Tag Archives: Sundt Construction

ASU's Interdisciplinary Sciences & Technology Building 4, built by Sundt Construction.

Sundt Named One of Nation's Safest Construction Companies in 2012

 

Sundt Construction, the 2013 RED Award winner for General Contractor of the Year, was named one of the nation’s safest construction companies in 2012 by the Associated General Contractors of America.

The Tempe-based construction company was one of 29 contractors that placed first in the Willis-sponsored Construction Safety Excellence Awards. The association, which oversees the safety awards, an annual ranking of construction safety programs, noted that 51 other companies were selected as winners for the quality of their safety practices.

“Safety is always a top priority for the construction industry,” said Joseph H. Jarboe, the association’s past president and senior vice president of Bethesda, Md.-based Clark Construction Group. “These companies showcase the highest commitment to keeping their projects and their employees safe.”

Jarboe said Sundt was selected as one of this year’s winners because of its exceptional leadership in safety. He noted that the company was dedicated to the development and implementation of premier safety and loss prevention programs.

The company presented outstanding guidance in safety and occupation health management, risk control, safety training, work site hazard identification and control, and safety program innovation, Jarboe said.

Jarboe noted that there are multiple winners because the awards are distributed for a number of categories, based on the size of the company, the amount of work performed and the type of work performed.

The AGC-Willis Construction Safety Excellence Award winners are selected by a panel of five independent safety professionals within the government, corporate and insurance industries. Final judging for the awards program took place during last week’s annual convention for the contractors’ association in Palm Springs, Calif.

 

Shane Malkowski

Sundt Names Shane Malkowski Heavy Civil Division Project Manager

Sundt Construction hired Shane Malkowski as a project manager for its heavy civil projects.

Malkowski will be responsible for supporting project and business development efforts relating to highway and transportation construction projects for the Tempe-based general contractor.

With 13 years of experience throughout Arizona, Texas and Utah, Malkowski is proficient in leading engineers, managing design-build projects and efficiently executing projects using alternative project delivery methods.

Prior to joining Sundt, he was involved with managing the roadway, drainage and bridge design teams for the Central Texas Regional Mobility Authority’s $210 million Manor Expressway design-build project.

Malkowski earned a bachelor of science in civil engineering from the University of Arizona.

Brossart Diane final 9314 5-29-12

Valley Forward Exands its horizon

Timing is everything, even when it comes to Mother Nature.

“In 2010, we got an $85,000 grant to look at some federal issues on sustainability,” says Diane Brossart, president and CEO of Valley Forward, which brings business and civic leaders together to improve the environment and livability of Valley communities. “We were asked to target Arizona’s Congressional delegation and get them up to speed in regards to understanding a sustainability agenda for Arizona and what that meant.”

What grew from that seed was an initiative that had actually been germinating for more than a decade, Brossart says: taking the successful Marocopa County-centric Valley Forward and giving is a statewide focus. In August, Valley Forward’s board voted unanimously to to move forward with a business plan that will transition Valley Forward into Arizona Forward in January.

Brossart says the state is facing some serious issues related to the environment and the livability and vitality of Arizona’s cities and towns will be impacted by upcoming decisions related to:
* Land use planning and open space,
* A balanced multi-modal transportation system,
* Improving and maintaining healthy air quality,
* Solar and renewable energy technology,
*  Managing our water resources, and
* Protecting wilderness, parks, national monuments and other natural areas for Arizona’s tourism economy.

“As Arizona and the country recover from the Great Recession, a statewide dialogue is more important than ever,” says William F. Allison, a shareholder at Gallagher & Kennedy. “The issues impacting us – water, energy, transportation, land use – involve the entire state rather than only the Valley. Arizona Forward will provide a forum to think outside the box and beyond the Valley.”

To get Arizona Forward to have its greatest statewide impact, Brossart and her staff connected with nine companies that had influence on communities along the Sun Corridor — the stretch of freeway that connects Tucson, Phoenix, Prescott and Flagstaff — to become charter members of Arizona Forward.

“The leaders of those companies have become our tour guides as we go into Pima County and Northern Arizona,” Brossart says. She points to Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner of Sundt Construction in Tucson, for opening doors for Arizona Forward to spread its wings into Southern Arizona.

“Southern Arizona already has a very strong environmental focus, but struggles with areas that are dependent on statewide engagement from both a funding and advocacy perspective,” Wadlington says. “(Valley Forward’s) shift (to a statewide focus) will provide Southern Arizona with added resources to coordinate its future growth in the larger context of the Sun Corridor.”

Experts agree that now is the perfect time for Valley Forward to shift to a statewide focus statewide because Arizona is at a turning point, economically and environmentally.

“There are major issues that affect the state like transportation; managing resources; and protecting the wilderness, parks, and national monuments,” says Alfie Gallegos, area sales manager for Republic Services. “These are not just environmental issues, but are issues that have an effect on Arizona’s economy statewide. I think Arizona is ready to start having more positive statewide conversations about finding ways to grow our economy in a manner that can be sustained and is environmentally friendly.”

Brossart says that while Arizona has had countless groups that have focused on making their communities better, Arizona Forward will be looking to help educate legislators become the glue that brings those regional organizations together in a spirit of cooperation and unity.

“So much of our goal is to drive a political agenda to the middle and bring folks on both sides of the aisle together,” Brossart says. “The issues that we focus on are sustainability and environmental. Everybody needs clean air, clean water, open space and parks. Those are the things that make a community viable, healthy and liveable. We all want that. Those aren’t political issues. But they do fall into a political arena that sometimes clouds the issues. But if we can be a reasoning voice of balance like we have been successfully in Maricopa County, if we can bring that statewide, it will be really good for Arizona — economically and environmentally.”

