Tag Archives: southern arizona

Kevin_Perko

Kevin Perko Joins Dibble Engineering

Kevin Perko, PE, joined Dibble Engineering as its Southern Arizona Office Leader. Kevin has more than 27 years of experience in multi-million dollar national and regional business development and project management. He has extensive technical knowledge and experience in all facets of civil engineering and construction management.

As office leader, Kevin will lead Dibble’s Southern Arizona business development and project management activities. Based in Dibble’s Tucson office, he is well-known and appreciated for his wide-range of technical knowledge and experience, sound decision making, and excellent business development and project management skills.

Kevin holds a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from the University of Florida. He is a registered civil engineer in 10 states and a member of ASCE.

Red Mountain Hike, Utah, Arizona Getaway Destination

Cox looks to Honor Environmental Volunteers

Cox Communications, in partnership with The Trust for Public Land (TPL), is seeking nominations for Arizona’s second annual Cox Conserves Heroes awards program. Nominations are being accepted at www.cox7.com/cox-conserves for volunteers in Metro Phoenix and Southern Arizona who are creating, preserving or enhancing outdoor spaces.

A total of $15,000 will be donated to local environmental nonprofits on behalf of the winner and two finalists.

A judging panel comprised of civic and environmental leaders will select three finalists who will then compete to be named Arizona’s 2013 Cox Conserves Hero. The winner will be chosen through an online public vote.

A nominee’s activity must be performed on a volunteer basis and may not be part of the individual’s paid job.

Nominations are accepted through May 20 at www.cox7.com/cox-conserves.

Arizona’s Cox Conserves Heroes Timeline:
Nominations:  Through May 20
Voting:  Late June
Winner Announcement: August

Melinda Gulick was named Arizona’s 2012 Cox Conserves Hero for her long-standing commitment to and passion for Arizona’s open space. By cultivating donors and working through complex financing models for the McDowell Sonoran Preserve, she built important awareness among both corporations and citizens.

The program takes place in multiple Cox markets across the nation and has donated more than $280,000 to local environmental nonprofits. Since launching in 2008, the program has recognized 25 Cox Conserves Heroes and 72 finalists. For more information, visit www.CoxConservesHeroes.com or Facebook.

TREO-Chairmans_Circle_2013

TREO adds to leadership

The TREO Board of Directors announced the following new leadership additions:

> New Vice Chairman of the Board/Chair-Elect: Guy Gunther, Vice President and General Manager, Tucson and Greater Arizona, CenturyLink. The Vice Chairman serves a key leadership role in partnership with the Chairman of the Board, and serves as Chair-Elect for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year.

New Chairman’s Circle Members:
> Karen D. Mlawsky, CEO, University of Arizona Medical Center
> Sandra Watson, President & CEO, Arizona Commerce Authority

“We’re thrilled to continue adding top business leadership to our ranks,” said Steve Eggen, retired CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems. “We have put together the right critical mass of leaders to accelerate our economic growth.”

As CenturyLink’s Vice President and General Manager, Guy Gunther is responsible for Northern and Southern Arizona markets for voice, data, entertainment and managed services, including P&L, field operations, customer experience, direct and indirect sales channels, network development and community relations. Gunther has over 20 years of senior management experience in telecommunications, consulting firms and finance. “I am honored to become part of the leadership of this effective organization,” said Gunther. “TREO is the connective tissue in the region – promoting our assets and creating value for companies looking to establish or expand operations in Southern Arizona.”

As CEO of the Hospital Division of The University of Arizona Health Network, Karen Mlawsky oversees both The University of Arizona Medical Center – University Campus and The University of Arizona Medical – South Campus, as well as dozens of affiliated clinics and physicians’ offices. She previously served as vice president of oncology services for University Medical Center in Tucson and spent more than 13 years at the Ohio State University Medical Center. “Health care will likely be one of the top job-creating industries, regardless of a slow economic recovery,” said Mlawsky. “There is tremendous opportunity to contribute to our region’s economic development through teaching and training our future health-care workforce.”

Sandra Watson, president and CEO of the Arizona Commerce Authority (ACA), brings more than 20 years of economic development leadership and experience to Arizona. She and her teams have successfully attracted hundreds of companies that have invested billions of dollars in capital and created more than 65,000 quality jobs. With Governor Brewer’s visionary leadership, and a private sector board of directors made up of some of the state’s most successful CEOs, the ACA has established an aggressive five-year plan and is experiencing strong results in strengthening the state’s overall economy. “Partnering with regional groups such as TREO is critical to our overall success. TREO is central to a larger, collaborative movement in the state,” said Watson. “As a result of our strong, long-standing working relationship, we will continue to attract quality companies creating high-wage jobs in the Tucson region, benefitting the statewide economy.”

