Tag Archives: steve sanghi

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip.

Microchip Sets Record Net Sales Quarter

Microchip Technology Incorporated (NASDAQ: MCHP), a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, reported results for the three months ended June 30, 2014.

Consolidated GAAP net sales for the first quarter of fiscal 2015 were a record $528.9 million, up 7.2% sequentially from net sales of $493.4 million in the immediately preceding quarter, and up 14.3% from net sales of $462.8 million in the prior year’s first quarter. Consolidated GAAP net income for the first quarter of fiscal 2015 was $89.9 million, or 40 cents per diluted share, down 19.4% from GAAP net income of $111.5 million, or 50 cents per diluted share, in the immediately preceding quarter, and up 14.4% from GAAP net income of $78.6 million, or 37 cents per diluted share, in the prior year’s first quarter.

Consolidated non-GAAP net sales for the first quarter of fiscal 2015 were a record $531.3 million, up 7.7% sequentially from net sales of $493.4 million in the immediately preceding quarter, and up 14.8% from net sales of $462.8 million in the prior year’s first quarter. Non-GAAP net sales in the first quarter of fiscal 2015 were $2.5 million higher than GAAP net sales due to the sell-through of inventory held by distributors of Supertex at the date of our acquisition not being included in our GAAP results. Consolidated non-GAAP net income for the first quarter of fiscal 2015 was a record $151.6 million, or 68 cents per diluted share, up 7.3% from non-GAAP net income of $141.3 million, or 64 cents per diluted share, in the immediately preceding quarter, and up 26.0% from non-GAAP net income of $120.4 million, or 57 cents per diluted share, in the prior year’s first quarter. For the first quarters of fiscal 2015 and fiscal 2014, our non-GAAP results exclude the effect of share-based compensation, expenses related to our acquisition activities (including intangible asset amortization, inventory valuation costs, severance costs, and legal and other general and administrative expenses associated with acquisitions), non-cash interest expense on our convertible debentures, and non-recurring tax events. A reconciliation of our non-GAAP and GAAP results is included in this press release.

Microchip also announced today that its Board of Directors declared a quarterly cash dividend on its common stock of 35.6 cents per share. The quarterly dividend is payable on September 4, 2014 to stockholders of record on August 21, 2014.

“We are very pleased with our execution in the June quarter. All of our non-GAAP financial metrics including net sales, gross margin percentage, operating expense percentage, operating profit percentage and earnings per share were better than the mid-point of our guidance provided on May 6,” said Steve Sanghi, President and CEO. “Excluding the results of Supertex, our non-GAAP gross margin was an outstanding 60%, and our non-GAAP operating profit was 33.5%.”

Mr. Sanghi added, “Including the results of Supertex, our consolidated non-GAAP gross margin was 59.8% and our non-GAAP operating profit was 33.2%. We are making excellent progress towards our long term goal of 35% non-GAAP operating profit. Consolidated non-GAAP earnings per share was a record 68 cents and was 2 cents better than the mid-point of our guidance.”

Mr. Sanghi added further, “We are seeing a seasonally normal business environment with strengths in many of our end markets like industrial, automotive, housing, consumer electronics and personal computing. We are seeing exceptional strength in some of our new products and technologies which are growing revenue at double digit percentages sequentially. As a result, our product delivery lead times have stretched out and we are selectively capacity constrained in fab, wafer sort, assembly and test operations particularly on our newest products and technologies. Our inventory of 108 days is below our targeted level of 115 and is expected to go lower this quarter. We are ramping all of our factories, but are limited by equipment lead times. We have increased our planned capital expenditures for fiscal year 2015 to $175 million.”

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip.

Microchip Acquires ISSC Technologies

Microchip Technology Incorporated, a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, and ISSC Technologies Corporation (ISSC) today announced that Microchip has signed a definitive agreement to acquire ISSC, a leading provider of low power Bluetooth and advanced wireless solutions for the Internet Of Things (IoT) market. ISSC is publicly traded on the GreTai Securities Market and is headquartered in Hsinchu, Taiwan (Hsinchu Science Park) with customer service or research activities in Shenzhen, China and Torrance, California. In calendar year 2013, ISSC had net sales of US$69.2 million and an operating margin of 18.9% based on their reported results under International Financial Reporting Standards.

Under the terms of the transaction, Microchip will commence a tender offer to acquire all of the outstanding shares of ISSC for New Taiwan (NT)$143 per share (approximately US$4.74 per share, based on an assumed exchange rate of NT$30.15 per US$) in cash, and acquire any remaining shares pursuant to a follow-on merger at NT$143 per share minus any dividends paid by ISSC prior to the close of the transaction. The transaction represents a total equity value of about NT$9.9 billion (approximately US$328.5 million), and a total enterprise value of about NT$8.9 billion (approximately US$294.3 million), after excluding ISSC’s cash and investments on its balance sheet of approximately NT$1 billion (approximately US$34.2 million). The acquisition is expected to be accretive to Microchip’s non-GAAP earnings per share in the first full quarter after completion of the tender offer at which time Microchip will own the majority of the outstanding shares of ISSC and consolidate its financial statements with Microchip’s.

The acquisition has been approved by the Boards of Directors of each company. The tender offer is expected to close in the third quarter of calendar 2014. The follow-on merger is expected to close in the fourth quarter of calendar 2014, subject to approval of the follow-on merger by ISSC stockholders,
regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions. In connection with the transaction, Microchip has entered into an agreement with certain ISSC shareholders holding approximately 28 percent of the outstanding shares of ISSC pursuant to which such shareholders have committed to tender approximately 17 percent of the outstanding shares of ISSC, which represents all unrestricted ISSC shares owned by them.

“We are delighted to have ISSC join the Microchip team. ISSC’s deep domain knowledge in Bluetooth and wireless technologies, and strong position in the Consumer markets, complement many of Microchip’s initiatives in wireless and IoT areas. We believe that combining ISSC’s strengths in wireless products and technology with Microchip’s brand, channel and operational strengths will enable significant cross selling opportunities,” said Ganesh Moorthy, COO of Microchip Technology.

“We are pleased to join Microchip Technology, a premier company in the semiconductor industry. Microchip has demonstrated consistent profitability, technology leadership and growth in its core businesses. We believe that this acquisition provides the best vehicle for us to realize significant value for ISSC shareholders, as well as the opportunities from scale of the much stronger sales and manufacturing platforms of Microchip,” said Max Wu, Chairman of ISSC.

“This transaction represents the first major overseas acquisition by Microchip and the purchase will be funded with a portion of Microchip’s foreign cash and will not require any additional borrowings from our line of credit. We believe the combination of a very strategic transaction that provides low power Bluetooth technology, ISSC’s strengths and capabilities and our use of foreign cash makes this a compelling transaction for the shareholders of both companies,” said Steve Sanghi, Microchip’s President and CEO.

Arizona’s 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders

What would you do it you opened the pages of this magazine and saw Jerry Colangelo listed as one of the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona? You’d do a double take, but it’s not out of the realm of possibilities.

Consider this: Among 439,633 Arizonans under age 5 in 2012, this is how the Census broke down those numbers:

• Hispanic: 196,776 (44.8 percent)
• Non-Hispanic white: 171,888 (39.1 percent)
• American Indian and Alaska Native: 22,198 (5 percent)
• Black: 18,617 (4.2 percent)
• Asian: 11,311 (2.6 percent)
• Two or more races: 18,088 (4.1 percent)
• Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander: 755 (0.17).

