Tag Archives: St. Luke’s Medical Center

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Az Business honors healthcare leaders

Each year, Az Business magazine hosts the Healthcare Leadership Awards to honor the women, men and institutions that bring excellence and innovation to Arizona’s healthcare system. Here are the winners and finalists who were chosen by a panel of industry experts and were recognized at the 2014 Healthcare Leadership Awards on Thursday, April 10 at the Ritz Carlton in Phoenix. See photos from the event here or on our Facebook page.

BIOSCIENCE COMPANY
Winner: Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen)
TGen has made great strides in the field if genomics medicine. TGen researchers work to help physicians prescribe drugs that are designed more intelligently, work more effectively and have fewer toxic side effects. They have received numerous grants to support research into brain cancer and brain injuries, advanced cancers, Parkinson’s, rare childhood disorders, and more.

Finalists:
Barrow at PCH
Sonora Quest

COMMUNITY OUTREACH/EDUCATION
Winner: Barbara Kavanagh, Arizona Myeloma Network
Kavanagh’s mission is to change the lack of information and support resources for myeloma cancer by forming the Arizona Myeloma Network and the Living with Myeloma Conference, which has grown to 300 people. She also introduced the Pat and Bill Hite Cancer Caregivers Education and Support Program for caregivers to receive support and answers.

Finalists:
Catherine Ivy, Ben and Catherine Ivy Foundation
Kathleen Goeppinger, Ph.D., Midwestern University

HEALTHCARE EXECUTIVE
Winner: Robert L. Meyer, Phoenix Children’s Hospital
Meyer is credited for the rapid and significant turnaround of Phoenix Children’s Hospital from the edge of financial failure to a successful $588 million expansion that made the hospital into one of the largest pediatric medical centers in the country. PCH is ranked in U.S. News & World Report’s Best Children’s Hospitals.

Finalists:
Tim Bricker, Chandler Regional and Mercy Gilbert
Mary Lee DeCoster, Maricopa Integrated Health System
Tony Marinello, CEO of Mountain Vista, IASIS Healthcare
Ed Myers, St. Luke’s Medical Center, IASIS Healthcare

HEALTHCARE ADVOCATE
Winner: Dr. John Chen, Maricopa Integrated Health System
Serving the community’s most vulnerable residents, Chen has helped thousands of patients within the Maricopa Integrated Health System. He sees patients who are in urgent need of treatment because of their lack of dental insurance or location in third world countries. He promotes dental care and hygiene to help prevent serious diseases.

Finalists:
Dr. Randal Christensen, Crews ‘n’ Healthcare
Gerri Hether, Orchard Medical Consulting

INSURANCE PROVIDER
Winner: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona
Marking its 75th anniversary in Arizona, BCBSAZ is committed to improving the quality of life for all Arizonans. The company focuses on providing the best value in health insurance as well as outside programs targeted to children and their families to help reduce childhood obesity.

Finalists:
Health Net of Arizona
UnitedHealthcare of Arizona

LEGAL ADVOCATE
Winner: Kristen Rosati, Polsinelli
As an attorney dedicated to the healthcare industry, especially to healthcare privacy, health information exchange and clinical research, Rosati has written 12 books, 30 articles and made 200 presentations on healthcare topics. She also helped establish two nonprofits in Arizona that support health information exchange and health information technology.

Finalists:
Richard Mallery, Snell and Wilmer
Martin L. Shultz, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck

MEDICAL CENTER OR HOSPITAL
Winner: Scottsdale Healthcare
As a nonprofit, Scottsdale Healthcare not only employs 6,500 staff members, but also is comprised of 1,400 volunteers who donate more than 155,000 hours of service each year. They are the largest employer in the City of Scottsdale and is known for its innovative medical technology, research and patient care.

Finalists:
Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center
Cancer Treatment Centers of America
St. Joseph’s Medical Center
St. Luke’s Medical Center

MEDICAL COMPANY OF THE YEAR
Winner: Ventana
Ventana is driving personalized healthcare through the development of “companion diagnostics” to identify patients most likely to respond favorably to specific therapies. Ventana has worked is currently engaged in more that 150 collaborative projects to develop and commercialize companion diagnostics globally.

Finalists:
Medtronic
W.L. Gore and Associates

MEDICAL RESEARCH COMPANY
Winner: Banner Alzheimer’s Institute
BAI has undergone a major prevention trial to evaluate a treatment in cognitively healthy older adults at the highest known genetic risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease at older ages. The study is part of the Alzheimer’s Prevention Initiative API, an international collaboration led by BAI to accelerate the evaluation of promising but unproven prevention therapies.

