Tag Archives: sun city

Grand Retail_Photo

ViaWest Group sells Grand Ave. plaza for $1.3M

ViaWest Group has sold Grand Retail Plaza, a premier multi-tenant strip center located at 9827 W. Grand Ave. in Sun City, Ariz., for a total consideration of $1.3 million. The property was 100% leased at time of sale.

Phoenix-based ViaWest Group sold the property to Kanjibhai Ghadia of Anaheim, Calif. Steve Julius and Jesse Goldsmith with CBRE’s Phoenix office negotiated the $1.3 million transaction.

ViaWest purchased the property in September 2011 from Pacific Western Bank subsequent to the original developer losing the property to foreclosure. At the time, the property was 100% leased but all the existing tenants had near-term lease expirations. “After purchasing, we reached agreements with all the existing tenants to extend their leases, except for one which we replaced with Domino’s Pizza on a 10-year lease. Additionally, shortly after acquisition we were able to creatively restructure an existing billboard lease by converting it to a perpetual easement allowing us to further enhance the economic performance of the asset by significantly reducing our basis,” added Danny Swancey, of ViaWest Group.

Grand Retail Plaza, which totals approximately 6,369 square feet and sits on 0.78 acres in the master-planned retirement community of Sun City, is currently fully occupied by five tenants, including Domino’s Pizza, Edward Jones, HE/PA Enterprises, Cash for Gold, and Cricket Wireless.

“Grand Retail Plaza is a superbly-located asset in excellent physical condition,” said CBRE’s Julius. “The property has no other retail competition at the intersection and has excellent Grand Avenue frontage and visibility. In addition, the property has a strong leasing history due to the success of each of its tenants.”

Built in 2003, the property sits just west of the Loop 101 freeway and approximately 30 minutes from the Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport. Located on the southeast corner of 99th Avenue and Grand Ave/US 60, Grand Retail Plaza sees an average of 41,707 vehicles per day via Grand Avenue and another 14,500 vehicles per day on 99th Avenue.

77293831

What do golf and surgery have in common?

Imagine sinking chip shots on three of the world’s most famous golf courses while chipping in to help fund a high-tech hybrid operating suite at Banner Boswell Medical Center. How’s it possible you ask?

Sun Health Foundation and Arrowhead Lexus have joined forces to sell drawing tickets for a chance to play in the 2013 Lexus Champions For Charity Golf Tournament, a five-day golf getaway for two, held Dec. 11-15, in Pebble Beach, Calif.

Ticket proceeds will help fund a new hybrid operating suite at Banner Boswell Medical Center in Sun City.

Only 400 drawing tickets are available, with the winner and a friend earning the chance to “play like a pro” on three of Pebble Beach’s hallowed golf courses: Pebble Beach, Spyglass Hill and Spanish Bay.

The winning package includes meals, carts and green fees; an incredible tee prize package; transportation between local airports and the golf resorts and a teaching clinic from a top PGA professional.

Tickets are $150 each or five for $600. Ticket sponsorship packages are also available. The winning ticket will be drawn October 3 at Arrowhead Lexus Peoria. Need not be present to win.  Purchase tickets by calling 623-832-7609 or visit sunhealthfoundation.org.

Hybrid Operating Suite
The $8.2 million project involves transforming a 40-year-old clinical space into a futuristic hybrid operating suite, the first of its kind in the West Valley. Construction will also include refurbishing and constructing two new OR suites. The hybrid will combine the latest surgical, cardiac catheterization and 3-D radiology technologies with real-time patient monitoring, allowing patients to stay in one place.

Interventional cardiologists, electro-physiologists or interventional radiologists and heart and vascular surgeons will work side by side. It will greatly benefit patients requiring minimally invasive valve procedures as well as those needing cardiovascular or vascular treatment. The results will be shorter recovery times, fewer complications, reduced pain and increased quality of life. Expected to be completed in late summer 2014, the project also includes expanding the Same Day Surgery unit. Ultimately, the project will allow Banner Boswell to continue to expand its comprehensive cardiac program to meet the current and future needs of the community.