If you combine numbers like that with the fact that 91.7 percent of the nation’s population growth between 2000 and 2010 was attributed to racial and ethnic minorities, with the largest segment of population growth occurring in the Hispanic community, lists like this — the 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona of 2014 — could become obsolete in our lifetimes.

Until we get there and as our state’s minority population moves toward majority status, it’s important to notice that the state’s most dynmanic business leaders have helped fuel our economic recovery and growth … and many of them just happen to be minorities. And while the future looks bright, we still have work to in overcoming outdated perceptions. According to a 2012 Minority Business Enterprise Report commissioned by the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and the Phoenix MBDA Business Center, a significant portion of minority-owned businesses in Arizona have had problems earning the trust of their customers, suppliers, peers and lenders and need support from within the business community to help break down some of these misconceptions and stigma.

The 25 Most Influential Minority Business Leaders in Arizona, whom you will meet below, have changed that perception.


Benito AlmanzaBenito Almanza
Arizona president
Bank of America
Heritage: Mexican-American
A graduate of Stanford University and the University of Santa Clara, Almanza has been with Bank of America for 34 years. He is a member of the Teach for America Arizona Board.
His hope for professional legacy: “Working every day with great teammates to make our community better and surrounding myself with strong leaders and developing them to replace me.”

Glynis BryanGlynis Bryan
CFO
Insight Enterprises Inc.
Heritage: Jamaican
Bryan is responsible for setting the company’s financial strategies; ensuring the company has the appropriate financial and operating controls and systems in place to support future growth; and serving as a financial and business advisor to the leadership team.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Setting a standard of excellence in an organization and helping teammates reach their full potential.”

Debbie CottonDebbie Cotton
Director
Phoenix Convention Center
Heritage: African American
Cotton manages a staff of 240 employees, a budget of $47.5 million and is the city’s chief representative to the state’s tourism and hospitality industry.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Throughout my career, I’d like to be remembered for adhering to high ethical standards and inspiring individuals to pursue careers within public service.”

Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.Gonzalo de la Melena Jr.
President and CEO
Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
Heritage: Peruvian and Mexican
De la Melena, who directs the state’s leading advocate representing more than 60,000 Hispanic business enterprises, has 20 years of global brand management, business development and Latino marketing experience gained from conducting business in more than 30 countries.
His hope for professional legacy: “For helping the lifeblood of our economy, small businesses, prosper – especially minority-owned businesses, now one-fourth of Arizona’s total. Our future global competitiveness depends on it.”

Diane EnosDiane Enos
President
Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community
Enos is the 23rd president of the Salt River Community and the second women elected to the office. Enos is the first member of the Community to become a lawyer and practiced in the Maricopa County Public Defender’s Office for 11 years.
Heritage: Onk Akimel O’Odham, or one of the River People otherwise known as Pima
Her hope for professional legacy: “The top qualities I’d like to be remembered for is someone who was unafraid to try something new and to do it with integrity for the good of my people.”

rufusRufus Glasper
Chancellor
Maricopa Community Colleges
Heritage: African American
As the CEO of one of the nation’s largest systems of community colleges, he is leading MCCCD to address the community’s education and workforce training needs.
His hope for professional legacy: “An educator who focused on human rights and education for first-generation college students, quality healthcare, workforce and jobs, and re-framing an institution for the future.”

Deborah GriffinDeborah Griffin
President of the board of directors
Gila River Casinos
Heritage: Gila River Indian Community member and Mexican-American
Griffin leads Arizona’s largest minority-run business with more that 2,500 employees.
Her hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered for creating a legacy of self-sufficiency and volunteerism in my community. My Tribe needs only to seek within themselves and have confidence in the beauty of their abilities to continue this legacy.”

Edmundo HidalgoEdmundo Hidalgo
President and CEO
Chicanos Por La Causa
Heritage: Mexican-American
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference in the community. The Hispanic community is at a breakaway point because of our demographics and the opportunities we establish for our youth will have a tremendous impact on our state. As the Hispanic community goes, so will the State of Arizona. My focus has always been in support of education and ensuring that young people get the opportunities I received as I was beginning my career. I am blessed to have been mentored by many individuals who were willing to invest in me and I have the responsibility to do the same.”

leezieLeezie Kim
Partner
Quarles & Brady
Heritage: Korean-American
Kim returned to Quarles & Brady after four years of service as a White House appointee to the U. S. Department of Homeland Security and as general counsel to Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano.
Her hope for professional legacy: “As a trusted counselor to and partner with leaders in business, government and politics who found new ways to get things done that make life a little better for us all.”

david_kongDavid Kong
President and CEO
Best Western International
Since he was named president and CEO in 2004, Kong has guided Best Western International through a brand resurgence, winning numerous awards for training, social media and ecommerce initiatives. Brand Keys ranked Best Western No. 1 in customer loyalty for four consecutive years.
Heritage: Asian
His hope for professional legacy: “I’d like to be remembered for having made a positive difference – in Best Western, in the industry and the lives of all our associates and our hotel staff.”

paulPaul Luna
President and CEO
Helios Education Foundation
Luna leads Helios Education Foundation, a philanthropic organization dedicated to creating opportunities for individuals in Arizona and Florida to succeed in postsecondary education. He is the former president of Valley of the Sun United Way and has held positions with Pepsi, IBM and the Office of Governor Bruce Babbitt.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “That I cared about our community and helped make it better.”

steve_maciasSteve Macias
President and CEO
Pivot Manufacturing
Macias serves on the Governor’s Council on Small Business and is co-chair of the Supply Chain/Buy Arizona Committee, which is exploring ways government can help promote Arizona businesses.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “Someone who made a positive impact in promoting manufacturing as a worthwhile and valuable industry that provides quality jobs to the community.”

louis_manuelLouis J. Manuel, Jr.
Chairman
Ak-Chin Indian Community
Heritage: Tohono O’odham Nation and Ak-Chin Indian Community
Manuel has diversified his Community’s economy with Ak-Chin Farms, Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino, Santa Cruz Commerce Center and a partnership with the Super Bowl Host Committee.
His hope for professional legacy: “That my decision making gave value and sustainability in promoting a strong future and self-reliance for the people I serve.”

clarenceClarence McAllister
President and CEO
Fortis Networks
Heritage: Black Latino
McAllister was born in Panama and earned degrees in electrical engineering from ASU and an MBA from Nova Southeastern University. In 2000, he and his wife Reyna started Fortis, a certified 8a and HUBZone government contractor specialized in engineering, construction and technology services.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an immigrant who came to this country in search of the American Dream, and built a business that employs more than 100 Americans.”

alfred_molinaAlfredo Molina
Chairman
Molina Jewelers
Heritage: Hispanic
Molina went from fleeing Cuba as a boy without a change of clothes to rocking the jewelry world by selling the Archduke Joseph diamond for $21.5 million, the most ever paid at auction for a colorless diamond.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as someone who made a difference. I believe that every individual is a precious jewel and it is my commitment and social responsibility to ensure they become brilliant.”

rodolfo-pargaRodolfo Parga, Jr.
Managing shareholder
Ryley Carlock & Applewhite
Heritage: Mexican
Parga has been named in multiple editions of Southwest Super Lawyers®, including in 2014. He also serves on the doard of Chicanos Por la Causa, a leading nonprofit helping advance and create economic and educational opportunities.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered as always trying my best to do the right thing, and being fair and loyal.”

