Tag Archives: scottsdale

AZ Science Center

More opt to holiday shop at the doctor's office

Santa is leaving attractive gifts in some Arizona stockings this season: rhinoplasties, breast implants, tummy tucks and facelifts, just to name a few. Plastic surgery procedures and cosmetic treatments are topping holiday lists, making this a busy time not just for Old Saint Nick but for local plastic surgeons. This year, both men and women are splurging on plastic surgery procedures for themselves as part of their holiday shopping.

“Many people use the holiday season as a time to treat themselves to a procedure for several reasons,” said Dr. Daniel Shapiro, a Scottsdale-based Board Certified Plastic Surgeon with Shapiro Plastic Surgery and Skin Klinic. “End-of-year bonuses, paid time off, unused vacation time, and a desire to do something for themselves all motivate people to have plastic surgery around the holidays,” he said. Dr. Shapiro says the trend towards splurging on surgery isn’t just for women, more men are asking Santa for nips and tucks and purchasing surgery and skin care vouchers as gifts.

Shelsi Guthrie is a patient of Shapiro Plastic Surgery and Skin Klinic who treated herself to a rhinoplasty this Christmas season. She opted for the procedure early in December so that she could debut her new look at family gatherings and on New Years. “Having my nose done is something I dreamed about doing for myself for years,” Guthrie said. “This year, I made giving myself this gift a priority and had the procedure done,” she said.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 14.6 million plastic surgery procedures were performed in the United States 2012 with the most popular procedures being Breast Augmentation, Nose Reshaping, Eyelid Surgery, Liposuction and Facelifts. More than 30% of the plastic surgery procedures preformed in the United States last year were performed in the Western Region of the country, an area that includes Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, California and Hawaii. According to the Society’s annual report, Americans spent about $11 billion on plastic surgery procedures last year.

More people will find gift certificates for plastic surgery, Botox and skincare under the tree this year, too. “People are asking their significant others, friends and even parents for cosmetically-oriented gifts,” Dr. Shapiro said. “Who wants another pair of socks when you can ask for Botox injections and look your best?” he said.

One thing is to be certain before purchasing a plastic surgery gift certificate for a gift, Dr. Shapiro says. “Only purchase a plastic surgery or Botox gift certificate for someone else if they ask for it,” he says. “What might be intended as a kind and geneous gift could be misconstrued by someone who doesn’t feel they need the procedure,” he says.

“If someone close to you wants a plastic surgery procedure or Botox, they’ll tell you,” he said.

plastic.surgery

More opt to holiday shop at the doctor's office

Santa is leaving attractive gifts in some Arizona stockings this season: rhinoplasties, breast implants, tummy tucks and facelifts, just to name a few. Plastic surgery procedures and cosmetic treatments are topping holiday lists, making this a busy time not just for Old Saint Nick but for local plastic surgeons. This year, both men and women are splurging on plastic surgery procedures for themselves as part of their holiday shopping.

“Many people use the holiday season as a time to treat themselves to a procedure for several reasons,” said Dr. Daniel Shapiro, a Scottsdale-based Board Certified Plastic Surgeon with Shapiro Plastic Surgery and Skin Klinic. “End-of-year bonuses, paid time off, unused vacation time, and a desire to do something for themselves all motivate people to have plastic surgery around the holidays,” he said. Dr. Shapiro says the trend towards splurging on surgery isn’t just for women, more men are asking Santa for nips and tucks and purchasing surgery and skin care vouchers as gifts.

Shelsi Guthrie is a patient of Shapiro Plastic Surgery and Skin Klinic who treated herself to a rhinoplasty this Christmas season. She opted for the procedure early in December so that she could debut her new look at family gatherings and on New Years. “Having my nose done is something I dreamed about doing for myself for years,” Guthrie said. “This year, I made giving myself this gift a priority and had the procedure done,” she said.

According to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 14.6 million plastic surgery procedures were performed in the United States 2012 with the most popular procedures being Breast Augmentation, Nose Reshaping, Eyelid Surgery, Liposuction and Facelifts. More than 30% of the plastic surgery procedures preformed in the United States last year were performed in the Western Region of the country, an area that includes Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming, Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, California and Hawaii. According to the Society’s annual report, Americans spent about $11 billion on plastic surgery procedures last year.

More people will find gift certificates for plastic surgery, Botox and skincare under the tree this year, too. “People are asking their significant others, friends and even parents for cosmetically-oriented gifts,” Dr. Shapiro said. “Who wants another pair of socks when you can ask for Botox injections and look your best?” he said.

One thing is to be certain before purchasing a plastic surgery gift certificate for a gift, Dr. Shapiro says. “Only purchase a plastic surgery or Botox gift certificate for someone else if they ask for it,” he says. “What might be intended as a kind and geneous gift could be misconstrued by someone who doesn’t feel they need the procedure,” he says.

“If someone close to you wants a plastic surgery procedure or Botox, they’ll tell you,” he said.

juice

Fox Enters Juice Market with Launch of Juby True

Fox Restaurant Concepts has expanded its presence in the thriving health-conscious restaurant market with the opening of Juby True, which stands for “Juice by True,” a juice bar poised to become a multi-unit concept by the end of 2014.

FRC, which has 40 restaurants under 13 brands in six states, opened Juby True in October as an extension to the restaurant group’s Scottsdale, Ariz. location of True Food Kitchen. The globally influenced restaurant debuted in Phoenix in 2008 and was developed in partnership with world-renowned leader in integrative medicine and best-selling author, Dr. Andrew Weil. It has since expanded into California, Colorado and Texas and has plans to open locations in Georgia, Virginia and Massachusetts.  New units of Juby True will be both stand alone locations and extensions of True Food Kitchen locations.

The launch of the walk-up juice bar is in response to the increasing demand for more healthful food options, said Sam Fox, CEO and founder of Fox Restaurant Concepts, based in Phoenix.

“When we first opened True Food Kitchen, we recognized the need for restaurants that offer nutritious food that also tastes good,” Fox said. “We instilled the same philosophy in Juby True, but this time in a portable, convenient cup.”

National Restaurant Association studies confirm the increasing interest in health and nutrition among today’s restaurant guests. In fact, 71 percent of adults said they are trying to eat healthier at restaurants than they did two years ago.

Juby True serves cold-pressed juices for $9, made in house and bottled for on-the-go convenience. The menu also features protein blends and smoothies for $8, water-based “hydrators” for $7, “juice boosts” for $4, coffees and teas ranging from $2-$6, and a variety of gluten-free, vegan and paleo-friendly snacks priced between $3 and $4. Additionally Juby True offers one- and two-day cleanse packages for $50 and $99, respectively.