Vial of Life

Newly Launched tools speak for you when you can’t

Sun Health recently launched two signature tools – Vial of Life and File of Life. Both resources, offered for free as a service to the community, are designed to enhance access to important medical information during an emergency.

A popular tool used by local residents and emergency personnel for many years, Sun Health, in partnership with Banner Health, recently revitalized Vial of Life with a slightly larger pill bottle. For use at home, the vial/bottle contains an easy-to-complete medical form that contains important information such as prominent medical conditions, past surgeries, physician contact information and medications. Area residents are encouraged to complete the medical form, place it in the pill bottle and then put the bottle in their refrigerator. To help emergency personnel locate the pill bottle, residents are encouraged to post a bright orange window cling on their front window or front door, or on the front of their refrigerator. This orange cling alerts emergency professional to look for the vial in the refrigerator.

File of Life puts that same potentially life-saving information in a portable device. The computer flash drive holds emergency medical information including:

•             Easy to follow instructions;
•             Pre-formatted, easy-to-populate emergency medical forms; and
•             Extra storage for additional members’ information.

The flash drive comes equipped with a lanyard, but it can easily be clipped on a key chain or stored inside a purse, making it an ideal portable solution to carry when away from home, traveling or exercising.

Free Classes
Area residents can learn more about the programs, and receive their free Vial of Life and File of Life by attending an introductory class. All classes listed are scheduled from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.:

·         Aug. 6, The Colonnade, 19116 Colonnade Way, Surprise
·         Sept. 10, Banner Boswell Medical Center, Support Services Building, 13180 N. 103rd Dr., Sun City
·         Sept. 11, Grandview Terrace, 14515 W. Granite Valley Dr., Sun City West
·         Oct. 31, La Loma Village, 14154 Denny Blvd., Litchfield Park

To register for an upcoming class, please call (623) 455-5741. For more information about this program, visit: www.sunhealth.org/vialoflife. To schedule a Vial of Life/File of Life presentation for your club or group, please call Autumn Leonard at (623) 832-5665.

118315706

Youngtown becomes GPEC’s 21st member community

The Town of Youngtown recently joined the Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) as its 21st member community. Youngtown is located at the Agua Fria River between Peoria, Sun City and El Mirage, and has a current population of approximately 6,200.

“We’re thrilled to have the Town of Youngtown on board at GPEC,” said GPEC President and CEO Barry Broome. “Youngtown is a unique, up-and-coming community with tremendous potential for economic growth. We’re excited to assist with their plans to move forward as a community.”

“The 21st GPEC community for the 21st Century — we’re proud to take a seat at the GPEC table,” Youngtown Mayor Michael LeVault said. “Youngtown is well positioned to be a vibrant and vital player in the region’s bright economic future.”

Youngtown was originally designed as a retirement community but has since evolved to accommodate young people and families. The community’s “village” feel sets the town apart from the rest of the region. The Town’s general plan for 2025 has a robust focus on economic development, targeting community revitalization, public relations and marketing, and business enhancement, attraction and diversification.

“Youngtown’s addition to GPEC’s family of communities speaks volumes about the depth and breadth of services available to its member communities and companies,” said Jim Lundy, GPEC’s board chairman and CEO of Alliance Bank of Arizona. “Whether an established business or startup, an older community or one just starting to rev up its economic engine, like Youngtown, GPEC offers expert economic development advice, marketing, research and prospect leads.”

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor's Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

roosevelt row arts district

Nominations announced for Governor’s Arts Awards

Sixty-two nominations from 18 Arizona communities were submitted in six categories for the 32nd annual Governor’s Arts Awards for individuals and businesses who have made substantial and outstanding contributions to arts and culture statewide.

Winners will be announced on Wednesday, March 6, at The Herberger Theater Center, 222 E. Monroe.  The Governor’s Arts Awards are presented by Arizona Citizens Action for the Arts in partnership with the Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Office of the Governor.

