Tag Archives: SRP

energy policies

SRP Surpasses Energy Efficiency Goals

Salt River Project exceeded its annual goal of helping residential and commercial customers save energy and money through the utility’s Energy Efficiency programs and initiatives.

Last year, SRP’s Energy Efficiency programs for both residential and commercial customers provided annual energy savings equal to 2.3 percent of SRP’s retail energy sales that resulted in a savings of 640 million kilowatt hours, which is equivalent to powering about 35,000 homes for one year.

The largest savings came from the Retail Lighting Program, which offered customers discounted prices on LED and CFL light bulbs from retailers such as Home Depot, Wal-Mart and Sam’s Club. SRP works with retailers and manufacturers to offer reduced prices, which drove annual customer purchases to nearly 2.7 million bulbs.

“The SRP energy-efficiency programs have experienced tremendous customer participation,” said Dan Dreiling, SRP director of Market Research and Customer Programs. “Not only do our customers expect us to provide ways to save, but they are also pleased with the programs we offer and continue to support them.”

Strong participation in the Energy-Efficient Pool Pump Program, Appliance Recycling and ENERGY STAR Homes also helped exceed program goals, he said.

Residential customers also increased their comfort and savings by taking advantage of comprehensive home assessments and rebates for services and products such as home duct repair and window shade screens as well as energy-efficient air conditioners and heat pumps.

Residential customers Steve and Lori Bold of Phoenix took advantage of SRP’s energy efficiency rebate programs when they sealed their attic and duct systems, replaced their two aging heat pumps with high-efficiency units, added new insulation and installed shade screens on the windows.

“As a result of the improvements, we reduced monthly energy use by more than 22 percent,” Steven Bold said. “The online advice and rebates offered by SRP helped to move the projects along and kept our costs down significantly.”

SRP takes an overarching approach to managing its resources in a way that balances reliability, affordability and environmental stewardship. This balance helps ensure the long-term performance of the grid while managing customers’ costs.

“In a dynamic era of changing resource and emissions requirements, these programs will play a pivotal role in cost-effectively meeting customers’ needs while also helping to optimize resources and protect the environment,” Dreiling said.

The vast majority of commercial energy savings was derived from enhanced lighting rebates through Standard Business Solutions, large commercial and industry energy-efficiency projects through Custom Business Solutions and lighting retrofit projects under the Small Business Solutions program.

Fry’s Food Stores participated in the SRP Business Solutions rebate programs to implement 50 projects in 30 metropolitan Phoenix stores. So far, Fry’s has realized about 1.2 million kilowatt-hours per year in energy savings.

“SRP rebate programs help Fry’s continue to reduce our carbon footprint, which is good for the environment as well as our bottom line,” said Ben Tan, energy manager of Fry’s Food Stores Facilities Engineering.

The SRP Board has set a goal to meet 20 percent of SRP’s retail electricity requirements through sustainable resources by the year 2020. Currently, SRP is ahead of schedule – providing about 12.8 percent of retail energy needs with sustainable resources, including wind, geothermal, solar, landfill gas, biomass and hydropower as well as energy-efficiency programs.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, serving about 990,000 customers.

Final Rendering

Ronald McDonald House Completes $2.1M Capital Campaign

Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix has completed a two-year, $2.1 million fund-raising campaign to cover all construction, furnishing and decorating expenses for the Valley’s third Ronald McDonald House and the first in the East Valley.

Renovation has begun on the 12,600 square foot former health care facility on the campus of Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, which is expected to open in November. The 248-bed Cardon Children’s Medical Center is operated by Banner Health.

The new facility will feature 16 bedrooms, including 2 apartments with kitchens for families with children with suppressed immune systems; a community kitchen, living and dining room; play area for children and outdoor area for adults and children. When completed, and in combination with the other two Ronald McDonald Houses, up to 79 families will have a home-away-from home every night. The new House will provide 5,840 nights a year.

“We now know it’s possible to be relieved and thrilled at the same time,” said Executive Director Nancy Roach, who has been at the helm of the organization for 14 years and has overseen fundraising and construction of two of the three Ronald McDonald Houses in the Valley. “Being able to serve families in the East Valley has been a longtime goal of ours. The community fully understood that by helping to fund this project, they ensure that families traveling to Cardon Children’s Medical Center can stay close to their children.”

The original Ronald McDonald House is located at 501 E. Roanoke Ave. A second House opened in 2008 on the campus of Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

The $2.1 million was secured primarily through private donations from individuals, foundations, corporate supporters and Valley-based McDonald’s owner/operators, who have committed to provide up to $150,000 of required operating expenses for the first three years. The Ronald McDonald House does not receive direct funding from the McDonald’s Corporation, but is generously supported by McDonald’s restaurant owner/operators in Central and Northern Arizona.

Among the largest donors to the project are the Gila River Indian Community, The Kemper Marley Foundation, The Halle Family Foundation, SRP, The Thunderbirds, Ronald McDonald House Charities Global and other generous community donors.

Plans for opening celebrations are underway and details will be announced later this summer.

HKS Architects of Phoenix designed the new house. UEB Builders is the general contractor.

For more information about Ronald McDonald House Charities of Phoenix, visit www.rmhcphoenix.com. For more information about Cardon Children’s Medical Center, visit www.bannerhealth.com/CardonChildrens.

A

SRP Improves Power Outage Map Features

This monsoon season Salt River Project electric customers now have access to more information, thanks to improvements that have been added during the year to SRP’s online Power Outage Map.

The SRP power outage page has been reimaged and allows for easier navigation. On mobile devices, the map is full screen and allows users easier control. Also, reporting an outage is now integrated into the outage page.

“We are constantly looking to improve our customers’ ability to learn about power outages in their area,” said Glen Traasdahl, director of SRP Technology Services. “By looking at what services our customers use and combining it with their valuable feedback, we roll out improvements all year long.”

The new-look outage page now contains more accurate information about each outage, with color-coded boxes that better describe the size of the outage. For example, during the season’s first summer storm on July 3 when more than 14,000 customers were out of power, SRP’s outage map looked like a rainbow with multi-colored boxes showing specific outages in yellow (1 to 100 customers affected), orange (101 to 500 affected), red (501 to 1,000 affected) and purple (more than 1,001 affected). Also, if the outage is a major one in which customers will be out of power for an extended period, a blue box will show the location of where customers can go to pick up free ice.