Valley Forward members expect the transition to Arizona Forward to foster additional collaboration and conversation on statewide issues, bring additional viewpoints on key issues and allow for a more global conversation.

“My hope is that we can, over time, have a collective vision that regardless of our own regional filters, we’re all in this together and need to find ways to move forward as one sustainable, economically successful state,” says Iain Hamp, community affairs representative, Wells Fargo Team Member Philanthropy Group.

Brossart says one of the biggest messages Arizona Forward will be trying to communicate is that making sound decisions about issues surrounding sustainability and the environment are good for business.

“If we make a case that shows the economic impact of parks and open space on the tourism industry, the business community will take notice and they are uniquely poised to deliver of that message and be heard,” Brossart says. “Parks groupies are great and they are important. But when the business community gets involved, people listen.”

Where Arizona Forward could have its biggest economic impact is on growth industries that rely on the state’s amazing natural resources.

“It’s an exciting time to be a part of solar energy, as the clean, renewable energy source is experiencing massive growth and helping the state and country achieve greater energy independence,” says Patricia Browne, director of marketing and communications for SOLON Corporation in Tucson. “And Arizona has been at the center of this growth. This has been made possible not only by the companies developing the solutions, but by the state and local officials, Arizona-based businesses and individual residents who recognize the importance that solar plays in a number of ways such as a cleaner environment, economic development, and energy price stability. However, there are still challenges in making the adoption viable on a large scale, and Arizona Forward helps bring together the right players to help make this happen on a state level.”

Richard Mayol, communications and government relations director for Grand Canyon Trust in Flagstaff, says Arizona Forward will give members in northern Arizona the opportunity to not only have a voice in discussions that affect the state today, but in decisions that impact what Arizona will be like 20 years from now.

“We hope it will help create an economy that provides the opportunity for prosperity without sacrificing the environment,” he says, “and makes northern Arizona an even better place to live, work, and raise a family.”

And that is what Arizona Forward’s mission is all about: bringing business and civic leaders together in order to convene thoughtful public dialogue on statewide issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.

“All areas of the state will benefit, from urban to rural and suburban areas in between due to a coordinated and planned strategy for such essential elements as affordable energy, water, transportation, affordable housing, and a wide band of employment opportunities,” says Janice Cervelli, dean of the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of Arizona. “All geographic, economic, and environmental sectors of the state will increasingly become part of a larger, interdependent, connected system.”

GOALS OF ARIZONA FORWARD

* Establish cooperative relationships with like-minded Arizona conservation organizations and facilitate collaboration on sustainability initiatives.
* Bring business and civic leaders together to convene thoughtful public dialogue on regional issues and to improve the environment and sustainability of Arizona.
* Increase awareness of and interest in environmental issues initially in the Sun Corridor and then beyond, statewide, building on an agenda of land use and open space planning, transportation, air quality, water, and energy.
* Support efforts to promote the Sun Corridor as an economic development area incorporating sustainability and smart growth principles.
* Serve as a technical resource on environmental issues through Arizona Forward’s and Valley Forward’s diverse membership of large corporations, small businesses, municipal governments, state agencies, educational institutions and nonprofit organizations.

ARIZONA FORWARD CHARTER MEMBERS
Arizona Community Foundation
First Solar
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold
National Bank of Arizona
SOLON Corporation
Sundt Construction
The Nature Conservancy
Total Transit
Wells Fargo

FOUNDING MEMBERS: Access Geographic, LLC; Adolfson & Peterson Construction Company; APS; Arizona Conservation Partnership; Arizona Department of Transportation; Arizona Heritage Alliance; Arizona Investment Council; Arizona State Parks Foundation; Arizona State University, Global Institute of Sustainability; Aubudon Arizona; Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona; Breckenridge Group Architects/Planners; Caliber Group; City of Tucson; Environmental Fund of Arizona; Fennemore Craig; Gabor Lorant Architects; Gammage & Burnham; Godec Randall & Associates; Grand Canyon Trust; Guided Therapy Systems; Haley & Aldrich; Intellectual Energy, LLC; John Douglas Architects; Jones Studio; Kinney Construction Services, Inc.; Lewis and Roca LLP; Logan Halperin Landscape Architecture; Pima County; RSP Architects; Southwest Gas Corporation; SRP; University of Phoenix; TEP / UNS Energy Corp.; The Greenleaf Group

rsz_old_main_-_credit_university_of_arizona

Sundt Begins Renovation Plans for UA's Old Main Building

 

Sundt Construction is returning to the University of Arizona to renovate the school’s historic Old Main building.

This is the second time Sundt will have helped preserve the 121-year-old iconic structure.

With an extensive background in rehabilitation and preservation, Sundt recently was awarded the project by the Arizona Board of Regents. Sundt’s project team already is evaluating the structural integrity and envelope of the building, identifying issues with the roof, porch, foundations and load-bearing structures, and determining solutions and options for the renovation.

“As we continue to evaluate and plan the renovation of Old Main, we are cognizant of the building’s existing condition, unique character and history,” said Kurt Wadlington, project director for Sundt. “The key is to find the balance between preserving the original aspects of the building and updating the structure for safety and efficient use.”

Built in 1891, the university’s Old Main building has been renovated twice before. The first was during World War II, when the U.S. Navy stepped in to save the building from demolition and used the space for a training facility.

