Tag Archives: St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

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St. Joseph’s and Barrow’s add new board members

The Board of Directors of St. Joseph’s Foundation recently elected two new members for Fiscal Year 2015. The new board members are:

Barry Berman, of Scottsdale, graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a bachelor’s in business administration, a major in finance and a minor in accounting. He began his career as an equity trader at The Milwaukee Co. and Loewl & Co. Berman joined Robert W. Baird and Co. Inc. in 1974 as senior vice-president and director, working there for 32 years before his retirement in 2006.

Greg Valladao, of Phoenix, is a senior managing director at Cushman and Wakefield. He earned a bachelor’s degree with a double major in political science and history from Tulane University in New Orleans and a juris doctorate from the University of Arizona College of Law. For the past 30 years, he has used his extensive retail, sales, management and legal expertise to become a well-respected commercial real estate executive with a reputation as a regional retail expert.

The Board of Trustees of Barrow Neurological Foundation (BNF) recently added three new members and elected a slate of officers. The new members are as follows:

David Farca, of Scottsdale, is president of ToH Design Studio. Farca was born and raised in Mexico City. He earned a degree in biomedical engineering from Universidad Iberoamericana, a degree in medical imaging infrastructure from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a master’s in business administration from Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México. Farca built a medical imaging business in Mexico that grew into one of the industry’s largest government suppliers. In 2000, he sold the business and moved to Scottsdale, where he and his wife, Mavi, opened ToH Design Studio.

Michael Hecomovich, of Scottsdale, is the founder and chairman/CEO, Global Marketing Services. Hecomovich earned a bacheolor’s degree in engineering from the United States Naval Academy and a master’s in business administration from the Thunderbird School of Global Management. He has more than 30 years of experience in general management, sales, marketing and business development for a wide range of organizations—from Fortune 100 companies to small start-up ventures.

William R. Metzler, of Scottsdale, is the co-founder and principal of West Coast Capital Partners. Metzler received bachelor’s degrees with honors in accounting and real estate finance from the University of Arizona. He is a senior with the American Society of Appraisers and a certified public accountant. He has previously served as the managing director of New York-based ING’s Investment Banking Unit and Ernst & Young’s Real Estate Advisory Group.

BNF board officers are as follows: Chair—Michael Haenel, Phoenix, executive vice president, Cassidy Turley BRE Commercial Industrial Services Group; Vice Chair—Dan Pierce, Phoenix, president, Kitchell; Treasurer—Karen C. McConnell, Phoenix, partner, Ballard Spahr LLP; and Secretary—Michael R. King, Phoenix, founding partner, Gammage & Burnham.

St. Joseph’s Foundation and Barrow Neurological Foundation are nonprofit support foundations dedicated to raising funds for St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix. Each foundation is governed by a board of directors made up of community leaders who serve on a voluntary basis. More information is available at SupportStJosephs.org, SupportBarrow.org or at the Foundations of St. Joseph’s on Facebook.

Chandler Regional Hospital

Kitchell finishes 171KSF patient tower at Chandler Regional

Kitchell recently completed a 171,000-square-foot expansion at Dignity Health Chandler Regional Medical Center, adding 96 beds and bringing the hospital’s bed count to 339, while adding and expanding comprehensive services.

The ICU at Chandler Regional Medical Center

The ICU at Chandler Regional Medical Center

“Chandler Regional is truly a community hospital with more than 50 years of history in the East Valley,” said Tim Bricker, president and CEO of Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical Centers. “The City of Chandler is growing at 1.7 percent per year which adds approximately 5,000 new residents annually.

This new tower and the services we’re able to provide as a result, exemplifies the city’s growth. We’re proud to be expanding to serve the health care needs of our community.”

The $125-million project began in December 2011, will add more than 200 new employees. The five-story addition includes 96 inpatient beds; an expanded emergency department with additional patient rooms, four trauma bays, two helipads and an expanded radiology department; expanded surgical services with six new operating rooms; and a new and expanded Intensive Care Unit with 32 beds.

Chandler Regional is the latest project in the growing portfolio by the design-build team of Kitchell and Orcutt | Winslow Partnership. The team is also responsible for several renovations and additions at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix, Dignity Health-St. Rose Dominican, Siena Campus in Henderson, Nev., and is also working at Mercy Gilbert Medical Center.

Chandler Regional Medical Center

Chandler Regional Medical Center

Chandler Regional first opened its doors in 1961 with 42 beds, 25 employees and 91 volunteers at what is now McQueen Rd. and Chandler Blvd. The facility moved to its current location in 1984 and by 1996 received $40 million in bonds which was used for major expansion over the next 10 years. In 2002, the hospital added a 140,000-square-foot tower that included a women’s center, outpatient diagnostic imaging, and dedicated emergency CT and MRI.  By 2011, the hospital added two new labs and an additional nine-bed holding unit to its Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. The following year, Chandler Regional opened a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with 12 private patient rooms featuring overnight accommodations.

The hospital began operating as a Level I Trauma Center in March 2014 after being granted provisional designation by the Arizona Department of Health Services. Official designation is expected later this fall.

Former TV news anchor Tara Hitchcock introduces her stepson, Dylan, a Barrow patient who received treatment for a brain tumor.

Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf scores record donations

As a longtime volunteer organizer of the Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf, Roger Maxwell declared this year’s event, May 1-2, the most successful tournament ever, having raised approximately $500,000 to benefit Barrow Neurological Institute and St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix.

“We are thankful for the support of our sponsors and everyone who have given so generously to this important cause,” said Maxwell. “Lou would have been proud.”

Maxwell, a golf professional of more than 40 years, was a friend of Grubb, a well-known and revered businessman who started the tournament in 1973 to raise money for charity. After suffering a ruptured aneurysm while golfing in 1986, Grubb underwent successful surgery at Barrow, prompting him to name the institute as beneficiary of tournament proceeds. To date, more than $5 million has been donated to Barrow on behalf of the Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf.

Approximately 450 guests attended the 2014 opening ceremony—featuring cocktails, casino-like gambling, an elegant dinner and a lively auction—at the Scottsdale Plaza Resort, May 1. The following day, 240-plus golfers headed out for a friendly, competitive round of golf at McCormick Ranch Golf Club, also in Scottsdale.

The event would not be possible without the organizational efforts of its volunteer committee: Greg Anderson, Scottie Button (chair), Hamilton Espinosa, Booker T. Evans, William Hunt, Stuart Kirk, Roger Maxwell, Larry Mayhew, Mike Medici, Loui Olivas, Jorge Quintero, Tom Reahard, Lee Rosenthal, Saundra Schrock, Dennis Scully, Joanne Springrose and Jerry D. Worsham II.