SRP is also working to provide faster, real-time information, with a goal of providing customers an outage update within 30 minutes of the start of the outage, said Wayne Wisdom, SRP’s director of Electric System Operations. He said that quicker information should be available later this summer.

“We’ll communicate the actual cause in the 30 minutes after the outage has begun for as many outages as we can,” said Wisdom. “If we are not able to determine the cause in this first 30 minutes, we’ll at least update the outage reason within 30 minutes by letting customers know that we’re investigating it and will get a cause identified as soon as we can.”

Wisdom said SRP currently represents outages based on geographical boundaries. Any customer who has signed up for e-notification and whose account lies within those boundaries is notified, he said.

“In the future we may still describe the outage based on a geographical boundary, but we will only notify those customers who are actually affected by the power outage. This means we’ll be able to be more descriptive in our communications,” he said. “For example, today we indicate that a power outage has been reported in your area. In the future, we’ll be able to say that your account/premise is being affected by a power outage.”

SRP first made its expanded power outage map available for all customers in advance of the 2012 monsoon season. Prior to that, the website feature was available only to SRP customers with a My Account ID. That was also the first summer storm season in which the SRP outage map was made available from a smart phone or tablet, which is particularly valuable to affected customers who are looking for real-time information about the estimated time that power will be restored.

By signing up for a notification on My Account, SRP’s online management tool, customers are also able to be alerted via email or text when their home is in an area where an outage has occurred. SRP also routinely posts updates and outage information on Twitter and Facebook during major storms. To get connected, follow @SRPconnect on Twitter or “like” SRP’s Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/srpconnect. During a power outage, SRP customer service representatives can be reached at (602) 236-8888.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, providing electric service to more than 990,000 customers.

energy.bill

SRP Customers Set Record for Energy Demand

For the first time since 2012, Salt River Project on Wednesday delivered a record amount of energy to its Phoenix-area retail customers. Between 4 and 5 p.m., SRP delivered an estimated retail peak demand of 6,707 megawatts.

That peak topped the previous SRP high this summer of 6,382 megawatts on July 22 and the all-time record of 6,663 megawatts on Aug. 8, 2012.

Strong customer demand is the result of several factors, including an increase in the number of SRP electric customers, extreme daytime temperatures, higher overnight temperatures and relatively high humidity. The high temperature recorded in Phoenix on Wednesday was 114 degrees, while the overnight low was 95 degrees.

Because the forecast calls for continuing high temperatures and increasing humidity, SRP power experts predict that records for high energy demand could continue this week.

SRP’s robust electrical grid was able to handle the record demand due in part to investments in new technology as well as a comprehensive maintenance plan to ensure optimal performance. The recently completed units at the Coolidge Generating Station as well as SRP’s wind and solar renewable-energy facilities helped meet the record customer demand, and SRP’s local generating units are all available to help ensure that SRP has enough energy to meet the needs of its customers this summer.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, serving about 990,000 customers.

energy policies

SRP Ranked No. 1 in Performance by J.D. Power

Salt River Project’s electric customers continue to give SRP higher marks for customer satisfaction, according to a report issued today by J.D. Power. With an increase of 21 performance points from a year ago, SRP ranks highest for residential electric service in the western United States among Large electric utilities for the 13th consecutive year.

With a Customer Satisfaction Index score of 730 on a 1,000-point scale in this year’s ranking, it is the 15th time in 16 years (1999, 2000, 2002-2014) that SRP scored the highest in the West among large electric utilities (500,000 or more residential customers). The average score in the West Large Utility region, which covers utilities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming, is 657.

SRP’s score was bolstered by ranking highest in the study’s Large Utilities segment in the West region for all six components, Power Quality and Reliability, Billing and Payment, Corporate Citizenship, Price, Communications and Customer Service.

The 2014 Electric Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction Study is based on responses from more than 104,000 online interviews conducted from July 2013 through May 2014 among residential customers of the 138 largest electric utility brands across the nation, which collectively represent more than 96 million households. More information on the Electric Utility Residential Customer Satisfaction study can be found at http://www.jdpower.com/press-releases/2014-electric-utility-residential-customer-satisfaction-study.

Today’s announcement was the second in the last week by J.D. Power in which SRP was recognized. On July 9, SRP was recognized for contact center operation customer satisfaction excellence under the J.D. Power Certified Contact Center Program. The Certified Contact Center Program distinction acknowledged a strong commitment by SRP’s service contact center operations to provide “An Outstanding Customer Service Experience.” SRP achieved certification for the live phone channel (ninth consecutive year), including interactive voice response (IVR) routing and customer service representative (CSR), as well as for the IVR self-service and Web self-service channels (first year, respectively). For J.D. Power 2014 Contact Center Certification Information, visit jdpower.com.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, providing electric service to more than 990,000 customers. SRP also is the metropolitan area’s largest supplier of water, delivering about 1 million acre-feet to agricultural, urban and municipal water users.

Water Conservation, City of Phoenix

SRP Water Supply Good after Sparse 2014 Runoff

In case anyone missed it, the five-month 2014 winter runoff season finished quite a bit like the previous three January-through-May periods: DRY.

In fact, this year’s five-month snowmelt season produced only 148,000 acre-feet _ the eighth-driest since Salt River Project has been keeping records for the last 116 years and the fourth consecutive year with below-median winter inflows into the SRP reservoirs.

The good news, however, is that the long-term forecast suggests the possibility of an El Niño event by the fall and winter of water year 2015. El Niño is characterized by warmer-than-normal ocean temperatures in the equatorial eastern Pacific. During El Niño events, the Pacific jet stream tracks farther south, with storms from the Pacific Ocean taking aim at the southwestern U.S. while, at the same time, the subtropical jet stream is displaced to the north, often leading to above-normal precipitation over Arizona.

Charlie Ester, SRP’s manager of Water Resource Operations, said that bodes well for a more active monsoon season followed by wetter conditions on the Salt and Verde watersheds next winter.

Ester said an “average” January-to-May runoff season would go a long way toward refilling the reservoirs on the Salt and Verde rivers that today stand at a healthy 53 perfect full with 1.22 million acre-feet stored – nearly the same percentage as one year ago. That followed the most productive runoff season — 444,788 acre-feet of stream flow accumulated in the first five months of 2013 – since 1,418,960 acre-feet of water was accumulated during the 2010 runoff season. The 30-year median runoff is 534,336 acre-feet.