Sundt was hired by the Navy to repair the exterior and interior walls, replace the failing roof trusses, and make several other updates. UA later reclaimed Old Main as a functional building. In 1972, Old Main was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Additional upgrades to the building took place between 2006 and 2008.

Sundt, serving as the design-build contractor, and the project’s architectural team of Poster Frost Mirto and NTD Architecture, plan to fence the site and begin design and preconstruction work in December and January. The $13.5M renovation project is scheduled for completion by July 2014.

 

Eric Hedlund - Marian Enriquez

Hedlund Joins Sundt Foundation Board of Directors

Sundt Construction appointed Eric Hedlund to a position on the Sundt Foundation board of directors, replacing Ray Bargull, the contractor’s longtime CFO who retired earlier this year.

Hedlund, Sundt’s executive vice president and COO, manages the company’s Building Group. He is a past president and life director of the Arizona Builders’ Alliance and has held a number of leadership positions with national construction industry organizations.

The Sundt Foundation was established by Sundt in 1999 to give its employee-owners a means of giving back to their communities. It provides financial support to nonprofit organizations dedicated to improving the lives of disadvantaged children and adults through organizations located near a Sundt office or major construction project.

The Foundation is primarily funded by contributions from Sundt employees and company matching. This year, the organization surpassed the $5M mark in grants awarded since its inception.

The Sundt Foundation Board of Directors is comprised of nine employees, four appointed by the company and five elected by the membership. The board convenes quarterly to approve grants based on recommendations made by employee committees in each Sundt office.

In another announcement, Sundt promoted Marian Enriquez to the newly created position of Manager of Employee Owner Experience and Diversity.

In her new role, Enriquez will be part of the company’s talent management team, responsible for leading a strategy intended to help create an environment where people can thrive and perform their best. In addition to maintaining employee-owner relations, her duties also include providing leadership on workforce and subcontractor diversity, equal employment opportunity, and human resource and federal contracting compliance.

Additionally, Enriquez will continue serving as Sundt’s Small Business Liaison Officer and overseeing the company’s subcontractor diversity program, which has been recognized by numerous highly regarded minority associations.

Enriquez joined Sundt 11 years ago and has been promoted to roles of increasing responsibility. She holds a Master of Business Administration and a bachelor’s degree in business management, both from the University of Phoenix. Enriquez also is certified as a Master Human Capital Strategist, Professional in Human Resources and Corporate Compliance and Ethics Professional.

 

Natural light floods the five-story atrium space

ASU's ISTB 4 Achieves LEED Gold Certification

 

Arizona State University’s recently opened Interdisciplinary Science and Technology Building 4 (ISTB 4) research facility was recognized as LEED Gold certified from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC).

To earn the LEED Gold, the $110M, 7-story ISTB 4 achieved 46 total LEED points under the LEED for New Construction Version 2.2 Rating System. One of the major project goals for the 298,000 SF building was to reduce energy as much as possible — when fully occupied ISTB 4’s energy use will be nearly one-half of a typical laboratory building.

HDR, as executive architect, collaborated with the design architect, Ehrlich Architects,  for the uniquely sustainable research and laboratory building. Sundt Construction was the general contractor.

As sustainable designer, Mathew Cunha-Rigby, LEED AP BD+C, point outs, “ASU and HDR were committed to making ISTB 4 a high performance, sustainable building from the beginning of the project. The university set a minimum goal of LEED Silver, with a stretch goal of LEED Gold.

“ASU also outlined sustainability targets that needed to be met for all new projects on campus, which helped influence many of the design strategies that were implemented in the building.”

Some of the sustainable strategies implemented in the building include:

>> Optimal building orientation based on local climate conditions and a high performance façade with vertical sunshades to reduce heat gain and incorporate passive cooling strategies.

>> Efficient active systems to minimize lighting, mechanical and process loads including energy recovery, reduced heating and cooling requirements for ventilated air, variable-air-volume settings for offices, labs and fume hoods, as well as, energy-efficient lighting, with occupancy sensor controls.

>> On-site renewable energy. ASU allocated energy produced by a photovoltaic array on the adjacent parking structure to ISTB 4 to supply more than 16% of its energy use.

>> Building performance monitoring to ensure the building will continue to meet its energy use reduction goals over the life of the building.

>>  Minimized resource use. Local building materials, extracted and manufactured within 500 miles of the site, totaled more than 44 percent of the entire material cost.

>> Daylighting. The building envelope and the interior space are designed to admit natural light into as many spaces as possible, and a central atrium brings daylight deep into the building interior.

>> Users are encouraged to use alternative transportation. ISTB 4 is within one fourth of a mile from a light rail stop and bus stops, serving five different bus routes. Bicycle racks are provided on site and the number of parking spaces has been reduced by 55% from that of a typical university building, with 10% of the parking spaces dedicated to carpool and fuel-efficient vehicles.

With the ISTB 4 certification, HDR now has a total of 14 LEED Gold projects.

 

Fickel - Castaneda - Aguilar

Sundt Construction Expands Civil/Industrial Team

Sundt Construction added three new employees to its civil/industrial team: Larry Fickel, area manager; Andre Castaneda, estimator II; and Nicholas Aguilar, field engineer.

As an area manager, Fickel will be responsible for projects throughout Greater Phoenix. He brings more than three decades of experience to his new role, most recently serving as a senior project manager for a Colorado-based contractor, where he was involved with a variety of projects, including water and wastewater treatment plants. Fickel earned a Bachelor of Science in building construction from Texas A&M University and continues to serve on the university’s Construction Industry Advisory Council.

Castaneda, an estimator, joins Sundt from a Tempe-based firm, where he worked as a project engineer and field estimator on roadway expansions and water treatment facilities. Castaneda earned a Bachelor of Science in construction management from Arizona State University.