Fruits and vegetables are sourced from local and regional organic farms in relation to “The Dirty Dozen” list. The foundation of Juby True was built with strong influences from True Food Kitchen’s anti-inflammatory philosophy.

startup

Getting an angel to open the checkbook

Governor Jan Brewer touts her policies and business regulatory climate as the reason Arizona is growing new businesses. That may be a factor, but it’s not the major reason Arizona topped the Kaufman Foundation Index of Entrepreneurial Activity in 2012. If it were the case, Arizona would have been on top again in 2013—instead of plummeting to 20th nationally.

“Just because there are a lot of startups,” observes Barry Broome, CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council, “doesn’t provide a measure of the economic growth in the Valley.” A startup can be someone opening a consultancy, a contractor or the next Apple. Self-employment is a form of startup. The challenge is nurturing a startup so it grows with high value jobs.

Local governments and the Arizona Commerce Authority see major value with growing Arizona startups into enterprises. Chris Mackay, economic development director in Chandler says, “There’s staying power when a business is local. It’s connected to the local community and if the economy falters, the owners are more willing to keep going locally as opposed to closing up shop.” That local staying power is one reason Mackay says Chandler makes big investments in growing future enterprises.

Planting the seeds

Arizona’s new economy needs startups to scale up into enterprises. Those growing small businesses become hiring employers offering high value jobs paying home-buying income. Government policy supporting businesses that can scale up is based on simple economics.

Businesses with more than 20 employees, says the Small Business Administration, generate two of three Arizona paychecks. Those same businesses cut checks for more than 70 percent of Arizona’s private payrolls. The value in 2012 was over $100 billion.

All new businesses are “startups,” but not all startup businesses will be entrepreneurial enterprises. “There is no relation between starting a business and starting a company,” says Dr. Daniel Isenberg, Professor of Entrepreneurship Practice and founding executive director of the Babson College Entrepreneurship Ecosystem Project in Boston. “Ninety percent of companies formed don’t grow high value jobs.”

Isenberg says that the difference between a start-up and enterprise is a matter of scale. He is an international advocate for scaling a business to grow as opposed to opening a business. An entrepreneur, he points out, is a business founder with a large company that just happens to be small right now.

Arizona State University, as the new American university, is at the cutting edge of helping turn ideas into enterprise. Recently, the college joined the elite ranks of schools offering a stand-alone degree in entrepreneurship. It’s on that list with Harvard Business School, Babson, and University of Texas. Its goal is getting new businesses that can grow into the market.

Locally grown

ASU says more than 70 percent of its W.P. Carey School of Business MBA graduates remain in Arizona. Keeping these graduates in state provides the human resources necessary to building new enterprises fueling the future economy.

“Starting a company — as opposed to just starting a business — is hard work,” says Isenberg. “An entrepreneur looks at the business and sees it growing. It’s a time of sleep deprivation, hard work, and endless pitches.” Few startups achieve quality growth—less than ten percent, he believes. “The golden triangle of a growing enterprise,” he continues, “is cash, customers and people.”

“An entrepreneurial endeavor isn’t limited to startups,” Isenberg emphasizes. “University research, family businesses, mature companies, all can be turned into a growing enterprise. Most startups tend to stay small.” The key to the economic contribution of startups in Arizona is scalability. He is adamant about it, “Ambition is not a dirty word. A business founder without ambition does not significantly contribute to overall economic growth.”

“There are a number of entrepreneurial success stories arising from a new direction for an existing, mature business,” Isenberg reports. Sometimes it takes a new owner with a vision; sometimes the existing management team finds a new direction. It can be a license from a university, a new product, or an innovative use of an existing product. Entrepreneurship can occur anywhere in a business’ lifecycle.”

Bringing ideas to market

Arizona colleges are on that licensing bandwagon. Entrepreneurs complain that it takes years to license patents or transfer technology from most universities. In ASU’s Office of Knowledge and Enterprise Development, the Arizona Furnace Technology Transfer Accelerator — first project of its type in the world — slashes technology transfer time from years to months. The AZ Furnace is a joint venture of ASU, University of Arizona, Northern Arizona University and Dignity Health. Funding partners include the Arizona Commerce Authority, BioAccel, and additional support from Thunderbird School of Global Management.

“There are hundreds of patents sitting on shelves at universities that could be in the market earning money for creators, colleges and businesses,” enthuses Gordon McConnell, assistant vice president, Entrepreneurship & Innovation Group in OKED. “We started a program to get patents into the market quickly.” The startups selected for incubation in AZ Furnace are either entrepreneurs in search of an idea to market or idea-creators ready to market through a business entity. The fledgling enterprises are capital-ready in 12 months or less.

Enterprise starts with a leader and a vision. The scale of the vision is what makes the difference, says Isenberg. The vast majority of business owners are thinking of a model that gets them to the point that they’re putting money in the bank. He says, “Entrepreneurs are thinking of a model that finds smart people, willing customers and puts the cash to back into the enterprise.”

“Angels invest in businesses they understand or CEOs they respect,” says Broome. “There’s a need for more of that in the Valley. We’re just not seeing the next Apple or Google evolving here.”

Gaining visibility

“The biggest challenge about getting angel and venture money is visibility,” says Brandon Clark, region coordinator for Startup Arizona.  “If you’re a promising digital startup locally, it’s a little harder to get noticed nationally being from a region not known for its digital startups.  That’s starting to slowly shift.” National publications, FastCompany and Entrepreneur Magazine, have eyed Arizona as an emerging technology region.

The development opportunity for the small business is capital. Combine the “Broome Factor”—known businesses; known leaders—with the large number of startups, and there are too many funding requests heading towards too few checkbooks.

What makes early investors open pocketbooks to startup businesses is scalability. Businesses with potential to grow create the greatest return on investment for the angels. “It’s also makes a difference to the local economy,” says Isenberg. “Local policymakers need to change their focus from ‘startup’ to a ‘high value growth business’.”

Cities like helping scalable startups — and provide resources that build success. There’s a loyalty factor when the business grows; it typically remains in the hometown that helped it succeed. This is important to Chandler, Mesa, Peoria, Phoenix, Scottsdale, and Surprise. These five cities have specifically invested in incubators and accelerators to nurture and graduate businesses achieving market traction. Chandler, Phoenix and Tucson have involvement with collaborative workspaces — Gangplank and Co+Hoots — as well.

While an employee or two in a collaborative workspace works well for a while, the time comes when a move up is needed. Clairvoyant, an enterprise and analytics startup now in Chandler Innovations started with Gangplank. “We grew from four employees in March to 12 in April,” smiles Amber Anderson, a firm partner and its business developer. “We needed a place to meet with clients and work with a growing team.” Still self-funded, the growing entity plans to hit 20 employees by January.

Mackay explains, “We help a company like this grow and hope that as it expands it continues to locate in Chandler.” To that end, the city is working with landlords in its Price Corridor to offer “teenage” space that lets a business move from the heavily subsidized rents and back office support of the incubator into its own place—without too much sticker shock.