“In spite of the consecutive dry winters, our reservoir system is in a good position to provide full allocation to our water customers because of SRP water resource management practices,” said Ester. “We’re keeping our fingers crossed for an active 2015 runoff season, and so far the early indications are good.”
SRP and central Arizona depend on wet winters and plentiful precipitation on the mountainous regions north and east of the Valley to replenish the reservoirs on the Salt and Verde rivers. Unfortunately, the watersheds contained in those mountainous regions received just 2.85 inches of precipitation from December 2013 through March 2014 — 37% of normal.

Overall, the SRP reservoir system has declined from completely full on May 1, 2010, to 56% full on May 1, 2014. Theodore Roosevelt Lake, which holds about two-thirds of the combined water stored on the Salt and Verde rivers, today stands at 42 percent full. Current storage on the Salt River system is 51 percent; the two reservoirs on the Verde River are a combined 66 percent of capacity.

SRP is the largest raw water supplier in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, normally delivering about 1 million acre-feet annually.

electricity

East Valley Energized by New SRP Line

A major new transmission project that will bring additional electricity and increased reliability to the Valley is now fully energized.

The final phase of the Palo Verde-Southeast Valley-Browning (PV-SEV) 500-kilovolt (kV) project was placed into service for the first time this month. This marked a major milestone for SRP, as it was the last segment of a new 150-mile transmission line that runs from the Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant area near Tonopah to the Browning Substation located in east Mesa.

“We are glad that after 14 years this project is in service,” said John Underhill, SRP’s senior director of System Operations. “The entire East Valley will benefit. This new transmission line, which originates in the West Valley, will now bring that power all the way around to the east. This provides us with another power source into that area, where little or no generating plants are being built east of the Santan Generating Station.”

Prior to the PV-SEV line, SRP depended on a single 500kV transmission line to bring energy from the Palo Verde energy hub to the East Valley. The final line segment, which spans 100 miles, is the last component of the PV-SEV 500-kV project that began construction in 2006, after six years of planning and approvals.

The project resulted from a study by SRP and other Arizona electric utilities, and approval by the Arizona Corporation Commission, showing a need for increased transmission capacity to meet increasing energy demands created by business and residential growth in central Arizona and Tucson. The study concluded that energy deliveries in central Arizona required a new transmission line and other equipment additions, significant upgrades to existing equipment, and the project overall would increase system reliability.

“Years of planning and hard work by many entities, including SRP employees and contract personnel, resulted in a quality project that will serve the needs of the customers for many years to come,” said Dan Hawkins, senior project manager of Major Transmission Projects for SRP.

The project has included the building of five large substations — Pinal West, Duke, Pinal Central, Abel and Dinosaur — and additions to the existing Hassayampa and Browning substations. Also as part of the project, two 500/230-kV transformers at Pinal Central and one 500/230-kV transformer at Duke, located in Pinal County, were energized May 30 and June 12, respectively. The PW-SEV-BOB Project will serve customers in Pinal, Pima and Maricopa counties.

“The design and building of the 150-mile system is really remarkable,” added Underhill. “I received a firsthand aerial view as our staff inspected the line in a helicopter. It’s impressive how we were able to build the line to blend in with the landscape.”

Partners in the transmission project include SRP (project manager), Tucson Electric Power Co., Electrical District #2, Electrical District #3, Electrical District #4, Western Area Power Administration and the Southwest Transmission Cooperative Inc.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, providing electric service to more than 990,000 customers.

football

Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee Announces Board

The Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee announces its Board of Directors for Super Bowl XLIX. The board of directors is comprised of business leaders that volunteer their time to drive the state’s efforts for Super Bowl XLIX.

The Host Committee is a private, non-profit Arizona corporation. The mandate of the Host Committee is to galvanize local stakeholders in a united approach to hosting the largest single-day sporting event by maximizing positive media exposure, fueling the economic engine of Arizona and leaving a lasting legacy long after the excitement of the Big Game. The board was assembled in 2013 to begin planning and to garner local corporate support and sponsors.

Board members include:
● Board Chair David Rousseau, president, SRP

● Brad Anderson, executive vice president, brokerage office services, CB Richard Ellis

● Michael Bidwill, president, Arizona Cardinals

● Jose Cardenas, senior vice president and general council, Arizona State University

● David Farca, president, ToH Design Studio

● Jim Grogan, chief operating officer, International Capital Investment Company

● Michael Haenel, executive vice president, Cassidy Turley

● Mike Kennedy, partner, Gallagher & Kennedy, P.A. (chairman, Super Bowl XLII Host Committee in 2008)

● Dan Lewis, senior vice president, Sovereign Finance

● Jeffrey Lowe, president, MidFirst Bank

● Mary Martuscelli, regional president for the private client reserve, U.S. Bank

● Andrew McCain, vice president and CFO, Hensley Beverage Company

● Patrick McGinley, vice president of property management, Vestar

● Steve Moore, president and CEO, Greater Phoenix CVB

● Jodi Noble, partner, Deloitte

● Jay Parry, president and CEO, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee

● Earl Petznick Jr., president and CEO, Northside Hay Company

● Ken Van Winkle, managing partner, Lewis Roca Rothgerber LLP

● KJ Wagner, president and CEO, Willis of Arizona, Inc.

● David Watson, co-founder and managing partner, mybody and president and managing partner, Revolution Tea

● John Zidich, CEO, Republic Media Publisher, The Arizona Republic

“We have an impressive group of business leaders working together to meet the fundraising goals for Super Bowl XLIX and to maximize the opportunity to build the Arizona brand in this unparalleled global spotlight,” said David Rousseau, Arizona Super Bowl Host Committee chairman. “We want to promote Arizona as an ideal destination for businesses and tourists well beyond Super Bowl XLIX.”

Super Bowl XLIX is scheduled to be played at University Of Phoenix Stadium on February 1, 2015, marking Arizona’s second Super Bowl in seven years. In Super Bowl XLII at University of Phoenix Stadium on February 3, 2008, The New York Giants beat the New England Patriots 17-14. Arizona’s first big game, Super Bowl XXX, was held at Arizona State University’s Sun Devil Stadium in 1996, with the Dallas Cowboys beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 27-17.

For more information on the Board of Directors, please visit http://azsuperbowl.com/about-us/meet-the-team/

energy policies

Southwest Renewable Resource launches Website

The member electric utility companies of the Southwest Variable Energy Resources Initiative (SVERI) have launched a dedicated website that provides near real-time data for renewable energy resources from across the desert Southwest.

SVERI is partnering with the University of Arizona to collect, display and analyze generator output and electric customer load data from the participating companies. The website is available to the public and can be accessed at http://sveri.uaren.org.

