our ‘Life in a Box’ workshop fills the gaps in specific skills sets for young adults who may not receive this instruction at home or in school. By bringing in a role model like Andrew Walter, who is committed to giving back to young people, workshops like this can make a monumental difference in a teenager’s life. It is our goal to provide a program that will also inspire other nonprofits to expand their outreach to teens in need.”

“Life in a Box” is one example of the many inspirational endeavors that Scottsdale Leadership’s Class 27 has established and fostered. Consisting of up-and-coming leaders, Scottsdale Leadership’s goal is to create legacy models for similar workshops and other initiatives for additional non-profits.

For more information about the difference Scottsdale Leadership is making for Valley youth and other nonprofits, visit scottsdaleleadership.org.

The free “We Take Your Health to Heart” event Feb. 13 includes a live broadcast of a heart procedure, as shown from last year’s program. RSVP to shc.org or call 480-882-4636. The event is Feb. 13 from 6:30-8 p.m. in the Saguaro South Grand Ballroom at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge, 5350 E. Marriott Dr., Phoenix.

Heart experts show latest treatments at free Feb. 13 event

The public is invited to see and hear information on the latest advances in heart attack and valve repair treatments with some of the nation’s foremost cardiologists and surgeons at a free community event Feb. 13 at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort.

Highlighting the event is a procedure broadcast live from the cardiac catheterization laboratory at Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center. “We Take Your Health to Heart” starts at 6:30 pm in the Saguaro South Ballroom at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge Resort, 535 E. Marriott Dr. in Phoenix.

Interventional cardiologist David Rizik, MD will perform the live procedure moderated by a panel of experts, and will join the panel shortly after completing the catheterization. Other presentations will include information on aortic stenosis and nonsurgical Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

“Over the last decade there has been a meteoric evolution in the heart and vascular sciences. We want to provide a rich educational experience, showcasing the latest cardiovascular technologies and interaction with world-class physicians,” said Dr. Rizik.

In addition to Dr. Rizik, who is medical director of Heart & Vascular Services and Interventional Cardiology for Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Thompson Peak Hospital; panelists include James Hermiller, MD, director of interventional cardiology at St. Vincent Heart Center of Indiana; Robert Riley, MD, medical director of cardiovascular surgery for Scottsdale Healthcare; Kevin Klassen, MD, medical director of cardiology services, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Thompson Peak Hospital; Scottsdale Healthcare cardiologists Robert Burke, MD and Allen Reinfeld, MD; and Maulik Shah, MD, medical director of interventional cardiology, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center.

One of the latest advances in is the Edwards Sapien Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) which will be featured with Dr. Rizik on KAET Channel 8, Arizona’s PBS later this month. The procedure is approved for patients with inoperable aortic stenosis (failing heart valves), using a catheter fed through the femoral artery to implant the new valve.

Registration for “We Take Your Health to Heart” is free at shc.org or call 480-882-4636. The event is Feb. 13 from 6:30-8 p.m. in the Saguaro South Grand Ballroom at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge, 5350 E. Marriott Dr., Phoenix Ariz. 85054.

“We Take Your Health to Heart” is sponsored by Scottsdale Healthcare and includes faculty from the 2013 Scottsdale Interventional Forum medical education conference taking place at the JW Marriott.

Scottsdale Healthcare is a community-based, not-for-profit health system that includes Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale Healthcare Primary Care centers and the Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute. A leader in medical innovation, talent and technology, Scottsdale Healthcare was founded in 1962 and based in Scottsdale, Ariz. For more information, visit www.shc.org.

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Arizona bioscience job growth outpaces nation

Arizona’s bioscience sector added jobs at nearly four times the national rate over the past decade and experienced double-digit job growth during the economic recovery, a new report shows.

Since Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was launched in 2002, Arizona’s bioscience jobs have increased by 45 percent to 99,018 in 2011. Nationally, the growth rate during this time was 12 percent. While hospitals dominate Arizona’s bioscience jobs, the state’s non-hospital subsectors grew 14 percent in 2011 alone.  During the economic recovery years of 2009-11, the state’s bioscience jobs increased 11 percent while there was no gain across the state’s private sector.

The new performance analysis of Arizona’s bioscience sector, commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, also found that the number of bioscience establishments in Arizona continues to grow faster than the national average and bioscience wages in the state are outpacing those in other private-sector industries.

The 10th-annual study, released Feb. 5 by the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice, did reveal funding challenges for the state.  In 2012, Arizona fell to its lowest venture capital investment level since 2009 and suffered a drop in National Institutes of Health funding while the top-10 funded states advanced.

“Arizona’s bioscience sector continues to significantly outperform the nation in terms of job and establishment growth and has made impressive gains in building a more concentrated industry base,” said Walter Plosila, senior advisor to the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice.  “However, more attention must be paid to academic research performance and venture capital investment to continue the trend in years to come.”

Plosila added that progress has been made over the past decade on all 19 actions recommended by Battelle in 2002, including substantial progress on nine.