Aguilar will work as a field engineer on the BHP Pinto Valley Restart project. He most recently worked as a project engineer at the Solana Generating Station in Gila Bend. Aguilar earned a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from Arizona State University, and remains active in the engineering community. He is a member of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, Engineers without Borders, and Bridges to Prosperity.

For more information visit sundt.com.

 

Sundt - Clark Garrett & Jonathan Hunt

Sundt Expands Industrial And Federal Teams

Sundt Construction hired Clark Garrett, quality manager for federal projects, and Jonathan Hunt, senior project engineer for civil and industrial projects.

Garrett will maintain quality standards for construction occurring at French Creek, a North Carolina Marine Corps satellite campus of Camp Lejeune where Sundt has multiple projects. He brings more than 25 years of experience to his new role, having worked on the quality-control efforts of military, healthcare, higher education, commercial and power plant projects across the Eastern U.S. Garrett earned a Bachelor of Science in engineering from North Carolina State University and served as a quality manager on another Camp Lejeune project.

Prior to coming to Sundt, Hunt served as a project engineer and district scheduler. He earned project and construction management certificates from Arizona State University and has worked on a variety of projects throughout Arizona valued at up to $100M.

Sundt Honored With ACCE Founder's Award

Sundt Honored With ACCE Founder's Award

Sundt Construction has been honored by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) with the 2012 Founder’s Award for its contributions to education within the construction industry.

“Receiving this recognition from such an esteemed organization is significant because it affirms our commitment to developing construction-industry professionals from the earliest stages of their careers,” said Richard Condit, senior vice president and chief administrative officer of Sundt.

Established in 2006, the Founder’s Award recognizes individuals, companies or organizations that, through their efforts over the past year, have had a profound effect on construction education, according to ACCE. The award criteria focus on a number of key impacts within the industry that include: positive impact on construction reputation, benefit and support of construction management programs and students, and contribution to the industry as a whole.

Sundt was nominated by Susan Thomas, a construction management program professor at Northern Arizona University who has had more than 25 years of personal experience with the company, first as a student, as an industry professional, and now as an educator.

“Sundt exemplifies the best when it comes to a ‘profound effect’ on construction education, impacts to local communities, impact to construction reputation and contribution to an industry as a whole. Based on personal experience over the past 25 years, they deserve to be recognized,” Thomas said in her nomination support statement.

Sundt maintains a commitment to construction education through a variety of initiatives, including sponsorship of regional and national student engineering competitions, involvement in college mentorship programs, construction-management curriculum development and teaching involvement in colleges where the company has offices.

sundt construction

Sundt Recognized By BestCompaniesAZ For Reshaping State

Sundt Construction, Inc.  is among 100 Arizona companies being honored by BestCompaniesAZ for reshaping the state’s workplaces over the past decade.

BestCompaniesAZ, a Mesa, Ariz.-based consulting firm that identifies, develops and promotes outstanding employers, recently released its 100 Best Arizona Companies of the Decade list in celebration of the organization’s 10th anniversary and Arizona’s Centennial. “We are proud to recognize companies that are at the forefront of innovation and economic growth in Arizona,” said Denise Gredler, president and CEO of BestCompaniesAZ. “These are the best and they deserve recognition.” Sundt’s name appears in the Stars of the Best category for mastery and leadership in its field.

“At Sundt Construction, we believe it is our people who make the difference,” said Sundt Senior Vice President and Chief Administrative Officer Richard Condit.  “We know that if we keep our employees happy, they, in turn, will work hard to keep our customers happy. We are grateful to be honored among other Arizona companies that also are dedicated to creating great workplaces and maintaining the highest performance standards.”

In addition to being one of the country’s oldest and most respected general contractors, Sundt provides a number of employee benefits, including an employee stock ownership plan; health plan, vision and prescription benefits; paid time off and an opportunity to make pre-tax donations to the Sundt Foundation, a separate non-profit organization focused on the needs of disadvantaged children and adults. The foundation receives most of its funding through employee contributions, which are matched by the company. To date, the Sundt Foundation has provided more than $5 million in aid to community organizations in communities where Sundt has an established office, or to charitable organizations associated with military installations where the company has a construction project underway.

For more information about Sundt Construction and BestCompaniesAZ, visit Sundt Construction’s website at sundt.com and visit BestCompaniesAZ’s website at bestcompaniesaz.com.

AZRE Newsmakers

Newsmakers: AZRE Magazine May-June 2012

Find out about Arizona’s newsmakers for May/June 2012

newsmakers - canada, oconnell, poulin» McCarthy Building Companies has appointed Scott Canada to the merit review committee for the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D funding opportunity solicitation in Phoenix. The initiative is an aggressive research and development plan led by the U.S. Department of Energy and aimed at developing solar technologies to meet a levelized cost of energy target of 6 cents/kWh without subsidy by 2020. McCarthy also promoted two associates to project directors. They are Lee O’Connell in Albuquerque and Steve Poulin in Tempe.

newsmakers - morrow» Voit Real Estate Services appointed Donald Morrow as managing director of the firm’s Phoenix operations. Morrow will oversee all aspects of Voit’s operations in the Phoenix market, including brokerage, asset and property management. Prior to joining Voit, Morrow served as a partner at Biltmore Holdings.