The SVERI participants include Arizona Electric Power Cooperative, Arizona Public Service Co., El Paso Electric Co., Imperial Irrigation District, Public Service Company of New Mexico, Salt River Project, Tucson Electric Power Co. and the Western Area Power Administration’s Desert Southwest Region.

“Challenges being faced in the Pacific Northwest and California in integrating renewable generation drove the creation of this investigatory effort,” said Robert Kondziolka, director of Transmission and Generation Operations at SRP and the current chair of the management committee for SVERI.
“Our objective is to collectively determine if and when the integration of renewable resources into our respective systems may create operational challenges, and to identify the most appropriate tools to address this challenge. Our overall goal is always to ensure continued system reliability and to provide benefits to our customers.”

SVERI was formed in the fall of 2012 to evaluate the likely penetration, locations and operating characteristics of variable energy resources within the Southwest over the next 20 years. The SVERI participants are exploring tools that may facilitate variable energy resource integration and provide benefits to customers.

clear energy systems coming to tempe

SRP Increases Renewable Energy Portfolio

Salt River Project has agreed to purchase an additional amount of renewable geothermal energy from a number of plants located in the Imperial Valley of southern California. SRP has amended its agreement with CalEnergy, LLC to add an additional 37 megawatts to a previous contracted agreement of 50 megawatts for a combined capacity of 87 megawatts. One megawatt is about enough energy to power approximately 250 homes in the Phoenix area.

The geothermal facilities are located in Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource Area – one of the world’s most prolific regions for the production of renewable energy. SRP’s purchase will begin with 18 megawatts in 2016 and grow to the full 87 megawatts in 2020. The agreement will allow SRP to continue providing its customers with sustainable energy from these facilities until 2039.

A geothermal plant produces electricity from naturally occurring geothermal fluid. Steam is formed when production wells tap into superheated water reservoirs thousands of feet beneath the Earth’s surface. Unlike other forms of renewable energy such as solar or wind, geothermal power plants are highly reliable as they produce energy continuously, irrespective of the time of the day or weather conditions.

Geothermal is one of the cleanest sources of baseload generation because, instead of burning fossil fuel to heat water into steam as seen in most conventional forms of generation, heat from the Earth is used to create steam that powers a turbine generator. Geothermal energy is considered renewable energy because no fuel is consumed and the energy is from naturally occurring sources.

SRP estimates that the geothermal power generated by the project will offset approximately 800 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions each year – the equivalent of taking about 70,000 cars off the road.

Under SRP’s Sustainable Portfolio goals, SRP must meet 20 percent of its retail electricity requirements through sustainable resources by the year 2020.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix area, serving nearly 990,000 electric customers.

APS Hyder II solar power plant located in Hyder, Arizona.

Green development stays sunny side up

Debates over energy consumption, reduction and alternatives occur frequently in the increasingly “green” world. Arizona stands as a leader in the alternative energy market with the use of solar, geothermal energy and natural gas as alternatives to more traditional energy providers. Even through the decline of green building projects, as reported by Forbes, major companies and builders such as APS, SRP and Adolfson & Peterson (A&P) have completed large alternative energy projects in the last year.

Arizona Public Service, through the APS AZ Sun Program, and McCarthy Building Companies completed its third solar project, a large solar installation called the Hyder II in Yuma County last year. It uses more than 71,000 single-axis tracking photovoltaic panels to generate 14 megawatts of solar energy, which is enough to serve 3,500 Arizona homes. The project set a record year for APS with 410 megawatts of solar power and represented the largest annual increase in solar capacity, nearly tripling the total from 2012. APS contains more than 750 megawatts of solar capacity on its system after investing nearly $1B in solar projects, and serves more than 185,000 Arizona homes. Another large solar project built last year is the Fry’s Marketplace PowerParasol, which shades 74,800 SF, including 220 parking spaces, driveways, aisles, grocery cart stations and sidewalks. It diminishes the heat-island effect, enables light passage to allow the growth of plants and generates 1,013,140 kilowatt hours of solar energy.
aps-quote
Geothermal energy is another popular source of renewable energy in Arizona. Both SRP and A&P developed geothermal projects in 2013. Geothermal energy produces electricity from naturally occurring geothermal fluid, and steam forms when production wells access superheated water reservoirs thousands of feet beneath the Earth’s surface. As opposed to wind and solar that are affected by the weather, geothermal is a more reliable source of renewable energy. SRP purchased 50 megawatts of geothermal energy from CalEnergy. The project will annually offset 460 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions, the equivalent of 40,000 cars. SRP also has an agreement to purchase geothermal energy from the Hudson Ranch facility in California and Utah’s Cove Fort plant.

A&P’s latest geothermal project is Lookout Mountain Elementary School where it constructed a closed-loop system that allows the ground’s heat to warm the building during the winter and reverse the process in the summer by transferring heat back into the ground. The system does not use any chemicals, untreated water or Freon. A&P expect it to last up to 30 years and the underground wells to last up to 75 years. The classrooms’ energy consumption will be reduced by 40 percent and the low maintenance and operations costs will save the school district up to $1.8M over the next 20 years.

Although there are many green projects occurring, there is a decline in contracts. Bryan Dunn, senior vice president of A&P, states that “the disconnect between the demand and not seeing as many ‘green contracts’ is that there are more and more building owners viewing a formal certification process as expensive and lengthy. Tight budgets don’t allow for the upfront costs associated with a formal green certification. Instead, they are looking to incorporate the energy saving and durability aspects of green building into their projects without a formal certification of the building.”

Dunn also says solar technology may be played out. He is seeing trends with technology, such as waste-to-energy, bio-mass and bio-gas and geothermal energy. “Clients are considering several types of alternative technologies on single projects…Utilizing multiple solutions also keeps overall and total project costs down, benefiting everyone in the long run,” he adds.

Besides the cost of green projects, Scott Canada from McCarthy explains that projects may be slowing because of supply and demand. “There may be a near-term slowing of new projects while Arizona’s energy consumption begins to grow again, with the improving economy. Energy, including renewables, often cycles between a period of expansion and pause,” he says, adding that solar costs are continuing to drop, making it an attractive energy source, especially with the abundance of sunshine in Arizona. In its latest forecast, APS predicts renewable energy, gas in particular, will double in Arizona by 2029.