Dan PuenteDan Puente
Owner
D.P. Electric
Heritage: Hispanic
Puente founded D.P. Electric in 1990 out of his garage with one truck and has built it into the largest Hispanic-owned company in Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “As an individual who created a company that set industry standards, gave back to an industry generous with opportunity and helped people grow personally and professionally.”

terry_ramblerTerry Rambler
Chairman
Arizona Indian Gaming Association
Heritage: San Carlos Apache Tribe
In addition to his AIGA leadership role, Rambler is chariman of the San Carlos Apache Tribe and president of the Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.
His hope for professional legacy: “Strong vision, consistent oversight, yet humble leadership that helped build successful partnerships in economic development, cultural preservation, and the expansion of tribal sovereignty.”

Terence-RobertsTerence Roberts, M.D., J.D.
Radiation oncologist
Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center
Heritage: African-American
Roberts specializes in stereotactic radiosurgery and tumors of the brain, spine, and prostate. He also received a law degree from Stanford University and practiced corporate law in the Silicon Valley for start-up companies.
His hope for professional legacy: “I would like to be remembered professionally as compassionate, knowledgeable and having integrity. Also as someone who innovated in an era of health care reform.”

Steve SanghiSteve Sanghi
Chairman, CEO and president
Microchip Technology
Heritage: Indian
Sanghi, named president of Microchip in 1990, CEO in 1991 and chairman in 1993, is the author of “Driving Excellence: How The Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader.”
His hope for professional legacy: “For building Microchip Technology into one of the most successful semiconductor companies, which achieved an unprecedented 100 consecutive profitable quarters in a brutally competitive industry.”

roxanne_song_ongRoxanne K. Song Ong
Chief presiding judge
Phoenix Municipal Court
Heritage: Chinese American
Song Ong, who chair the Arizona Supreme Court Commission on Minorities, was the first Asian female judge in Arizona and first minority to be named as Phoenix chief judge.
Her hope for professional legacy: “It would be my great honor to be remembered for three primary things: (1) my work in judicial and civics education, (2) the promotion of cultural competency and diversity in the judicial and legal profession, and (3) promoting access to justice for all Arizonans through legal services and education.”

Charlie-ToucheCharlie Touché
Chairman and CEO
Lovitt & Touché, Inc.
In 2004, Touché became chairman and CEO of one of the largest insurance agencies in the United States, with nearly 200 employees in three offices and more than $300 million in total premiums.
Heritage: Hispanic
His hope for professional legacy: “I’m proud to say that during this entire century, we’ve remained a client-driven, hands-on kind of company with people who will roll up their sleeves and jump in the trenches to help those we do business with.”

lisa_uriasLisa Urias
President and CEO
Urias Communications
Heritage: Mexican
Urias has built an award-winning advertising, marketing and public relations agency that specializes in the diverse markets of the American Southwest, particularly the Hispanic market.
Her hope for professional legacy: “Having a nationally-known agency that successfully connects corporations to multicultural markets through ad campaigns, public relations and community outreach for mutual benefit and respect.”

lonnie_williamsLonnie J. Williams, Jr.
Partner
Stinson Leonard Street LLP
Heritage: Black
The Yale graduate’s practice focuses on commercial business and employment-related matters. He is a fellow of the American College of Trial Lawyers, one of the premier legal associations in America.
His hope for professional legacy: “Martin Luther King said, ‘if it falls your lot to be a street sweeper, go on out and sweep streets like Michelangelo painted pictures.’ Professionally, I would like to be remembered like that street sweeper.”

kuldip_vermaKuldip Verma
CEO
Vermaland
Heritage: East Indian
Vermaland, founded by Verma, holds more than 24,000 acres of land in Arizona with a portfolio valued at $500 million. Nabha, the tiny Indian village Verma was born in, could fit many times into the acreage he now controls in the desert Southwest.
His hope for professional legacy: “I saw a dream and pursued it. Success without humility is a curse, but Success with your values intact is a blessing.”

Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip.

Microchip Completes Acquisition of Supertex

Microchip Technology Incorporated and Supertex, Inc. announced that Microchip has completed its previously announced acquisition of Supertex following approval of the transaction by Supertex shareholders at Supertex’s special meeting of shareholders held today.

Approximately 98.4% of the Supertex shares that voted were voted in favor of the merger in which Supertex shareholders will receive $33.00 per share in cash. Overall, approximately 87.7% of the total outstanding Supertex shares were voted. Therefore, approximately 86.43% of the total outstanding Supertex shares were voted in favor of the acquisition transaction.

“We are very pleased to have completed our acquisition of Supertex,” said Steve Sanghi, President and CEO of Microchip. “I welcome the Supertex employees into the Microchip family and look forward to building a combined organization that will bring the capabilities of both organizations to bear in the marketplace.”

As a result of the completion of the transaction, trading in Supertex common stock on the NASDAQ will cease effective after the close of market today.

Microchip will share more information regarding the Supertex transaction during its Q4 and FY2014 financial results conference call scheduled for Tuesday, May 6, 2014.

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Microchip Announces Acquisition of Supertex

Microchip Technology Incorporated (NASDAQ:MCHP), a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, and Supertex Incorporated (NASDAQ: SUPX) today announced that Microchip has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Supertex for $33 per share in cash, which represents a total equity value of about $394 million, and a total enterprise value of about $246 million, after excluding Supertex’s cash and investments on its balance sheet of approximately $148 million. The acquisition is expected to be accretive to Microchip’s non GAAP earnings per share in the first full quarter after completion of the acquisition.

The acquisition has been unanimously approved by the Boards of Directors of each company and is expected to close in the second quarter of calendar 2014, subject to approval by Supertex’s stockholders, regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions.

“We are pleased to have Supertex become part of the Microchip team. Supertex’s deep domain knowledge in high voltage analog and mixed signal technologies, and strong position in the Medical, Industrial and Lighting markets, complement many of Microchip initiatives in these areas. We believe that combining Supertex’s business with Microchip’s Analog business will enable significant synergies and cross selling opportunities,” said Steve Sanghi, President and CEO of Microchip Technology.

“We are pleased to join Microchip Technology, a premier company in the semiconductor industry. Microchip has demonstrated consistent profitability, technology leadership and growth in its core businesses. We believe that this acquisition provides the best vehicle for us to realize significant value for Supertex’s shareholders, as well as the opportunity to scale up to the much stronger sales and manufacturing platforms of Microchip” said Henry Pao, President and CEO of Supertex.

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Microchip’s Sanghi Headlines CEO Breakfast

The Association for Corporate Growth-Arizona will feature the leader of one of the Valley’s most dynamic and influential companies for its CEO Breakfast on September 10.

Steve Sanghi, Chairman, President & CEO of Microchip Technology Inc., and co-author of the book “Driving Excellence:  How the Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader,” will address ACG’s audience of Valley business leaders.

The event will take place on Tuesday, September 10 from 7 to 9 a.m. at the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa Grand Ballroom in Phoenix. Registration begins at 7 and the breakfast begins at 7:30 a.m.

Sanghi is one of the most respected CEOs in the Arizona business community, and has overseen the extensive growth of Microchip into a significant player in the technology industry.

“We are very pleased to be able to feature someone with Mr. Sanghi’s broad experience and sharp insights into today’s business environment,” said Christine Nowaczyk, Board President for ACG-Arizona. “He’s a dynamic and visionary business leader who has a lot to share that can make other companies and ventures successful.”

Tickets for the September 10 event are available for $49 for ACG members and sponsors, and $69 for ACG non-members, if purchased by September 6; and $59 for ACG members and sponsors, and $79 for ACG non-members, if purchased after September 6. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.acg.org/arizona or calling 602-343-6280.