The Roadmap was launched in 2002 as a long-range plan to make the state’s bioscience sector globally competitive. The Roadmap was commissioned by the Phoenix-based Flinn Foundation, which committed to 10 years of major funding of Arizona biosciences and formed a network of committees involving statewide experts to implement its recommendations.

There was also a major increase in bioscience establishments, rising 31 percent since 2002 to 892 firms, which is above the national growth rate of 23 percent.

Bioscience jobs in Arizona pay an average salary of $56,328, or 28 percent higher than the $44,098 for all private-sector industries. Since 2002, bioscience salaries have increased 44 percent.

“After 10 years, Arizona has carved a niche in the highly lucrative and competitive biosciences field,” said Martin Shultz, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “We’re one of the nation’s top emerging bioscience states, and our growth in high-wage jobs continued during both good economic times and bad.”

In terms of research dollars, NIH funding in 2012 was $174 million, or 19 percent greater, than the 2002 figure. This is a decrease from $184 million in 2011. While NIH funding, the gold standard for biomedical research funding, did increase slightly faster than the national average of 18 percent over the past decade, Arizona is no longer meeting its goal of obtaining funding at a growth rate higher than the top-10 funded states. In addition, its share of the funding pool remains nearly the same as it was in 2002.

The latest data also shows:
•    The largest non-hospital bioscience subsector continues to be research, testing and medical laboratories. This group now boasts about 8,900 workers across 466 establishments, roughly a 60 percent increase in both employees and firms since 2002. The other subsectors are drugs, pharmaceuticals and diagnostics; hospitals; medical devices and equipment; and agricultural feedstock and chemicals.
•    Venture capital investment was $22 million in 2012, which is the lowest figure since 2009. This was a drop of 68 percent from 2011, compared with a national decline of 49 percent.
•    Bioscience-related academic research and development expenditures at Arizona’s universities reached a record $452 million in 2011, a 55 percent increase since 2002. Arizona’s growth had outpaced the nation until 2009, but now trails the overall U.S. growth rate of 74 percent.
•    Arizona universities spun out seven bioscience companies in 2012. University discoveries have now led to 67 new bioscience startups since 2002 as well as 180 bioscience patents.

There were a number of major developments in 2012 that showed the collaborative nature of Arizona biosciences, including the completion of major projects, the approval of future pursuits, and an emphasis on education.

The University of Arizona opened its new Health Sciences Education Building on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus that enabled the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix to increase enrollment and for Northern Arizona University to begin Phoenix-based physician assistant and physical therapy programs. In addition, final approval was granted by the Arizona Board of Regents for the UA Cancer Center-Phoenix to be built on the same campus in partnership with St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

A number of incubators and accelerators opened or expanded with more in the planning stages. BioInspire, an incubator for medical-device startups, opened in Peoria; GateWay Community College in Phoenix opened the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation; the Arizona Center for Innovation at the UA Science and Technology Park in Tucson opened upgraded facilities and launched new programming; Flagstaff received funding for a planned accelerator; and the statewide Arizona Furnace accelerator began awarding seed money and access to incubation space.

Among other major developments, the inaugural Arizona SciTech Festival attracted 200,000 participants from across the state during February and March 2012, making it one of the largest in the nation; Banner Alzheimer’s Institute launched a $100 million trial to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease; a new skin-cancer drug first tested by Translational Genomics Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare received expedited approval from the Food and Drug Administration; Arizona State University began leading the first national algae biofuel testbed; Mayo Clinic announced plans for a new cancer center on its north Phoenix campus; and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert announced a $63 million expansion.

On Dec. 4, 2012, the Flinn Foundation and bioscience leaders from across Arizona came together at the Arizona Biltmore to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the launching of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap. The Foundation announced it has committed to continue funding Arizona biosciences and coordinating the Roadmap as it enters its next chapter.

“We recognize this is a long-term pursuit,” said Jack Jewett, president and CEO of the Flinn Foundation. “We will continue to strive to improve the lives of Arizonans today and tomorrow through new medical discoveries, access to clinical trials and the recruitment of top researchers, while also attracting high-wage jobs that will strengthen Arizona’s economy.”

The Flinn Foundation is a Phoenix-based, private, nonprofit philanthropic endowment. It was established by Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Flinn in 1965 with the mission of improving the quality of life in Arizona to benefit future generations. The nonprofit philanthropy supports the advancement of Arizona’s bioscience sector, the Flinn Scholars program, arts and culture, and the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership.

clinical research advantage - vaccines

TGen, Scottsdale Healthcare study may help pancreatic cancer patients

A multi-center Phase III clinical trial demonstrates that Abraxane (nab-paclitaxel) plus gemcitabine is the first combination of cancer drugs to extend survival of late-stage pancreatic cancer patients compared to standard treatment.
The MPACT (Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial) study was led by physicians from Scottsdale Healthcare’s Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials, a partnership between Scottsdale Healthcare and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Their findings show that Abraxane plus gemcitabine was well tolerated and resulted in clinically meaningful outcomes compared to gemcitabine alone, the current standard of care. The study abstract was released today and the data will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2013 Gastrointestinal Cancers annual meeting Jan. 25 in San Francisco.