Small Business Leadership Academy: Lauri Leadley

ASU and SRP Help Small Businesses

Small businesses play a key role in our economy, creating jobs and helping our community. The W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University is offering a program to help small business owners and executives learn how to improve efficiency, streamline operations and raise profits. The seventh annual Small Business Leadership Academy is available to the leaders of small and diverse local businesses.

“Small businesses play a crucial role in our economy, and the W. P. Carey School of Business is very interested in helping local business owners to succeed through added education in subjects like strategy, branding and teamwork,” said Dean Amy Hillman of the W. P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University. “We designed the Small Business Leadership Academy to fit into the busy schedules of executives from growing businesses.”

Salt River Project (SRP), the program’s founding co-sponsor, is offering a number of scholarships to its current suppliers and small business customers.

“The partnership we have with ASU, coupled with the sponsorship and scholarships we offer to the academy, is a natural fit for SRP in supporting economic development within our own community,” said Carrie Young, senior director of SRP Corporate Operations Services.

The eight-week academy and its graduation will run on Wednesday nights from Sept. 3 to Oct. 29. The curriculum will cover business strategy, branding, competing through services, negotiations, management and teamwork, among other areas. Program applications are due July 18.

Participants must:

> Have been in business for at least three years,
> Have annual revenues between $1 million and $10 million,
> Have fewer than 100 employees,
> Be the owner or principal of the business.

Applicants must be able to attend all scheduled classes and related activities. Those who complete the program will receive Continuing Education Units (CEUs) from Arizona State University. These units are widely used as a measure of participation in non-credit, professional development courses.

For more information about sponsoring a scholarship or applying to the program offered through the nationally ranked W. P. Carey School of Business, call (480) 965-7579, e-mail or visit http://wpcarey.asu.edu/executive-education/small-business-academy. Current SRP suppliers can also contact SRP’s Supplier Diversity Department for information about this year’s nominating process at SupplierDiversity@srpnet.com.

CGS Documentation Scrubber Removal

SRP Environmental Project Improves State’s Air Quality

A $470 million dollar effort to further reduce emissions from the Salt River Project’s largest single generator of electricity is now complete. On May 1, the last component of the project – selective catalytic reduction technology (SCR) – to lower nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from the Coronado Generating Station in St. Johns became operational.

The project was a result of a 2008 agreement between SRP and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to improve regional air quality by installing equipment and systems to remove additional emissions of NOx and sulfur dioxide (SO2) from CGS.

The new controls not only further reduce SO2 and NOx emissions from the plant, but also address mercury emissions.

“CGS is a critical component of SRP’s fleet of generating facilities that provide affordable and reliable electricity to our customers 24 hours a day,” said CGS manager Dan Bevier. “Now we will be able to achieve this goal and significantly reduce emissions.”

CGS, owned and operated by SRP, uses coal as a fuel to generate electricity from two 400-megawatt units for SRP customers in the greater Phoenix metropolitan area. Completed in 1980, the plant was equipped with then state-of-the-art emission controls including partial flow scrubbers for SO2 reductions and electrostatic precipitators for particulate matter reduction.

The environmental improvement project included the installation of low NOx burners on each of the two units – one in 2009 and the other in 2011. Additionally, SRP constructed new 100 percent flow SO2 removal systems on each of the units – one in 2011 and one in 2012. The project was completed when the SCR on unit 2 was installed and became operational on May 1.

According to SRP senior project manager Gary Barras, the environmental improvement effort at CGS was one of the largest construction projects in Arizona and involved nearly 3,000 workers and contractors at a time when the state was in the midst of the great recession. Barras said the project team completed each phase of work on-schedule and with an outstanding safety record.
The project also included the construction of two new 400-foot concrete exhaust stacks, two 22,000-square-foot multi-level absorber buildings and required more than 4,000 individual pieces of equipment. In addition, more than 29,000 cubic-yards of concrete, nearly 8,000 tons of ductwork and structural steel and more than a million feet of new conductor were needed. The project team also coordinated a global supply chain of consultants and specialized equipment manufacturers located on four major continents.

In addition to installing enhanced emission controls at CGS and as part of the agreement with EPA, SRP funded $4 million in several supplemental environmental projects including installing 100 to 200-kilowatt solar photovoltaic systems at public schools, upgrading emission controls on school buses and replacing wood-burning stoves with clean-burning wood pellet stoves. All of the supplemental environmental projects are contributing to cleaner air in the communities near CGS and in metropolitan Phoenix.

SRP is the largest provider of electricity to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area, serving more than 985,000 customers.

phoenix

GPEC Earns Economic Development honor

Cited as one of the Best to Invest Top U.S. Groups of 2013, the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) has once again made Site Selection magazine’s annual ranking for top U.S. Economic Development Groups.

“This recognition is a reflection of our elected and business leaders working together to promote Greater Phoenix and Arizona as business friendly,” said Barry Broome, president and CEO of the Greater Phoenix Economic Council. “The Arizona Competitiveness Package of 2011 and subsequent economic development policies have dramatically shifted our market’s competitive position towards advanced manufacturing and other high-tech industries.”

The ranking took into account four objective categories: new jobs, new jobs per 10,000 residents, new investment amount and new investment per 10,000 residents. “This year’s Best to Invest Top Groups in the U.S. all demonstrated an ability to reach new markets while reaping significant reinvestments from their existing industries,” said Ron Starner, general manager and executive vice president of Conway Data Inc. and Site Selection magazine.

The magazine also features a ranking for top North American deals of 2013, highlighting the Apple, Inc. locate to Mesa, Ariz. The collaboration included a partnership between GPEC, the Arizona Commerce Authority, the city of Mesa, DMB Associates, Maricopa County, and Salt River Project.

Several factors contributed to determining the Top Deals of 2013, including: level of capital investment, degree of high-wage jobs, creativity in negotiations and incentives, regional economic impact, competition for the project and speed to market. “Trends among this elite group of projects include a penchant for free trade zones and an awareness that sometimes facility reuse is as good as brand new,” said Adam Bruns, managing editor of Site Selection.

Broome credits the successful consummation of the project to “years of work on infrastructure, permitting, and crafting performance-based incentives.” He also cited the ability to offer a “turnkey real estate option” as a key factor in sealing the deal.

Fresh Water is Becoming Scarcer with the Planet's Changing Climate

CAP has $1 Trillion Impact on Arizona Economy

Key players in Arizona’s water supply gathered today at the GPEC Ambassador Event to discuss the future of water in greater Phoenix at Renaissance Square in Downtown Phoenix.