Also behind the scenes, working to make this year’s tournament better than ever, was the recently formed Lou Grubb Friends Fore Golf “Futures” Committee, including Nick and Julie Bartolo, Melissa and Tyler Button, Claire Cunningham, Natalie Grimberg, Jennifer Hoffman, Elissa Iatridis, Erik Jensen, Brian Kirk, Elizabeth Oviedo, Rebecca Pepple, Jake Thomas, Brandon Wallraff and Lindsi M. Weber.

THANKS TO THIS YEAR’S SPONSORS!
American Fire Equipment
Angelica
Archsol
Arizona Cardinals *
Arizona Care Network
Arizona Diamondbacks *
Barrow Neurosurgical Associates
Big Two Toyota Scion of Chandler
Bill and Linda Hunt *
Caroline and Chris Hoeye
Cathy and Tom Reahard
CBIZ *
Celia and Kent McLellan
Clark Hill
Dan and Kathy Grubb
Dignity Health Medical Group
DPR Construction *
Duke Realty
Gallagher & Kennedy
Gammage & Burnham
Grubb Family *
Image Stream Medical
In Celebration of Golf
Jennings Strouss
Julie and Mitch Pierce
Kathy and Dan Grubb *
Kitchell *
K.M. Facility Services LLC
Lanmore Services
Leslie and Donald Budinger
McCormick Ranch Golf Club
Mayer Hoffman McCann
Merrill Lynch
MGA Home Healthcare
MidFirst Private Bank
Nancy and Robert Spetzler
NWQ
Peg and Bob Wolf
Polsinelli
QCM Technologies
Randy and Ken Kendrick
Ridenour, Hienton & Lewis
Sandra and Larry Mayhew *
Saundra and Jeff Schrock
Scottie and Alan Button
Shelby and Steve Butterfield *
Smith Group JJR
Springrose Family
SRP
Stericycle
Symmetry Software *
York Capital Management
Young’s Market Company
* Major sponsors

Arizona philanthropists John and Doris Norton

St. Joseph’s gets its Largest Donation

St. Joseph’s Foundation has received the largest donation in its history, a $19-million gift that will help create one of the nation’s foremost centers for lung, heart and esophageal medicine at Dignity Health’s St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

The historic donation from long-time Arizona philanthropists John and Doris Norton is one of the biggest ever given to any hospital in the state. “St. Joseph’s is the leading hospital in the Valley and the new Institute will quickly take its place among the few truly elite medical centers of its kind anywhere,” said John Norton, who was born at St. Joseph’s. “We are blessed to be able to do this and hope others will join us in supporting this important effort,” added his wife, Doris.

St. Joseph’s will use the gift to dramatically expand the hospital’s already highly acclaimed thoracic and lung transplant program. Hospital leaders expect the new Institute will become as nationally respected as St. Joseph’s Barrow Neurological Institute. Barrow is among the nation’s top brain and spine centers.
The new John and Doris Norton Thoracic Institute will stretch across several buildings on the St. Joseph’s campus. A critical focus of the Institute will be research into organ rejection. The body’s rejection of transplanted lungs is a paramount problem for many patients. Additionally, researchers and physicians will concentrate on the epidemic increase in esophageal cancer. The incidence of esophageal cancer is rising at a rate greater than any other cancer in the United States. It has seen a seven fold increase in the last three decades and many experts blame the increase on the nation’s mounting obesity issue.

The historic gift will also help extend lung cancer research, new cardiac services and medical education programs. The current number of thoracic clinical and research staff at St. Joseph’s is expected to triple.

“St. Joseph’s already has a national reputation as a ‘destination hospital’ because of the highly specialized medicine practiced here,” says Patty White, president of St. Joseph’s. “When doctors around the country need another level of care for patients, they often turn to us. With the launch of this Institute and the generosity of the Nortons, we will expand our national reputation even farther.”

The Norton’s gift will be invested in several areas:
· Recruitment of national heart and lung specialists.
· Addition of needed cardiac services, such as a heart failure program.
· Recruitment of nationally known scientists.
· Creation of a publications division to disseminate research findings internationally.
· Development of a telemedicine program connecting St. Joseph’s experts to rural doctors.

“With the help of this donation we will become a national leader in cardiothoracic disease,” said Ross Bremner, MD, director of the Institute. Dr. Bremner said he was especially excited about the establishment of the Institute’s telemedicine program. “Many, many people with cardiothoracic disease are underserved. Through this gift, the people of Arizona, and patients from around the western United States, will be able to obtain cutting-edge care for esophageal, lung and heart diseases.”

Under Dr. Bremner’s leadership thoracic and lung transplantation services at St. Joseph’s have grown rapidly. Today, St. Joseph’s has the only lung transplantation program in the state. The transplantation team has performed more than 250 lung transplants since the 2007 program launched. St. Joseph’s patients have a survival rate that exceeds the national average and the program has a remarkable success rate in finding donor lungs rapidly. While the wait for a lung transplant can take many months or years at other hospitals, St. Joseph’s team has developed such expertise that the average wait time is only 45 days. This has resulted in individuals from all over the nation traveling to St. Joseph’s for their care.

Brian Mortenson, president and CEO of St. Joseph’s Foundation, says that the Nortons’ gift provides important seed funding for the new Institute to grow into “another Barrow.”

“In the 1950s the Barrow family gave a lead gift of $2.1 million to launch the much needed neurological institute. Since then thousands of others have joined in their support and created the world-class Barrow Neurological Institute,” said Mortenson. “With the Norton’s amazing gift and support of others in the community, we will accomplish the same thing in the field of cardiothoracic medicine. We so appreciate the Norton family for their faith in St. Joseph’s and their commitment to the health of this community.”

health

Humana, Dignity Health Sign Agreement

Humana Inc., one of the nation’s leading health and well-being companies, has reached an agreement that provides its members access to Dignity Health facilities in Arizona.

The new network agreement, which takes effect May 1, 2014, includes Humana’s Medicare Advantage (including PPO, HMO and Private Fee for Service plans), employer groups and individual plan members.

“This agreement provides our Arizona members with access to Dignity Health’s network of respected facilities and health care providers,” said Victoria Coley, Arizona and Nevada Market Vice President for Humana’s Employer Group segment. “Through this partnership, we’ve been able to substantially increase health care options for our members who live in the East Valley and, soon, the West Valley.”

“Humana has a strong Medicare Advantage presence in Arizona. Expanding our network to include Dignity Health will offer our members a strong provider network and is key to our continued growth in the market,” said Brendan Baker, Arizona Market President for Humana’s Senior Products.

Humana members will have in-network access to St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, including Barrow’s Neurological Institute; Chandler Regional Medical Center; Mercy Gilbert Medical Center; and the soon-to-open St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center. Members will also have access to Dignity Health’s network of nearly 200 physicians and its care centers in Arizona, including two specialty hospitals, six surgery centers, four urgent care centers and 30 imaging centers.