“We are ecstatic that this clinical trial of Abraxane plus gemcitabine improves survival for patients with advanced stage IV pancreatic cancer,” said Dr. Daniel Von Hoff, international lead investigator for MPACT, chief scientific officer for Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare, and TGen’s Physician-In-Chief. “It once again demonstrates that laboratory science based medicine can make a difference for patients.”

MPACT is the largest phase III clinical trial completed in advanced pancreatic cancer with more than 800 patients. Findings from the study showed a 59 percent increase in one-year median survival rates from less than a quarter of the patients (22 percent) to more than a third (35 percent). The two-year survival rate for this cancer is negligible, less than 4 percent, but that more than doubles (9 percent) with the nab-paclitaxel/gemcitabine combination.

One of those patients was Lynne Jacoby, 48, of Phoenix, who works as a director of compliance for a healthcare company. Jacoby was given only weeks to live when her Stage 4 pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a tumor the size of a golf ball, was first diagnosed in April 2012 — nine months ago.

“If you had to live your life in a year, and that is all the time you have, wouldn’t you do everything you could to experience this time,” said Jacoby, who for nearly a year before her diagnosis had experienced night sweats, indigestion, stomach pains, neck and back pain, and an elevated white-blood count.

She began the treatment of Abraxane plus gemcitabine in May 2012 and continues on the medications, saying now that she “feels awesome, wonderful.” She is scheduled to remain on the drug combination through May 2013.

“Life is priceless. No amount of money can be placed on life. I know I would be gone already if it was not for Dr. Von Hoff,” said Jacoby, who also refers to him as “Dr. Von Hope.”

The study showed significant improvement among some of the sickest patients including those with increased metastases. Significantly there was no increase in life-threatening toxicity. Other drug combinations that have demonstrated benefit have been limited by increased toxicities.

“This is a major improvement in a cancer with the lowest survival rates among all cancer types,” said Dr. Ramesh Ramanathan, medical director of Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare and principal investigator for the clinical trial in the United States. “Advanced pancreatic cancer is fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States and throughout the world. It is difficult to diagnose with a majority of the cases diagnosed at a late stage after the disease has already advanced.”

Abraxane wraps traditional chemotherapy, paclitaxel, in near-nano sized shells of albumin, a protein that the tumor sees as food. The tumor uses various mechanisms to preferentially attract the albumin, which then acts like a “Trojan Horse” to release its package of chemotherapy inside the tumor. It is approved in the U.S. for metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer.

The pancreas is a gland behind the stomach that secretes enzymes into the upper part of the small intestine to help digestion. It also produces hormones, including insulin, which helps regulate the metabolism of sugars.

The incidence of pancreatic cancer is increasing worldwide with an estimated 279,000 cases per year, including nearly 44,000 in the U.S. in 2012, and resulting in more than 37,000 American deaths last year.

Individuals seeking information about eligibility to participate in clinical trials at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare may contact the cancer care coordinator at: 480-323-1339; toll free at 1-877-273-3713; or via email at clinicaltrials@shc.org.

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Scottsdale Healthcare plans NE Phoenix expansion

Scottsdale Healthcare announced today it is opening new primary care offices and actively pursuing locations for additional ambulatory services in Northeast Phoenix.

Expansion in Northeast Phoenix is part of the nonprofit health system’s effort to broaden services in partnership with community physicians and diversify beyond its three hospital campuses in Scottsdale. Still in planning stages, the expansion may include primary care and specialist physician offices, outpatient surgery, diagnostic imaging, laboratory, occupational health and wellness services.

Two new Scottsdale Healthcare Primary Care physician offices are slated to open in January in Phoenix and Tempe, joining sister locations in Arcadia, Scottsdale and Grayhawk.

“Scottsdale Healthcare hospitals have served the Northeast Valley for 50 years, and placing needed services closer to where our patients live is part of how we want to transform the way care is provided over the next 50 years,” said Scottsdale Healthcare President and CEO Tom Sadvary.

Healthcare and insurance reform, and consumer demand, are placing more emphasis on outpatient care and wellness, including management of chronic diseases like diabetes and hypertension, according to Sadvary.

“By collaborating with our physicians we can offer Northeast Phoenix residents more access to quality medical care and better coordination of care between patients, physicians and hospitals. Our intent is to create opportunities for better managing one’s health and contribute to reducing overall costs for medical care,” explained Sadvary.

Healthcare consumers want convenience, quality and value, added Scottsdale Healthcare Senior Vice President Gary Baker. “Our goal is providing multiple access points for care, promoting wellness and disease prevention, helping individuals proactively manage chronic disease, and providing the highest-quality care and service that patients expect from Scottsdale Healthcare,” said Baker.

Scottsdale Healthcare has been expanding its infrastructure to create a clinically integrated network of care through investments in information technology and connectivity with physician offices, disease management infrastructure, and alignment with leading private practice physicians.

The new practices will become members of the Scottsdale Health Partners network, a joint venture between Scottsdale Healthcare and the Scottsdale Physician Organization, that was successfully launched this year.

“Scottsdale Health Partners includes more than 450 independent physicians covering the Northeast Valley. Through this strong partnership, physicians are helping us co-develop how Scottsdale Healthcare will be successful in a value-based environment,” said Sadvary.