The event featured a panel consisted of David Modeer, general manager at Central Arizona Project, Grady Gammage Jr., an Attorney at Gammage & Burnham, Dave Roberts, the Senior Diretor of Water Resources at Salt River Project, and Michael Lacey, the director at Arizona Department of Water Resources.

The panel attempted to address various concerns facing Arizona’s water supply that have come to fruition as a result of what has been a 14-year drought extending from Texas to California.

“The efforts that the people on this panel and others have been making over the last 5-10 years in response to the drought, and going forward, are without question one of the most important efforts made to sustain the economy and quality of life of this state,” Modeer said.

The importance of the efforts to sustain Arizona’s water supply was highlighted in a study by the W.P. Carey School of Business at Arizona State University.

According to the study, “Central Arizona Project’s delivery of Colorado River water from 1986 through 2010 has generated in excess of $1 trillion of Arizona’s gross state product.”

Between 2005 and 2010 alone, it is pointed out in the study, CAP’s contribution to gross state product increased 27.7 percent to 49.5 percent.

“The significance of what’s at stake for Arizona is unparalleled,” Modeer said. “Without water, we don’t have a viable state of Arizona.”

While plans for the future and actions that have already been taken were discussed with optimism, Lacey acknowledged that there are no definitive answers.

“I have people come up to me all the time and say, ‘so do we have enough water?’” he said. “And, that is exactly like if I come up to one of you and say, ‘do you have enough money?’”

The answer to both of those questions, he said, is: “it depends.”

“The real questions are ‘what do we do with the water we have and what are our chances of getting more?” he said.

In addressing these questions, Lacey said that the public needs to overcome several misconceptions.
One of these misconceptions, he said, stems from the fact that Arizona is the junior right holder on the Colorado River.

“Unfortunately, I think the public’s perception is, if there’s a declaration of shortage on the river, then Phoenix is dry,” he said. “That’s not true. While we are the junior right holder, it is highly unlikely that there will be nothing in the canal.”

Also, he said, even if there is a shortage, it will be mostly agriculture that is affected, not municipal use.

“A declaration of water is not going to mean there isn’t water coming out of your tap,” he said.
While it was acknowledged that there is no sure answer in addressing the issues, the discussion served as an opportunity to find consensual agreements between important Arizona figures.

“The issue that we in the system are dealing with is ‘how do you get an agreement among a really diverse group of states and water rights holders within those states to do something now?’” Modeer said.

college_students

SRP awards MCC Foundation $270,000

Salt River Project (SRP) will create a Scholars Fund at the Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation to recognize and assist outstanding Maricopa students who are studying a variety of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) related programs. SRP is making a $250,000 contribution that will be provided to the Foundation over the next six years; it will grant renewable scholarships to qualifying students.

SRP will also donate an additional $20,000 – $10,000 each to Chandler-Gilbert and Estrella Mountain Community Colleges – for a total of $270,000. These donations will establish a Get into Energy fund for students pursuing an energy-related career at each school.

“We support students and programs at the 10 Maricopa Community Colleges,” said Dr. Steven R. Helfgot, CEO of the Maricopa Community Colleges Foundation. “With the generosity of supporters like the Salt River Project, we are truly able to offer more resources and opportunities to our students.”

“SRP’s mission when evaluating any scholarship opportunity is to enhance the value added to our community and provide financial assistance to outstanding students. We look forward to this opportunity to partner with Maricopa Community Colleges and hope to, in turn, generate a pipeline of highly skilled potential employees,” said Kellee Zavala, SRP Manager of Talent Acquisition.

baby_trees

Nonprofit giving away drought-tolerant trees

The Valley Permaculture Alliance (VPA), a small nonprofit organization, has big plans to help homeowners reduce energy bills and improve air quality: give away 2,000 drought-tolerant shade trees by the end of June and 100,000 trees over the next ten years.

Through partnerships with APS and SRP, Valley homeowners completing a tree-planting education workshop designed by a certified arborist can take home two free 3-to-5-gallon desert adaptive, low-water, fast-growing trees per property. For details about times, locations and to register, visit www.vpaaz.org or call (602) 535-4635, Ext. 101.

The offer is only good one time for each property.

Upcoming giveaways are scheduled in Chandler, Mesa, North Scottsdale, Phoenix, Surprise and Tempe.

Workshops, organized and offered either online or in a classroom, provide information about:
 how to pick the right spot on the property to create shade for the home to reduce energy
 picking the right tree
 how to properly plant the tree in rock, grass or decomposed granite
 how to maintain the tree.

“We are the tree people,” said VPA Executive Director Jennifer Bonnett.

“We give away free trees and have for several years. Our Shade Tree program reduces energy and improves air quality. Shade trees planted on the west, east or south side of residential buildings can cut energy an average of 214 kilowatt hours per year per mature tree. Our mission is to educate and engage the entire community to create a healthier, more efficient environment. If we can add a cost-effectiveness factor to the outcome, even better.”

Bonnett said that 10,000 shade trees planted near homes would reduce CO2 emissions from power plants by about 15,000 metric tons over 30 years.

Shade Tree workshops and giveaways are scheduled throughout the year on Saturday mornings.

APS-territory workshops are scheduled at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. on the dates that follow. Registration must be completed online.
 April 26: North Scottsdale Distribution, Grayhawk Elementary School, 7525 E. Grayhawk Drive, Scottsdale.
 May 10: Tempe Distribution, Skysong Center, 1475 N. Scottsdale Road, Scottsdale.
 May 17: Surprise Workshop and Distribution, Communiversity @ Surprise, 15950 N. Civic Center Plaza, Surprise.

SRP-territory workshops are scheduled at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Registration must be completed online.

 May 3: South Phoenix Workshop & Distribution, South Mountain Community College, 7050 S. 24th St., Phoenix.
 June 7: Phoenix Workshop, Desert Botanical Garden, 1201 W. Galvin Parkway, Phoenix.
 July 12: Chandler Workshop, Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Williams Campus, 7360 E. Tahoe Avenue, Mesa.

For more information about the Shade Tree Program and all VPA programs, visit www.vpaaz.org.

aerospace

Industry leaders view aerospace prospects

Through a joint effort led by Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Authority, Able Aerospace Services and SRP, industry leaders at next week’s MRO Americas convention in Phoenix will gain a birds-eye view of expansion and relocation opportunities in the Valley. The opportunity comes courtesy of a VIP aerial helicopter tour, as well as a reception and tour at Able Aerospace Services—a $20 million build-to-suit success story at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

“We are extremely proud of our relocation to Gateway, not only because of our expansion into a state-of-the-art facility but also because of the partnership that this building represents,” said Lee Benson, CEO of Able Aerospace Services. “This was a collaboration in every sense. We are honored to share our story with others in our industry who might benefit from these same opportunities.”