TREO Officers include:
> Chairman of the Board – Steve Eggen, (ret.) Chief Financial Officer, Raytheon Missile Systems
> Vice Chairman of the Board/Chair-Elect – Guy Gunther, Vice President and General Manager, Tucson and Greater Arizona, CenturyLink
> Immediate Past Chairman – Paul Bonavia, Chairman and CEO, UNS Energy Corp. & Tucson Electric Power Company
>  Secretary/Treasurer – Lisa Lovallo, Market Vice President, Southern Arizona, Cox Communications

TREO is governed by a 16-member Chairman’s Circle, which serves as a key advisory group for business development strategy and represents the Tucson region to national business prospects, and a 46-member Board of Directors.

TREO continues its Chairman’s Circle/Board of Directors expansion efforts begun in 2010. Economic development is a high priority, demanding increased engagement from the key companies, organizations and people that drive the Southern Arizona economy. TREO leadership recognizes the importance of providing strong thought leadership for community development and strengthening the Tucson “product” and positioning as a business center.

The above new members join other leaders providing both private and public sector perspective in accelerating economic development. For a complete listing of the TREO Chairman’s Circle and Board of Directors, visit http://www.treoaz.org/About-TREO-Board-of-Directors.aspx.

Stephanie Healy

Healy joins Cox southwestern leadership team

Cox Communications has announced Stephanie Barat Healy as its new director of public affairs for Southern Arizona.  Healy will be responsible for all Cox Public Affairs and Community Relations activities in Pima and Cochise counties.

“We are honored to have Stephanie heading up our southern Arizona Cox Communications Public Affairs team,” said Lisa Lovallo, Vice President and Market Manger, Southern Arizona.  “Stephanie and her family have been in Tucson for many years.  She cares deeply about our community and has a proven track record of bring diverse groups together to address public policy issues in a collaborative, sensitive and positive way.  She will be a great addition to our team.”

Prior to Cox, Healy held the position of executive vice president for the Southern Arizona Leadership Council (SALC). Her experience directing and implementing public policy and external relations activities for SALC will make for a smooth transition into her new role at Cox.

Healy has also served as president of the Hospital Council of Southern Arizona where she managed all aspects of a not for profit membership organization that included fourteen regional hospitals with a purpose of working collectively to improve the region’s health care climate and system.

Healy also held the position of Director of Economic Development for the Tucson Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce where she oversaw the division’s development of programs that promoted Tucson as a center for global trade and investment.

Healy became a Flinn-Brown Academy Fellow in fall 2011 after being nominated and accepted into the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership; a unique statewide program to nurture and develop leaders. She has also been recognized by Tucson Lifestyle as a key community leader working to build Tucson’s high-tech economy.

After relocating from Chicago nearly seventeen years ago, Healy resides in Tucson and is married to Tim Healy, vice president of Brokerage Services for CB Richard Ellis in Tucson.  The Healys have two children.

treo board

TREO Board Of Directors Votes In New Officers

The TREO Board of Directors today announces the election of its officers for the Fiscal Year 2012-13. Terms are July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013.

The officers are:

Steve Eggen, CFO, Raytheon Missile Systems – Presiding Chairman of the Board

Lisa Lovallo, VP and Systems Manager, Cox Communications Southern Arizona – Secretary/Treasurer

The TREO Board is comprised of 46 community leaders from the private sector, public sector and academia, including presidents of both universities and the community college in Southern Arizona, mayors of public jurisdictions in the Tucson region, Pima County and major corporations and businesses operating in Southern Arizona. The TREO Board and major stakeholders represent 85,000 employees in Southern Arizona. For a full listing of the TREO Board of Directors, visit http://www.treoaz.org/Living-and-Working-Tucson-Leaders-Board-of-Directors.aspx.

In addition, the TREO Board of Directors unanimously voted to extend the President & CEO contract for a three year term. “We have full confidence in Joe Snell. Snell has led this organization since 2005 and has guided the efforts of TREO, resulting in high value to the community. Our region has challenges ahead of us and he continues to be the right leader at the right time,” said Steve Eggen, incoming Chairman of the Board.

“The organization is focusing on and achieving the goals set out for it by the TREO Board of Directors,” he continued. “We have exciting plans in motion for this fiscal year.”

For more information on TREO Board of Directors, visit TREO’s website at treoaz.org.

tucson airport

Study Puts Tucson Airport’s Economic Impact At $3.2 Billion

A new study shows Tucson International Airport (TIA) brings an annual economic impact of more than $3.2 billion to the region.

The study was commissioned by the Tucson Airport Authority (TAA) and conducted by MBA students from the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. It has been more than 10 years since TAA conducted such an analysis.