Mr. Sanghi was named the President of the Company in August 1990, Chief Executive Officer in October 1991, and the Chairman of the Board of Directors in October 1993.  In June 1995, Mr. Sanghi received an Arizona Entrepreneur of the Year award. Mr. Sanghi and Microchip have won numerous awards and honors for business excellence throughout his tenure as President and CEO.

Microchip Technology Inc. (NASDAQ:  MCHP) is a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, providing low-risk product development, lower total system cost and faster time to market for thousands of diverse customer applications worldwide. Headquartered in Chandler, Arizona, Microchip offers outstanding technical support along with dependable delivery and quality. For more information, visit the Microchip website at http://www.microchip.com.

Founded in 1954, the Association for Corporate Growth (ACG) is a global association for professionals involved in corporate growth, corporate development, and mergers and acquisitions. Today ACG stands at more than 13,000 members from corporations, private equity, finance, and professional service firms representing Fortune 500, Fortune 1000, FTSE 100, and mid-market companies in 55 chapters in North America, Europe, and Asia. The Arizona chapter of ACG includes representatives from corporate investment and private equity groups, financiers, venture capitalists and supporting consultant services. For more information, visit www.acg.org/arizona.

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Microchip's Sanghi Headlines CEO Breakfast

The Association for Corporate Growth-Arizona will feature the leader of one of the Valley’s most dynamic and influential companies for its CEO Breakfast on September 10.

Steve Sanghi, Chairman, President & CEO of Microchip Technology Inc., and co-author of the book “Driving Excellence:  How the Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader,” will address ACG’s audience of Valley business leaders.

The event will take place on Tuesday, September 10 from 7 to 9 a.m. at the Arizona Biltmore Resort & Spa Grand Ballroom in Phoenix. Registration begins at 7 and the breakfast begins at 7:30 a.m.

Sanghi is one of the most respected CEOs in the Arizona business community, and has overseen the extensive growth of Microchip into a significant player in the technology industry.

“We are very pleased to be able to feature someone with Mr. Sanghi’s broad experience and sharp insights into today’s business environment,” said Christine Nowaczyk, Board President for ACG-Arizona. “He’s a dynamic and visionary business leader who has a lot to share that can make other companies and ventures successful.”

Tickets for the September 10 event are available for $49 for ACG members and sponsors, and $69 for ACG non-members, if purchased by September 6; and $59 for ACG members and sponsors, and $79 for ACG non-members, if purchased after September 6. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.acg.org/arizona or calling 602-343-6280.

Mr. Sanghi was named the President of the Company in August 1990, Chief Executive Officer in October 1991, and the Chairman of the Board of Directors in October 1993.  In June 1995, Mr. Sanghi received an Arizona Entrepreneur of the Year award. Mr. Sanghi and Microchip have won numerous awards and honors for business excellence throughout his tenure as President and CEO.

Microchip Technology Inc. (NASDAQ:  MCHP) is a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, providing low-risk product development, lower total system cost and faster time to market for thousands of diverse customer applications worldwide. Headquartered in Chandler, Arizona, Microchip offers outstanding technical support along with dependable delivery and quality. For more information, visit the Microchip website at http://www.microchip.com.

Founded in 1954, the Association for Corporate Growth (ACG) is a global association for professionals involved in corporate growth, corporate development, and mergers and acquisitions. Today ACG stands at more than 13,000 members from corporations, private equity, finance, and professional service firms representing Fortune 500, Fortune 1000, FTSE 100, and mid-market companies in 55 chapters in North America, Europe, and Asia. The Arizona chapter of ACG includes representatives from corporate investment and private equity groups, financiers, venture capitalists and supporting consultant services. For more information, visit www.acg.org/arizona.

Mr. Hitoshi Tatsuno, Vice President of Operation Management Dept. & Purchasing Dept., Nidec Corporation, receives the 12 billionth PIC® Microcontroller trophy from Joe Krawczyk, Vice President, Sales, Asia Pacific, Microchip Technology Inc.

Microchip Delivers 12 Billionth Microcontroller

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today announced the shipment of its 12 billionth PIC® microcontroller (MCU) to the Nidec Corporation—a preeminent global supplier of precision motors, based in Japan.  Microchip delivered this 12 billionth MCU approximately 10 months after delivering its 11 billionth.
Today’s announcement demonstrates the industry’s continued acceptance of Microchip’s 8, 16 and 32-bit PIC microcontrollers as the high-performance, low-power, cost-effective solution for embedded-control designs.

“The time between each of our 1 billionth shipments continues to accelerate, in the face of Microchip’s increasing MCU market share, and shipping our 12 billionth to a long-term customer like Nidec makes this achievement particularly gratifying,” said Microchip’s president and CEO Steve Sanghi.  “Motor control has always been one of our strengths, and the fact that such an esteemed global leader in motor manufacturing has continued using our PIC MCUs for so long is a testament to that strength.”

“We have reached this milestone because of the high quality of our PIC microcontroller portfolio and MPLAB® development systems, along with the outstanding support provided by our direct-sales team and sales-channel partners,” Sanghi continued.

A customer for more than 10 years, Nidec makes extensive use of Microchip’s 8-bit and 16-bit PIC MCUs and dsPIC® digital signal controllers with advanced motor-control peripherals.  Additionally, Nidec uses Microchip’s comprehensive platform of scalable motor-control development tools and free motor-control software, application notes and tuning guides to achieve rapid prototyping and shorten development cycles.

“Our longstanding relationship with Microchip Technology has been beneficial to both parties, and we have always valued the outstanding quality of their motor-control devices,” said Hitoshi Tatsuno, Nidec’s vice president of operation management department and purchasing department.  “We are honored to be the recipient of Microchip’s 12 billionth PIC microcontroller.”

Microchip serves more than 70,000 customers in over 65 countries, has shipped more than 1.4 million development tools to date, and partners with more than 130 global third-party tool manufacturers.  Additionally, Microchip has a broad portfolio of more than 1,000 8-, 16- and 32-bit PIC microcontrollers, and is the only company to support all of its microcontrollers and digital signal controllers under a single integrated development environment—the free MPLAB X IDE, which is open source and enables cross-platform development using the Linux, Mac OS® and Windows® operating systems.

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Microchip Announces FIRST Robotics results

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, today announced the results of the 2013 FIRST® Robotics Competition (FRC) Arizona Regional, held March 22-23, 2013 in Chandler.

Phoenix’s Carl Hayden High School; Tempe Preparatory Academy, Tempe; and Buena High School, Sierra Vista qualified to compete in the 2013 FIRST Robotics Competition Championship, April 25-27, 2013 in St. Louis, MO. Kingman High School/Kingman Academy of Learning, Kingman; Yuma High School, Yuma; and Rockwell-Collins & Escondido Charter High School, Escondido, Calif. were Regional Finalists.  Students had six weeks to build a robot capable of competing in this year’s competition, the game called Ultimate AscentSM, where teams joined forces to fling saucer-like discs through various slots during several two-minute and fifteen-second matches.  Extra points were scored for robots that could hang from a 10 foot tower in the final seconds of the match.  Any student participating on a FIRSTteam is eligible to apply for more than $16 million in scholarships.

“The engineering challenge presented by FIRST to build a functioning robot that must accomplish specific tasks inspires students to find creative solutions using math, science and engineering, while adhering to strict deadlines.  Working with industry mentors, students learn marketable skills such as working on a team, critical thinking, marketing and problem solving, while having fun at the same time,” said Steve Sanghi, president and CEO of Microchip Technology, co-chair of the FIRST Arizona Regional Planning Committee, FIRST sponsor and member of the FIRST Board of Directors.