A total of three VIP tours will depart from downtown Phoenix on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 on a Bell 212 helicopter provided by event partner SRP. The tour will fly participants over Greater Phoenix for an aerial view of the Valley, then make an intermediate stop at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport for a reception and tour of the new $20 million Able Aerospace Services headquarters—an industry leading repair, overhaul, design and manufacturing facility, and a leading aftermarket supplier of FAA-approved replacement parts.

The Able event will include a short presentation on the cost savings incentives that made its new facility possible, and provide an opportunity for guests to talk directly with local leaders and partners in the MRO aerial tour, including the City of Phoenix, City of Mesa, Town of Gilbert, Town of Queen Creek, City of Apache Junction and the Gila River Indian Community. The return flight will fly over Falcon Field, then back to downtown Phoenix.

“This is a truly unique way for us to share Greater Phoenix’s regional assets with aerospace leaders from across the globe,” said Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport Business Development Director Michael Merk. “In the span of about 100 minutes, we will showcase the best and brightest of our development and expansion opportunities—from the sky and from the state-of-the-art Able Aerospace Services operation that has made Gateway Airport a true manufacturing destination.”

MRO Americas provides a world-class venue for the aviation/aerospace industry to exchange ideas, share best practices, gain knowledge, generate new business leads and cement existing relationships with other commercial air transport, maintenance, repair and overhaul leaders. The three-day event is held at a different U.S. location each year. This year, it is being held April 8 – 10 at the Phoenix Convention Center.

clear energy systems coming to tempe

SRP Elections Fill 46 Seats

Voters in Salt River Project elections Tuesday elected new officers and filled 22 seats on the board and council of the Salt River Project Agricultural Improvement and Power District and new officers and 20 seats on the board and council of the Salt River Valley Water Users’ Association – SRP’s collective governing bodies.

Results from Tuesday’s election become official after a canvass by the SRP boards at their next meetings on Monday, April 7. The newly elected officials will take office May 5 and 6. The terms of SRP president, vice president, board and council seats are all four years.

In unofficial results posted this morning, SRP President David Rousseau of Phoenix and Vice President John R. “Randy” Hoopes of Chandler were re-elected to their second four-year terms. Both candidates were unopposed.

In other unofficial results in which Board incumbents faced challengers, John “Jack” M. White Jr. of Phoenix was re-elected over Ray Arvizu of Phoenix for Seats 6 in both the District and Association; incumbent William W. “Bill” Arnett of Mesa held off challenger Connie Wilhelm of Phoenix for District at-large Seat 12; and incumbent Wendy L. Marshall of Phoenix defeated John Hulburd of Phoenix for District at-large Seat 14.

In contested board seats in which there was no incumbent seeking re-election, Mark V. Pace of Gilbert won Seats 10 in both the District and Association; defeating Mark J. Andersen of Gilbert in the unofficial results. Pace will succeed the retiring Dwayne Dobson on the Board.

In non-contested board seats, incumbent Paul Rovey of Peoria won Seats 2 and Deborah S. Hendrickson of Tempe won Seats 8 in both the District and Association.

In non-contested board seats in which there was no incumbent seeking re-election, Leslie C. Williams of Phoenix won Seats 4 in both the District and Association.

In contested Council races, unofficial winners were Jacqueline “Jacque” L. Miller, Nicholas J. Vanderwey and Robert W. Warren for Seats 6; and Dave B. Lamoreaux, William P. Schrader Jr. and William “Billy” P. Schrader III for Seats 10.

Also elected to Council seats were Jerry Geiger, Kimberly Owens and Bill Sheely for Seats 2; Garvey M. Biggers, M. Brandon Brooks and Michael G. Rakow for District 4; Christopher J. Dobson, Mark L. Farmer and Mark C. Pedersen for Seats 8.

Elected to Council seats were Geiger, Owens and Sheely for Seats 2; Biggers, Brooks and Rakow for Seats 4; and Dobson, Farmer and Pedersen for Seats 8.

SRP is locally regulated by officials elected from within the Salt River Reservoir District boundaries. The Association and District boards establish policy, approve annual budgets, and set prices and fees. Councils for both Association and District amend and enact bylaws, and make appointments to vacant board, council and vice president seats. Traditionally, candidates seek identical positions in each organization.

To be eligible to vote, District and Association electors must be the owner of qualified land, or an individual who has been appointed by the trustee(s) to vote qualified land held in a qualifying trust as of Dec. 22, 2013. In addition, District electors must be a qualified, registered Arizona voter and reside within the state of Arizona. Association electors must also be at least 18 years of age.

All Association positions and all but the four District at-large board positions (Seats 11, 12, 13 and 14) are elected on an acreage-based voting system. The four District at-large board members are elected on a one-vote-per-landowner basis.

SRP is the largest provider of water and power to the greater Phoenix metropolitan area.

SolarPower

Tempe finishing 924-Kw solar project

The City of Tempe, in partnership with SRP and Solar City, is preparing to place the final panel on the city’s largest solar project. Located at Tempe’s South Water Treatment Plant, the project features more than 3,000 solar panels that will generate more than 1.6 million kilowatt hours of electricity each year, supplying 15 percent of the plant’s energy needs.

“This is an important step in the City of Tempe’s commitment to sustainability,” said Tempe Mayor Mark Mitchell. “This is the first and the largest of several solar projects that we’ll be implementing at city facilities over the next few years.”

Tempe expects to save more than $25,500 in utility costs during the first year, with anticipated savings of $2.3 million over 20 years. The project will reduce the water plant’s carbon emissions by 1,130 metric tons annually, equivalent to removing 235 cars from the road each year.

“The city of Tempe is to be commended for investing in green energy to provide water, a valuable resource, to its residents,” said Lori Singleton, SRP’s Director of Emerging Customer Programs for Solar, Sustainability and Telecom. “We commend the City of Tempe for their commitment to solar energy.”

Future solar projects include a 250-kilowatt facility at Tempe’s downtown Police/Courts building and 900-kilowatt facility at the city’s Johnny G. Martinez Water Treatment Plant.

advertising

Cramer-Krasselt Dominates 2014 ADDY Awards

The local advertising industry celebrated its version of the Oscars last weekend and Cramer-Krasselt dominated the competition with 18 awards, including two gold, five silver and 11 bronze honors for a wide range of clients.