Finalists:
Banner MD Anderson
University of Arizona Cancer Center

PHYSICIAN OF THE YEAR
Winner: Jimmy Chow, IASIS Healthcare
Chow improved the field of orthopedics by helping to design and teach a hybrid technique of a minimally invasive total hip replacement where the surgeon builds a new hip from inside the body. This surgery results in no post-operative limitations and many patients are discharged within 24 hours. Chow is one of 10 surgeons in the world to perform his surgery.

Finalists:
Karen Corallo Chaney, Magellan Health Services
David Notrica, Phoenix Children’s Hospital

RESEARCHER OF THE YEAR
Winner: Venkatesh G. Ramaiah, Arizona Heart Hospital
Ramaiah, the medical director and director of vascular and endovascular research, successfully created the “un balloon,” which is used to remodel thoracic endografts without the wind sock effect. This products was able to be marketed and sold.

Finalists:
David Jacofsky, CORE Institute
Glen Weiss, CTCA

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT
Linda Hunt, Dignity Health
Hunt, who has served as the leader of Dignity Health in Arizona since 2012, has taken a leadership role to advance healthcare and the biosciences for the people of Arizona. She has worked diligently with legislators, business leaders, educators, scientists and community organizations in order to identify, formulate, and support policies that will give Arizonans better healthcare and raise the bar of knowledge.


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Dr. Heuser - updated photo

St. Luke's Cardiology Chief Directs Symposium

Promedica International’s Cardiovascular Disease Management symposium is being held at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix, Oct. 4 – 5, 2013. Directed by Richard Heuser, M.D., FACC, chief of cardiology at St. Luke’s Medical Center and in practice with Phoenix Heart Center, a Physician Group of Arizona practice, Inc., the two-day continuing education conference will center on recent advancements and controversial topics in multiple areas of cardiovascular disease, and present new ideas for tailoring the most appropriate treatment plan for each individual.

This interactive, case-based program combines prestigious speakers and cutting-edge, evidence-based medicine studies to give attendees a practical overview of the optimal methods and management of the informed physicians’ practice, and to discuss and debate the exciting options on the horizon.

“The goal of this summit is to help medical professionals stay abreast of new, innovative studies and approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis and management,” said Dr. Heuser. “This will ultimately result into improvements in patient care and better patient outcomes for those who attend.”

Additionally, attendees will explore advances in cardiovascular device development and delivery of health care to help navigate this difficult new health care environment.

This symposium is designed for primary care physicians, clinical cardiologists, interventional cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, basic scientists, vascular medicine specialists, nurses, perfusionists, cath lab technicians, and other health care professionals with a special interest in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Promedica International is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Nurses and perfusionists may also earn continuing education units (CEUs). The cost for physicians to attend is $695 through August 23, and $795 thereafter.  The cost for residents, fellows and nurses to attend is $495 through August 23, and $595 thereafter. For more information, lodging information and to register, visit www.promedicacme.com.

Following the two-day symposium, physicians are invited to attend the Phoenix Transradial Summit, on Oct. 6, in the same location. For more information and to register, visit www.pameas.org.

Dr. Heuser - updated photo

St. Luke’s Cardiology Chief Directs Symposium

Promedica International’s Cardiovascular Disease Management symposium is being held at the Arizona Biltmore Hotel in Phoenix, Oct. 4 – 5, 2013. Directed by Richard Heuser, M.D., FACC, chief of cardiology at St. Luke’s Medical Center and in practice with Phoenix Heart Center, a Physician Group of Arizona practice, Inc., the two-day continuing education conference will center on recent advancements and controversial topics in multiple areas of cardiovascular disease, and present new ideas for tailoring the most appropriate treatment plan for each individual.

This interactive, case-based program combines prestigious speakers and cutting-edge, evidence-based medicine studies to give attendees a practical overview of the optimal methods and management of the informed physicians’ practice, and to discuss and debate the exciting options on the horizon.

“The goal of this summit is to help medical professionals stay abreast of new, innovative studies and approaches to cardiovascular disease prevention, diagnosis and management,” said Dr. Heuser. “This will ultimately result into improvements in patient care and better patient outcomes for those who attend.”

Additionally, attendees will explore advances in cardiovascular device development and delivery of health care to help navigate this difficult new health care environment.