Since 1981, 152 artists, individuals, arts and cultural organizations, educators and businesses have received Governor’s Arts Awards

Nominees, by category, and their hometowns are:

Artist: Lee Berger, Phoenix; Charles Bruffy, Phoenix; Daniel Buckely, Tucson; Michael Christie, Phoenix; Bobb Cooper, Phoenix; Barbara Dahlstedt, Glendale;  Maria Isabel Delgado, Chandler; Shawn Franks, Phoenix; Deb Gessner, Mayer; Kristine Kollasch, Phoenix; Bruce Marion, Chandler; Fredric Myers, Apache Junction; Monica Saldana, Goodyear; Mike Vax, Dewey; Jim Waid, Tucson.

Arts in Education – Individual: Annica Benning, Scottsdale; Kathryn Blake, Phoenix; Dennis Bourret, Tucson; Simon Donovan, Tucson; Patti Hannon, Phoenix; Marion Kirk Jones, Phoenix; Sherry Koopot, Paradise Valley; Barbara Nueske Perez, Gilbert; Charles St. Clair, Glendale; Joshua Thye, Phoenix.

Arts In Education – Organization: Arizona Dance Education Organization, Phoenix; Copperstar Repertory Company, Chandler; The Glendale Arts Council, Glendale; Lovena Ohl Foundation, Scottsdale; Marshall Magnet Elementary School, Flagstaff; OpendanceAZ, Phoenix; Phoenix Conservatory of Music, Phoenix; The Phoenix Symphony, Phoenix; Sonoran Glass School, Tucson; UAPresents, Tucson; West Valley Conservatory of Ballet, Surprise.

Business: BMO Harris Bank, Phoenix; LDVinci Art Studio, Chandler; Southwest Ambulance, Mesa.

Community: Alwun House Foundation, Phoenix; Contemporary Forum, Phoenix; Del E. Webb Center for the Performing Arts, Wickenburg; Flagstaff Cultural Partners, Flagstaff;
James E. Garcia, Phoenix; KXCI Community Radio, Tucson; Mesa Arts Center, Mesa; Release the Fear, Phoenix; Scottsdale International Film Festival, Scottsdale; Virginia G. Piper Charitable Foundation, Phoenix; Warehouse Arts Management Organization, Tucson; Young Arts Arizona Ltd., Phoenix.

Individual: Marco Albaran, Tempe; James K. Ballinger, Phoenix; Richard A. Bowers, Phoenix; Ted G. Decker, Phoenix; Faith Hibbs-Clark, Phoenix; Kaitlyn Mackay, Glendale;
Constance W. McMillin, Sun City; Nichole Newman-Colter, Litchfield; Hope Ozer, Paradise Valley; Rebecca Taylor, Yuma.

Honorees will be selected by an independent panel of judges.

The eighth annual Shelley Award also will be presented to an Arizona individual who has advanced the arts through strategic and innovative work in creating or supporting public policy beneficial to the arts in Arizona.  The award is named for Shelley Cohn, who spent more than 25 years as executive director of the Arizona Commission on the Arts.

Ticket prices are $135 for members of Arizona Citizens for the Arts and $150 for nonmembers.  Sponsorships are available.
For information and to make reservations go to www.governorsartsawards.org.

Centennial Series - AZ Business Magazine January/February 2012

Centennial Series: Arizona’s History Impacts The Way We Live Our Lives

100 Years of Change: From ‘Sesame Street’ to scientific breakthroughs, Arizona’s history impacts the way we live our lives

During Arizona’s first century, every elementary school student in the state learned about the five Cs that drove Arizona’s economy — copper, cotton, cattle, citrus and climate.

There is a chance that if you ask Arizona elementary school students what C words drive the state’s economy now, their best answers might be casinos or Cardinals, whose University of Phoenix Stadium has been filled with fans, and hosted both a Super Bowl and a BCS championship game since it opened in 2006.

A lot has changed since copper and cotton drove the state, but that doesn’t lessen the impact Arizona’s first 100 years had on the way we live our lives today.

Here are a baker’s dozen events, people or projects from Arizona’s history, its first 100 years, that shaped the state or helped the state make history:

Gaming

In 1988, the U.S. Congress passed the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) in response to the proliferation of gambling halls on Indian reservations. IGRA recognized gaming as a way to promote tribal economic development, self-sufficiency, and strong tribal government.