Support from cities

The difference by which startup is accepted into a city’s incubator is the ability to scale up from the garage to commercial space; from one employee to more than 20. Chandler and Mesa are looking for businesses with this capacity. Innovations gives lab and office space to businesses that have formed entities — LLCs, corporations, partnerships — and a business plan. Mesa’s new Technology Accelerator is planned with a similar focus, but is looking for businesses at an earlier stage. Surprise’s Arizona TechCelerator wants to shepherd a business to the angel investor stage.

In Surprise, scalability is one of the criteria to be accepted into Arizona’s oldest incubator. The TechCelerator is looking for businesses offering something outside the box or creating a new niche. “The company has to be started before we’ll consider them,” says Julie Neal, the economic development coordinator for the city’s enterprise. “They need a mentor, a plan and have to know where they are going.”

“Scaling up is difficult,” says Isenberg, “but doing it right defines the difference between the successful entrepreneur with a growth business and a startup that just stays small. Marketplaces are competitive. The startup has to acquire customers. That means overcoming inertia or changing buyer behavior. While established companies are cruising on their business platforms, the startup has to hire people, start a company, raise money, and all the while, it’s competing in the marketplace. That’s tough work.”

After incubation, the business must gain market traction. At this phase, the fledgling enterprise has product going out and customers paying for it. The kinks are being smoothed, and it’s time to move up to the next stage and grow. Isenberg says that the high growth criterion is simply 20 percent annual increases in sales or staff for five years.

Getting capital

To make this leap requires high levels of capital — the checks venture capitalists cut. The biggest challenge in Phoenix is that there are few sources for local venture capital. The venturists hang out in places like Silicon Valley, Boston, San Diego and Seattle. “There are even a couple of funds with deep ties to the Valley,” worries Clark, “but they have very little involvement in local startups.”

Clate Mask, CEO of Infusionsoft, had to travel out of town for his venture capital. “At one time, I was told that a fund wouldn’t cut a check for a firm in Phoenix because we didn’t have the workforce for success,” he says. “That’s no longer true; venture funds are seeing that there is a real climate for success in the Valley.”

Another resource for a growing business is the Arizona Commerce Authority’s “Growing Your Arizona Business” services. The quasi-public agency provides mentorship, regulatory assistance, access to incentive programs and site selection. It also works as a liaison connecting the growing business with other business resources. The agency mentors businesses in accessing federal procurement and grant opportunities as well as serving as an entrée to international trade.

Overall, the major resource in Arizona for start-up businesses is the universities. Anemic legislative funding for the schools causes their efforts to help to face the same struggles growing businesses face. Their efforts to improve Arizona’s long-term economy are stymied by a declining source of capital.

“ASU is underfunded,” complains Barry Broome. “The school has done an amazing job despite being financially crippled by budget cuts. It’s suffering from a lack of resources to take its programs to scale.” “Scalability” is applicable to the business-development programs at the universities and other public agencies just as it is for growing enterprises.

“Getting money for those programs is the top job for the next governor,” predicts Broome.
Opportunity in Arizona will come from the core of businesses growing today. They will create the jobs for the new economy and drive economic success for the next generation.

silverleaf

New Luxury Homes Break Ground at Sterling at Silverleaf

Cypress Development broke ground on the second phase of Sterling at Silverleaf, bringing 12 luxury estate villas priced from $2.2 million to the private golf community of Silverleaf.

The new $27.6 million second phase will be built to the same gold-level LEED certified standards as the sold-out first phase of 16 villas. Sterling at Silverleaf made national headlines in 2012 when it was named Arizona’s first and only single-family new construction project to be awarded gold-level certification by the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB), making the villas the greenest homes in Arizona. Just this month, the U.S. Green Building Council also awarded the project gold-level LEED certification

“We are changing the way our industry builds luxury homes and proving there is a way to create the ultimate in green, luxury living,” said Nathan Day, president of Cypress Development Group. “Demand has been high since we announced the second phase at Sterling because our product is so unique to the marketplace. This is about building smart, innovative homes that provide a real value for our buyers.”

Sterling’s estate villas offer three different floor plans of two-story homes ranging from 3,980 to 4,800 square feet with an attached cabana or casita with a private entrance. The three and four-bedroom villas come standard with top-of-the-line custom estate features such as Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances, exotic stone countertops, natural stone and marble floors, custom cabinetry, custom hand-forged iron stair railing, 9’ ceilings in second story,  a full masonry fireplace, a private two or three-car garage, a game room with a mini bar, professionally designed walk-in closets, his and hers bathroom vanities, a Jacuzzi bathtub in the master bathroom and a climate controlled wine room.

All 12 estate villas are being built at once with completion expected in late 2014.

Four iPads are installed throughout each villa that control the home automation and security systems providing the ability to remotely control every element within the home such as audio, video, lighting, window coverings, security and wine room temperature. Sterling at Silverleaf also developed a proprietary Eco-Mode App with Crestron, which dims the lighting in the home to 80 percent of full power levels, automatically saving 20 percent on the energy bill.

Phase two at Sterling at Silverleaf is now for sale and The Silverleaf Group of DMB Realty Network manages sales for the community and can be reached at (480) 502-6902. For more information, visit www.sterlingatsilverleaf.com.

silverleaf

$27.6M of Real Estate Breaks Ground in Scottsdale

Cypress Development broke ground today on the second phase of Sterling at Silverleaf, bringing 12 luxury estate villas priced from $2.2 million to the private golf community of Silverleaf.

The new $27.6 million second phase will be built to the same gold-level LEED certified standards as the sold-out first phase of 16 villas. Sterling at Silverleaf made national headlines in 2012 when it was named Arizona’s first and only single-family new construction project to be awarded gold-level certification by the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB), making the villas the greenest homes in Arizona. Just this month, the U.S. Green Building Council also awarded the project gold-level LEED certification

“We are changing the way our industry builds luxury homes and proving there is a way to create the ultimate in green, luxury living,” said Nathan Day, president of Cypress Development Group. “Demand has been high since we announced the second phase at Sterling because our product is so unique to the marketplace. This is about building smart, innovative homes that provide a real value for our buyers.”

Sterling’s estate villas offer three different floor plans of two-story homes ranging from 3,980 to 4,800 square feet with an attached cabana or casita with a private entrance. The three and four-bedroom villas come standard with top-of-the-line custom estate features such as Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances, exotic stone countertops, natural stone and marble floors, custom cabinetry, custom hand-forged iron stair railing, 9’ ceilings in second story,  a full masonry fireplace, a private two or three-car garage, a game room with a mini bar, professionally designed walk-in closets, his and hers bathroom vanities, a Jacuzzi bathtub in the master bathroom and a climate controlled wine room.

All 12 estate villas are being built at once with completion expected in late 2014.