This symposium is designed for primary care physicians, clinical cardiologists, interventional cardiologists, cardiovascular surgeons, basic scientists, vascular medicine specialists, nurses, perfusionists, cath lab technicians, and other health care professionals with a special interest in the field of cardiovascular medicine.

Promedica International is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Nurses and perfusionists may also earn continuing education units (CEUs). The cost for physicians to attend is $695 through August 23, and $795 thereafter.  The cost for residents, fellows and nurses to attend is $495 through August 23, and $595 thereafter. For more information, lodging information and to register, visit www.promedicacme.com.

Following the two-day symposium, physicians are invited to attend the Phoenix Transradial Summit, on Oct. 6, in the same location. For more information and to register, visit www.pameas.org.

joint

St. Luke’s Designated an Aetna Institute of Quality

St. Luke’s Medical Center announced it has been once again been designated an Aetna Institute of Quality® Orthopedic Care Facility for total joint replacement. St. Luke’s is the only hospital in Arizona to receive this specific level of distinction.

Aetna makes information about the quality and cost of health care services available to its members to help them make informed decisions about their health care needs. In line with this goal, Aetna recognizes hospitals and facilities in its network that offer specialized clinical services for certain health conditions. Facilities are selected for consistently delivering evidence-based, safe care.

“St. Luke’s Medical Center is pleased to receive this esteemed distinction from Aetna, in the area of total joint replacement,” said Ed Myers, CEO, St. Luke’s Medical Center. “Our medical professionals strive for excellence by giving each and every patient high quality, consistent health care day in and day out.”

As leaders in high quality, specialized orthopaedic care, surgeons on the medical staff at St. Luke’s Medical Center offer innovative procedures designed to meet the individual needs of patients. The dedicated orthopedics unit at St. Luke’s Medical Center features 20 all-private, spacious rooms with breathtaking views of both the city skyline and the surrounding mountains. The newly remodeled until also includes four state-of-the-art nursing stations designed to keep nurses near their patients for optimum care. For more information about the orthopaedic services offered at St. Luke’s Medical Center, visit AZMoreMotion.com or call toll-free 1-855-931-MORE (6673).

Arizona Heart Walk - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

St. Luke¹s adds First Patients in Cardiac Clinical Trial

St. Luke’s Medical Center today announced its chief of cardiology, Richard Heuser, M.D., FACC, has enrolled the first two U.S. patients in the PRESERV clinical trial (Prospective Randomized Evaluation to Study the Effects of Reduced contrast media on the Vitality of the Kidney) sponsored by Osprey Medical Inc.(ASX: OSP).The study utilizes the CINCOR System, a dye reduction and removal system that aims to limit the amount of dye used during a coronary angiogram, a common heart procedure, from reaching the kidneys, thereby reducing the risk of kidney damage.

“We are honored to have Dr. Heuser enroll our first U.S. patients,” said Mike McCormick, president of Osprey Medical. “He is one of the world’s leading cardiologists and we are excited to have his contributions to the PRESERV Trial.

Dye is routinely used to ‘x-ray’ heart tissue during coronary angiography and stenting procedures, but it can cause serious and irreversible damage to the kidneys, known as Contrast Induced Nephropathy (CIN). This damage can be significantly more harmful to those patients at high-risk of CIN due to pre-existing chronic kidney disease, which accounts for 25 percent of all patients undergoing coronary angiography and stenting procedures

“While there is no way to completely prevent dye from reaching the kidneys, the CINCOR System potentially offers patients an advanced level of protection against the damage it can cause,” said Dr. Heuser.

Prevention of CIN in high-risk patients may lead to shorter hospital stays, improved patient outcomes and may ultimately save patient’s lives.

The trial will enroll 600 patients in up to 40 centers around the world. St. Luke’s Medical Center is the only participating hospital in Arizona.

St. Luke’s Medical Center is currently seeking qualified patients to enroll in the clinical trial. Participants are required to partake in a 30-day study and will receive a $25 gift card upon completion. For more information about enrollment, contact Renata Schwartz, RN, at 602-251-8890.

hospital

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona honors hospitals

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona has named both Mountain Vista Medical Center and St. Luke’s Medical Center as a Blue Distinction Center+ in the area of Knee and Hip Replacement.

The Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care® program is a national designation awarded by Blue Cross Blue Shield companies to medical facilities that have demonstrated expertise in delivering quality specialty care – and has recently been expanded to include more robust quality measures focused on improved patient health and safety as well as new cost-efficiency measures.