By the end of 1994, 10 casinos were in operation in Arizona. Currently, 15 tribes operate 22 casinos in the state, creating a huge boost for Arizona tourism and the economy.

To put it into perspective, a study commissioned by the Ak-Chin Indian Community in 2011 showed that Harrah’s Ak-Chin Casino Resort alone accounts for 1,094 jobs, $36,713,700 in payroll, and a total economic impact on the community of $205,322,355. And those numbers represent figures before the resort added a 152-room hotel tower in July 2011.

Air travel

In 1935, the City of Phoenix bought Sky Harbor International Airport for $100,000. In 2010, the airport served 38.55 million passengers, making it the ninth busiest in the U.S. in terms of passengers and one of the top 15 busiest airports in the world, with a $90 million daily economic impact. The airport handles about 1,252 aircraft daily that arrive and depart, along with 103,630 passengers daily, and more than 675 tons of cargo handled.

“As much as anywhere in the U.S., Phoenix is a creature of good air connections,” says Grady Gammage Jr., an expert on Arizona’s history. “There is no good rail service (in Arizona). There are no real transportation corridors. Sky Harbor has had a huge impact.”

Road travel

Another transportation milestone occurred in 1985 when the Maricopa Association of Governments approved a $6.5 billion regional freeway plan for Phoenix and voters approved a 20-year, one-half cent sales tax to fund it. By 2008, the Arizona Department of Transportation had completed the construction and Phoenix boasted 137 miles of loop freeways that link the metro area.

The loop freeways have had a significant impact on shaping Phoenix and, ultimately, Arizona, says Dennis Smith, MAG executive director.

“The loop freeways resulted in a distribution of job centers around the Valley,” Smith says. “That allows every part of the Valley to achieve its dream and have employment closer to where the homes are. That distributes the wealth throughout the Valley.”

Smith says the freeways also extended the Valley’s reach to Yavapai, Pinal and Pima counties, creating a megapolitan area known as the Sun Corridor.

Master-planned neighborhoods

Arizona is home to countless master-planned residential communities, but the first one — Maryvale — opened in 1955 in West Phoenix as the post-war years exerted their influence. Its developer, John F. Long, wanted to plan and build a community where young people could buy an affordable home, raise a family and work, all in the same area. He named the development after his wife, Mary, and its influence is felt to this day.

“Because Maryvale was a master-planned community and because John did affordable housing, the master plan included a lot of parks, school sites and shopping areas,” says Jim Miller, director of real estate for John F. Long Properties. “It really was where people could live and work. If you lived in Maryvale, you weren’t more than three-quarters of a mile from a park or school. That forced a lot of other builders to adopt the same type of philosophy.”

The first homes sold for as little as $7,400, with a $52-a-month mortgage. The first week the models went on the market, 24,000 people stopped by to take a look.

Retirement communities

A year before Maryvale opened, Ben Schleifer introduced a different lifestyle to an older demographic. In 1954, Schleifer opened Youngtown in West Phoenix, the first age-restricted retirement community in the nation, according to research by Melanie Sturgeon, director of the state’s History and Archives Division. No one younger than 50 could live there. By 1963, Youngtown had 1,700 residents and Arizona was on its way to becoming a retirement mecca.

But it was builder Del E. Webb and his construction companies that firmly established the concept of active, age-restricted adult retirement in Arizona with the opening of Sun City on Jan. 1, 1960, next to Youngtown and along Grand Avenue. According to Sturgeon’s research and a magazine observing Sun City’s 50th anniversary, about 100,000 people showed up the first three days to see the golf course, recreation center, swimming pool, shopping center and five model homes. Traffic was backed up for miles. The first homes sold for between $8,500 and $11,750. Sun City had 7,500 residents by 1964 and 42,000 by 1977, the same year Webb decided the community was big enough and he began construction on Sun City West.

Law

Ernesto Arturo Miranda was a Phoenix laborer whose conviction on kidnapping, rape, and armed robbery charges based on his confession under police interrogation resulted in the landmark 1966 U.S. Supreme Court case (Miranda v. Arizona), which ruled that criminal suspects must be informed of their right against self-incrimination and their right to consult with an attorney prior to questioning by police. This warning is known as a Miranda warning.