Four iPads are installed throughout each villa that control the home automation and security systems providing the ability to remotely control every element within the home such as audio, video, lighting, window coverings, security and wine room temperature. Sterling at Silverleaf also developed a proprietary Eco-Mode App with Crestron, which dims the lighting in the home to 80 percent of full power levels, automatically saving 20 percent on the energy bill.

Phase two at Sterling at Silverleaf is now for sale and The Silverleaf Group of DMB Realty Network manages sales for the community and can be reached at (480) 502-6902. For more information, visit www.sterlingatsilverleaf.com.

eyes

Medical Practice Announces New Scottsdale Location

Southwestern Eye Center announced the opening of their new Scottsdale Office. The move allows the physicians to provide greater patient access and services to those in the Scottsdale area, whether or not they have insurance.

“We appreciate the support from our patients, here in the Scottsdale area, that have been with us for many years, and have welcome many more to our practice recently,” said Dr. Matthew Palmer, OD. “We are excited for the new facility to help us continue to provide the best care to the community and allow for a greater patient experience.”

The new office will be located at 3301 North Miller Rd. in Scottsdale, increasing its previous size by 1000 square feet. The location will be much more accessible, with improved signage and better visibility. With six exam lanes and a minor procedure room, Southwestern Eye Center will be able to better meet the needs of the ever aging population and the influx of young professionals into the heart of Old Town Scottsdale. The local medical practice has 25 locations throughout Arizona and three in New Mexico, serving a wide range of eye related needs in each office.

Dr. Daniel Adelberg M.D., Dr. Michael Champion M.D. and Dr. Denise Garcia M.D. will work alongside Dr. Palmer in providing comprehensive eye care and specialty ophthalmologic services. With the ever changing health care climate, they felt a bigger office will enable them to provide increased services while maintaining close relationships with their patients. The new space will remain in close proximity to the previous office so doctors can continue to see their established patients and allow for continued growth.

For more information on Southwestern Eye Center and its physicians, visit www.sweye.com. Follow Southwestern Eye Center on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SWeyecenter and on Twitter at @SWeyeCenter.

eyes

Medical Practice Announces New Scottsdale Location

Southwestern Eye Center announced the opening of their new Scottsdale Office. The move allows the physicians to provide greater patient access and services to those in the Scottsdale area, whether or not they have insurance.

“We appreciate the support from our patients, here in the Scottsdale area, that have been with us for many years, and have welcome many more to our practice recently,” said Dr. Matthew Palmer, OD. “We are excited for the new facility to help us continue to provide the best care to the community and allow for a greater patient experience.”

The new office will be located at 3301 North Miller Rd. in Scottsdale, increasing its previous size by 1000 square feet. The location will be much more accessible, with improved signage and better visibility. With six exam lanes and a minor procedure room, Southwestern Eye Center will be able to better meet the needs of the ever aging population and the influx of young professionals into the heart of Old Town Scottsdale. The local medical practice has 25 locations throughout Arizona and three in New Mexico, serving a wide range of eye related needs in each office.

Dr. Daniel Adelberg M.D., Dr. Michael Champion M.D. and Dr. Denise Garcia M.D. will work alongside Dr. Palmer in providing comprehensive eye care and specialty ophthalmologic services. With the ever changing health care climate, they felt a bigger office will enable them to provide increased services while maintaining close relationships with their patients. The new space will remain in close proximity to the previous office so doctors can continue to see their established patients and allow for continued growth.

For more information on Southwestern Eye Center and its physicians, visit www.sweye.com. Follow Southwestern Eye Center on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SWeyecenter and on Twitter at @SWeyeCenter.

Ron Guziak picture

Sun Health CEO named to national board

Sun Health President and Chief Executive Officer Ron Guziak is one of 10 new members recently elected to Care Continuum Alliance’s (CCA) 2013-14 board of directors.  Guziak was elected during a business meeting at the CCA Forum 2013, the association’s national meeting, held Oct. 23-25 in Scottsdale.

CCA is the leading advocate for population health management and wellness. The care continuum includes wellness and health promotion, prevention, care coordination and patient advocacy, condition management and complex case management. CCA promotes the role of these and other strategies in raising care quality, improving health outcomes and reducing preventable health care costs for individuals with or at risk of chronic disease.

Guziak was cited for bringing “…an entrepreneur’s sprit to Sun Health, believing the best business practices must be applied to achieve strategic outcomes,” according to CCA’s official announcement.

Guziak joins a board of top executives from Accenture, Accountable Health, Alere, ASAP Brazil, HealthFitness, ICA, Noridian, Silverlink and Viridian.  Fred Goldstein, the association’s president for accountable care, was approved as chairman.

Sun Health’s Care Transitions program also received a second consecutive “Outstanding Leadership in Population Health Award” from CCA during the national meeting.

Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner earns honor

U.S. News and World Report and Best Lawyers ® recently named one of North Scottsdale’s largest law firms, Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner, P.C., as one of the 2014 “Best Law Firms.” “The award comes shortly after the firm’s named partners, Randy Nussbaum, Greg Gillis and Dean Dinner were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in  The Best Lawyers in America©,  2014.

Nationally, U.S. News and Best Lawyers ® named the firm Tier 3 in the practice areas of Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law.

In the Metro Phoenix area, U.S. News and Best Lawyers ®named the firm Tier 1 in the in the practice areas of: Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law Litigation – Bankruptcy and Tier 3 for Commercial Litigation Construction Law.

The “Best Law Firms” rankings are based on a combination of client feedback, information provided on the Law Firm Survey and the Law Firm Leaders Survey and Best Lawyers peer-review.

The Best Lawyers in America© 2014 scoring for Randy Nussbaum, Greg Gillis and Dean Dinner were part of the scoring criteria used by U.S. News and World Report and Best Lawyers®.

Listed on the The Best Lawyers in America ®  website are quotes from clients including Tim Hammer of TJM Painting Inc. who said, “Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner is a great firm and has great lawyers.”

Christine Ritter of Rental Service Corporation in her client comment is quoted as saying, “I have worked with Nussbaum through my equipment rental company and they are a very good firm and work with the client on several issues,”

Randy Nussbaum’s areas of practice include complex bankruptcy law, real estate, construction, and contract law. Mr. Nussbaum is a certified specialist in bankruptcy law by the Arizona Board of Legal Specialization and is also certified specialist in business bankruptcy law by the American Board of Certification.

Greg Gillis’ areas of practice include construction law, commercial collection, real estate law, and bankruptcy litigation which he has performed in Arizona for 25 years. During that time, he has appeared and litigated cases in 14 of Arizona’s 15 county superior courts.

Dean Dinner’s practice has emphasized bankruptcy law, creditor-debtor rights, workouts, commercial transactions and commercial litigation. He is certified as a Bankruptcy Specialist by the Arizona Board of Legal Specialization. His experience in the bankruptcy field is extensive, involving representation of secured creditors, surety companies, unsecured creditors, creditor committees, lessors, trustees and debtors in Chapter 7, 11, 12 and 13 proceedings.