Chandler, Ariz.-based Microchip Technology is the organizing sponsor of the FRC Arizona Regional.  Fifty high-school robotics teams competed in the 2013 FRC AZ Regional, including 44 teams from Arizona, three from New Mexico, two from California and one from Mexico.  AZFirst, a non-profit organization, awarded the Steve Sanghi Scholarship to Bianca Rodriquez, a senior at Carl Hayden High School, Phoenix, AZ.  Funded by Steve and Maria Sanghi, this scholarship totals $16,000 over four years, and is awarded to an outstanding FIRST participant who intends to pursue a college degree in science, technology, engineering or math.  Coconino High School won the Regional Chairman’s Award, which recognizes the team that best represents a model for other teams to emulate, and embodies the purpose and goals of FIRST.  Christine Sapio, teacher at Coconino High School, Flagstaff, a FTC (FIRST Technical Competition) Affiliate Partner, received the “Outstanding Volunteer of the Year” award for her success in growing the FTC robotics program for middle-school and high-school students.

Additionally, Dave Thompson, FIRST coach at Coconino High School, received the Woodie Flowers Finalist Award, which recognizes a teacher or engineer who demonstrates excellence in teaching science, math and creative design.  Chris Brandt from Saguaro High School in Scottsdale was awarded the “Arizona Teacher of the Year,” based upon an essay written by his students.

Generous supporters of the 2013 FRC Arizona Regional included Organizing Sponsor Microchip Technology; Leader in Technology Sponsor Microchip Technology Employees; and Captain of Innovation Sponsors Army ROTC, Avnet, Craig and Barbara Barrett, Medtronic Foundation, Microchip Technology and Wells Fargo.  Friends of the Future Sponsors included Best Buy Children’s Foundation, Go Daddy, ON Semiconductor, and Steve and Maria Sanghi.  Regional Fan Sponsors included Chase Giving Foundation and Wishes in Stitches/Alan and Margaret Jannuzzi.

Due to the growth of local FIRST programs First Lego League, FTC and FRC), two separate FRC Arizona regional events are expected to be held in 2015.  Recruitment of FRC teams is currently occurring, with a goal of doubling the number of teams in the next two years.  For more information and to get involved, contact FIRST Regional Director Carol Popovich at carol.popovich@microchip.com or (480) 792-7938.

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Microchip Wins Prestigious Technology Awards

Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, mixed-signal, analog and Flash-IP solutions, announced that it has been recognized by the following global electronics industry publications and organizations for product innovation and technology leadership.

After launching in November, Microchip won three prestigious awards for its MGC3130, which offers low-power, precise, fast and robust hand position tracking with free-space gesture recognition.  The MGC3130, featuring Microchip’s patented GestIC® technology, was handpicked by the editors of Electronic Design Magazine for their “2012 Best of Electronic Design Awards,” in the Digital category, for enabling the next dimension in intuitive, gesture-based, non-contact user interfaces for a broad range of end products.  EE Times China Magazine’s “2013 Annual Creativity in Electronics (ACE) Awards” selected the MGC3130 as a Product of the Year in the Microcontroller/Memory/Interface category.  EDN Magazine named the MGC3130 to their “2012 Hot 100” list, in the Microcontrollers & Processors category.

EE Times China also chose Microchip for two additional “ACE Products of the Year.”  The 70 MIPS dsPIC33E and PIC24E family of digital signal controllers and microcontrollers won in the Digital Processor/DSP/FPGA category, and the MPLAB® XC C compiler line won in the EDA/Tools category.

Likewise, EDN Magazine named a total of six Microchip products to its annual “Hot 100” list, which their editors selected from “the many thousands of products announced during the past year.”  In the Analog category, Microchip’s MCP47A1 digital-to-analog converter was honored; and the 23A1024/23LC1024, 23A512/23LC512, 23LCV51/23LCV1024 serial SRAM family, which includes a battery-backed non-volatile option, was chosen in the Memory & Storage category. Two products were selected in the Boards & Development Tools category, including the MPLAB XC C compiler line, which represents Microchip’s simplified and integrated compiler strategy, as well as the RN-131 and RN-171 PICtail™/PICtail Plus Wi-Fi® development boards with the TCP/IP stack integrated on the module, enabling wireless connectivity for any microcontroller via a serial interface. Finally, the PIC12LF1840T48A, which integrates an 8-bit microcontroller with an RF transmitter for secure-access applications, was chosen for EDN’s RF/Microwave category.

The venerable 8-bit PIC® microcontroller was also named a finalist in Design News Magazine’s “2012 Golden Mousetrap Awards.”  Specifically, the PIC10F(LF)32X and PIC1XF(LF)150X MCUs with integrated configurable logic in 6- to 20-pin packages got the nod in their Electronics & Test: Embedded Computing/Processing category.

Microchip’s JukeBlox® 3.1 Wireless Audio Platform, based on technology from its recent SMSC acquisition, won a 2012 “Readers’ Choice Tech Award” from ECN Magazine in the Boards and Modules category.  Winners were named by the editors of ECN, based on their assessment of readers’ newsletter clicks, Web traffic and social-media engagement for each of the many products they covered during the year.

In addition to the three EE Times China ACE Awards, China’s trade press bestowed three other annual product awards on Microchip.  The MCP6N11 Instrumentation Amplifier won two honors, one from EDN China’s “Innovation Awards” in the Leading Product category, and the other from EEPW Magazine’s “Power Supply Products Awards” in the Best Application: Power Devices category.  From their separate “Editors’ Choice Awards,” EEPW named Microchip’s AR1100 mTouch™ Analog Resistive Touch Screen Controller their Best Touch Panel Solution.

In the area of technology leadership, The Embedded Microprocessor Benchmark Consortium (EEMBC) honored Microchip for significantly contributing to the development of its next-generation industry benchmarks. Specifically, Microchip was recognized for determining fair and reliable cross-platform accuracy requirements for EEMBC’s FPBench™ benchmark, which is critical to the evaluation of floating-point performance.  Additionally, Microchip evaluated and recommended math function libraries for software-only reference implementations, and tested and ported multiple libraries to make FPBench safe for 16-bit microcontrollers.

“It is a testament to Microchip’s continuous-improvement culture that we have received this recognition from an esteemed organization such as EEMBC, as well as product awards from some of the most influential global publications in our industry,” said Steve Sanghi, Microchip’s president and CEO.  “The breadth of these product awards across the diverse categories of human interface, microcontrollers, DSP, wireless networking, audio, analog, memory and development tools illustrates the continued investments we are making—both in R&D and strategic acquisitions—to enable our customers’ innovation.”

115990791

Science Foundation releases 5-year plan to strengthen STEM education

Ask any leader of a technology company in Arizona what their biggest hurdles are and there is always one common challenge: finding enough homegrown qualified workers to fill their needs.

“Arizona is transitioning to an economy that is increasingly dependent upon a knowledge-based workforce,” said Steve Sanghi, CEO of Microchip in Chandler. “Out No. 1 challenge is to improve the schools. Arizona high schools are near the bottom and if we don’t improve them soon, it’s really going to impact the future.”

Science Foundation Arizona (SFAz) is doing something to help Sanghi and other business leader. The nonprofit public-private partnership has launched the Arizona STEM Network. The STEM Network is a first-of-its-kind strategic effort to help transform Arizona’s educational system for STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics).

“The vision for a statewide, strategic commitment to STEM education is coming to fruition,” said Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer. “The Arizona STEM Network will help build a common agenda for STEM education that will lead our teachers and students forward.”