After the Supreme Court decision set aside Miranda’s initial conviction, the state of Arizona retried him. At the second trial, with his confession excluded from evidence, he was again convicted, and he spent 11 years in prison.

Healthcare

The first successful surgery and use of an artificial heart as a bridge to a human heart transplant was conducted at the University Medical Center in Tucson by Dr. Jack Copeland in 1985. His patient lived nine days using the Jarvik 7 Total Artificial Heart before he received a donor heart.

It also put the spotlight on Arizona as a place where cutting-edge research and healthcare was taking place.

Copeland made several other contributions to the artificial heart program, including advancing surgical techniques, patient care protocols and anticoagulation. He also performed the state’s first heart-lung transplant and the first U.S. implant of a pediatric ventricular assist device. In 2010, Copeland moved to a facility in San Diego, where he continues to make an impact on health care.

Entertainment

Joan Ganz Cooney, who received her B.A. degree in education from the University of Arizona in 1951, was part of a team who captured the hearts and imaginations of children around the world with the development of Sesame Workshop, creators of the popular “Sesame Street.” Now in its 42nd season, the children’s television show uses puppets, cartoons and live actors to teach literacy, math fundamentals and behavior skills. Today, Cooney serves as a member of Sesame Workshop’s executive committee. In 2007, she was honored by Sesame Workshop with the creation of The Joan Ganz Cooney Center, which aims to advance children’s literacy skills and foster innovation in children’s learning through digital media.

Military bases

Williams Air Force Base in Mesa, which broke ground for its Advanced Flying School on July 16, 1941, allowed more than 26,500 men and women to earn their wings. It was active as a training base for both the U.S. Army Air Forces, as well as the U.S. Air Force from 1941 until its closure in 1993.

It also opened the door for other military training bases in Arizona, including Luke Air Force Base; which employs more than 8,000 personnel and covers 4,200 acres and is home to the largest fighter wing in the world, the 56th Fighter Wing; Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Tucson, home to the A-10 Thunderbolt II, which was used in combat for the first time during the Gulf War in 1991, destroying more than 900 Iraqi tanks, 2,000 military vehicles, and 1,200 artillery pieces; and Yuma Marine Corps Air Station, which specializes in air-to-ground aviation training for U.S. and NATO forces. In 1990, almost every Marine that participated in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm trained at Yuma.

Solar power

Solar power has the potential to make Arizona “the Persian Gulf of solar energy,” former Gov. Janet Napolitano once said. But despite the overabundance of sunshine, the industry didn’t take root in the state until the end of the last century.

The first commercial solar power plant in the state came in 1997 when Arizona Public Service (APS) built a 95-kilowatt, single-axis tracking photovoltaic plant in Flagstaff. In 1999, the City of Scottsdale covered an 8,500-square-feet parking lot with photovoltaic panels, to both provide shaded parking and generate 93 kilowatts of solar power.

Arizona installed more than 55 megawatts of solar power in 2010, doubling its 2009 total of 21 megawatts, ranking it behind California (259 megawatts), New Jersey (137 megawatts), Florida (110 megawatts), and Nevada (61 megawatts).

Water

Construction of the Central Arizona Project — which delivers water to areas where 80 percent of Arizonans reside — began in 1973 at Lake Havasu. Twenty years and $4 billion later, it was completed south of Tucson. The CAP delivers an average 1.5 million acre-feet of water annually to municipal, agricultural and Native American users in Maricopa, Pima and Pinal counties.

“Without the CAP, we wouldn’t have the population we have today,” says Pam Pickard, president of the CAP board of directors. “We wouldn’t have our economic base. We wouldn’t have the industry we have.”

But the CAP wouldn’t have been possible without another milestone that occurred nearly 60 years earlier — Hoover Dam and its reservoir, Lake Mead, 30 miles southeast of Las Vegas. Hoover Dam, constructed between 1933 and 1936, tamed the Colorado, which Marshall Trimble, Arizona’s official state historian, says was even more erratic than the Salt River. The dam created reliable water supplies for Arizona’s Colorado River Valley and, eventually, Central and Southern Arizona via the CAP.