“We have always been dedicated to high-quality patient care and to making the entire health system work better for patients and their families,” said Carolyn Pace, Vice President of Managed Care at Dignity Health in Arizona. “We are pleased to be able to respond to the health care needs of Humana members at our numerous care centers.”

brain

TGen-Barrow-PCH study brain injuries

In an effort to lower medical costs, identify patients at risk for injury, and speed patient recovery, scientists will attempt to identify a molecular signal that indicates severity of brain-injury during a $4 million, five-year federal grant to Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital and the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen).

The molecular profile — comprised of RNA, the body’s relay messenger between DNA and protein — could help identify which patients are most at risk for vasospasm after hemorrhagic stroke.  Hemorrhagic stroke can occur as:

•    Subarachnoid hemorrhage, or the bleeding into the area between the brain and a thin membrane that covers it.
•    Ruptured brain aneurysm, which is an abnormal bulge or ballooning in the wall of an artery within the brain.

By identifying this RNA molecular marker, a new standard of individualized care could be established, enabling medical teams to respond more rapidly to quickly changing health conditions, and allowing earlier intervention to prevent a secondary injury from occurring.

“We hope this study will lead to less injury, less testing and cost, and shorter stays in the hospital,” said Dr. Yashar Kalani, M.D. and Ph.D., a resident physician in Neurological Surgery and assistant professor at the Barrow Neurological Institute and one of the study’s principal investigators. Additional investigators at Barrow include Drs. Robert Spetzler, Peter Nakaji, Felipe Albuquerque and Cameron McDougall.

Vasospasms are characterized by bleeding in the brain that causes irritation and nearby blood vessels to spasm and narrow. This decreases blood flow to the brain, which can result in damage or even death to parts of the brain.

Only about half of patients with brain-aneurysm ruptures survive, and those who do survive often are severely disabled for life. In the 10 days following such ruptures, blood vessels can narrow, leading to loss of oxygen, strokes and brain damage.

“If we knew what is happening during this period, we might be able to intervene and prevent the secondary injury,” Dr. Kalani said.

Barrow will provide patient care and collect blood and spinal fluid samples that will be analyzed by TGen. A recent TGen study showed spinal fluid could be sequenced for RNA biomarkers. Samples will be checked daily to compare and identify changes.

Another part of the study will be conducted at Barrow’s partnership with Phoenix Children’s Hospital, where researchers will investigate the effects of intraventricular hemorrhage — another form of bleeding in the brain — in newborn babies. Intraventricular hemorrhage in newborns occurs secondary to diminished blood flow and oxygen delivery to the brain. Intraventricular hemorrhage is associated with the development of hydrocephalus and damage to the brain that can result in cerebral palsy or other types of motor and cognitive delays.

“This study will get us one step closer to learning what is unique in pediatric stroke so we can provide the best quality care and improve the long term outcomes for these children,” said Dr. P. David Adelson, one of the principal investigators of the study at Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

“In addition, as this study progresses, we want to know how to identify children at risk, and how they differ from adults with similar conditions, this will not only help us to be more accurate at providing current treatments but to develop new ones.” said Dr. Jorge Arango, an investigator affiliated with Barrow Neurological Institute at Phoenix Children’s Hospital and with the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix.

In the study of both adults and children, TGen researchers will use state-of-the-art sequencing — to analyze RNA transcripts, searching for biomarkers that could identify at-risk patients.

RNAs are cell molecules made from DNA that help create proteins.

“There has been an explosion over the last several years in our understanding of the functional and regulatory mechanisms modulated by RNA” said Dr. Kendall Van Keuren-Jensen, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor in TGen’s Neurogenomics Division and also a principal investigator in the study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

“We are very excited about the potential for extracellular RNAs to provide us with accessible information about the mechanism of disease, and in doing so, provide us with pre-symptomatic markers of disease,” said Dr. Matt Huentelman, Ph.D., an Associate Professor in TGen’s Neurogenomics Division and also a principal investigator on the project. “In the best-case scenario, these markers can be coupled with an improved clinical management of the disease, too. In a nutshell, that is what we are exploring under this new grant award.”

This type of study is now possible because of continuing improvements in optics and computer speed that enables TGen’s cutting-edge technology to sequence at ever-faster rates and at ever-lower costs. While it took 13 years and $2.7 billion to spell out the first human genome, such sequencing can now be done in a matter of days and for less than $5,000.

Additional partners in the study include: University of California, San Francisco; and Stanford University.

prevention trial - brain scan images

ASU student ‘brains’ behind concussion tutorial

For decades, the devastating effects of repeated concussions on the health of professional athletes was a well-kept secret – until it exploded into a national controversy. As investigative journalists reported scientific evidence of the long-term impact of head injuries on NFL players, the focus soon shifted to high school athletes. How could we protect their health and safety?

Arizona was an early adopter of protection for high school athletes. In 2011, the state legislature passed a law requiring coaches to remove high school athletes from play if they even so much as suspect a concussion. The law requires that the athlete must obtain written clearance from a medical professional, like a physician or athletic trainer, in order to return to the sport.

State legislators also called for preventive measures that would make it mandatory for high school coaches, students and parents to complete concussion-education programs. To comply with the law, the Arizona Interscholastic Association deemed that every high school athlete in the state must complete Barrow Brainbook. This interactive, online training was developed in part by Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center in Phoenix.

But the real brains behind Barrow Brainbook belong to Arizona State University educational technology doctoral student Robert Christopherson.

“Over 180,000 high school athletes in the State of Arizona have benefitted from the knowledge of Robert Christopherson,” said Dr. Javier Cárdenas, neurologist and brain injury expert who is director of St. Joseph’s B.R.A.I.N.S. Clinic. “Robert’s expertise in educational technology is the primary reason Barrow Brainbook has not only successfully taught high school athletes about concussion dangers, but has become the most successful concussion education program in the country.”

When he began his research, Christopherson noticed immediately that most available concussion education programs targeted coaches and parents, but few addressed the athletes themselves. From the start, he said the directive from Cárdenas was empowering youth to assess the situation and be part of the decision-making process. Today, Barrow Brainbook remains the only concussion education program in the nation directed at high school athletes.

To engage the young athletes, Christopherson considered social media for two reasons. First, research showed that student behavior online and in classrooms was becoming increasingly similar. Second, it was important to deliver concussion instruction close to where the head injuries happen. Teaching the athletes on the football field was not an option, so the researcher had to come up with an equally effective venue.

“So we decided to make a pseudo-Facebook,” he explained. “We created an environment that looks like Facebook, has a lot of the same social network interactions and includes characters that represent those people who influence the athletes most – peers, role models including NFL players and college athletes, and doctors.”

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The changing role of nurses

They are the healthcare providers that will see 22 percent job growth – more than any other occupation – through 2018. They are the communicators. They bridge the gap in the medical industry. They are the part of the healthcare team that makes sure that the right patient is in the right place getting the right thing done.