“The vision of Scottsdale Healthcare and SHP is to embrace a pluralistic model of physician alignment, supporting employed and private physicians in improving care for patients in our community. It is a partnership based on a shared culture of quality, a desire to improve coordination of care and patient access, and a mutual engagement in improving patient outcomes,” added Richard Silver, MD, chief medical officer and vice president, Physician Alignment for Scottsdale Healthcare.

Scottsdale Healthcare’s track record of success with strategic partnerships illustrates its commitment to collaborations that are focused on achieving the highest quality care and best patient experience, noted Sadvary.

“We believe that working collaboratively with our physicians is the best way to expand beyond acute care. Hospitals and health providers must change the way they do business to ensure a strong future in this era of health reform. It makes sense to bring our services closer to patients in the communities we serve and provide greater value for healthcare consumers,” said Sadvary.

“Our ambulatory services expansion will not only benefit consumers by bringing the right mix of services in the right locations, it allows Scottsdale Healthcare to explore additional partnerships with physicians to extend our high quality care in outpatient settings in addition to our Osborn, Shea and Thompson Peak hospital campuses,” added Baker.

Scottsdale Healthcare is the largest employer in Scottsdale, Arizona and the nonprofit parent organization of Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation. For more information, visit www.shc.org.

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TGen, Scottsdale Healthcare lead pancreatic cancer study

A new cancer drug combination demonstrated significant improvement in overall survival of late-stage pancreatic cancer patients compared to those receiving standard treatment, according to results of a Phase III clinical trial led by physicians from Scottsdale Healthcare’s Virginia G. Cancer Center Clinical Trials, a partnership with the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Physicians at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare were first to design a clinical trial to determine the safety, tolerability and effectiveness of nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) in combination with the standard drug gemcitabine in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Results of that multicenter study chaired by Dr. Daniel Von Hoff were encouraging enough that it led to one of the largest international studies ever done in pancreatic cancer, with 861 patients.

Full results are expected to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2013 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in Jan. 24-26 in San Francisco.

“This is a great example of rapid bench to bedside development of new treatments for cancer. We’re ecstatic that we will have a new treatment for patients with late stage pancreatic cancer,” said Dr. Von Hoff, international lead investigator and Chief Scientific Officer for the Virginia G. Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare and TGen’s Physician-In-Chief.

The pancreas is a gland behind the stomach that secretes enzymes into the upper part of the small intestine to help digestion. It also produces hormones, including insulin, which helps regulate the metabolism of sugars. Advanced pancreatic cancer is fourth most common cause of cancer death in the United States and throughout the world. It is a difficult to diagnose and treat cancer with the lowest survival rates among all cancer types.

Nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) is an albumin-bound formulation of paclitaxel, produced by Celgene Corp. Dr. Von Hoff said that results of the MPACT (Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial) study will lead Celgene to submit for FDA approval.

“Pancreatic cancer incidence is increasing worldwide with almost 220,000 cases per year, and we are optimistic that this will have worldwide impact for treating advanced pancreatic cancer,” added Dr. Ramesh Ramanathan, Medical Director of Virginia G. Cancer Center Clinical Trials at Scottsdale Healthcare and principal investigator for the United States.

Dr. Von Hoff credited the support of Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation, Stand Up to Cancer and the Seena Magowitz Foundation for advancing the study at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare. He noted that TGen and International Genomics Consortium scientists in collaboration with scientists from Abraxis Bioscience found that in pancreatic cancer, an albumin-binding protein called SPARC was present at high levels in cells within the pancreatic tumor microenvironment. They hypothesized that the albumin formulation of nab-paclitaxel may be taken up by tumor and surrounding cells with high SPARC expression.

Individuals seeking information about eligibility to participate in clinical trials at the Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare may contact the cancer care coordinator at 480-323-1339; toll free at 1-877-273-3713 or via email at clinicaltrials@shc.org.

Tom Lehman w_trophy

Schwab Cup ticket sales benefit Scottsdale Healthcare

It’s great golf for a great cause – fans buying tickets for the Charles Schwab Cup Championship can designate nonprofit Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation as their charity of choice through the Tickets Fore Charity Program.

The Champions Tour event is Oct. 31 – Nov. 4 on the Cochise Course at The Desert Mountain Club in Scottsdale. Tickets purchased at ScottsdaleHealthcareTickets.org can be designated to benefit Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation and proceeds will support the nonprofit Neighborhood Outreach Access to Health (NOAH) clinics, an affiliate of Scottsdale Healthcare.

Tom Lehman, winner of the 2011 Schwab Cup, supports the work that charities like NOAH carry out for children.

“Scottsdale Healthcare is participating in the Tickets Fore Charity program where 100% of the net proceeds will support the underserved in our community through its NOAH clinics. The work that charities like NOAH carry out for children is especially important to me,” said Lehman. “Scottsdale Healthcare is special for several other reasons – three of my children were born there.”

Valley golfers have long supported health care for underserved families through Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation’s annual Golf Classic, a charity pro-am that raises funds for Scottsdale Healthcare’s NOAH clinics.