The firm, which recently celebrated its fifth anniversary, was founded in July of 2008 by Randy Nussbaum and Gregory Gillis with a focus on complex bankruptcies, commercial litigation, construction law, real estate law, just as the economic downturn began. Despite the recession, the firm surpassed its initial three-year business plan in just two years. Dean Dinner one of the initial partners became the third named partner in 2010 and the firm added to its expertise to include trust and estate planning and probate, administrative law such as within the pest control and landscaping industry, and insurance defense work. Over the years, the firm has continued to expand to its current number of 11 lawyers and nearly 30 employees total.

Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner earns honor

U.S. News and World Report and Best Lawyers ® recently named one of North Scottsdale’s largest law firms, Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner, P.C., as one of the 2014 “Best Law Firms.” “The award comes shortly after the firm’s named partners, Randy Nussbaum, Greg Gillis and Dean Dinner were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in  The Best Lawyers in America©,  2014.

Nationally, U.S. News and Best Lawyers ® named the firm Tier 3 in the practice areas of Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law.

In the Metro Phoenix area, U.S. News and Best Lawyers ®named the firm Tier 1 in the in the practice areas of: Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law Litigation – Bankruptcy and Tier 3 for Commercial Litigation Construction Law.

The “Best Law Firms” rankings are based on a combination of client feedback, information provided on the Law Firm Survey and the Law Firm Leaders Survey and Best Lawyers peer-review.

The Best Lawyers in America© 2014 scoring for Randy Nussbaum, Greg Gillis and Dean Dinner were part of the scoring criteria used by U.S. News and World Report and Best Lawyers®.

Listed on the The Best Lawyers in America ®  website are quotes from clients including Tim Hammer of TJM Painting Inc. who said, “Nussbaum Gillis & Dinner is a great firm and has great lawyers.”

Christine Ritter of Rental Service Corporation in her client comment is quoted as saying, “I have worked with Nussbaum through my equipment rental company and they are a very good firm and work with the client on several issues,”

Randy Nussbaum’s areas of practice include complex bankruptcy law, real estate, construction, and contract law. Mr. Nussbaum is a certified specialist in bankruptcy law by the Arizona Board of Legal Specialization and is also certified specialist in business bankruptcy law by the American Board of Certification.

Greg Gillis’ areas of practice include construction law, commercial collection, real estate law, and bankruptcy litigation which he has performed in Arizona for 25 years. During that time, he has appeared and litigated cases in 14 of Arizona’s 15 county superior courts.

Dean Dinner’s practice has emphasized bankruptcy law, creditor-debtor rights, workouts, commercial transactions and commercial litigation. He is certified as a Bankruptcy Specialist by the Arizona Board of Legal Specialization. His experience in the bankruptcy field is extensive, involving representation of secured creditors, surety companies, unsecured creditors, creditor committees, lessors, trustees and debtors in Chapter 7, 11, 12 and 13 proceedings.

The firm, which recently celebrated its fifth anniversary, was founded in July of 2008 by Randy Nussbaum and Gregory Gillis with a focus on complex bankruptcies, commercial litigation, construction law, real estate law, just as the economic downturn began. Despite the recession, the firm surpassed its initial three-year business plan in just two years. Dean Dinner one of the initial partners became the third named partner in 2010 and the firm added to its expertise to include trust and estate planning and probate, administrative law such as within the pest control and landscaping industry, and insurance defense work. Over the years, the firm has continued to expand to its current number of 11 lawyers and nearly 30 employees total.

shopping

Economy's Q3 Growth Boosts Local Businesses

The U.S. economy grew faster than expected in the third quarter as businesses restocked shelves, and Arizona businesses are noticing the uptick. A 2.8% boost from July to September has Valley business owners optimistic about the holiday season and the first quarter of 2014. Local restaurants, retail, real estate and even purveyors of luxury goods and services report a steady incline of consumer spending, some even reaching pre-economic downturn levels.

Dr. Daniel Shapiro, a Scottsdale-based plastic surgeon reports nearly 35% growth in 2013 over 2012. “As a board-certified sugeon that’s been practicing for 22 years, my schedule stayed busy despite the economic downturn…but over the last few months we’ve been forced to reinstate a waiting list that spans several months for surgery as well as a consult fee,” he said. “It’s evident that people have more money to spend now, and are more confident spending it,” he said.

Shapiro is just one Valley business owner that says the economy is on the upswing. Restaurant owners, many hit hard by the economic downturn are also saying that business is booming again. “Having owned restaurants in Arizona over the last 20 years, it’s easy to spot a trend when it’s happening,” said Dave Andrea, owner of Brat Haus in Old Town Scottsdale. “First it’s small things like patrons adding another round of drinks, or ordering dessert, when before they’d forgo those things in an effort to save money,” he said,

Both Andrea and Shapiro agree that people are splurging on themselves a little more now, whether it’s a long awaited nip and tuck or just a well-deserved dessert.

What’s fueling the Valley’s economic stability? The labor market continued to improve, but at a snail’s pace, government data showed. Across the country, gross domestic product expanded at a 2.8 percent annual rate, the quickest pace since the third quarter of 2012, the Commerce Department said on Thursday. It was an acceleration from a 2.5 percent clip in the second quarter and beat economists’ expectations for a 2.0 percent rate.

DECO Communities, a Scottsdale-based real estate development company just announced completion of two new urban renewal projects which transform infill properties into stylish and modern apartment homes called Cabana Modern Apartment Homes. With 4 properties completed in the last 16 months, the company says real estate is on the upswing as well. “There is a high demand for the kind of development we are doing,” said Rob Lyles, partner for DECO Communities, “And the outlook for real estate development and growth in Arizona next year is exceptionally promising,” he said.

Consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S. economic activity, expanded at a 1.5 percent rate, slowest pace since the second quarter of 2011. It grew at a 1.8 percent rate in the April-June period.  With the news of economic growth at the start of the holiday season and the ‘high-season’ for Valley tourism, business owners are exceptionally optimistic about the Q1 2014 economic reports as well.

shopping

Economy’s Q3 Growth Boosts Local Businesses

The U.S. economy grew faster than expected in the third quarter as businesses restocked shelves, and Arizona businesses are noticing the uptick. A 2.8% boost from July to September has Valley business owners optimistic about the holiday season and the first quarter of 2014. Local restaurants, retail, real estate and even purveyors of luxury goods and services report a steady incline of consumer spending, some even reaching pre-economic downturn levels.

Dr. Daniel Shapiro, a Scottsdale-based plastic surgeon reports nearly 35% growth in 2013 over 2012. “As a board-certified sugeon that’s been practicing for 22 years, my schedule stayed busy despite the economic downturn…but over the last few months we’ve been forced to reinstate a waiting list that spans several months for surgery as well as a consult fee,” he said. “It’s evident that people have more money to spend now, and are more confident spending it,” he said.