They are nurses and they are now taking on more specialized roles, applying advanced technologies and filling voids created by an anticipated shortage of primary care physicians.

“We are encouraging our nurses to return to school to advance their degree,” said Deborah Martin, senior director of professional practice at Banner Health. “Patients are much more complex in our hospitals, as well as in the home and our communities … Nurses need to have higher levels of education to manage these complexities in all settings where nurses practice. Advanced degrees are now required for our upper level nursing managers.”

About 10,000 Baby Boomers reach retirement age every day, fueling the long-term demand for specialized nurses. To help fill that need, Arizona State University implemented the Adult-Gerontology Nurse Practitioner Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) concentration.

“It will prepare nurse practitioners to deliver primary care to adults throughout their lifespan with increased emphasis on care of the aging population,” says Katherine Kenny, clinical associate professor and director of the DNP program at ASU.

Johnson & Johnson’s website lists more than 3,000 capacities in which nurses can be employed — from school nurses to jailhouse nurses. Nurses practice in hospitals, schools, homes, retail health clinics, long-term care facilities, battlefields, and community and public health centers. Everywhere there are people, there are patients, and everywhere there are patients, there are nurses.

“Nurses are becoming more influential in the policy changes that are occurring with the Affordable Care Act,” Kenny says. “More nurses are practicing in ambulatory care settings and public and community health.”

Arizona educational institutions are now offering a wide range of educational opportunities which support the nursing profession’s challenge to improve patient care outcomes for individuals, systems, and organizations. And because of skyrocketing healthcare costs, preventative care and education have become integral elements in reducing chronic illness and minimizing re-hospitalization.

“Nurses are now specializing in everything from palliative care and managing chronic illness, to maintenance and preventative care,” says Ann McNamara, dean of Grand Canyon University’s College of Nursing. McNamara says students at GCU are spending more time concentrating on home healthcare and hospice in their new hands-on simulation labs, complete with live actors, computer-operated mannequins, and dynamic patient scenarios.

Angel MedFlight provides air medical transportation services from bedside to bedside.  The company’s CEO, Jeremy Freer, says “[Our] nurses are able to put all the components of the puzzle together and make the medical flight process more efficient, effective and compassionate.”

Nurses are also assessing the long-range healthcare needs of patients.

“Where once the hospital nurse’s prime responsibility was to provide the best care possible that the patient needed at that moment, now the nurse is also focused on what happens next,” explains Maggi Griffin, vice president of patient care services at John C. Lincoln Health Network.

Griffin says that patient discharge planning and post-hospitalization follow up are other key roles of the evolving nursing profession.

Advancements in technology have significantly enhanced patient care in recent years.  Nurses now have the ability to monitor patient conditions remotely, and electronic health records enable nurses to track, evaluate, and document patient information.

“Technology is opening doors to deliver nursing care in new and innovative ways, often serving as a second set of eyes to enhance patient safety or monitoring patients from their homes,” says Deborah Martin, senior director of professional practice at Banner Health. Martin adds that Medication Bar Coding is another example of how technology is helping nurses be more effective and prevent errors.

Due to the skyrocketing cost of healthcare in general, nurses are becoming more involved in a patient’s primary care.

“As advanced practice providers of healthcare, nurses with master’s and doctoral degrees are able to deliver high quality care to patients in their own individual practice,” Martin says, “as well as work side by side with physicians to provide care in a more cost effective manner.”

“As the major component of hospital rosters, nurses’ salaries account for a significant part of any hospital budget,” Griffin adds. “With financial stresses coming from the economy, from government healthcare program budget cuts and from other areas, nursing is much more tightly controlled.”

A decade ago, nursing shifts were scheduled regardless of room occupancy. Currently, industry experts say those staffing schedules fluctuate based on patient population in each unit.

The other major shift is in the demand for specialized nurses. Julie Ward, chief nursing officer at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, says specialties have nurses working in both the inpatient and outpatient settings.

“We are also exploring roles for nurses to shepherd groups of patients through the maze of care,”  Ward says. St. Joseph’s nurses make follow-up phone calls to patients to ensure the patient is safe and able to follow their discharge instructions, Ward says.

Still, the primary evolution of the nursing industry has been in higher education. Gone are the days when nurses were simply bedside attendants. Now, they are replacing the expensive medical doctors and are running their own practices as Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) and in other upper level specialties. Most hospitals are encouraging their nurses to return to school to improve their knowledge base and advance their degrees.

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies (IOM) launched a two-year initiative to respond to the need to assess and transform the nursing profession. The IOM appointed a Committee on the RWJF Initiative on the Future of Nursing for the purpose of producing an action-oriented blueprint for the future of nursing. Through its deliberations, the committee developed four key messages:

* Nurses should practice to the full extent of their education and training.

* Nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.

* Nurses should be full partners, with physicians and other health care professionals, in redesigning health care in the United States.

* Effective workforce planning and policy making require better data collection and information infrastructure.

“We are encouraging our nurses to return to school to advance their degree,” Martin says. “Patients are much more complex in our hospitals, as well as in the home and our communities. As noted by the IOM, nurses need to have higher levels of education to manage these complexities in all settings where nurses practice. Advanced degrees are now required for our upper level nursing managers.”

Sun Health

Dignity names new West Valley hospital

Dignity Health announced that “St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center” will be the name of its new West Valley hospital during an official groundbreaking at the planned 35-acre medical campus near the Loop 101 and Glendale Avenue.

The $44 million Dignity Health facility is scheduled to open in early 2014 and will provide West Valley residents with a new alternative to receive high quality healthcare services. Dignity Health already operates three hospitals in the Valley including St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, which is home of the Barrow Neurological Institute in central Phoenix, and Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert Medical Centers. Dignity Health was previously known as Catholic Healthcare West.

When the new facility opens, the first phase will contain a 60,000 square-foot hospital that will include an emergency room, 24 inpatient beds, two operating rooms and diagnostic services. For the most complex medical cases, patients will benefit from the clinical integration with St. Joseph’s in central Phoenix. Established in 1895, St. Joseph’s today is nationally recognized for its specialty care and its expertise in treating the most complex medical cases.

“St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center was selected as the name of the medical campus because it builds on more than a century of healthcare in the Valley and people recognize St. Joseph’s as a beacon of quality care,” says Linda Hunt, Dignity Health Arizona President and CEO. “We intend to deliver that same excellence to the residents of the West Valley.”

The hospital will initially employ 200 staff and will have the capacity to expand to 200 inpatient beds as demand grows. The 35-acre medical campus will house community physicians and outpatient partners, giving patients one location for their healthcare needs.

“St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center will be a vibrant medical campus right in the heart of the West Valley,” says Gregg Davis, President of St. Joseph’s Westgate Medical Center. “The campus is designed to be a model for the nation’s changing healthcare environment and will change as medicine and the community evolve.”

The campus will serve as a collaborative venture in partnership with physicians in the West Valley to enhance and better manage the delivery of healthcare to patients in the area.