Sports

On April 24, 2000 Arizona Gov. Jane Dee Hull signed a bill that created the Arizona Tourism and Sports Authority (initially known as the TSA). Later, it was renamed to the Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority.

The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority was instrumental in the constructions of University of Phoenix Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals and an anchor of Glendale’s sports complex. The development of the stadium, also home to the Fiesta Bowl, marked a shift in the economic landscape of the West Valley and Arizona sports. The Stadium has already hosted one Super Bowl and will host a second in 2015.

The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority has also been instrumental in Cactus League projects — including Surprise Stadium, Phoenix Municipal Stadium, Tempe Diablo Stadium, Scottsdale Stadium, Goodyear (Cleveland Indians and Cincinnati Reds) and in Glendale (Los Angeles Dodgers and Chicago White Sox.) The economic impact of Cactus League baseball is estimated at $350 million a year.

“There’s no doubt about it, sports is an integral part of any destination tourism package,” says Lorraine Pino, tourism manager at the Glendale Convention and Visitors Bureau. “Our tourism literally exploded over the past few years.”

Isabelle Novak, Noelle Coyle and Tom Ellis contributed to this story.

Arizona Business Magazine January/February 2012


Significant Infrastructure - AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Centennial Series: Significant Infrastructure In Arizona History

AZRE’s Centennial Series for this issue focuses on 100 years of infrastructure.

Find out what is ranked as the most significant infrastructure in Arizona history:

INTERSTATE HIGHWAY SYSTEM
Construction completed for the I-10: 1956-58, I-17: 1954, I-40: 1961-84

I-10: A major East-West interstate highway, it runs from California, enters Arizona, continues through Phoenix and Tucson and exits at the New Mexico border. I-17: It was the first freeway segment built in Phoenix. Although it does not go between states, it is the main freeway that takes people up to popular destinations in Northern Arizona, including the Grand Canyon.

PALO VERDE NUCLEAR GENERATING PLANT
Construction began in 1976; it was commissioned in 1988.

Palo Verde is the largest nuclear generating facility in the U.S., averaging more than 3.2 gigawatts of electrical power. Located in Wintersburg (45 miles west of Phoenix), it serves 4M people. APS owns 29.1% the plant and also operates it.

COLORADO RIVER DAM SYSTEM: GLEN CANYON AND HOOVER DAMS
Glen Canyon: Construction began in 1956 and the dam opened in 1966.

Hoover: Constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression; it was dedicated on Sept. 30, 1935, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Glen Canyon: This dam is the second largest on the Colorado River at Page. Its main purpose includes generating electrical power, water storage and recreation activities. The dam generates an average of 451 megawatts, which contributes 6% of the total electricity generated in Arizona. The Colorado River caused the Glen Canyon, which lies to the north of the dam, to become flooded and has subsequently created the large reservoir called Lake Powell.  Hoover Dam: Once known as Boulder Dam, this concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River sits on the border between Arizona and Nevada. The dam’s generators provide power for public and private utilities in Nevada, Arizona and California.

CENTRAL ARIZONA PROJECT
Construction began in 1973 and new and modified dams built as part of the project were completed in 1994.

The Central Arizona Project (CAP) is a 336-mile canal that diverts water from the Colorado River at Lake Havasu City into Central and Southern Arizona. It is the largest and most expensive aqueduct system ever built in the U.S.

PHOENIX SKY HARBOR INT’L AIRPORT
Sky Harbor has been operating under its current name prior to 1935, when it was purchased by the city of Phoenix. Terminal 1 was built in 1952.

Sky Harbor began serving American Airlines and Bonanza Air (Frontier Airlines) and TWA in the 1950s. Today Sky Harbor is the primary regional hub and Mexico gateway for Tempe-based US Airways, its largest operator. Both US Airways and Southwest Airlines  operate out of Sky Harbor’s Terminal 4, which handles about 80% of airport traffic.