Starting with a single nurse practitioner traveling between schools in the Scottsdale and Paradise Valley school districts in 1996, Scottsdale Healthcare’s NOAH program added a mobile clinic in 2001 and now operates several onsite health centers in Scottsdale and Phoenix. NOAH has provided health services to more than 30,000 individuals.

NOAH clinics are designated Federally Qualified Health Center Look-Alikes (FQHC-LA), which make quality primary care services more available and affordable to low-income, underserved and special populations.

Designated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, FQHC-LAs provide a medical home for patients in need so they can receive coordinated care. They also serve to improve public health, reduce the burden of non-urgent care services in hospital emergency rooms and provide needed services such as free immunizations for uninsured children.

NOAH operates as a 501c3 in affiliation with Scottsdale Healthcare and governed by an independent community-based board. To learn more about Neighborhood Outreach Access to Health (NOAH) visit noahhelps.org.

Be sure to go to ScottsdaleHealthcareTickets.org and select Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation as your designated charity. Any Day Grounds Tickets for the Charles Schwab Cup Championship are $20.

Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2012, Scottsdale Healthcare is the locally-based nonprofit parent organization of Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Shea Medical Center and Scottsdale Healthcare Thompson Peak Hospital, Virginia G. Piper Cancer Center at Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale Healthcare Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare Foundation. A leader in medical innovation, talent and technology, Scottsdale Healthcare is the largest employer in Scottsdale, Arizona. For more information, visit www.shc.org.

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CBRE, Az Commercial Advisors Help Scottsdale Healthcare Secure New HQ

 

McCormick Place, a vacant, 74,474 SF, 3-story office building at 8125 N. Hayden Road in Scottsdale, sold for $14.95M in a deal handled by CBRE.

Scottsdale Healthcare Corporation, a nonprofit health system, has acquired the building, which will become its new corporate headquarters.

Luke Walker and David Carder of CBRE’s Phoenix office, along with Patti Gentry of Arizona Commercial Advisors of Scottsdale, represented the buyer in the acquisition. The seller, a real estate investment company based in northern California, was represented by Jerry Noble, Pat Devine and Greg Mayer, also in CBRE’s Phoenix office.

“Scottsdale Healthcare was seeking a centralized location for its corporate office in order to maximize resources and better support each of its hospital campuses,” Walker said. “McCormick Place will provide it with the necessary space to relocate its corporate and other business office functions, while creating flexibility for future enhanced patient services on its Osborn campus.”

Gentry added: “From a business perspective this location will strengthen Scottsdale Healthcare’s footprint in the City of Scottsdale by establishing a major corporate headquarters in the center of the city, and the timing of this transaction will allow the company to benefit from a cost perspective as well.”

Until 2008, the building served as the corporate headquarters for Medicis Pharmaceutical Corporation. It is located on the NEC of Hayden Rd. and Via de Ventura, central to all three Scottsdale Healthcare hospital campuses. The property is also less than one mile from the Loop 101 and in proximity to numerous upscale retail amenities, including the Villages on Hayden and The Shops at Gainey Village.

Also included in the sale was an adjacent, free-standing, covered parking garage.

Scottsdale Healthcare plans to move into its new corporate headquarters in 2013.

 

Pressure In The Workplace

Pressure In The Workplace

It presents itself in a host of manifestations: sleepless nights, gut-wrenching fear, grinding teeth, an angry kick to a trash can.

Workplace stress has changed the environment for those who have been fortunate enough to maintain employment through the recession, but shoulder guilt and face a heavier workload because they survived the cutbacks.

“We have seen an increasing number of hospital and clinic visits with the primary complaint being that stress in the workplace has led to increased levels of depression and anxiety,” says Brian Espinoza, a psychiatrist at St. Luke’s Behavioral Health Center in Phoenix.

A still-struggling economy has cranked up the pressure on those workers left to carry the load. A poll by Right Management shows that 79 percent of employees say their workload has increased because of layoffs. And a recent study commissioned by the American Psychological Association shows that 20 percent of workers say their daily level of stress exceeds 8 on a 10-point scale.

“The economy has caused many companies to ‘downsize,’ effectively increasing the workload of the remaining staff,” says Dr. Kevin Klassen, a cardiologist with Scottsdale Healthcare. “With the increased demands of
the workplace being coupled with fear of loss of job and health benefits, negative stress increases markedly.”

Here are some signs of workplace stress, according to Chip Coffey, director of outpatient services for St. Luke’s Behavioral Health:

  • Increase in workers’ compensation claims
  • Increase in employee complaints and grievances
  • Customer complaints describing your employees as “irritable” or “stressed”
  • Verbal or physical conflict among any of your employees
  • Increase in sick days or call-offs
  • Frequent staff turnover or requests to transfer out

Experts warn that workplace stress doesn’t just impact the employee in a negative manner, it can adversely impact the business’ bottom line.

“When employees experience stress and anxiety for whatever reason, they tend to follow poor eating habits and forego their daily exercise regimen,” says Cheyenne Autumn, director of health and wellness strategies for UnitedHealthcare of Arizona. “High stress levels can prompt absenteeism and decrease (productivity) among employees. Also, stress can cause high blood pressure and impair the immune system response, making people more vulnerable to colds, flu and other infectious conditions.”