“This is a great project for the City of Glendale as the Loop 101 corridor near Glendale’s Sports and Entertainment District is one of the city’s key economic focus areas,” says Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers. “The new hospital will not only expand development west of the freeway, it will also attract other healthcare-related businesses and jobs to the area.”

While this is the first Dignity Health hospital in the West Valley, the organization began to lay the business foundation of its launch several years ago. Today, Dignity Health operates a family practice clinic and an orthopedic clinic in Peoria, imaging centers throughout the area, an outpatient surgery center and a partnership with the Minute Clinics located in the CVS pharmacies in Glendale and Goodyear.

pharmaceuticals

Arizona bioscience job growth outpaces nation

Arizona’s bioscience sector added jobs at nearly four times the national rate over the past decade and experienced double-digit job growth during the economic recovery, a new report shows.

Since Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap was launched in 2002, Arizona’s bioscience jobs have increased by 45 percent to 99,018 in 2011. Nationally, the growth rate during this time was 12 percent. While hospitals dominate Arizona’s bioscience jobs, the state’s non-hospital subsectors grew 14 percent in 2011 alone.  During the economic recovery years of 2009-11, the state’s bioscience jobs increased 11 percent while there was no gain across the state’s private sector.

The new performance analysis of Arizona’s bioscience sector, commissioned by the Flinn Foundation, also found that the number of bioscience establishments in Arizona continues to grow faster than the national average and bioscience wages in the state are outpacing those in other private-sector industries.

The 10th-annual study, released Feb. 5 by the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice, did reveal funding challenges for the state.  In 2012, Arizona fell to its lowest venture capital investment level since 2009 and suffered a drop in National Institutes of Health funding while the top-10 funded states advanced.

“Arizona’s bioscience sector continues to significantly outperform the nation in terms of job and establishment growth and has made impressive gains in building a more concentrated industry base,” said Walter Plosila, senior advisor to the Battelle Technology Partnership Practice.  “However, more attention must be paid to academic research performance and venture capital investment to continue the trend in years to come.”

Plosila added that progress has been made over the past decade on all 19 actions recommended by Battelle in 2002, including substantial progress on nine.

The Roadmap was launched in 2002 as a long-range plan to make the state’s bioscience sector globally competitive. The Roadmap was commissioned by the Phoenix-based Flinn Foundation, which committed to 10 years of major funding of Arizona biosciences and formed a network of committees involving statewide experts to implement its recommendations.

There was also a major increase in bioscience establishments, rising 31 percent since 2002 to 892 firms, which is above the national growth rate of 23 percent.

Bioscience jobs in Arizona pay an average salary of $56,328, or 28 percent higher than the $44,098 for all private-sector industries. Since 2002, bioscience salaries have increased 44 percent.

“After 10 years, Arizona has carved a niche in the highly lucrative and competitive biosciences field,” said Martin Shultz, chair of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap Steering Committee. “We’re one of the nation’s top emerging bioscience states, and our growth in high-wage jobs continued during both good economic times and bad.”

In terms of research dollars, NIH funding in 2012 was $174 million, or 19 percent greater, than the 2002 figure. This is a decrease from $184 million in 2011. While NIH funding, the gold standard for biomedical research funding, did increase slightly faster than the national average of 18 percent over the past decade, Arizona is no longer meeting its goal of obtaining funding at a growth rate higher than the top-10 funded states. In addition, its share of the funding pool remains nearly the same as it was in 2002.

The latest data also shows:
•    The largest non-hospital bioscience subsector continues to be research, testing and medical laboratories. This group now boasts about 8,900 workers across 466 establishments, roughly a 60 percent increase in both employees and firms since 2002. The other subsectors are drugs, pharmaceuticals and diagnostics; hospitals; medical devices and equipment; and agricultural feedstock and chemicals.
•    Venture capital investment was $22 million in 2012, which is the lowest figure since 2009. This was a drop of 68 percent from 2011, compared with a national decline of 49 percent.
•    Bioscience-related academic research and development expenditures at Arizona’s universities reached a record $452 million in 2011, a 55 percent increase since 2002. Arizona’s growth had outpaced the nation until 2009, but now trails the overall U.S. growth rate of 74 percent.
•    Arizona universities spun out seven bioscience companies in 2012. University discoveries have now led to 67 new bioscience startups since 2002 as well as 180 bioscience patents.

There were a number of major developments in 2012 that showed the collaborative nature of Arizona biosciences, including the completion of major projects, the approval of future pursuits, and an emphasis on education.

The University of Arizona opened its new Health Sciences Education Building on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus that enabled the UA College of Medicine-Phoenix to increase enrollment and for Northern Arizona University to begin Phoenix-based physician assistant and physical therapy programs. In addition, final approval was granted by the Arizona Board of Regents for the UA Cancer Center-Phoenix to be built on the same campus in partnership with St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center.

A number of incubators and accelerators opened or expanded with more in the planning stages. BioInspire, an incubator for medical-device startups, opened in Peoria; GateWay Community College in Phoenix opened the Center for Entrepreneurial Innovation; the Arizona Center for Innovation at the UA Science and Technology Park in Tucson opened upgraded facilities and launched new programming; Flagstaff received funding for a planned accelerator; and the statewide Arizona Furnace accelerator began awarding seed money and access to incubation space.

Among other major developments, the inaugural Arizona SciTech Festival attracted 200,000 participants from across the state during February and March 2012, making it one of the largest in the nation; Banner Alzheimer’s Institute launched a $100 million trial to prevent or delay Alzheimer’s disease; a new skin-cancer drug first tested by Translational Genomics Research Institute and Scottsdale Healthcare received expedited approval from the Food and Drug Administration; Arizona State University began leading the first national algae biofuel testbed; Mayo Clinic announced plans for a new cancer center on its north Phoenix campus; and Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center in Gilbert announced a $63 million expansion.

On Dec. 4, 2012, the Flinn Foundation and bioscience leaders from across Arizona came together at the Arizona Biltmore to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the launching of Arizona’s Bioscience Roadmap. The Foundation announced it has committed to continue funding Arizona biosciences and coordinating the Roadmap as it enters its next chapter.

“We recognize this is a long-term pursuit,” said Jack Jewett, president and CEO of the Flinn Foundation. “We will continue to strive to improve the lives of Arizonans today and tomorrow through new medical discoveries, access to clinical trials and the recruitment of top researchers, while also attracting high-wage jobs that will strengthen Arizona’s economy.”

The Flinn Foundation is a Phoenix-based, private, nonprofit philanthropic endowment. It was established by Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Flinn in 1965 with the mission of improving the quality of life in Arizona to benefit future generations. The nonprofit philanthropy supports the advancement of Arizona’s bioscience sector, the Flinn Scholars program, arts and culture, and the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership.

banner alzheimers foundation - brain research

Combination of Diet and Radiation Therapy Shows Promise

A team of brain cancer researchers at Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center has effectively treated brain tumor cells using a unique combination of diet and radiation therapy. The study, “The Ketogenic Diet Is an Effective Adjuvant to Radiation Therapy for the Treatment of Malignant Glioma,” was published in PLOS ONE.