“These updated findings provide an accurate and current picture of the job creation and economic activity brought about by TAA’s ongoing operations, significant infrastructure investments and partnerships with more than 100 tenants. We take great pride in helping to improve the economic vitality and quality of life in southern Arizona,” said TAA President/CEO Bonnie Allin.

The airport’s direct, indirect and induced economic effects are included in the total. Direct impact is generated as a result of employment and operation of the airport and tenant businesses. The Eller MBA consulting team calculated a total annual direct impact of $1.7 billion stemming from payroll, goods and services purchased by the airport and airport businesses, expenditures on capital improvement projects and payment of local taxes from airport activity.

The remainder of the $3.2 billion total is attributed to indirect and induced impact.

Indirect impact includes money spent at the airport and in the community by airport patrons, plus revenue generated by businesses that chose to locate in the region because the airport is integral to their operations.

Induced impact, also known as the multiplier effect, is based on an economic principle that quantifies how revenue generated by airport activities grows as it cycles through the community. For example, when TAA hires a local construction company for a project, the company hires additional employees, who increase demand for goods and services in the region through spending their salaries. The businesses they patronize hire additional workers, and the process repeats.

Similarly, 13,000 workers are directly employed at TIA. Indirect and induced effects of airport employment bring the total to 35,000 local jobs supported as a result of the airport’s presence in the community.

The UA graduate students are part of the Eller MBA’s experiential learning program, which allows the students to participate in a strategic consulting project. TAA is one of the College’s 12 clients this year, including Raytheon, Microsoft and Intuit, said Eller College of Management Director for Experiential Learning Nannon Roosa.

“This program is the cornerstone of our MBA’s first year,” Roosa said. “Projects like these challenge students to apply core business skills to address a real-world business issue.

“Eller’s innovative curriculum, combined with pioneering research, distinguished faculty, excellence in entrepreneurship and social responsibility, has brought international recognition to the program,” she added.

The report helps to demonstrate the importance of TIA to a strong local economy, which is useful in regional business recruitment and retention efforts, as well as air service development initiatives. TAA will share the findings from this study for inclusion in an Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) study that will quantify the statewide impact of aviation, as well as other economic development groups such as TREO, the Arizona Commerce Authority, local chambers and the Metropolitan Tucson Convention & Visitors Bureau.

For more information on the Tucson International Airport, visit their website at flytucsonairport.com.

FutureShock

State Leaders Prepare The Copper State For Explosive Growth

An official letter from the state’s Lawn and Pool Use Enforcement Division says you must choose between taking out your green lawn or draining your swimming pool. You can’t have both, as the state has been severely restricting outdoor water use ever since the population of Central and Southern Arizona swelled to 10 million people around 2040.

You opt to keep the pool because urban sprawl and the heat-island effect have caused Arizona to break yet another record — the number of summer days when the temperature fails to drop below 100 degrees.

But time in the pool is getting rarer. Your daily commute from Pinal County to Phoenix is a grinding two hours. You’d like to work closer to home, but job centers and transportation routes haven’t reached your relatively new subdivision.

Welcome to the Sun Corridor, circa 2050.

With foresight, unified planning and a significant investment in the state’s infrastructure, the above scenario need not play out.

Without it, according to the author of a recent report on Arizona’s future, a part of the state risks becoming, not the next Los Angeles, but its bland sister — the San Fernando Valley.

“You’ll essentially get existing urban development patterns spread all over the place in a seamless, homogenous, urban fabric of chain stores, fast food restaurants and red stucco houses,” says Grady Gammage Jr., a principle author of “Megapolitan — Arizona’s Sun Corridor,” published by Arizona State University’s Morrison Institute for Public Policy.

The report predicts that land stretching from the middle of Yavapai County to western Cochise County to the Mexican border will someday merge into one integrated super metropolitan area — a “megapolitan” dubbed the Sun Corridor.

That doesn’t mean there will be uninterrupted development between Prescott and Tucson — there is too much Indian and federal land in the way. Instead, the corridor’s economies and commuting patterns will merge.

Imagine a series of overlapping circles emanating from Pima, Pinal and Maricopa counties. According to a measurement developed by scholars at the Metropolitan Institute at Virginia Tech, if at least 15 percent of workers from one area commute to another, those commuting patterns have merged.

Already, Pinal County sends 40 percent of its workers into other regions, most likely north to Maricopa County.

“That means Maricopa and Pinal are already merged,” Gammage says.

Some time between 2010 and 2020, Pinal is expected to send more than 15 percent of its workers south to Pima County, Gammage adds, creating an economic bridge between Phoenix and Tucson.