Hosted by the Metro Phoenix Chapter of the American Advertising Federation, the annual ADDY Awards honor advertising excellence in print, radio, television, digital, out-of-home and other categories.

A record 500 entries were evaluated by a distinguished panel of judges representing the nation’s top advertising and integrated marketing agencies.

“Our work is based on the idea that the brand with the most friends wins,” said Ian Barry, C-K’s senior vice president and executive creative director. “We work tirelessly to uncover insights that not only help us create memorable work for a wide range of clients, but that also drive their businesses.”

Among C-K’s award-winning work was:

Arizona Science Center
(Out-Of-Home: Bronze Winner)
C-K extended its “Never Stop Wondering” campaign inside Arizona Science Center to ask questions about, well, everything.

Phoenix Coyotes
(Newspaper: Bronze Winner)
The “Hungrier than Ever” campaign conveyed new ownership’s commitment to the team and a renewed commitment to Phoenix Coyotes’ fans.

MGM Grand
(Consumer or Trade Publication: Silver Winner)
Print ads in high-profile publications such as Entertainment Weekly, Bon Appetit and Travel + Leisure underscored MGM Grand’s position as the ultimate entertainment authority in Las Vegas, with legendary events, along with world-class nightlife, dining and shows.

Monterey County Convention and Visitors Bureau
(Newspaper: Bronze and Silver Winner)
“Grabbing life by the moments” was the premise of a new campaign for Monterey County Convention and Visitors Bureau. The idea was to highlight the amazing moments visitors can experience in Monterey, layered with the destination’s carpe diem attitude toward life.

Salt River Project (TV: Bronze and Silver Winner)
It feels good to save money and energy. This campaign brings that good feeling to life with light-hearted and exaggerated scenarios in TV, online, radio, and print. C-K also worked to secure specific media placements that align with “feel good” moments.

Valley Toyota Dealers (TV: Bronze, Silver and Gold Winner)
Eight years and still going strong, C-K’s “Pat” campaign for Valley Toyota Dealers took the quirky spokesperson’s antics to a new level, while driving robust vehicle sales.

scam

SRP Warns of Business Scam

Business customers of Salt River Project continue to be subjected to a phone scam where the caller fraudulently demands money for an electricity payment. SRP customer service representatives have received numerous phone calls from concerned customers, primarily those who operate restaurants, convenience stores or markets. However, the scam artists last week increased their activity on Valentine’s Day when they targeted floral shops on one of the busiest days of their year.

The pattern is similar in most cases. The imposters try to convince customers that their power is in danger of being cut off, sometimes during their busiest time of the day, and that only an immediate credit card or debit card payment can avoid disconnection of service. Some customers are instructed to go to a nearby convenience store where they can buy a prepaid card, load it with money and call back with a card number so funds can be withdrawn immediately.

“Many customers call SRP to confirm whether their electricity bill is due and avoid paying scam artists, however some customers may not understand that SRP does not call to demand payments and are not so fortunate,” said Renee Castillo, senior director of SRP Customer Services.

To avoid becoming a victim of these scams, Castillo urges customers to:
· Never give your credit or debit card number or other personal information to any caller or visitor without knowing their true identity.
· When any concern arises, immediately contact the account manager listed on the top portion of the SRP bill statement or the SRP Business Contact Center at (602) 236-8833.
· Residential customers can call SRP at (602) 236-8888 for accurate information about their electric account, program information or to confirm SRP employee identification.
· Contact the FTC at 1-877-382-4357 and local police if they receive a similar call from a scam artist.

A reminder to all business and residential customers:

· SRP will send out a delinquent reminder bill if the account becomes eligible for disconnection.
· SRP recommends signing up for MyAccount to view and manage accounts online at any time on www.srpnet.com.

theater

Artigue Elected President of ATC Board

Cameron Artigue, an attorney with Gammage & Burnham in Phoenix, has been elected President of Arizona Theatre Company’s Board of Trustees. Robert Glaser, Principle at PICOR Commercial Real Estate Properties in Tucson continues to serve as Chair.

Glaser and Artigue will be joined on the Executive Committee by:

 Immediate Past Chair – Michael Seiden, Former President and CEO of Western International University, Phoenix

 Vice President – Phoenix, Susan Segal, an attorney with Gust Rosenfeld PLC

 Vice President (Tucson) – Lynne Wood Dusenberry, University of Arizona – retired;

 Assistant Treasurer – Marc Erpenbeck, President and Chief Legal Counsel, George Brazil, Phoenix

Secretary – Robert Taylor, Senior Director of Regulatory Policy and Public Involvement, Salt River Project, Phoenix.

 Assistant Secretary – Dina Scalone-Romero, Executive Director, Therapeutic Riding of Tucson

For more information, visit www.arizonatheatre.org.

electricity

SRP offers free electrical safety workshop

SRP is sponsoring a free Electric Safety Workshop to educate workers on the potential hazards of working near overhead and underground electrical power lines and other utilities. The workshop will focus on tree workers, landscapers and excavators as well as individuals who work around utility lines.

Instruction will be in English and Spanish.

The event will include safety presentations on overhead and underground electrical, gas and other utilities, OSHA regulations, Blue Stake procedures, trenching and shoring demonstrations, and live electrical demonstrations of what can happen when contact is made with power lines. The event will also feature presentations by the Arizona Division of Occupational Safety and Health, Southwest Gas, Cox Communications, Arizona Blue Stake, Arizona Burn Center, Trench Shore Rentals, Asplundh Tree Expert Company and Liberty Wildlife. There will also be safety presentations including a live tree rescue and hazards involving chain saws and aerial lifts.

Participants must be 18 years or older. The workshop includes lunch and a chance to win raffle prizes. Tree workers can receive 4.5 CEUs (A/U/T/M) from the International Society of Arboriculture.

When: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, February 22. Registration begins at 6 a.m.
Registration and RSVP deadline is February 14.

Where: SRP’s PERA Club, 1 East Continental Drive in Tempe.

Why: Every year, professional tree trimmers, landscapers and excavators are killed or seriously injured in electrical contact tree-trimming and excavation accidents.  Workers also operate dangerous equipment and are vulnerable to serious injuries when working near overhead and underground electric lines and other utilities.

For more information or to register, call (602) 236-2995 or email electricsafetywksp@srpnet.com.