Led by Adrienne C. Scheck, PhD, Principal Investigator in Neuro-Oncology and Neurosurgery Research at Barrow, the groundbreaking research studied the effects of the ketogenic diet in conjunction with radiation therapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, an aggressive and deadly type of brain tumor. The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that alters metabolism and is used in the treatment of pediatric epilepsy that does not respond to conventional therapies. The diet’s affects on brain homeostasis have potential for the treatment of other neurological diseases, as well.

In the study, mice with high-level malignant gliomas were maintained on either a standard or a ketogenic diet. Both groups received radiation therapy. Dr. Scheck’s team discovered that animals fed a ketogenic diet had an increased median survival of approximately five days relative to animals maintained on a standard diet. Of the mice that were fed a ketogenic diet and received radiation, nine of 11 survived with no signs of tumor recurrence, even after being switched back to standard food, for over 200 days. None on the standard diet survived more than 33 days.

One theory behind the success of the treatment is that the ketogenic diet may reduce growth factor stimulation, inhibiting tumor growth. Barrow scientists also believe that it may reduce inflammation and edema surrounding the tumors. This is believed to be the first study of its kind to look at the effects of the ketogenic diet with radiation.

Dr. Scheck believes that the study has promising implications in the treatment of human malignant gliomas. “We found that the ketogenic diet significantly enhances the anti-tumor effect of radiation, which suggests that it may be useful as an adjuvant to the current standard of care for the treatment of human malignant gliomas,” she says.

Dr. Scheck adds that the ketogenic diet could quickly and easily be added into current brain tumor treatment plans as an adjuvant therapy without the need for FDA approval. She is currently exploring options for clinical trials.

Patty Gentry

Patti Gentry Appointed to St. Joe's Community Board

Patti Gentry, principal and designated broker of Arizona Commercial Advisors, has been appointed to the St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center Community Board.

According to Gentry, it is a passion for quality healthcare that drives her to volunteer her time for St. Joseph’s.

“I have two sisters who both required high-quality healthcare, so I have two very personal reasons to be involved,” Gentry said. “In addition, I want to support the operations of a hospital that is focused on meeting the needs of our community, particularly in today’s difficult healthcare environment.”

St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center is a nationally recognized center for quality tertiary care, medical education and research. Located downtown, in the heart of Phoenix, the 607-bed, not-for-profit hospital provides a wide range of health, social and support services, with special advocacy for the poor and underserved.

Arizona Commercial Advisors is the only woman-owned, full-service commercial real estate firm in the Valley. Based in Scottsdale,  the unique boutique firm was created in 2009 by Gentry, who specializes in the office market, offering services that include tenant lease representation, office building acquisition, lease or disposition, and build-to-suit opportunities.

For more information about Arizona Commercial Advisors and its services, call Patti Gentry at (602) 799-3500 or visit acaaz.com.

ST. JOSEPH'S BARROW NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE BRET MICHAELS

Bret Michaels opens music room at St. Joseph’s

Former Poison frontman Bret Michaels is showing off a new room for patients and their families at the Phoenix hospital where he was treated for a brain hemorrhage.

The musician officially opened the Bret Michaels Hospitality and Music Room inside St. Joseph’s Barrow Neurological Institute on Tuesday.

The room is located near patients’ rooms and features relaxation areas for patients and families. It is decorated with a music theme and features Michaels’ personal music memorabilia.

Michaels says he’s thrilled to give back to a hospital he credits with saving his life.

He was treated at the hospital in April 2010 for a subarachnoid hemorrhage, a life-threatening type of stroke.

He then returned to St. Joseph’s in 2011 to undergo a heart procedure.

Barrow Clinical Trial - Down Syndrome Patients

Barrow Launches Novel Clinical Trial For Down Syndrome Patients

Physicians at Barrow Neurological Institute at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center are conducting a novel research study to evaluate a medication that could improve intellectual function in young adults with Down syndrome. Participants for the clinical trial are currently being recruited.

“To my knowledge, this is the first trial of its kind,” says Benjamin Seltzer, MD, Director of the Center of Alzheimer’s Disease and Cognitive Disorders at Barrow Neurological Institute. “Down syndrome is the most important cause of development delay. Many of the medical problems associated with Down syndrome, such as low thyroid and heart defects, can now be corrected. But, until recently, there has been little hope that we could ever truly improve intellectual function (in Downs people). Now, however, researchers have developed a medication that may have such a benefit. (A study like this has been needed for a long time).”

There are more than 400,000 people living with Down syndrome in the United States. One in every 691 babies is born with Down syndrome.

The clinical trial at Barrow will last about 15 weeks. Participants will be required to take the newly developed medication twice daily and to have periodic blood and memory testing and brain wave examinations. The study is also being conducted at several other research centers in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Participants can be male or female and should be between 18 and 30 years of age. They must be in good general health and have a reliable person who can accompany them to all appointments.

For more information on how to enroll in this study, please call: Catherine Young at 602-406-3719.

For more information on Barrow Neurological Institute, visit their website at thebarrow.org/.

CEO Linda Hunt - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Linda Hunt, CEO, St. Joseph’s Hospital And Medical Center

CEO Series: Linda Hunt

Title: President
Company: CHW Arizona/St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center


How is St. Joseph’s preparing itself to meet the changes being brought on by national health care reform and the state’s budget crisis?

We’ve been on the ground from the very beginning. Catholic Healthcare West, our parent company, has really been involved with the Obama Administration in looking at different ways to provide health care, and we know that health care has to change. The most important thing for us has been quality — providing the high quality access. We have a lot of people without care or without access to care. So when you look at how do we do that and how do we lower our cost of delivering care, those things have been driving forces for St. Joseph’s and CHW to be intimately involved in what needs to occur.
It’s a tremendous strain if we have the (state) budget cuts that are proposed. About 44 percent of our patients are AHCCCS (Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System ) patients, and this will be anywhere between $25 million to $31 million for just our organization alone that we will see decreased.
We also are part owners of Mercy Care Plan, so for us it’s a real concern. Mercy Care Plan has 386,000 lives, and about 60,000 of those lives (coverage) will be eliminated if the state budget crises and the state waiver go through.

The mass shooting that took place in Tucson really put attention on the work of Level I trauma centers, such as the one at St. Joseph’s. What message has that sent to Legislators and the community?