ARIZONA’S MILITARY BASES
Davis-Monthan AFB, Tucson: Established in 1935 as Davis-Monthan Landing Field; Luke AFB, Glendale: 1941; Williams AFB, Mesa (now Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport): Opened 1941 and closed in 1993.

D-M: The host unit at the base is the 355th Fighter Wing. It provides A-10 Thunderbolt II close-air support, which was crucial in the Gulf War. Luke: The 56th Fighter Wing (56 FW) is the host wing at Luke and is composed of four groups of 27 squadrons, including eight fighter squadrons. The base population includes about 7,000 military and civilian members and 15,000 family members. With about 80,000 retired military members living in Greater Phoenix, the base services a total population of more than 100,000. Williams: It was an active training base for the Army and the Air Force. Before closing in 1993, it was the leading pilot training center of the USAF, supplying 25% of its pilots. Since its closure it is now the civilian Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.

ROOSEVELT LAKE AND DAM
Dedicated in March 1911 by President Theodore Roosevelt, for whom it was named.

This reservoir formed by Theodore Roosevelt Lake (now called Roosevelt Lake) and Roosevelt Dam on the Salt River is part of the Salt River Project (SRP). Located 80 miles northeast of Phoenix, the reservoir (created by a masonry dam) is the largest lake located entirely within the state of Arizona. Roosevelt Lake is a popular recreation destination within the Tonto National Forest. Roosevelt is the oldest of the six reservoirs constructed and operated by SRP. It also has the largest storage capacity of the SRP lakes, with the ability to store 1.6 M acre-feet of water.

METRO PHOENIX FREEWAY SYSTEM
Loop 101: 1988, completed in 2001 to the present; 202: 1990 to the present; State Route 51 (Piestewa Parkway): U.S. 60 (Superstition Freeway): Truck U.S. 60, 1966.

101: This semi-beltway encompasses much of Metro Phoenix and connects Valley suburbs, including Tolleson, Glendale, Peoria, Scottsdale, Mesa, Tempe and Chandler. 202: This beltway encompasses the East Valley and navigates and surrounds Tempe, Mesa, Chandler, and Gilbert, making it very vital to the area freeway system. 51: This is the only new freeway to be built through central Phoenix other than I-10. It was renamed from Squaw Peak Parkway to Piestewa Freeway in honor of Lori Piestewa, who was killed in Iraq. 60: Like most of the East-West U.S. routes, 60 was cut short of its final destination by the I-10.

SUN CITY, ARIZONA
Construction began in the 1960s as a Del Webb community and was built on what was once the ghost town of Marinette.

The Sun City development established Arizona as a state for retirees. Little has changed for the community in the past 40 years. However, as more people retired to the area, Del Webb began construction on Sun City West in the late-1970s, Sun City Grand in the late-1990s, Sun City Anthem in 1999, and Sun City Festival in July 2006.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

Aaron Matos is the founder and CEO of Jobing.com. - AZ Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

Jobing.com’s Aaron Matos Talks About His First Job

Aaron Matos
Title: Founder/CEO
Company: Jobing.com

Describe your very first job and what lessons you learned from it.
I was a bike mechanic at Swiss American Bicycles. I learned how to work for a boss who was demanding about service quality, timeliness and doing things right. When I was 14, I thought he was overbearing and too hard on me and others. Now, 24 years later, I realize he helped feed an insatiable desire to do excellent work.

Describe your first job in your industry and what you learned from it.
I was a personnel manager at El Dorado of Sun City. I learned that HR and managers can have too many rules, and that if management creates a culture where people are empowered they can accomplish great things.

What were your salaries at both of these jobs?
(Swiss American Bicycles) $3.35 an hour; (El Dorado of Sun City) $21,500 a year.

Who is your biggest mentor and what role did they play?
Chris Gaffney, the current lead investor at Great Hill Partners. He has supported and pushed me as CEO … He has taught me that business and life have a long arc, and that you’ve got to keep your eye always focused on building a great business for your customers first and foremost.

What advice would you give to a person just entering your industry?
Focus on getting things done and accomplishing things. I always traded responsibility for pay, knowing pay would come. Too many people focus on “promotions” or “job titles.” Work to take on big projects and accomplish big important goals for your company. Not only will you learn and grow faster, but others will notice and you’ll get those promotions because you earned it.