Shapiro is just one Valley business owner that says the economy is on the upswing. Restaurant owners, many hit hard by the economic downturn are also saying that business is booming again. “Having owned restaurants in Arizona over the last 20 years, it’s easy to spot a trend when it’s happening,” said Dave Andrea, owner of Brat Haus in Old Town Scottsdale. “First it’s small things like patrons adding another round of drinks, or ordering dessert, when before they’d forgo those things in an effort to save money,” he said,

Both Andrea and Shapiro agree that people are splurging on themselves a little more now, whether it’s a long awaited nip and tuck or just a well-deserved dessert.

What’s fueling the Valley’s economic stability? The labor market continued to improve, but at a snail’s pace, government data showed. Across the country, gross domestic product expanded at a 2.8 percent annual rate, the quickest pace since the third quarter of 2012, the Commerce Department said on Thursday. It was an acceleration from a 2.5 percent clip in the second quarter and beat economists’ expectations for a 2.0 percent rate.

DECO Communities, a Scottsdale-based real estate development company just announced completion of two new urban renewal projects which transform infill properties into stylish and modern apartment homes called Cabana Modern Apartment Homes. With 4 properties completed in the last 16 months, the company says real estate is on the upswing as well. “There is a high demand for the kind of development we are doing,” said Rob Lyles, partner for DECO Communities, “And the outlook for real estate development and growth in Arizona next year is exceptionally promising,” he said.

Consumer spending, which accounts for more than two-thirds of U.S. economic activity, expanded at a 1.5 percent rate, slowest pace since the second quarter of 2011. It grew at a 1.8 percent rate in the April-June period.  With the news of economic growth at the start of the holiday season and the ‘high-season’ for Valley tourism, business owners are exceptionally optimistic about the Q1 2014 economic reports as well.

Portrait Photography by Michael Baxter, Baxter Imaging LLC

Scottsdale Companies Form Development Company

A new full-service development company, Cypress Development Group,  was announced today as the result of a merger between Scottsdale-based developer Sterling Collection Development Group (SCDG) and luxury home builder, Luster Custom Homes.

Longtime friends Nathan Day, president of SCDG, and Tanner Luster, president of Luster Custom Homes, decided to combine their companies and increase their staff in order to form Cypress Development Group that will specialize in high-end residential and commercial projects that combine progressive sustainable features with impeccable finishes.

The pair’s expertise lies in pioneering the most advanced construction techniques in order to bring new ideas, methods and best practices to the development industry with an uncompromising attention to detail. From concept to completion, Cypress will offer comprehensive development services including site selection and acquisition, development funding, strategic planning, project design, construction, green-building expertise and interior design.

“This is an exciting step and major growth opportunity for all of us,” said Nathan Day. “By partnering with Luster Custom Homes and creating a full-service development company, it allows us to critically think outside the box and streamline the development process. We can now manage the entire build process from concept to completion and do things quickly, efficiently and consistently.  We have the ability to explore innovative building process and test the efficiency, especially in the green building arena, and have full quality control under one roof.”

Cypress opened the doors to its new 4,000 square-foot office last week at Canyon Village in Scottsdale’s DC Ranch community. The new company also recently hired six employees, adding to the existing team of 12.

“We have worked with Sterling for several years now and have enormous respect for their reputation and team. Our greatest asset has always been our people and by coming together we have made a substantial increase in the quality of that asset,” said Tanner Luster. “There are great synergies between our teams, our services and our clients. Our two companies have a shared vision for innovation and success that will only be enhanced by coming together. It is a true reflection of our business philosophy, which is all about building smart, innovative products that provide real value for consumers and real estate professionals.”

Day and Luster began working together in 2011 on the first phase of Day’s development, Sterling at Silverleaf, in which Luster is the builder. Sterling is a luxury, custom-home community that sits on 12-acres within the gates of Silverleaf featuring a collection of 16 villas designed by world-renowned architect Bing Hu. The community made national headlines in 2012 when it was named Arizona’s first and only single-family new construction project to be awarded gold-level certification by the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB), making the villas the greenest homes in Arizona. Just this month, the US Green Building Council also awarded the project GOLD level LEED certification

Cypress Development Group’s first project will be phase two of Sterling, an additional 12 villas priced from $2.2 million, that will break ground later this month.

For more information on Cypress Development Group, visit www.cypressdevelopment.com.

Senate Judiciary Committee Hears From Prominent Voices On Both Sides Of Gun Control Debate

Giffords Will Share Inspiring Story in Scottsdale

In partnership with the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona, Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts will present An Evening with Captain Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords: Endeavor to Succeed, on Friday, Nov. 22, at 8 p.m.

Tickets are available for $89, $69 and $59 online at www.ScottsdalePerformingArts.org or through (480) 499-TKTS (8587).

On Jan. 8, 2011, Capt. Mark Kelly would face the toughest challenge of his life when an assassination attempt was made on his wife, former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. His dedication to family and Giffords’ road to recovery would captivate the nation. For Kelly, focus equals success – even in the face of adversity.

Personifying the best of the American spirit, Kelly is a homegrown hero who was a combat pilot in Iraq, an astronaut on four space shuttle missions and commander of the final flight of Space Shuttle Endeavour. He has combined teamwork, leadership, communication and family in an unwavering commitment to succeed.

Kelly will show audiences how to accomplish their mission while maintaining the love and devotion to family that is the foundation of true success. A book signing will follow. Proceeds from this event will benefit the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona.

Senate Judiciary Committee Hears From Prominent Voices On Both Sides Of Gun Control Debate

Giffords Will Share Inspiring Story in Scottsdale

In partnership with the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona, Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts will present An Evening with Captain Mark Kelly and Gabrielle Giffords: Endeavor to Succeed, on Friday, Nov. 22, at 8 p.m.

Tickets are available for $89, $69 and $59 online at www.ScottsdalePerformingArts.org or through (480) 499-TKTS (8587).

On Jan. 8, 2011, Capt. Mark Kelly would face the toughest challenge of his life when an assassination attempt was made on his wife, former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords. His dedication to family and Giffords’ road to recovery would captivate the nation. For Kelly, focus equals success – even in the face of adversity.

Personifying the best of the American spirit, Kelly is a homegrown hero who was a combat pilot in Iraq, an astronaut on four space shuttle missions and commander of the final flight of Space Shuttle Endeavour. He has combined teamwork, leadership, communication and family in an unwavering commitment to succeed.

Kelly will show audiences how to accomplish their mission while maintaining the love and devotion to family that is the foundation of true success. A book signing will follow. Proceeds from this event will benefit the Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona.

pool

Paddock Pools Relocating Corporate Headquarters

A long-standing business presence on Thomas Road, in the southern part of Scottsdale, is moving north.

Paddock Pools is relocating its corporate headquarters to its already significant presence at the 29,000 square foot Paddock “Superstore” near the Loop 101 and Shea Boulevard.