To prevent stress from further depleting the workplace, Klassen says employers need to assume that their employees have personal and job-related stressors and remember that everyone has their breaking point.

“Employers need to say please and thank you,” he says. “They need to praise good performances openly and address mistakes privately in a way where the intent is to instruct, rather than to belittle. The same workload can be perceived as crushing or as manageable, depending upon the environment in which the work is done.”

Experts suggest that employees take a proactive approach to managing his or her stress level. Autumn says stressed-out employees should recognize that exercise is the best antidote. Simple steps, such as walking around the building a couple of times each day or taking the stairs instead of the elevator can reduce stress, she says. These activities stimulate adrenalin and the movement of the body will energize the employee for the remainder of the day.

“Employees should also be open and honest with their supervisor or manager,” recommends Dr. Anne-Marie Reed, a board certified family physician at Camelback Health Care. “Communication is the best course of action. Discuss what is causing the workplace stress. That may start with understanding the symptoms of stress itself.”

Espinoza says that it is important for employees to self-monitor for signs of depression and anxiety, such as insomnia, lack of interest in activities which were previously enjoyed, poor self-confidence, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, lack of appetite, lethargy, or sluggishness, and most importantly, thoughts of suicide or homicide. If any of these symptoms are troublesome and interfere with work and home responsibilities, seek medical attention immediately.

Coffey also says it’s important to remind yourself that while you may feel stressed, things aren’t always as bad as they seem.

“Practice being content,” he says. “Most of us know how to be discontent, but we do not practice letting ourselves be content. Take time each day to recognize that things may not be great, they may not be horrible. They just are. This is being content.”

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

50 Largest Employers in Arizona - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

50 Largest Employers In Arizona

These are the 50 largest employers in Arizona, including public and privately held companies and not-for-profit corporations, ranked by the number of employees based on full-time equivalents of 40 hours per week and based on industry research.


50 Largest Employers in Arizona

Walmart Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 30,634
Employment change since 2010: Added about 300 jobs
2010 revenue: $421.8 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Bentonville, Ark.
Phone: (479) 273-4000
Website: www.walmart.com

Banner Health

Arizona employees in 2011: 28,353
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1911
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 747-4000
Website: www.bannerhealth.com

Wells Fargo & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 14,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $93.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1852
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 411-4932
Website: www.wellsfargo.com

Bank of America Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 13,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,000 jobs
2010 revenue: $150.5 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1904
Headquarters: Charlotte, N.C.
Phone: (800) 944-0404
Website: www.bankofamerica.com

McDonald’s Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 12,770
Employment change since 2010: Added about 955 jobs
2010 revenue: $22.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1955
Headquarters: Oakbrook, Ill.
Phone: (800) 244-6227
Website: www.mcdonalds.com

Apollo Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 460 jobs
2010 revenue: $4.9 billion
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1973
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (480) 966-5394
Website: www.apollogrp.edu

Kroger Co. *

Arizona employees in 2011: About 12,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 400 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.7 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1883
Headquarters: Cincinnati
Phone: (623) 936-2100
Website: www.frysfood.com
* Includes Fry’s Food Stores and Fry’s Marketplace

Raytheon Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 11,500
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $25.2 billion
Company’s focus: Missile manufacturing
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: Waltham, Mass.
Phone: (520) 794-3000
Website: www.raytheon.com

JP Morgan Chase & Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 10,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 600 jobs
2010 revenue: $102.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1799
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (602) 221-2900
Website: www.chase.com

Honeywell International Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,716
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 700 jobs
2010 revenue: $33.4 billion
Company’s focus: Aerospace manufacturing
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Morristown, N.J.
Phone: (602) 231-1000
Website: www.honeywell.com

Intel Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,700
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $43.6 billion
Company’s focus: Semiconductor manufacturing
Year founded: 1968
Headquarters: Santa Clara, Calif.
Phone: (480) 554-8080
Website: www.intel.com

Target Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 9,300
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $65.4 billion
Company’s focus: Discount retailer
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Minneapolis
Phone: (612) 304-6073
Website: www.target.com

US Airways

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,926
Employment change since 2010: Added about 150 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.9 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1981
Headquarters: Tempe
Phone: (480) 693-0800
Website: www.usairways.com

Catholic Healthcare West

Arizona employees in 2011: 8,291
Employment change since 2010: Added about 500 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1986
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (602) 406-3000
Website: www.chw.edu

Home Depot Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 8,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 350 jobs
2010 revenue: $66.2 billion
Company’s focus: Home improvement
Year founded: 1978
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (714) 940-3500
Website: www.homedepot.com

Walgreen Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,750
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $63.3 billion
Company’s focus: Retail drugstores
Year founded: 1901
Headquarters: Deerfield, Ill.
Phone: (847) 940-2500
Website: www.walgreens.com

Safeway Stores Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,500
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $41.1 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1926
Headquarters: Pleasanton, Calif.
Phone: (480) 894-4100
Website: www.safeway.com