If you weren’t doing this, what would you be doing instead?
I don’t spend energy thinking about what you could be doing instead. Too many people don’t succeed because they have their eye on another ball in a different game. Be passionate about what you’re currently doing.

Arizona Business Magazine Jan/Feb 2011

2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

2010 HCLA – Legislative Impact Award And Lifetime Achievement In Research Award

Legislative Impact Award

Honoree: Roy Ryals, Executive Director, Southwest Ambulance

Roy Ryals
Executive Director
Southwest Ambulance

Virtually every pre-hospital care related rule at the Arizona Department of Health Services, and every piece of related state legislation approved in the past 30 years, has something in common — Roy Ryals helped to write it.

Roy Ryals, Executive Director of Southwest Ambulance, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

Ryals, executive director for the Southwest region of Southwest Ambulance and Rural/Metro, is considered the pre-hospital regulatory expert and reference point. His knowledge and memory of the history behind decisions, and the far-reaching effects of every word that’s written, has earned him the respect of both the industry and state regulators.

In effect, every patient in Arizona who has used an ambulance over the past 30 years has benefited from Ryals’ intellect and participation in the legislative and regulatory process, whether he’s at the state Capitol, in a board room, or in the back of an ambulance. Ryals has been appointed by four Arizona governors to the Emergency Medical Services Council and was named by three directors of Department of Health Services to the State Trauma Advisory Board.

He is president of the Arizona Ambulance Association and a registered lobbyist with the state. At Southwest Ambulance and Rural/Metro, Ryals is responsible for all contracts, regulatory issues and legislative oversight. He indirectly oversees all field employees through his involvement in medical protocols and regulation for field crews of both companies. He also manages Southwest’s administrative leadership team and legislative consultants. Ryals began his career at Southwest Ambulance in 1987 as the executive director over Arizona medical transport.

Two years later, he was promoted to national director of EMS. In 1991, he became the regional chief operating officer overseeing system integration and regulatory compliance.

[stextbox id="grey" image="www.swambulance.com"]www.swambulance.com[/stextbox]




Lifetime Achievement Award

Honoree: Joseph Rodgers, PH.D.

Joseph Rodgers, PH.D., Founder and Senior Scientist
Banner Sun Health Research Institute

Joseph Rogers, Ph.D., the motivating force behind Banner Sun Health Research Institute in Sun City, has devoted three decades to finding the cause of and cure for Alzheimer’s disease. But the first work from researchers at the institute did not originate in multimillion-dollar labs or in high-tech facilities; they began their research at a card table with folding chairs.

Joseph Rodgers, Founder and Senior Scientist Banner Sun Health Research Institute, 2010 Health Care Leadership Awards

The institute, a tribute to Rogers’ tireless efforts in the field of Alzheimer’s research, has created opportunities for intensive research into other age-related illnesses, including Parkinson’s disease and arthritis. The discoveries already made at the institute, and those yet to come, promise to have significant benefits for millions around the world. Rogers, the institute’s founder and senior scientist, was recruited in 1986 to develop the research facility.

His qualifications for this breakthrough role include a doctorate from the University of California, San Diego; a postdoctoral fellowship and service as a staff scientist at the Salk Institute; and immediately prior to his arrival in Arizona, he was at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, serving as a principal investigator within the New England Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Harvard University. Rogers made the revolutionary discovery of the damage that inflammation causes to the Alzheimer’s-affected brain. Initially, other scientists scoffed because conventional wisdom precluded the inflammatory process from entering the brain, but Rogers’ discovery changed Alzheimer’s research.

Under Rogers’ leadership, the institute has attracted internationally recognized faculty and scientists, who have made their own compelling discoveries, including a direct linkage between Alzheimer’s and high cholesterol, and a compound of drugs that has promise for significant benefit to those with rheumatoid arthritis. Another key to the institute’s growth is its full-tissue repository, which Rogers initially developed as a brain bank soon after founding the institute.

[stextbox id="grey" image="www.bannerhealth.com"]www.bannerhealth.com[/stextbox]