The building and real estate that had housed the company’s headquarters near 64th Street and Thomas Road were not part of the original transaction and will likely be redeveloped.

Sensing an opportunity with the recovering Arizona housing market and economy, Paddock was purchased in early 2012 from the previous owner, Lincolnshire, which had owned the company since 2005.

“Our instincts were right about buying this company when we did with its rich history and great name.  Business has been brisk,” Owner Craig Maggi said.

Paddock has built pools for many of the Valley’s large resorts, including popular area water parks and tens of thousands of pools in homes since the company’s founding in 1958.  It is one of Arizona’s iconic, blue-chip brands that consumers trust and know, said Maggi.

According to Maggi, part of new ownership’s success has been the result of a renewed focus on pool construction, service and remodeling, what he describes as the original mission of Paddock Pools.

“For decades Paddock Pools has been a premier builder of pools in the communities in which it has served, always being a conscientious citizen of them.   We will continue to emphasize this in the years ahead as we expand the great Paddock name,” Maggi said.

quayle

Quayle elected to TGen Foundation Board

Former U.S. Vice President Dan Quayle, who served under President George H.W. Bush from 1989-93, was elected today to the Board of Directors of the TGen Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the non-profit Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

Vice President Quayle attended grade school and high school in Phoenix and Scottsdale and he and his wife, Marilyn, are now residents of Paradise Valley. He brings to the TGen Foundation his vast career experience in politics and financial investment.

“It is my honor to be selected to be a part of TGen and the phenomenal work this biomedical institute is doing to find better treatments for the most serious diseases affecting humanity,” said Quayle, who also is a former U.S. representative and senator from Indiana, and who today is chairman of Cerberus Global Investments, a private equity company with $25 billion under management.

TGen Foundation Board Chairman Bennett Dorrance welcomed Quayle, noting that he is instantly one of the best known among a cadre of top-flight Arizonans who serve on the non-profit panel.

“Today we welcome Vice President Dan Quayle to our TGen family with high expectations and confidence that he will further enhance our philanthropic reach across the nation and help fuel TGen’s genomic research of the world’s most pressing diseases,” Dorrance said. “We welcome his involvement, his extraordinary relationships and his business acumen.”

Dr. Jeffrey Trent, TGen President and Research Director, also welcomed Quayle, whose term as Vice President (1989-1993) coincided with Dr. Trent serving as Scientific Director of the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland.

“In 1990, the NIH and the Department of Energy joined with international partners in a quest to sequence all 3 billion letters in the human genome. Vice President Quayle is acutely aware of the importance of this public effort, and remains an advocate for genomic research and what is means for our patients,” Dr. Trent said.

TGen Foundation President Michael Bassoff said that the addition of Quayle to the TGen Foundation Board of Directors would undoubtedly be of huge importance to the future of the institute.

“He brings a powerful internationally recognized voice to advance TGen’s scientific research,” Bassoff said.

Quayle graduated from DePauw University in 1969, and received his law degree from Indiana University in 1974.

He was first elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1976 at age 29; to the U.S. Senate in 1980 at age 33; and Vice President of the United States in 1988 at age 41, during which he made official visits to 47 nations and served as chairman of the National Space Council. He has authored three books, including Standing Firm, a vice-presidential memoir, which was on The New York Times best-seller list for 15 weeks.

Quayle also was a distinguished visiting professor of international studies at Thunderbird, The American Graduate School of International Management in Glendale, Arizona.

At Cerberus, one of the world’s leading investment firms, he has been actively involved in new business sourcing and marketing in North America, Europe and Asia. His extensive global network of public and private sector decision-makers, combined with his investment expertise, has significantly contributed to the growth of Cerberus.

technology

itelligence partners with Optima ECM Consulting

itelligence today announced it has formed a partnership with Optima ECM Consulting, a specialized consulting firm with in-depth expertise in the implementation of Enterprise Information Management (EIM) using OpenText Solutions for SAP®. Headquartered in Scottsdale, Optima helps customers overcome the common disconnect between structured processes and unstructured information. Together, itelligence and Optima will provide customers with OpenText solutions to increase business process efficiency, eliminate internal resource time loss, minimize risk and reduce cost.

“Optima was the clear choice for itelligence when we looked to collaborate with a leader in the SAP network that had the right EIM experience and expert knowledge — specifically around OpenText,” said Steve Niesman, president and CEO, itelligence North America. “As a Platinum Partner of OpenText, Optima will offer our customers unique abilities to combine and optimize SAP and OpenText solutions to address and improve multiple business objectives.”

OpenText solutions provide EIM software that helps companies of all sizes manage, secure and leverage unstructured business information, whether in the data center or in the cloud. Working across multiple industries, Optima Consulting serves as a true consultant that helps organizations build their roadmap and enterprise strategy. Through itelligence’s strong customer portfolio with global mid-market companies, the partnership allows Optima to expand their services to a new customer base.

“As we look to expand our reach to an SAP customer base, working closely with itelligence is a natural fit,” said Shaney Salomon, founding partner and chief executive officer of Optima ECM Consulting. “itelligence has global reach and deep knowledge of medium-size enterprises, a business audience that we’re looking to grow. This collaboration will allow us to deliver immediate value to our collective customer base to effectively increase our value-add and demonstrate a truly successful partnership.”

To kick off the partnership, itelligence and Optima will host a roundtable session with Zappos at the SAP TechEd event on Oct. 23 in Las Vegas. The roundtable is designed to connect customer experts and business decision makers to discuss the OpenText Rapid Deployment Solution as a turnkey value add for the enterprise.

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Equity Crowdfunding Rules Approved by SEC

Although delayed for nearly a year, today the Securities and Exchange Commission unanimously approved the release of proposed equity crowdfunding rules. The proposed rules have been published and are available on the SEC website for public comments. The rules are part of the implementation of The JOBS Act, a 2012 law which legalized the opportunity for regular people to invest in local businesses without cumbersome regulations.

Attorney Jonathan Frutkin wrote the book “Equity Crowdfunding: Transforming Customers into Loyal Owners” which was published earlier this year. The book, available on Amazon.com, explains how this extraordinary opportunity will allow local businesses to generate new enthusiasm to accelerate their growth. Frutkin is Principal with The Frutkin Law Firm, PLC in Scottsdale, Arizona.

“The release of proposed rules by the SEC is a monumental step forward,” Frutkin says. “It finally moves the ball forward, permitting equity crowdfunding to be finally legal and implemented in 2014.”

Frutkin believes that the ability of regular people to own part of their local economy, rather than being limited to simply investing in large multi-national companies like Exxon and Apple will be transformative to communities.

“People have become far too disconnected from their investment dollars. Instead of driving Wall Street, their investment in Main Street will make their neighborhood a much more interesting place to live,” Frutkin notes. “Now, at least some of their net worth will help their community flourish.” Frutkin also emphasized that equity crowdfunding is not permitted yet, and any company looking at this type of financing should contact their legal counsel.