The five-year plan being led by SFAz will leverage effective education practices and teaching advances, including the state-adopted, internationally benchmarked Common Core Standards. The Arizona STEM Network will provide educators, the business community and donors with a centralized infrastructure, tools, resources and the framework needed to measure performance and achieve collective impact in Arizona classrooms. The plan’s driving force is to help Arizona children be successful in school, careers and life.

The Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation — which provided $2.2 million for the establishment of SFAz’s STEM initiative, announced a new three-year, $2.1 commitment beginning in this year that will allow SFAz to roll out its plan for the Arizona STEM Network. Also providing financial support for the launch were the Helios Education Foundation, Intel, JPMorgan Chase Foundation and Research Corporation for Science Advancement.

“We believe that the private sector must play an active role in developing the next generation to keep our businesses competitive and our economy vibrant,” said Tracy Bame, president of Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation. “A first-rate education that encompasses the STEM disciplines is a foundational step to provide students with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed.”

The STEM Network focuses on four strategic areas:

* Integrating STEM learning into Arizona schools and districts.

* Developing and deploying a predictive analytics system to measure impacts.

* Strengthening teacher effectiveness in STEM teaching.

* Creating opportunities for the private business sector to meaningfully engage with schools.

“Arizona must develop a globally competitive educational system and STEM disciplines will lead the way,” said Darcy Renfro, vice president of education and coordinator of the Arizona STEM Network at SFAz. “The Network will link existing STEM assets in Arizona, build on best practices and foster innovative teaching approaches for school districts to help students improve in these areas.”

microchip technology

Microchip Technology Acquires SMSC

Microchip Technology Incorporated, a leading provider of microcontroller, analog and Flash-IP solutions, and Standard Microsystems Corporation announced that Microchip has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Standard Microsystems Corporation (“SMSC”) for $37.00 per share in cash, which represents a total equity value of about $939 million, and a total enterprise value of about $766 million, after excluding SMSC’s cash and investments on its balance sheet of approximately $173 million. The acquisition has been approved by the Boards of Directors of each company and is expected to close in the third quarter of calendar 2012, subject to approval by SMSC stockholders, regulatory approvals and other customary closing conditions.

“We believe SMSC’s smart mixed-signal connectivity solutions aimed at embedded applications are an ideal complement to Microchip’s embedded control business,” said Steve Sanghi, Microchip’s President and CEO.  “This acquisition will expand Microchip’s range of solutions as SMSC contributes exciting new products and capabilities in the automotive, industrial, computing, consumer and wireless audio markets, significantly extending our served available market.”

“We are excited by the strategic possibilities presented by this acquisition,” continued Sanghi.  “SMSC in its most recent fiscal year ending February 29, 2012 reported net sales of $412 million, non-GAAP gross margin of 54.4% of sales, and non-GAAP operating profit of 12% of sales.  We expect this acquisition will be accretive to Microchip’s non-GAAP earnings in the first full quarter after completion of the acquisition.  We look forward to completing this transaction in the third calendar quarter of 2012.”

“This transaction represents a compelling opportunity for SMSC employees, customers and stockholders by combining the leading market position and world class operational excellence of Microchip Technology with the world class smart mixed-signal connectivity solutions from SMSC,” said Christine King, President and CEO of SMSC.  “We are pleased to become part of Microchip Technology, a premier company in the semiconductor industry.”

For more information on Microchip Technology, visit Microchip Technology’s website at microchip.com. Also Visit SMSC at www.smsc.com

Chalkboard - Making the Grade for Growth

STEM Education – Making The Grade For Growth

Arizona Leaders know it’s a problem.

“When one of our top employers of scientists and engineers says that if he had the decision to make all over again, he would never bring his business and its thousands of high-wage jobs to Arizona because of the lack of commitment to education, that is a call to action,” says Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton.

The top employer Stanton is talking about is Craig Barrett, former Intel CEO, who told state lawmakers in no uncertain terms that cuts in education are stifling Arizona’s economic development. But the financial aspect of education isn’t the only thing suppressing the state’s ability to prosper in the technology and bioscience industries. It’s the quality of Arizona education that’s killing us, according to another Valley tech leader.

“Our high schools are a mess,” says Steve Sanghi, CEO of Microchip in Chandler. “They are among the worst in country and that is a major problem that we need to address before the state can prosper.”

Sanghi sees many hopeful workers come into Microchip looking for a job, but are unable to pass a remedial math test that the company gives to all prospective employees. If they cannot pass, they cannot get hired, Sanghi says.

“STEM education — science, technology, engineering, math — is where we lack,” Sanghi points out. “That’s where the most competitive, high-paying jobs will be in the future. That’s where other countries are taking our jobs and taking our positions. That’s where we need to improve, but that’s a very tall order.”

It seems like a Herculean task. Arizona ranks 44th in the country in the Quality Counts report, compiled each year by Education Week in conjunction with the Education Research Center. That ranking represents a slight drop from the state’s standing in last year’s report.

“Today’s students have a lot of distractions,” Sanghi says. “We cannot compete with Hollywood stars or sports figures because they are bigger than life. It’s easy to get students to dribble a ball or go into music or arts. It’s crucial that we get them interested in science and technology before pop culture gets them. Once pop culture gets them, we can’t get them back.”

The only way to change the way students view education is through visionary leadership, says Pearl Chang Esau, president and CEO of Expect More Arizona, a statewide movement dedicated to making Arizona education the best in the nation.

“Our leaders need to start viewing education as an investment, not as an expense,” Esau says.

Many of Arizona’s leaders are taking the challenge to heart and introducing programs and legislation aimed at promoting and strengthening STEM education in the state:

  • Rep. Heather Carter, R-Cave Creek, has introduced a bill to make it easier for STEM professionals to become certified to teach and bring their expertise to the classroom.
  • Rep. Kimberly Yee, R-Phoenix, has introduced legislation to boost STEM education in poorly performing schools by calling for the State Board of Education to intervene when a school has earned a D or F for two consecutive years.
  • And Stanton, who campaigned on an education platform even though he was publicly criticized because school districts, not cities, have jurisdiction over education in Arizona, has created a Mayor’s Futures Forum on Education.

 

“The city of Phoenix is not as well-positioned as it should be to compete in the national economy,” Stanton says. “We need more of our kids graduating high school and studying in areas that will create the jobs of the future.”

Ironically, the man who has been the biggest critic of the state’s poor education record may be the man to help give it a much-needed spark. Retired Intel CEO Barrett has been named chairman of the Arizona Ready Education Council. He will be heading “Arizona Ready,” which is dedicated to helping Arizona students prepare to succeed in college and in careers that will boost the state’s economy. To improve education, Arizona Ready has established specific, measurable goals and accountability for everyone involved in educating our children.

“There is a lot of room for improvement in the K-12 education system in Arizona,” Barrett says. “I believe it is the responsibility of society to give the next generation the tools to be successful.”

Barrett insists that Arizona schools need to strive not just to be the best in the state, but they need to challenge themselves to be the best in the world so Arizona can compete in the global marketplace.

“It is not appropriate to just compare one local school district, or state, with another,” Barrett says. “You have to compare the accomplishments of your students with the best in the world.”

Glenn Hamer, president and CEO of the Arizona Chamber of Commerce and Industry, agrees with Barrett that raising the standards is imperative to improving education and creating a pipeline of future workers with the skills to succeed in tomorrow’s tech-heavy industries. To accomplish that, Arizona Ready is raising the standards and hopes to accomplish these goals by 2020:

  • Increase the percentage of third-graders meeting state reading standards to 94 percent. In 2010, 73 percent met the standard.
  • Raise the high school graduation rate to 93 percent.
  • Increase the percentage of eighth-graders performing at or above “basic” on the National Assessment of Education Programs (NAEP) to 85 percent. In 2010, the numbers were 67 percent in math and 68 percent in reading.