» Sundt Construction chairman and former CEO J. Doug Pruitt was named among the recipients of the prestigious 2012 Golden Beaver Award. Pruitt received the Management Award from The Beavers, a heavy civil engineering construction association. He retired as CEO of Sundt in September 2011, but remains involved with the company serving as chairman. Sundt also added Tom Auay-Fuay to serve as project manager in the Southwest. He will concentrate his efforts on preconstruction activities relating to mining and industrial construction projects.

» Commercial Properties Inc. (CPI) hired John B. Daley, who brings 30 years of commercial, retail, office and industrial real estate experience. Daley has coordinated some of the largest commercial real estate deals in Arizona. CPI also was selected by CoStar Group as recipient of a CoStar Power Broker Award. In addition, four brokers won individual awards as Top Industrial Leasing Brokers. They include Leroy Breinholt, Darin Edwards, Cal Johnson and Eric Jones.

» The Arizona Builders’ Alliance was honored by the Associated General Contractors of America as a 2011 Community Award recipient, one of 13 organizations recognized as the construction industry’s best charitable work. The ABA Community Board supported four projects in 2011.

newsmaker - byrd» Lincoln Property Company hired Tina Byrd as property manager in the Desert West Region office in Phoenix. Byrd is responsible for managing the newly renamed and remodeled Camelback Square.

» CBRE announced that Ike Isaacson has been named the new leader for its Tucson office and the Southern Arizona market. Isaacson has nearly 15 years of commercial real estate experience in the Tucson market, specializing in the leasing and sale of office, medical and R&D buildings.

» Erin Harper joined Alliance Project Advisors as senior project manager in Phoenix. Prior to joining Alliance Project Advisors, Harper worked with CBRE Global Corporate Services on site at American Express’ TRS Division since 1996. She has more than 20 years of project management experience.

newsmakers - gaylord, hawks, bladine» Jennings, Haug & Cunningham expanded its legal services with the addition of a prominent Arizona environmental law practice group. The three attorneys include senior partner Karen Gaylord, Ronnie Hawks and Janis Bladine. They have been representing clients in environmental law.

» Scottsdale-based MC Companies has announced the new joint venture with Phoenix-based Clark-Wayland Construction. This venture will focus mainly on development and construction of new multi-family projects in Phoenix and Tucson. The combined company has more than 75 years construction experience and has built more than 25,000 units in Arizona.

newspaper - plapp» Colliers International announced that senior associate Danny Plapp joined the office properties team of Charles Miscio, Greg McMillian and Niki Ward. Plapp will focus on procuring new tenants for property owners, while working with the specific needs of users. He joins Colliers from LevRose Commercial Real Estate in Scottsdale. Plapp has more than four years of commercial real estate experience, specializing in office properties.

» Carlyle Development Group announced a leasing and management team for the newly acquired Metrocenter in Phoenix. This team includes the addition of Brent Meszaros as general manager, real estate veteran Anita Blackford as senior VP of leasing, and locally based Phoenix Commercial Advisors as Metrocenter’s exclusive retail broker representative.

» Gensler added three new associates to its Phoenix staff. They include Jennifer Gozzi, interior designer; Lori Stenguist Johnson, project coordinator; and Stephanie Gomez, marketing manager.

AZRE Magazine May/June 2012

Sundt - Jeffrey Perelman

Sundt Names Perelman Sr. VP For Growth Strategy And Business Development

Sundt Construction hired Jeffrey Perelman as senior vice president of growth strategy and development. He will provide the leadership to create, manage and execute strategic expansion across all markets.

A veteran strategist and construction/real estate senior executive, Perelman brings more than three decades of experience to his role at Sundt. His extensive career includes serving in leadership roles for a large construction company and as a consultant at Ernst & Young, where he advised clients in the construction, real estate, controls and building materials industries.

Perelman holds a Master of Business Administration in strategy and marketing from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Business at Northwestern University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in electrical engineering and computer science, also from Northwestern University.

He is an active member of the Urban Land Institute, the National Council for Public-Private Partnerships and prior to relocating to Tempe, served on the board of directors of Northshore Congregation Israel.

Sundt - Tucson Courthouse

Sundt Begins Work On 1st Of 2 Massive Concrete Pours For Tucson Courthouse Foundation

Beginning at midnight on Friday, June 8, Sundt Construction executed the first of two massive concrete pours that will form the foundation of the new 290,000 SF courthouse shared by Pima County and the City of Tucson.

Construction at the site, located at Toole and Stone avenues in Downtown Tucson, began Feb. 1 and is scheduled for completion in August 2013. The first seven to nine months of the job are being spent on the foundation, just getting to grade level.

Some facts about the project:

  • The concrete mat slab is divided into two parts: A and B. Section A was poured June 8. The second pour happens on June 29.
  • The pours must be performed at night because of the lower temperatures and the traffic impacts. The ideal temperature for pouring concrete is about 70 degrees. Sundt uses chilled water and spray bars to keep the concrete cool.
  • Pour A took approximately eight hours to complete:
    • 440 cubic yards of concrete placed per hour
    • 3,553 cubic yards total
    • 20,000 SF, approximately
    • 70 trucks per hour for a total of 380 truckloads
  • Pour B is expected to encompass:
    • 700 cubic yards of concrete placed per hour
    • 4,000 cubic yards total
    • 24,000 SF, approximately
  • The two sections of the foundation (A and B) will be joined with a construction joint. The weeks between pours gives the project team a jump on the construction schedule in order to begin the concrete foundation walls.
  • The foundation is 25 feet below grade and will measure approximately one acre.
  • The steel-frame building will have seven floors above grade. Its exterior skin is unitized curtain wall and precast concrete.
  • The concrete has to be placed within 90 minutes of leaving the batch plant. Beyond that, it can’t be used because it will set up too quickly and may not cure to the specified design strength of 5,000 psi.
  • Two redi-mix companies are supplying the concrete. One is located at I-10 and Tangerine; the other is in Vail.
  • Continuous on-site testing during and after the pour ensures the mix is accurate and cures to the required strength.
  • Sundt’s contract for the core and shell: $48.2M.
University of Phoenix - Sperling Center

New University Of Phoenix Campus Opens, Offers Technologically Advanced Classrooms

The University of Phoenix unveiled its new, one-of-a-kind campus — the John Sperling Center for Educational Innovation.