Frutkin has been active in the crowdfunding movement since The JOBS Act was passed last year. He is a frequent speaker and commentator on the future of crowdfunding finance.

neon-vibe-730px1380318591website

Neon Night Envy Run kicks off Scottsdale Super Expo

Racers across greater Phoenix will run, dance and party in the dark during the Night Envy Neon Run on Nov. 1, all while benefiting Shape Up US, a Scottsdale nonprofit dedicated to fighting obesity.

The 5K run, which starts at 6 p.m., takes place at Westworld of Scottsdale as the kick-off event of the Scottsdale SUPER EXPO. The high-energy race will feature five color zones full of black lights, loud music, neon paint cannons, and dozens of obstacles. Racers are invited to an 80s-themed after party following to continue the fun late into the night.

“It’s a great time for adults and families who want to get out and have a blast,” said Priscilla Barney, owner of B Extreme events, the organization producing the race. “No one can resist the explosion of neon paint and the glow of black lights, but the race also provides a fun way to exercise and feel great while raising money for a very important Phoenix nonprofit.”

Shape Up US will receive a percentage of proceeds when racers register online with promo code SHAPEUPUS. The organization is committed to building a healthy future for America’s children by improving the health, fitness and overall wellbeing of youth and their families.

Funds from the Night Envy Neon Run have been earmarked for Shape Up US’ Hip Hop Healthy Heart for Children™, an innovative, engaging education curriculum that helps teachers motivate their students to live healthy, active, balanced lives.

“Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the past 30 years,” said Jyl Steinback, executive director, Shape Up US. “We must reverse this trend through awareness, education and action. The Night Envy Neon Run goes a long way in supporting our efforts, as it raises funds for Shape Up US while also giving people an opportunity to shape up themselves.”

Registration for the Night Envy Neon Run is $30 with promo code SHAPEUPUS . The fee includes participation in the Run, a race T-shirt, bib number, swag bag, and entrance to the after-party. For more information or to register for the Night Envy Neon Run, visit nightnv.com.

Soleri Bridge2(1)

CVB Markets Scottsdale as 'Home for the Holidays'

“The weather outside is delightful” during the holiday season in Scottsdale, and the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau is enticing visitors to book their trip and enjoy the warm weather, rates and activities the destination has to offer.

From mid-October through mid-January, the campaign will reach potential holiday visitors across the United States and Canada. Playing off of four popular holiday jingles, including “The Weather Outside is Delightful,” “Baby It’s Warm Outside,” “Let It Glow,” and “Hiking in a Winter Wonderland,” the campaign highlights resort and activity deals on ScottsdaleHolidayExperience.com. The page features more than 50 resort, golf, dining and attraction offers. Additionally, the site showcases seasonal events.

The bureau’s “holiday jingles” campaign aims to increase visitation from Nov. 15 through Jan. 15, a need-time period for the local tourism industry. This campaign is targeted at visitors who may not have traditional holiday plans and are looking for a convenient, warm-weather destination where they can enjoy holiday activities with a Sonoran Desert twist.

“Changing a holiday traveler’s mindset from beach to desert isn’t easy, but that’s why we have invested in this three-year program,” said Caroline Stoeckel, vice president of marketing at the bureau. “Scottsdale has great rates, warm weather, and an abundance of activities, which all make the destination a perfect holiday getaway.”

Promotional elements include print, online, direct mail and email, which will be marketed in both primary and secondary feeder markets.

This is the second year of a three-year campaign to increase holiday visitation in Scottsdale. Last year, the campaign resulted in over 28 million impressions and garnered a 139 percent return on investment for the bureau.

Soleri Bridge2(1)

CVB Markets Scottsdale as ‘Home for the Holidays’

“The weather outside is delightful” during the holiday season in Scottsdale, and the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau is enticing visitors to book their trip and enjoy the warm weather, rates and activities the destination has to offer.

From mid-October through mid-January, the campaign will reach potential holiday visitors across the United States and Canada. Playing off of four popular holiday jingles, including “The Weather Outside is Delightful,” “Baby It’s Warm Outside,” “Let It Glow,” and “Hiking in a Winter Wonderland,” the campaign highlights resort and activity deals on ScottsdaleHolidayExperience.com. The page features more than 50 resort, golf, dining and attraction offers. Additionally, the site showcases seasonal events.

The bureau’s “holiday jingles” campaign aims to increase visitation from Nov. 15 through Jan. 15, a need-time period for the local tourism industry. This campaign is targeted at visitors who may not have traditional holiday plans and are looking for a convenient, warm-weather destination where they can enjoy holiday activities with a Sonoran Desert twist.

“Changing a holiday traveler’s mindset from beach to desert isn’t easy, but that’s why we have invested in this three-year program,” said Caroline Stoeckel, vice president of marketing at the bureau. “Scottsdale has great rates, warm weather, and an abundance of activities, which all make the destination a perfect holiday getaway.”

Promotional elements include print, online, direct mail and email, which will be marketed in both primary and secondary feeder markets.

This is the second year of a three-year campaign to increase holiday visitation in Scottsdale. Last year, the campaign resulted in over 28 million impressions and garnered a 139 percent return on investment for the bureau.

Soleri Bridge2(1)

CVB Markets Scottsdale as 'Home for the Holidays'

“The weather outside is delightful” during the holiday season in Scottsdale, and the Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau is enticing visitors to book their trip and enjoy the warm weather, rates and activities the destination has to offer.

From mid-October through mid-January, the campaign will reach potential holiday visitors across the United States and Canada. Playing off of four popular holiday jingles, including “The Weather Outside is Delightful,” “Baby It’s Warm Outside,” “Let It Glow,” and “Hiking in a Winter Wonderland,” the campaign highlights resort and activity deals on ScottsdaleHolidayExperience.com. The page features more than 50 resort, golf, dining and attraction offers. Additionally, the site showcases seasonal events.

The bureau’s “holiday jingles” campaign aims to increase visitation from Nov. 15 through Jan. 15, a need-time period for the local tourism industry. This campaign is targeted at visitors who may not have traditional holiday plans and are looking for a convenient, warm-weather destination where they can enjoy holiday activities with a Sonoran Desert twist.

“Changing a holiday traveler’s mindset from beach to desert isn’t easy, but that’s why we have invested in this three-year program,” said Caroline Stoeckel, vice president of marketing at the bureau. “Scottsdale has great rates, warm weather, and an abundance of activities, which all make the destination a perfect holiday getaway.”

Promotional elements include print, online, direct mail and email, which will be marketed in both primary and secondary feeder markets.

This is the second year of a three-year campaign to increase holiday visitation in Scottsdale. Last year, the campaign resulted in over 28 million impressions and garnered a 139 percent return on investment for the bureau.