 

“Every kid has that dream of becoming a celebrity in Hollywood or becoming a sports star,” Sanghi says. “But the chances of the average high school student making it in Hollywood or in sports is 1 in 1,000 at best. But if we can get them interested in STEM and get them to dream about becoming a doctor or scientist or engineer, the chances of them achieving their dream is pretty high. Most will be able achieve that.”

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

Steve Sanghi - Microchip Technology

Steve Sanghi, Microchip Technology Inc.

Steve Sanghi, talks about his experience as President and CEO of Microchip Technology, Inc. and the role technology plays in Arizona’s future.

Title: Chairman of the Board, President and CEO

Company: Microchip Technology, Inc.


How is being CEO of a technology company different from being CEO of a more traditional manufacturing company?
I used to think it was very different, but I’m not sure I believe that anymore. I understand the technology of a project, why our technology is better than the competition’s and why it is not. I think that makes me more effective. But it can also make CEOs with a technology background more biased; they do not rely on the team as much as they should.

Video by Duane Darling

What has been your most significant challenge as CEO of Microchip?
The first challenge was taking the company and turning it around. We were in so much trouble financially. We had no cash to go forward. Our technology was outmoded. Our employees lacked morale. Our factories were inefficient. So we took all those elements and developed what we call the “aggregate system,” a big-picture approach where we took all the elements of the business and created a better workplace and management culture that allowed us to succeed.

Any plans to expand your product lines?
I call my acquisition strategy “elbow out.” Our products need products from other companies around them to make them work. So we look at companies that make products that we do not make ourselves, then we look at acquiring them so we can “elbow out” the competition.

How does technology fit into Arizona’s economic future?
If you look at the state’s first 75 years, the four Cs that drove the economy were copper, cattle, citrus and climate. If you look at the last 25 years, technology, construction, retail and hospitality have taken a more prominent role. As we look forward, technology is going to play a more dominant role in Arizona’s economy as the world keeps moving toward a knowledge economy. So the four Cs that are driving Arizona today are computers, communications, consumer electronics and climate.

How is Arizona as a place to do business?
We have more than 400 people working here. Our business has grown from a $70 million company into a $1.5 billion company, so it has worked well for us. But there are pros and cons. Many times, to get the right talent, we have to go to other technology centers — California, Oregon, Texas, Colorado. If we had the talent here, it would make things easier. A benefit of being in Arizona is that we have a lower cost of living, the cost of doing business is lower, and our turnover rate is much lower than other tech centers. We have always been proud to call Arizona home.

What three things would make Arizona more tech-business friendly?
No. 1 is to improve the schools. Arizona high schools are near the bottom and if we don’t improve them soon, it’s really going to impact the future. No. 2 is getting a handle on the immigration problem and controlling it. No. 3 is that Arizona has historically lacked risk capital. Having more risk capital available is crucial so entrepreneurs can build companies here instead of having to look elsewhere.

Your biggest accomplishment as CEO?
Taking a company that was hemorrhaging money in 1990 and leading it to 84 consecutive quarters of profitability is something that I could not have imagined and is something that no other semiconductor company has been able to achieve. Right now, we are shipping about a billion units a year. So to see how far we have come and how well our products are accepted makes me very proud. You can only see so far in the future, but when you get there, you can see farther.

[stextbox id="alert" bcolor="ffffff" bgcolor="eaeaea" image="null"]Vital Stats: Steve Sanghi

  • Named president of Microchip in August 1990, chief executive officer in October 1991, and chairman of the board of directors in October 1993.
  • Author of the book “Driving Excellence: How the Aggregate System Turned Microchip Technology from a Failing Company to a Market Leader (Wiley).”
  • Member of the board of directors of Xyratex Ltd., member of the national board of directors of FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Robotics, and a member of the Board of Trustees of Kettering University.
  • In 2010, Mr. Sanghi was named EE Times’ — a leading electronics-industry publication — “Executive of the Year.”
  • Under Sanghi, Microchip’s returns have increased 4,476% since the Company’s IPO in 1993.
  • Honored with the Arizona Technology Council’s 2010 Lifetime Achievement Award.[/stextbox]

Arizona Business Magazine March/April 2012

Future of Technology - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

The Future of Technology In Arizona: Where Do We Go From Here?

The future of technology: Science and engineering turned Arizona’s first 100 years upside down, so where do we go from here?


Think about the achievements in technology that came during Arizona’s first 100 years.

  • The first transcontinental telephone service between New York and San Francisco (1915).
  • The world’s first radio broadcasting station goes on the air  (1920).
  • Television has its first successful demonstration in the United States (1927).
  • James Watson and Francis Crick at Cambridge University describe the structure of the DNA molecule (1953).
  • The microchip is invented (1959).
  • The first test-tube baby is born (1978).
  • IBM introduces its first personal computer (1981).
  • Cellular telephones are introduced to consumers (1982).
  • Development of the World Wide Web begins (1989).
  • Dolly the sheep becomes the first mammal cloned from an adult cell (1996).
  • Apple introduces the iPod (2001).
  • Facebook is launched (2004).
  • Scientists discover how to use human skin cells to create embryonic stem cells (2007).

They are all innovations that have changes the way we lives our lives and do business.

Where will technology take us as Arizona enters its second century? How will it affect our lives? Here are technologies and scenarios that some of Arizona’s best and brightest minds see playing out in the state’s next 100 years.


The Future of Technology In Arizona


Future of TechnologyMark Bonsall
General manager and CEO
SRP

If I had to pick one technology with the potential to truly revolutionize the industry it would be finding affordable ways to store energy on a very large scale.  This would increase the value of intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar and could transform electricity into a more common commodity.  It isn’t clear that this is possible, but with the growing focus on electric vehicles and other storage technologies, it is certain there will be significant gains over the next century.


Future of TechnologyMark Edwards
Vice president of corporate development and marketing
Algae Biosciences, Inc.

Algae-based food, fiber, feed, fertilizer, fuels, and advanced medicines will transform those industries, as we know them today. The current serious problems of waste and pollution will be solved with sustainable algae-based production that recycles and reuses nutrients, water, and energy while regenerating air, water and soils. Our children’s children will have sufficient natural resources to produce the food, energy and transportation they will need.

Algae Biosciences is Scottsdale-based and focused on discovering and unlocking the powers of algae to resolve critical human issues – nutrition, health, energy and environment.


Future of TechnologySteve Sanghi
President and CEO
Microchip Technology Inc.

If I had to pick one (technology that will have biggest impact on Arizona’s next 100 years) it would be the renewable-energy complex of technologies. For Arizona, the primary renewable-energy opportunities can be broken into three categories—measurement, conservation and harvesting.  The world’s oil supply will eventually run out, and Arizona has more days of sun than most areas.  We must continue working to tap into this ever-present energy source.  At the same time, we must focus on developing the technologies that will enable individuals and companies to both measure and conserve their energy usage.  For example, Arizona has the potential to play a key role in developing the technologies that will be employed at the home, industrial and utility levels to make the burgeoning “smart grid” work.


Future of TechnologyJohn Lefebvre
President
Suntech America

The amount of energy generated through renewable sources like solar power has the potential to surpass that derived from fossil fuels in the next 50 years. We’ve already seen remarkable technological innovations in the solar field to increase efficiency, develop solutions for energy storage, and further reduce costs, with further improvements on the horizon. With over 300 days of sunshine, Arizona is naturally poised to take advantage of these advancements and its abundant resource by generating clean electricity without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.