This award-winning facility provides students with technologically advanced, yet practical learning environments, or “classrooms without boundaries.”

The campus, at 1625 Fountainhead Parkway, Fountainhead Corporate Center, in Tempe, celebrated its grand opening yesterday. Fountainhead won the 2012 RED Award for Best Office Project. Its designer, DAVIS, was named Architect of the Year.

“The innovation at this new campus embodies the foundation of what University of Phoenix prides itself in delivering to its students – an education without boundaries,” said Bill Pepicello, president of the University of Phoenix.

Technologically advanced classrooms called “Classrooms Without Boundaries” were designed with practicality at top-of-mind for students. The walls are writable surfaces, as well as the desktops, which flip to vertical positions allowing for easy presentations. Through use of eBeam® technology, instructors and students can work directly from projected computer screen images on the walls where they can open files, click on tabs or images, drag and drop files, etc., with the use of a special “pen.” The use of telepresence in these classrooms can extend programs/instruction into smaller, remote campuses and communities, such as in Yuma,  where testing is already underway.

“The ‘Classrooms Without Boundaries’ are real working classrooms but also labs for experimenting, developing and adopting new teaching technologies and techniques. Ideas that prove successful here are rolled out to programs and other campuses,” said David Fitzgerald, Phoenix campus director. “Even though these are physical classrooms at a physical campus, they’re all about having an education without barriers – our students are going to class on campuses or on their iPhone®, iPad® and laptops from their kitchen, workplace and local coffee shops.”

The campus not only offers highly advanced classrooms to students, but also gives visitors innovative experiences that showcase what the university is all about. From the lobby, through hallways to a large briefing/media room, the first floor of this 10-story building, (through a mixed use of technology, graphics and artistic design) tells the story of the university through “experiences” such as touch and learn panels, life-size progressive videos, and interactive maps. “These experiences were designed to offer fun, yet informative narratives of the university telling who we are, who we serve, how we do it, where we are going and what it means to potential students,” Fitzgerald said.

The John Sperling Center for Educational Innovation now serves as the main campus for  Metro Phoenix with numerous other campus locations throughout the Valley. The campus also houses traditional classrooms, a state-of-the-art nursing lab, a counseling center that lets students serve real families and individuals, a student advisement center, The Rev Café, a student resource center with computer workstations and group study rooms, video booth labs that let students work on and improve presentations and the usability lab where University staff facilitate end-user observations and real-time product design.

The Apollo Group Real Estate and Facilities team enlisted architecture and construction firms for this project. Besides DAVIS, construction was a joint effort between Sundt Construction (shell and tenant improvement) and Southwest Architectural Builders.

For more information about University of Phoenix, visit their website at www.phoenix.edu.

Sundt Foundation Water Delivery

Sundt Foundation Names New Officers

The Sundt Foundation has named three new officers to its board of directors. Tom Crohurst, area quality manager in Tucson and the board’s former vice president, will serve as president for the coming year.

Lisa White, a project administrator from Sundt’s Tempe office, will fill the role of vice president, while John Parsons, a Sundt senior accountant in Tucson, will be the board’s new treasurer. He replaces Carol Peabody, a longtime Sundt employee who plans to retire next year.

Meanwhile, Abigail Shaver, office manager for Sundt Construction’s San Antonio office and immediate past-president, was elected to a three-year term on the board. She will continue to represent Foundation members throughout Texas.

“Giving back to the community is a personal value of mine that aligns with the corporate conviction here at Sundt that supporting the less fortunate is the right thing to do,” said Crohurst. “As individuals – and as a company and a foundation – we have a tremendous opportunity to make a difference in the communities where we live and work.”

The Sundt Foundation was established by Sundt in 1999 to give its employee-owners a means of giving back to their communities.  It provides financial support to nonprofit organizations dedicated to improving the lives of disadvantaged children and adults through organizations located near a Sundt office. The Foundation is primarily funded by contributions from Sundt employees and company matching.

The Sundt Foundation Board of Directors is composed of nine employees, four appointed by the company and five elected by the membership. The board convenes quarterly to approve grants based on recommendations made by employee committees in each Sundt officiate on funding allocation.

Sundt recognizes the importance of community giving. Today, its employees remain dedicated to ensuring the well-being of others, donating generously to charitable causes and volunteering hundreds of hours each year to help various local organizations achieve their missions. For many employees, the Sundt Foundation is the principal way by which they give back to the communities they call home.

To date, the Foundation has awarded more than $5 million in donations. Nonprofit organizations interested in applying for a grant may visit www.sundtfoundation.org for more information.

Sundt water bottles

Sundt Construction To Donate 150K Bottles Of Water To Thirst Aid Drive

Thirst Aid Drive - St. JosephSundt Construction Company, with the help from its subcontractors and suppliers, will lead off the 2012 Thirst Aid Water Drive on May 11 by delivering 150,000 bottles of water by semi-truck to St. Joseph the Worker, a Human Service Campus Agency.