American Express Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 7,465
Employment change since 2010: Added about 200 jobs
2010 revenue: $30.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1850
Headquarters: New York
Phone: (623) 492-7474
Website: www.americanexpress.com

Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 7,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 935 jobs
2010 revenue: $19 billion
Company’s focus: Mining
Year founded: 1834
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 366-7323
Website: www.fcx.com

Pinnacle West Capital Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,900
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 earnings: $330.4 million
Company’s focus: Electric utility
Year founded: 1985
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 250-1000
Website: www.pinnaclewest.com

Bashas’ Supermarkets

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,641
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 1,800 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Grocery stores
Year founded: 1932
Headquarters: Chandler
Phone: (480) 895-9350
Website: www.bashas.com

Scottsdale Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: 6,556
Employment change since 2010: Added about 55 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 882-4000
Website: www.shc.org

UA Healthcare

Arizona employees in 2011: About 6,000
Employment change since 2010: Added about 2,050 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 694-7737
Website: www.u.arizona.edu

Circle K Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 590 jobs
2010 revenue: $16.4 billion
Company’s focus: Convenience stores
Year founded: 1951
Headquarters: Laval, QC, Canada
Phone: (602) 728-8000
Website: www.CircleK.com

General Dynamics

Arizona employees in 2011: 5,026
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,810 jobs
2010 revenue: $32.5 billion
Company’s focus: Defense, communications
Year founded: 1952
Headquarters: Falls Church, Va.
Phone: (480) 441-3033
Website: www.generaldynamics.com

Boeing Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,800
Employment change since 2010: Added about 100 jobs
2010 revenue: $64.3 billion
Company’s focus: Aircraft manufacturing
Year founded: 1916
Headquarters: Chicago
Phone: (480) 891-3000
Website: www.boeing.com

Carondelet Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,690
Employment change since 2010: Added about 124 jobs
2010 revenue: About $601 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1880
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 872-3000
Website: www.carondelet.org

Mayo Foundation

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 138 jobs
2010 revenue: $7.9 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1864
Headquarters: Rochester, Minn.
Phone: (480) 301-8000
Website: www.mayo.edu

CVS Caremark Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,500
Employment change since 2010: Added about 50 jobs
2010 revenue: $96.4 billion
Company’s focus: Pharmaceutical services
Year founded: 1993
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (615) 743-6600
Website: www.caremark.com

Salt River Project

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,346
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 392 jobs
2010 revenue: $2.7 billion
Company’s focus: Utility supplier
Year founded: 1903
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 236-5900
Website: www.srpnet.com

Costco Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,151
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $76.2 billion
Company’s focus: Membership discount stores
Year founded: 1976
Headquarters: Issaquah, Wash.
Phone: (602) 293-5007
Website: www.costco.com

Abrazo Health Care *

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,089
Employment change since 2010: Added about 951 jobs
2010 revenue: $1.5 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Nashville
Phone: (602) 674-1400
Website: www.abrazohealth.com
* A division of Vanguard Health Systems

Albertsons Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 4,000
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 450 jobs
2010 revenue: $5.9 billion
Company’s focus: Grocery and drug stores
Year founded: 1939
Headquarters: Boise, ID
Phone: (602) 382-5300
Website: www.albertsons.com

FedEx Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,918
Employment change since 2010: Added about 330 jobs
2010 revenue: $34.7 billion
Company’s focus: Delivery, copy centers
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Memphis, Tenn.
Phone: (866) 477-7529
Website: www.fedex.com

Southwest Airlines Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,857
Employment change since 2010: Added about 259 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.1 billion
Company’s focus: Airline
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Dallas
Phone: (602) 304-3983
Website: www.southwest.com

Marriott International

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,522
Employment change since 2010: Added about 722 jobs
2010 revenue: $11.7 billion
Company’s focus: Resorts and hotels
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters: Bethesda, Md.
Phone: (301) 380-3000
Website:  www.marriott.com

Qwest Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,200
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 190 jobs
2010 revenue: $12.3 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1896
Headquarters: Denver
Phone: (800) 244-1111
Website: www.Qwest.com

United Parcel Service

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,170
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 48 jobs
2010 revenue: $49.5 billion
Company’s focus: Package delivery
Year founded: 1907
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (888) 967-5877
Website: www.ups.com

John C. Lincoln Health Network

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,166
Employment change since 2010: Added about 539 jobs
2010 revenue: $551 million
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1927
Headquarters:  Phoenix
Phone: (602) 870-943-2381
Website: www.jcl.com

USAA

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,045
Employment change since 2010: Added about 74 jobs
2010 revenue: $17.9 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1922
Headquarters: San Antonio
Phone: (800) 531-8111
Website: www.usaa.com

Charles Schwab & Co. Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 3,001
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.2 billion
Company’s focus: Financial services
Year founded: 1974
Headquarters: San Francisco
Phone: (800) 435-4000
Website: www.schwab.com

Freescale Semiconductor

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $4.5 billion
Company’s focus: Microchip manufacturing
Year founded: 1953
Headquarters: Austin
Phone: (512) 895-2000
Website: www.freescale.com

IBM Corp.