Future of TechnologyDiane Brossart
President
Valley Forward Association

The biggest issues facing Arizona over the next 100 years are managing a finite water supply and transitioning to a clean energy economy. Green technology and innovation will create economic and environmentally sound solutions, making Arizona the leading destination for living wisely and sustainably in a desert.

Valley Forward Association promotes cooperative efforts to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities.


Future of TechnologyKelly Mott Lacroix
Graduate research associate
Water Resources Research Center in Tucson

We do not have a silver bullet to solve our water supply and demand challenges The state and its water issues are too diverse.  Rather, there are many smaller pieces from the simple and small scale, such as rainwater harvesting, to the large and complex, such as increased reclaimed water use, that when taken together will constitute a solution.


Future of TechnologyBill Hubert
President and founder
Cology, Inc.

Universal, personal-application based technology in general, and highly-sophisticated, profile-driven applications that help consumers (students and parents in our industry) not only gain access to a broader spectrum of programs and services available – but an interactive relationship with providers that will help both sides of the “economic equation” benefit from the transaction.

Scottsdale-based Cology, Inc. is a leading provider of end-to-end private student loan origination and repayment servicing solutions for lenders.


Future of TechnologyCR Herro
Vice president of environmental affairs
Meritage Homes

In the next century, climate will take the lead role in transforming Arizona and its buildings into energy-producing solar collectors. Arizona has the ability to become the largest producer of renewable, clean energy nationwide. In residential construction, that has already started.  The first cost-effective solar communities debuted in Arizona. Meritage Homes introduced the nation’s first net-zero homes in Arizona, saving owners both energy and money. And Arizona utilities lead the country in sponsoring energy efficiency and renewable energy programs.  Arizona is shaping up to be a state powered by the sun in every way imaginable.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Niemiec
President
Phoenix Institute of Herbal Medicine & Acupuncture, College & Clinic

Technology will be used to not only focus on the tiny gene, but to see the bigger picture of the bio-energetic field of the body. Not unlike what you would see in a Star Trek movie, technology would be used to assess and heal both the body and mind, taking into account the bio-electric system. Acupuncture and Oriental medicine has been focused on individualized medicine for thousands of years, with each treatment and formula specifically adapted to an individual, changing as the person changes and moves toward health. Thus, this dynamic medicine is the forefather of modern “individualized medicine” and can work well to make modern biotechnology more effective.


Future of TechnologyDanny Murphy
Airport director
Sky Harbor International Airport

With the explosion of mobile devices, coupled with high speed wireless networks, there is a new generation that will live their lives on mobile technology, using smartphones, touchpads and other mobile devices.
In the past we used to print so many information pieces about the airport. And while we still provide printed materials to an extent, our focus is on providing information via the web and for mobile units.


Future of TechnologyDr. Grace Caputo
Director
Phoenix Children’s Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency

Moving to a system where we utilize electronic medical records will really give us the ability to shape and improve health care across the board. Pediatric healthcare will be heavily impacted as we have just started to unravel genetic bases diseases. In the future, we hope to understand the genetic process of diseases so we can treat them and ultimately prevent diseases with wellness and lifestyle changes.


Future of TechnologyCatherine Anaya
Anchor
CBS 5 News

I think the internet technology we currently use to help in our news gathering will become a bigger factor in how we do things. Smart phones  (or whatever replaces them in the next 100 years) will replace cameras and studios creating more intimacy and accessibility. That accessibility will make it much easier to hold those in power more accountable for their actions which I hope will have a positive impact on how the state’s laws are created, shaped and enforced.


Future of TechnologyMahesh Seetharam, M.D.
Medical oncologist and hematologist
Arizona Oncology

Personalized medicine through whole genome sequencing (genomics), proteomics and noninvasive imaging will pave the way for the future.  Current research to evaluate for circulating cancer cells, and evaluation for cancer in urine samples are already being studied, and holds promise for the future.


Kenneth J. Biehl, M.D.
Radiation oncologist
Arizona Oncology

Immensely precise and conformal radiation treatments in the form of stereotactic radiation, high dose-rate radiation and molecularly targeted radiation will allow radiation oncologists surgical precision in assisting the people of Arizona to improve cancer cure and control. Just as the technological advances in the past have allowed women diagnosed with breast cancer to pursue breast conservation therapy rather than mastectomy, and have allowed men to preserve erectile function with prostate cancer, future advances will allow more Arizonans diagnosed with cancer to enjoy a better quality of life along with improved cure rates.


Michael Crow
President
Arizona State University

The biggest single technology to impact the future of Arizona will be individualized learning technologies that allow individuals to master subjects in ways customized to their particular types of intelligence and learning modalities.  This technology will allow people to learn more quickly and more deeply and more broadly. Those places, hopefully like Arizona, that enable and empower this kind of learning will see tremendous positive impacts from this technological development.


Where to invest in technology

Patricia Ternes, a financial advisor with RBC Wealth Management in Scottsdale says these are the four technology sectors to invest in going into Arizona’s next century:

1. Water 
Growing imbalances in global water supply and demand are well documented. Within that heading, the companies involved with water fall into four categories: (1) activities and technologies that increase supply; (2) the building of the necessary water structure; (3) processes that help reduce demand; and (4) water management.

2. Agriculture
When you look at the growth of the world’s population companies that are involved in agriculture and food production will continue to be attractive and important.

3. Health
Another important sector will be health care services and life sciences tools and services that provide better quality of life for the aging population.

4. The unknown
The fourth sector doesn’t exist yet.  Advances are happening so fast that something new will be created that will change our lives.


Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012

Microchip's PIC Microcontroller

Microchip Ships Its Ten Billionth PIC Microcontroller

Today, Microchip Technology Inc., a leading provider of microcontroller, analog and Flash-IP solutions, announced the delivery of its ten billionth PIC microcontroller to Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd, in less than a year after delivering its nine billionth.

“The shipment of our ten billionth PIC microcontroller is a remarkable achievement, and shipping it to a giant in the electronics industry like Samsung makes it even more satisfying,” said Microchip President and CEO Steve Sanghi.

This shipment is a “significant accomplishment” because it proves the industry’s acceptance of Microchip’s microcontrollers as high-performance, low power, and cost-effective, as the company continues to gain worldwide market share.

According to Sang Kim, vice president of R&D, Samsung Electronics, Digital Imaging Division, Samsung is “honored to be the recipient of Microchip’s 10 billionth PIC microcontroller.” Samsung has been a Microchip customer for many years, and is “quite pleased with the high performance” by its 32-bit PIC32 microcontroller portfolio.

Sanghi gives the credit for the company selling one billion in less than a year to its “PIC microcontroller portfolio, MPLAB development systems, direct sales and sales-channel partners” because they “provide maximum benefits for customers to reach their design goals.”

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About Microchip Technology Inc.

Headquartered in Chandler, Microchip Technology Inc. provides low-risk product development, lower total system cost and faster time to market for customer applications worldwide. Providing technical support and dependable delivery and quality, the company serves more than 70,000 customers in more than 65 countries.

The company has shipped 1.15 million development tools and partners with more than 130 global third-party tool manufactures, and it is the only company to support all of its microcontrollers and digital signal controllers under a single integrated development environment known as MPLAB X IDE, which is a free, open source that enables cross-platform development.

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For more information about Microchip Technology’s PIC microcontroller, visit www.microchip.com.