The selection criteria used to evaluate facilities were developed with input from the medical community and include general quality and safety metrics as well as program specific metrics. Mountain Vista and St. Luke’s are proud to have met the rigorous selection criteria that have been set by the Blue Distinction Centers for Specialty Care program.

“Our hospitals are honored to be recognized for their enduring commitment to deliver quality specialty orthopaedic care in a cost-efficient way,” said Bob Wallen, regional vice president, Managed Care, for IASIS Healthcare, the parent company of Mountain Vista and St. Luke’s. “This designation will help guide patients to choose the very best care available.”

Research confirms that the newly designated Blue Distinction Centers and Blue Distinction Centers+ demonstrate better quality and improved outcomes for patients, with lower rates of complications and readmissions than their peers. Blue Distinction Centers+ also are more than 20 percent more cost-efficient. The program provides consumers with tools to make better informed health care decisions, and these results will enable employers, working with their local Blue Plan, to tailor benefits to meet their individual quality and cost objectives.

Nursing Shortage Still Plagues Arizona’s Health Care Industry

Web can be a blessing and a curse for health advice

Admit it. You’ve had an ache or pain or a sniffle or stiffness and Googled your symptoms to figure out what was wrong. We’ve all done it.

While WebMD may be the quickest way to find and answer, it may not be the healthiest.
“The danger is that many different diseases have similar symptoms and it is difficult for a person without medical training to distinguish between possible causes,” says Dr. Jim Dearing, chief medical officer for John C. Lincoln’s Physician Network. “This becomes more dangerous if the patient decides to self-medicate instead of consulting a physician, because they could easily be treating the wrong thing – and their treatment may make the real cause of their symptoms worse.”

According to a 2011 Pew study, 80 percent of Internet users look for health information online, making medical inquiries the third most popular use of the Web, trailing only email and search engine use. And a recent survey of 1,000 people found that almost one-quarter of 1,000 people surveyed have misdiagnosed and treated themselves wrongly thanks to the information they found online.

“With the abundance of information available on the Internet, sorting fact from fiction can be difficult,” says Dr. Mary Ellen Dirlam, medical director of Samaritan Academic Faculty Practices at Banner Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. “Information on the web may be inaccurate, incomplete, outdated or biased by commercial interests. Misinformation or applying accurate information inappropriately may result in needless worry or false reassurance, causing delay of treatment.”

Some of that needless worry has created a condition called “cyberchondria,” which is fear and preoccupation with medical concerns caused by health research online.

Virginia Kwan, a psychologist at Arizona State University, examined how symptoms presented online can influence people’s reactions to possible medical conditions
“The way gamblers say they have a ‘hot hand,’ cyberchondriacs believe they have ‘hot symptoms,’” Kwan says. “If they hit the first two in a list, they believe they must have the third one as well.”

While issues of misdiagnosis and cyberchondria can result from overzealous online medical research, doctors agree that there is a constructive place for Internet research in healthcare.

“The Internet provides a wealth of information for parents interested in their child’s medical care,” says Dr. Robb Muhm Jr. of Phoenix Children’s Hospital. “The amount of information can be overwhelming at times. The biggest danger for parents is choosing the incorrect information from among all the available information on the Internet.  This is an area where the pediatrician can be very helpful. We can help the parents make the right decision for their child based on experience, research, and the most current information.”
Dr. Sanford Silverman of Scottsdale’s Center for Attention Deficit and Learning Disorders and Center for Peak Performance points out that the Internet can be a useful tool to create a common ground to start a diagnostic and treatment discussion with a medical professional.

“The more informed the patient is, the easier it is to communicate with them,” he says. “In this respect, prospective patients can learn from pertinent Internet sites and then share their thoughts and findings with the doctor. I have worked with many patients who were diagnosed with anxiety and or depression. By using the Internet to research this diagnosis, they found links to Attention Deficit Disorder, which they then believed was a more accurate diagnosis.  They scheduled an appointment to investigate if they have this disorder.  In the majority of my cases, they were accurate and ADD was a contributing or major part of their difficulties.  The Internet helped steer them to appropriate authorities.”

ADVICE FROM EXPERTS

Valley doctors offer insight for those people who have a medical issue or question and are considering turning to the Internet for answers:

Dr. Mary Ellen Dirlam, Banner Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center: Patients searching the internet need to verify the identity and credentials of the online source. Reputable sources include their healthcare provider as well as the Medical Library Association internet site. This website offers an excellent article, “A user’s guide to finding and evaluating health information on the web” as well as a list of good sources for information.