Tucson was a great example of why Level I trauma centers are needed. It truly is the life-saving component of life care. If we would not have had the hospital in Tucson, if we would not have had the trauma surgeons, the neurosurgeons right there ready, a number of those people would not have survived. I think Gabby Giffords can really say one day, “I owe my life to these people and to the quick response that they had.” We have very limited funding. As you know, it’s not about money coming in from the federal government or the state government for Level I. It’s really thanks to a number of our patients who have insurance and the variety of people who give to us to make sure we can continue to have the resources available to provide that kind of care.

How has St. Joseph’s evolution mirrored that of the state’s health care industry?

When the (Sisters of Mercy) got here in the 1890s, they found a very small community of people who were working here, but also many other people who had come here because they were ill. (The sisters) came here to teach, and all of a sudden they looked around and said, “My gosh, it’s not about teaching. We have to provide health care for these people. They’re dying in the streets.”

So, I feel we are the beginning of health care in this community and have continued for almost 116 years. When you look at the number of firsts that were done at St. Joseph’s, many times we brought health care and progressive health care to this community. When you look at the first residency, the first pharmacy in-house, the first NICU, the first MRI, the first CAT scan … it truly is a jewel to be treasured in this community.

Is health care a cooperative effort in the Valley?

I think we all compete. We are businesses. But I think it’s a camaraderie because we’re all about taking care of people in this community. When you look back, there are a lot of great friendships that you have with the other CEOs. And we do share. We share resources. When we get in trouble as a Level I trauma center, when we’re overwhelmed, everyone pitches in and we fan out patients. We do a number of things together. If we need equipment, we lend it to each other. So in a way we compete, but we are all here to serve this community and I think that is very important.

How does St. Joseph’s work with rural communities?

Look at Children’s Rehabilitative Services, which we have been a partner of the state with in caring for children. We have clinics all over the state. We work with the Indian communities; we work with Flagstaff, Prescott; Yuma and Tucson work together with us. So right there is a perfect example of that collaboration. We have outreach clinics throughout the state, especially in the rural areas. We train residents and new physicians, which we think is a very important part of training the next generation of caregivers. We are training a lot of the physicians that will be practicing in rural Arizona and other rural areas of this country.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix has stripped St. Joseph’s of its Catholic standing. how does that affect the average patient?

If you came into our hospital in early December and you came in today, we would look no different. The one thing we cannot do is Mass in the chapel. We still have worship services, they’re just not Catholic worship services. But we do have rosaries, we have spiritual hours, we have people who are there to allow you to pray and to provide that spiritual comfort, just as we did in the past. … We acknowledge that (Bishop Thomas J. Olmstead) has the authority to no longer designate us a Catholic hospital. We’re all very sad about that. … But we will always take care of people who are here and do what we can do to make sure they are safe, and that they receive the care that they deserve. … it came down to we had to save the life we could and we did.


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Vital Stats: Linda Hunt

  • Service Area President, Catholic Healthcare West
  • President, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center
  • Bachelor of Science in Nursing from William Carey College in Mississippi
  • Master of Science in Nursing Administration from the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
  • Graduated from the Johnson & Johnson Fellows Program in Management at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania
  • Was on the faculty at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Regis University in Denver
  • Active in Greater Phoenix Leadership and the Greater Phoenix Economic Council

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Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

Health Care Leadership Awards Ceremony 2011

Congratulations to all winners and finalists of the Health Care Leadership Awards 2011!

The Health Care Leadership Awards ceremony took place March 8, 2011 at The Ritz Carlton in Phoenix, Ariz. and had quite the turnout.

Guests included those within the health care community — all committed to bringing quality health care to the Valley.

This year we had a special keynote speaker Dr. Peter Rhee, Medical Director of University Medical Center – who gave a moving presentation.

Arizona Business Magazine presented a special Award of Merit to the University Medical Center Trauma Unit for its outstanding and heroic work.

 


News Coverage of HCLA 2011

3TV
ABC 15
CBS 5

 


Complete Photo Album
from the 2011 Award ceremony

Congratulations to the 2011 Health Care Leadership Award Honorees and Finalists!

Community Outreach

Winner:

Molly Stockley, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Finalists:

Center Against Family Violence, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Jean Revard, Paradise Valley Hospital

Community Outreach winner Molly Stockley, director of marketing, Center Treatment Centers of America

Hospital Executive

Winner:

David Veillette, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Finalists:

Jo Adkins, West Valley Hospital

Ruth W. Brinkley, Carondelet Health Network

Hospital or Medical Center Executive winner David Veillette, president and CEO, Cancer Treatment Centers of AmericaHospital or Medical Center Executive winner David Veillette, president and CEO, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Institution or Education

Winner:

Home-Based Care Team, Cigna Medical Group

Finalists:

Dr. Mark Smith, Banner Health

Water Watchers Program, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Institutional or Educational Program winner Home-Based Care Program, Cigna Medical Group

Insurance/Insurance Executive

Winner:

David J. McIntyre Jr., TriWest Healthcare Alliance

Finalists:

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona

Benton Davis, UnitedHealthcare of Arizona

Insurance/Insurance Executive winner David J. McIntyre Jr., president and CEO of TriWest Healthcare Alliance

Manager

Winner:

Martha Martinez, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Finalists:

Nathan Lewis, Banner Health

Jean Revard, Paradise Valley Hospital

Health Care Manager winner Martha Martinez, manager of interpreters program, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Nurse or Nursing Advocate

Winner:

Stacy Danahy, Laser Spine Institute

Finalists:

Diane Drexler, Cancer Treatment Centers of America

Virginia Prendergast, Barrow Neurological Institute

Nurse or Nursing Advocate winner Stacy Danahy, director of medical operations, Arizona, Laser Spine Institute

Physician

Winner:

Dr. John Post, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Finalists:

Dr. Bentley Bobrow, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Dr. Andrew Garff, Paradise Valley Hospital

Physician winner Dr. John "Papa" Post, MD, medical director, McDowell Healthcare, Maricopa Integrated Health System

Researcher

Winner:

Dr. Eric Reiman, Banner Alzheimer’s Institute

Finalist:

Dr. David Adelson, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Researcher winner Eric Reiman, MD, executive director, Banner Alzheimer's Institute

Surgeon

Winner:

Dr. David Adelson, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Finalist:

Dr. Scott Peterson, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

Surgeon winner David Adelson, MD, FACS, FAAP, medical director, Children's Neuroscience Institute, Phoenix Children's Hospital

Special Recognitions:

Behavioral Health Care Award

Richard Clarke, Magellan Health Services of Arizona

Behavioral Health Care Award winner Richard Clarke, PH.D., chief executive officer, Magellan Health Services of Arizona

Neonatal Care Award

Dr. Cristina Carballo, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

Neonatal Care Merit Award to Cristina Carballo, MD, medical director of neuro/NICU, Phoenix Children's Hospital

Hospital & Medical Center, Merit Award

St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, HCLA 2010; Flickr: AzNow.Biz


Complete Photo Album
from the 2011 Award ceremony

View all of the bios in the March/April issue of Arizona Business Magazine.