Arizona employees in 2011: About 3,000
Employment change since 2010: Stayed about even
2010 revenue: $95.8 billion
Company’s focus: Technology services
Year founded: 1924
Headquarters: Armonk, N.Y.
Phone: (800) 426-4968
Web site: www.us.ibm.com

Cox Communications Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,997
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 67 jobs
2010 revenue: $9.1 billion
Company’s focus: Telecommunications
Year founded: 1962
Headquarters: Atlanta
Phone: (623) 594-0505
Website: www.cox.com

TMC HealthCare

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,966
Employment change since 2010: Lost about 84 jobs
2010 revenue: Unavailable
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1943
Headquarters: Tucson
Phone: (520) 327-5461
Website: www.tmcaz.com

Verizon Wireless

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,901
Employment change since 2010: Added about 201 jobs
2010 revenue: $63.4 billion
Company’s focus: Wireless provider
Year founded: 1984
Headquarters: Basking Ridge, N.J.
phone: (480) 763-6300
Website: www.verizonwireless.com

Cigna HealthCare of AZ

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,865
Employment change since 2010: Added about 401 jobs
2010 revenue: $21.3 billion
Company’s focus: Health care
Year founded: 1972
Headquarters: Philadelphia
Phone: (602) 942-4462
Website: www.cigna.com

Grand Canyon University

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,818
Employment change since 2010: Added about 537 jobs
2010 revenue: $385.8 million
Company’s focus: Educational services
Year founded: 1949
Headquarters: Phoenix
Phone: (602) 639-7500
Website: www.gcu.edu

Starbucks Coffee Co.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,783
Employment change since 2010: Added about 1,003 jobs
2010 revenue: $10.7 billion
Company’s focus: Food service
Year founded: 1971
Headquarters: Seattle
Phone: (602) 340-0455
Website: www.starbucks.com

Go Daddy Group Inc.

Arizona employees in 2011: 2,754
Employment change since 2010: Added about 441 jobs
2010 revenue: $741.2 million
Company’s focus: Internet services/technology
Year founded: 1997
Headquarters: Scottsdale
Phone: (480) 505-8800
Website: www.GoDaddy.com

These are the state’s 5 largest government employers, ranked by the number of employees.

State of Arizona: About 49,800 employees
City of Phoenix: About 15,100 employees
Maricopa County: 12,792 employees
Arizona State University: 11,185 employees
Mesa Public Schools: 8,376 employees

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Arizona Chapter of FEI held its fourth annual CFO of the Year Awards

The Arizona Chapter Of FEI Held Its 4th Annual CFO Of the Year Awards

The Arizona Chapter of Financial Executives International (FEI) held its fourth annual CFO of the Year Awards on Nov. 4. FEI Arizona presents the CFO of the Year Awards to financial professionals for outstanding performance in their roles as corporate financial stewards. The nominations and awards recognize exemplary financial management in all types of businesses: public, private and nonprofit. An impressive set of independent judges from local business and academia selected the winners based on their contributions to their respective organizations and their involvement in the community. The following CFOs were honored at the event:

Nonprofit CFO of the Year

Mary Jane Rynd Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer Virginia G. Piper Charitable TrustMary Jane Rynd
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust

 

The talent and drive that Mary Jane Rynd put into becoming the first female partner of a national accounting firm in Arizona is now benefiting one of the state’s largest nonprofits.

As executive vice president and chief financial officer, Rynd she oversees the investment management of the approximately $500 million endowment of the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust. She also supervises the trust’s investment consultants and staff in the investment committee of the board of trustees.

For more than a decade before Virginia Piper’s death, Rynd served as the philanthropist’s tax adviser. As a result, Rynd has a full understanding of Piper’s approach to her philanthropy — and translates that every day into the work and spirit of the trust.

“I think I’m really lucky, because the people that I work with are highly motivated, extremely good professionals,” Rynd said.

Among her achievements at the trust is the identification, purchase and complete renovation of the nonprofit’s current offices. Over the past four years, she also has managed the diversification of the trust’s investment portfolio.


Private Company CFO of the Year

Tim Einwechter Chief Financial Officer Ascent Healthcare SolutionsTim Einwechter
Chief Financial Officer
Ascent Healthcare Solutions

 

In his 13 years as chief financial officer, Tim Einwechter has guided his company from a small startup to the $160 million corporation it is today.

When Einwechter began his tenure at the company that was then known as Alliance, he had to deal with cash shortages and other various financial struggles. He aggressively pursued investment capital that allowed the medical device company to take advantage of opportunities in its market. He also initiated a merger in 2005 that allowed the organization to continue growing, and played a key role when Stryker Inc. acquired the company, now known as Ascent Healthcare Solutions, in 2009.

“Life as CFO is not one of simply saying no,” he said. “Rather, it is one of bringing sense of reason to the discussions, understanding the business drivers and supporting what is important to drive the success of the business.”

Beyond the financials, Einwechter is committed to maintaining the ethics that make Ascent a success. In fact, the company’s mission statement of “Results, Integrity, and Quality” was coined by him. Einwechter’s understanding of what makes a business successful, along with a strong focus on ethical behavior, has created a shared ownership of the company’s commitment to integrity.