Dr. Robb Muhm Jr., Phoenix Children’s Hospital: We should all be critical media consumers. We always need to be mindful of where the information is coming from.  The American Academy of Pediatrics website (aap.org) is a good starting point. The AAP has another parent-specific website dedicated to providing accurate, current information on a wide variety of topics: healthychildren.org.  When I have a question, I start with these two websites.

Dr. Penny Krich, EVDI Medical Imaging: A patient should be wary of anecdotal medical information often found on the Internet. Each patient’s medical history is different. It should be taken into account that a similar symptom for one person may have very different implications for someone else with a different underlying medical problem.

Jelden Arcilla, chief nursing officer, St. Luke’s Medical Center:  The best sites to visit and reference for individual and basic education on health and medical conditions are non-profit, government and academic web sites.  These are sites are generally unbiased with no individual disclosure or conflicts and have the most updated, evidence-based research to support its information and recommendations.  They also are reputable web sites to provide you referrals to nearest health care provider who can further address your concerns.

Scottsdale Living Magazine Spring 2012

How Fashion Can Lead To A Number Of Painful Health Problems

Agonizingly beautiful: Wearing heels that are too high and jeans that are too tight are just two of the fashion statements that can lead to health problems down the road, experts say.


Suppressing a scowl and the urge to launch those insufferable stilettos through a nearby window, you hear your mother’s voice in your ear.

“Beauty is pain,” she reminds you.

Fueled by societal standards and a powerful biological urge to attract, women endure grueling conditions to acquire allure and beauty.

Though bound feet, cinched corsets and lead makeup went the way of the powdered wig (phew!), many contemporary beauty trends are just as dangerous to women’s physical health.

“I think footwear is one of the worst things we do to women,” says Dr. Anthony Hedley, an orthopedic surgeon at St. Luke’s Medical Center in Phoenix. “Women’s feet, by and large, get an absolute hammering throughout their lives.”

The usual culprits? Tall, thin, pointy shoes.

High heels place a high volume of impact on a small area of bones, instead of distributing the weight evenly over all 26 bones in the human foot. With each step, sky-high heels add about 25 percent more impact on hip and knee joints and double the stress on the muscles supporting the spine.

Towering heels can lead to chronic over-stretching of the plantar fascia, shortening of the Achilles tendon, and other painful or unsightly foot conditions, Hedley says.

“High heels cause a number of things detrimental to the feet in the log run: drifting of the metatarsals, hammertoes, Haglund’s deformity, bunions, Achilles tendonitis,” Hedley says. “When the feet are ridiculously high, posture is thrown out so badly that it causes back, hip and shoulder pain.”

Several of these chronic conditions deform the foot, making it difficult to wear any shoe at all, whether stiff and chic or drab but comfortable.

To avoid limping down the road, orthopedic experts recommend keeping your everyday heels less than 2.5 inches.

Skinny jeans, high heels’ trendy cohort, should also be worn with caution.

Doctors are noting a rise in the number of patients reporting unconventional leg pain. Increasingly, pant size is to blame.

“Skin-tight jeans can cause vascular obstructions, and you don’t want your nerves constricted,” says Hedley.

Over time, when pressure cuts off the femoral nerve, one can develop burning or numbness as a permanent condition. Other significant and undesirable side effects of skinny jeans are blood clots, muscle pain and urinary track infections, Hedley says.

To dodge a trip to the doctor’s, avoid trendy jeans so skinny you have to lie down to zip up.

Another spring must-have that is becoming a painful problem for fashionistas is the oversized handbag, a fashionable way to tote laptops, diapers, water bottles — you name it.

But before you splurge on a jumbo-sized purse to carry every tool of the trade, consider the risks of having it all.

The American Chiropractic Association recommends carrying no more than 10 percent of your body weight in your purse or bag. Even just basic essentials — commuting shoes, reading/writing material, coat, snack and a laptop — can quickly add up.

Every extra pound of weight you carry is amplified six times across the knee joint, says Denise McGinley, director at the Center for Orthopedic Innovation at St. Luke’s Medical Center. Heavy, extra-large shoulder bags can cause neck pain, muscle inflammation, and, in serious cases, “dropped” shoulders and acute episodes of muscle spasms.

If you need to lug cargo amassing more than 10 percent of your body weight, invest in a rolling carryall, since pack mules are so 2011.

“Don’t let fashion mislead you and make you the victim, because some of the results are irreparable and avoidable,” Hedley says. “You can be fashionable without being foolish.”

 

Scottsdale Living Magazine Spring 2012