Arizona Ambulance - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Life-Saving Trauma Units Take Hours Of Hard Work And Planning

When Disaster Strikes

The mass shooting in Tucson on Jan. 8 that left six people dead and Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Tucson) and 12 others wounded outside a Safeway grocery store dramatically demonstrated the responsiveness of our state’s emergency trauma system. The fact that Giffords and the other victims were transported within minutes to University Medical Center (UMC), one of Arizona’s eight Level I trauma centers, and other Tucson hospitals, is a testament to the importance and value of emergency preparedness.

UMC was well prepared to transition from a quiet Saturday morning with zero patients in its trauma center to a sudden influx of critically injured patients with life-threatening injuries. Open communication between first responders and the UMC trauma center was crucial and enabled the trauma team to mobilize prior to patients arriving by air and ground transport.

Thanks to effective interaction between the first responding law enforcement officers, EMS and trauma center staff, the gunshot victims were given high-level care at the scene and during transport. According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for Arizonans ages one to 44. In 2009, Arizona’s Level I trauma centers treated 23,290 patients.

Arizona’s Level I trauma centers are located in Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center, Flagstaff Medical Center, John C. Lincoln North Mountain Hospital, Maricopa Medical Center, Phoenix Children’s Hospital, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Scottsdale Healthcare Osborn and UMC. All eight of Arizona’s designated Level I trauma centers are in populated areas, yet serve the entire state.

Medical experts often cite the importance of transporting victims of traumatic injury to a trauma center within the “golden hour,” or the first 60 minutes after an injury has been sustained, to improve their chances of survival. It is during this most critical time that a life can be saved if specialized medical care is administered.

Due to Arizona’s geographical expanse, trauma centers and first responders must work together to ensure quality care is available as quickly as possible for all residents. This does not happen by chance, and depends largely on the tremendous behind-the-scenes efforts involved in emergency preparedness planning meetings and training classes.

Level I trauma centers like UMC have earned their distinguished designation by meeting stringent requirements, including specialty physician staffing, clinical capabilities, as well as research and community education. Level I trauma centers are required to be staffed around the clock by surgeons, anesthesiologists, physician specialists and trauma nurses. Their commitment to caring extends well beyond the walls of their individual trauma centers to serve the entire state.

Laurie Liles is president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare
 Association, www.azhha.org.

Arizona Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Good Samaritan Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

Arizona’s Health Care Industry Has Flourished From Cottages To World-Class Facilities

A Century of Care

From cottages to world-class facilities, Arizona’s health care industry has flourished

Mayo Clinic Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011 In the nearly 100 years since Arizona became a state, the health care sector has become a powerful economic force.

According to a study by Arizona State University’s L. William Seidman Research Institute, Arizona’s hospital community alone employs more than 80,000 people and contributes $11.5 billion to the gross state product. Indirectly, hospitals create about 120,000 additional jobs, more than the combined populations of Coconino, Graham and Santa Cruz counties.

Sisters of Mercy

It all started some 17 years before statehood in January 1895, when the Sisters of Mercy had collected enough money to rent a six-bedroom cottage at Fourth and Polk streets in Downtown Phoenix. Each room was equipped with two beds for TB patients, and thus was born St. Joseph’s Sanitarium, predecessor of St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center and the first hospital in Phoenix. Downtown Phoenix 1900s - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011

In the mid-1940s, the nuns purchased 10 acres at Third Avenue and Thomas Road, which was part of an old dairy farm. Today, St. Joseph’s is a 670-bed, not-for-profit hospital that is one of the cornerstones of the state’s health care industry.

A second giant in health care, Good Samaritan Hospital of Phoenix, launched its first facility in an apartment building at Third Street near Van Buren in 1911. Initially incorporated as the Arizona Deaconess Hospital and Home, it opened with 15 beds.

One-hundred years later, Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center in Downtown Phoenix is the flagship of Banner Health, with more than 662 licensed patient care beds. Banner Good Samaritan employs more than 4,200 health care professionals and support staff. Nearly 1,700 physicians representing more than 50 specialties work with Banner Good Samaritan staff to care for more than 43,000 inpatients a year.

Another early entry in the health care scene was the State Asylum for the Insane, which was rebuilt after a fire in 1911. In 1924, the asylum was informally renamed Arizona State Hospital.

Established in 1943 as a community hospital, Tucson Medical Center is among the 300 largest hospitals in the country. It is licensed for 650 adult and skilled nursing beds, and serves more than 30,000 inpatients and 122,000 outpatients a year.

St. Luke Hospital - AZ Business Magazine Mar/Apr 2011In 1971, University Medical Center — a private, nonprofit hospital located at the Arizona Health Sciences Center adjacent to the University of Arizona in Tucson — was established. UMC is Arizona’s only academic medical center, and earlier this year it became an international focal point for neurosurgery and trauma care after a gunman shot and wounded U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) and killed six people.

In Northern Arizona, the Flagstaff Medical Center, a not-for-profit hospital, was founded in 1936. A part of the Northern Arizona Healthcare family, it has some 270 beds and its medical staff includes about 200 physicians. Among its specialties are cancer, heart and sports medicine.

Health care continues to be a concern on Indian reservations throughout Arizona, particularly in some of the remote regions. A relatively new program, the American Indian Research Center for Health is designed to improve the health status of Native Americans and increase the number of Native American scientists and health professionals engaged in research. Classes for the student-training component of the program are held at the University of Arizona.

Read more…

Health Care Leadership Awards 2011

HCLA 2011 – Hospital & Medical Center

Merit Award: St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center

St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Merit Award for Hospital & Medical CenterSt. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center first opened its doors in March 1895, and more than a century later it is a leader in Arizona health care. St. Joseph’s has come a long way since the Sisters of Mercy opened it as a six-bedroom cottage in Downtown Phoenix, originally founded to help tuberculosis sufferers who came to Phoenix to improve their health.

The hospital went through numerous expansions and fundraising efforts before opening in 1953 at its current location on Fifth Avenue and Thomas Road as a 325-bed hospital. Since then, St. Joseph’s has almost doubled in size and the campus now encompasses 55 acres. In 2010, the hospital had nearly 40,000 inpatient admissions and more than 435,000 outpatient visits.
Along with providing excellent health care, St. Joseph’s is one of the state’s largest teaching hospitals, having trained more neurosurgeons than any other hospital in the world. St. Joseph’s is the new regional campus of Creighton University Medical School.

This not-for-profit hospital also houses the internationally renowned Barrow Neurological Institute, the Heart & Lung Institute, St. Joseph’s Children’s Health Center, a Level I Trauma Center verified by the American College of Surgeons, the Muhammad Ali Parkinson Center, and much more. The only transplantation programs in the Valley, the Heart & Lung Institute at St. Joseph’s has conducted approximately 70 lung transplants and five pediatric heart transplants.

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