As temperatures rise, employees from Sundt’s corporate headquarters in Tempe are once again gearing up to participate in the annual Thirst Aid water bottle drive to benefit St. Joseph the Worker, a nonprofit organization that aids the homeless and other disadvantaged individuals throughout the Phoenix area. Many of them suffer from thirst, heat-related illness and even death when temperatures soar in the spring and summer months.

The Sundt Foundation organized the company’s first Thirst Aid event in 2010 with the hope of collecting 1,200 water bottles. They crushed their goal by collecting 49,000 bottles, and that number tripled the following year when 149,000 bottles came through our doors – so many that St. Joseph the Worker was able to build collaboration with the entire Human Services Campus.

As a result of Sundt’s donation, St. Joseph the Worker, in collaboration with the Human Services Campus service providers, did not have to turn away any individual who needed water.

The Human Services Campus, an unprecedented collaboration of 15 homeless service providers, was created in 2005 to address the growing demand for services by people experiencing homelessness. Each day, 1,300 men and women access resources such as shelter, physical and mental health services, dental care, substance abuse treatment, employment services, and housing placement.

Collectively, each agency worked with their supporters to collect donated water and heat relief funding to be able to provide for the needs of the individuals utilizing services on the Human Services Campus.

Each year, the City of Phoenix holds a water drive and places hydration stations around the community.  With the support of our collective donors, St. Joseph the Worker and other Human Service Campus providers did not have to reach out to the City of Phoenix for the first time.

By providing for the individuals on the campus through this collective effort, the City of Phoenix was able to support smaller agencies that do not have the support of organizations such as Sundt Construction Company.

The goal for this year’s drive; Collecting 150,000 water bottles and continuing the commitment to making the event as green as possible. How? St. Joseph the Worker in partnership with the Human Services Campus providers, are installing recycling containers at all areas where trash receptacles are currently located so that the water bottles aren’t thrown away.

“As Sundt employees, we’re fortunate to have nice jobs in comfortable offices where we always have access to clean, cool water,” says Lisa White, a Foundation board member and organizer of the event. “Not everyone is so lucky, which is why the Sundt Foundation decided to get involved in Thirst Aid with our own water bottle drive. Since then, the participation and support have been tremendous. Many of our subcontractors have also gotten involved. It’s so satisfying to reach out and do what we can to help others – for them and for us.”

“On behalf of everyone here at St. Joseph the Worker, we wish to thank Sundt Construction Company for being the foundation that makes these collaborative efforts possible,” says Brent Downs, Executive Director for St. Joseph the Worker.  “Their continued support will provide needed heat relief to over 1,300 men and women every day!”

For more information on Sundt Construction, visit Sundt’s website at sundt.com. Also, for more information on Thirst Aid, visit St. Joseph the Worker’s website at sjwjobs.org/thirst-aid.

2012 Annual Economic Outlook

Industry Experts' Forecast On 2012 Economy

Recovery is on the horizon, but industry experts are cautious in their forecast as the 2012 economy slowly bounces back. 

Looking at Arizona’s recession-starved commercial real estate industry as a whole, 2011 was flat and 2012 is trending just slightly better. So say local experts.

But broken down into its various components, there is a wide divergence of attitude and optimism for the rest of this year.

AZRE tapped key players from a variety of real estate-related disciplines to check their crystal balls and predict whether commercial real estate will soar, slump or stagnate in 2012, and what factors could turn the tide.

Investment
A plethora of CMBS properties will come due in 2012, and private owners of distressed properties may be more willing to sell, says Jennifer Pescatore, who oversees commercial real estate loans for Bank of Arizona.

There is plenty of money available for the right property in the right submarket and investors with the right credentials, she says.

But except for the multi-family sector and some industrial opportunities, Pescatore isn’t sure values have slipped enough to generate a significant number of sales or new development in 2012.

She’s anticipating relatively small loans — $2M to $15M — on income properties as standard 2012 fare.

But substantial job growth and improvement in the global economic picture could change that relatively pessimistic outlook, says Ryan Suchala, Bank of Arizona president.

“Arizona offers a unique opportunity, and it’s a great place to do business,” Suchala says.

This year could be better than expected, Suchala notes, but for measurable improvement in real estate values and transactions, 2013 is a more realistic time frame.

Economic development
Economic development directors by nature are always upbeat about the future, and Chandler’s Christine Mackay has reason to be.

“Activity level since the first of the year has gone through the roof,” she says.

Intel is constructing a new fabrication plant scheduled for completion in 2013 but already keeping a virtual army of construction workers busy. And when Intel ramps up, so do the tech giant’s customers and clients, Mackay adds.

Other healthy growth signals: EBay/PayPal is expanding, building out the fourth floor of its Chandler facility.

In January, San Diego-based developer Doug Allred Company broke ground at the NEC of Price and Willis roads in Chandler for Park Place, the Valley’s first spec office complex to rise from the dust of the recession since 2009.

Phoenix has a lot more old office properties to fill up before any spec projects are likely to appear on its planning agenda, but virtually all the big warehousing/distribution center space has been snapped up, and the city is actively looking for “shovel ready” spots where developers can build more, says Bruce MacTurk, deputy director for economic development.

It’s a good news-bad news scenario, he says.

By mid-January, five large industrial users were looking at Phoenix, but the city had only two buildings with more than 500,000 SF of space available.

There’s even some good news about Phoenix’s languishing retail centers as owners are renovating to reposition the sites, MacTurk says.

While economic development leaders like MacTurk and Mackay are focused on job creation, the fallout from job growth is a healthier, more vibrant residential and commercial real estate scenario, they say.