The U.S. Census designates these areas with cross-region commuting patterns as “combined statistical areas,” something the “Megapolitan” report says may happen by the 2020 decennial census.

The Sun Corridor will be one of 10 megapolitan areas in the United States. By 2030, it could be home to 10 million people and 4.5 million jobs, making it a potential hotbed of wealth and productivity. According to the report, the nation’s office market and high-tech clusters are in megapolitans.

However, as the Morrison Institute report asks, will Arizona be able to harness the staggering potential of such an area?

That would require a whole new level of dialogue and cooperation between the five councils of government, six counties, 57 municipalities and 300 other governmental units spanning the 30,000-square-mile area that would make up the Sun Corridor.

And the state is just at the beginning of that process, Gammage says, adding, “We’re behind the curve.”

Shannon Scutari, on the other hand, believes she sees progress every day.

As Gov. Janet Napolitano’s policy advisor for growth and infrastructure, Scutari is on the front lines of important growth initiatives, including the long-term planning exercise developed by the Urban Land Institute, AZ One – A Reality Check for Arizona, held last spring at the Phoenix Convention Center.

Statistics from the Morrison Institute

AZ One assembled more than 300 people from Maricopa and Pinal counties and guided them through alternative growth scenarios with the purpose of generating discussion and consensus.

“They’re talking to each other, there’s no doubt about it,” Scutari says of the disparate public and civic leaders she encounters in her job. “Some of them are actually even listening to each other.”

Scutari adds that the governor hopes to see the AZ One exercise duplicated in the Tucson and Flagstaff areas.

While her office is trying to bring several growth issues into sharp relief, Scutari says a pressing challenge is the state’s need to invest in transportation infrastructure.

That is why the Arizona Department of Transportation has begun a $7 million statewide study and is working with cities, tribal governments, land-use planners, regional transportation organizations and others to assess the state’s infrastructure.

One important feature of the Statewide Transportation Planning Framework, Scutari says, will be to connect land-use decisions with transportation infrastructure, some


thing that has never been done. The study already has outlined some of the most critical transportation needs.

Right now, the governor is backing an initiative campaign to put on the November ballot a one-cent increase in the state’s sales tax. The increase would raise $42 billion over 30 years to pay for transportation infrastructure.

The money is needed as Arizona’s roads and freeways are “only going to get worse in the next 25 years,” warns Tim James, director of research and consulting for ASU’s L. William Seidman Research Institute.

James headed a team that spent a year studying the state’s infrastructure and its ability to handle growth. The resulting report did not endorse the Napolitano-backed initiative, but it did say that without changes in funding mechanisms, the state cannot keep up with growth.

“There will be longer commutes, there will be more time spent in traffic, you’ll be traveling at lower speeds,” James says. “It’s going to be more congestion and less safe journeys. The road system is going to become unacceptably poor.”

The report, commissioned by the Arizona Investment Council, formerly known as the Arizona Utility Investors Association, concluded that accommodating growth is going to be “very, very costly” — probably $417 billion to $532 billion in the next 25 years.

In that time period:

  • Electricity demand will increase by about 85 percent, yet the state faces a funding gap in paying for new plants.
  • Just providing telecommunications services to the state’s current unserved population would cost up to $2 billion. Creating a state-of-the-art fiber network that would guarantee high quality telecommunications would cost about 10 times that.
  • Water delivery and treatment systems built decades ago will need to be replaced.

While it is impossible to predict exactly what the Sun Corridor will look like in 2040, planners do know generally where growth will occur.

Eric Anderson, transportation director for the Maricopa Association of Governments, says projections show most growth in Maricopa County will be in the West Valley as developable land in the east diminishes. Pinal County, where it meets the southeast corner of Maricopa County southeast of Queen Creek and the 275-acre state land parcel dubbed Superstition Vistas, will see a lot of growth as well. Finally, Anderson says, areas around Casa Grande and Maricopa will continue to expand.

According to MAG’s latest figures, there are about 1.8 million housing units already approved or entitled in various master-planned communities in Maricopa and Pinal counties.

Jay Hicks, co-chairman of the AZ One steering committee and a vice president at EDAW Inc., an architecture and environment consulting company, says people still can shape the character of future development, even in the face of all that entitled land.

Some parcels may need to be re-entitled as time passes and communities become more cognizant of the way land uses affect pollution levels and energy consumption.

Additionally, 40 to 50 percent of all commercial properties will need to be redeveloped in the next 15 to 20 years, Hick says.

Facing the challenges that come with growth seems daunting, but Scutari says there is “a sense ofoptimism” among the state’s stakeholders.

As Gammage put it: “There is an opportunity here, if we can seize it and get ahead of it, we can do something really special.”