Construction
“Compared to this time last year, it feels much better,” says Bo Calbert, McCarthy Building Cos. Southwest president. “There are a lot more opportunities to pursue.”

McCarthy’s revenue is up 10%, he says. Key drivers for that spike are healthcare, renewable energy, schools and Native American projects, especially in hospitality and gaming.

But Calbert says he believes there is “more pain to come” before Arizona’s construction industry is back on a solid uphill track.

“To be an Arizona-only contractor is not sustainable,” he says. “There is promise, and more opportunities are coming, but not enough.”

D.P. Electric vice president Scott Muller says he has a backlog of healthcare and military projects to keep workers busy in 2012 — primarily technology upgrades.

And the company is detecting more interest from local property owners and developers, some hoping to entice California data centers and manufacturing operations ready to make a move.

“We’re excited about 2012,” Muller says.

“Those in the real estate and construction industry understand that the current market, compared to three or four years ago, has created a great opportunity to build, move or expand at a significant cost savings,” he says. “In 2012, we’ve seen an increase in our Design-Build/Design-Assist projects because this is where the best value is brought to the owner/developer.”

Architecture
Data centers, specialized healthcare facilities and military installations are also on Mike Medici’s 2012 hot list.

“Technology is constantly pushing the limits of existing buildings,” says Medici, managing director of SmithGroupJJR Arizona Architects. “And a lot of hospitals are positioning for the future or catching up from the past.”

Architects are tapped for new projects at the conceptualizing stage, and Medici sees good news coming for all commercial real estate sectors, even if the bounty won’t happen in 2012.

“We are seeing several developers looking at mixed-use office/retail/multi-family, especially along the light rail line,” he says. “It’s not as much activity as in 2004, 2005 and 2006, but there are opportunities bubbling up. For two years previously developers were not talking to us. Now modestly they are coming out of the woodwork.”

LEO A DALY architectural firm just completed the Casino Del Sol Resort in Tucson and is currently working on a project with Davis-Monthan Air Force base, says senior architect Rod Armstrong.

There is no pent-up demand for shopping centers or new office buildings, Armstrong says, but the international architecture firm is “always in business development mode,” and the signs are positive.

“We feel the increased level of commitment with potential clients. People are loosening up, and things will happen quickly. We’re hopeful for 2012,” he says.

Multi-family
While interest in and financing for new development remains limited in Metro Phoenix, one sector finding favor is multi-family, fueled by a limited supply and the single-family housing market collapse, says Tom Simplot, Arizona Multihousing Association president.

“Apartment owners are cautiously optimistic due to a rebound in values and rents,” Simplot says.

He doesn’t envision a lot more product coming online in 2012, but in select markets — in Scottsdale, Ahwatukee, and along the light rail line — some projects are moving forward and could be under construction this year and available by 2013.

Luxury condo developer Optima is betting Scottsdale is ready for more downtown-living opportunities.

“Optima Sonoran Village is in an advantageous position because it is the first new residential development in several years and builds on the economic, architecture, and marketing success of Optima Camelview Village,” says David Hovey Jr., Optima vice president. “Construction has started on Optima Sonoran Village with occupancy second quarter of 2013.”

Hovey says financing is still tight and mixed-use projects are iffy because of existing over-supply of office and retail components, but, if there is “only a gradual increase in new product over the next few years, the luxury unit market will remain healthy.”

Healthcare
Medical facilities needing upgrades or expansions to keep up with changing technologies, aging baby boomer needs and unsettled health coverage issues, are providing work for local real estate trades — a trend that will continue throughout 2012.

Cancer- and pediatric-focused projects are already in progress, as are several clinics and rehabilitation centers aimed at bringing cost-effective healthcare into communities, says Sundt Construction’s Russ Korcuska, who has been piloting hospital construction projects in Arizona for two decades.

Still, some of the big players will “sit on the sidelines until the (November) election because of the tremendous effect that could have on healthcare and Medicare. The new congress will be pivotal,” Korcuska says.

Some upgrades can’t wait.

“Healthcare construction is tied to population, and there is a great need to accommodate the baby boomer generation,” says Steve Whitworth, Kitchell’s Healthcare Division manager.

Healthcare construction will see a “slight increase in 2012, as larger organizations prepare for healthcare reform,” he says.

Whitworth predicts a sharper focus on cost-cutting delivery methods and energy efficiency in 2012 both in new development and upgrades to existing facilities.

“Healthcare will remain healthy,” he says.

Solar
Solar power was Arizona’s red-hot growth topic a year ago, with government leaders proffering incentives and touting the state’s virtues to the clean-energy companies looking for a place to grow and prosper.

Then mid-year, solar panel makers Solyndra and Stirling Energy Systems failed, and in December industry giant First Solar said it would slow progress of its under-construction Mesa plant.

So how do some of the state’s solar experts envision their industry’s 2012 prospects?

SRP sees strong demand for solar upgrades in both commercial and residential uses even though it “slowed somewhat” from 2011 when monetary inducements were greater, says Debbie Kimberly, director of customer programs and marketing.

“It’s encouraging to see this demand even at reduced incentive levels,” Kimberly says.

She says she expects interest in solar to continue apace throughout 2012, especially in leased rather than purchased systems.

And APS’ 2012 outlook for solar is “overwhelmingly positive” based on continued strong customer demand, says Barbara Lockwood, the utility company’s director of energy innovation.

“We asked our customers,” she notes. “The customers want solar.”

Installers could second that.

“Our forecast is 100 percent growth over last year,” says Gary Held, Harmon Solar sales and marketing manager. “And last year was the biggest year we ever had on the commercial side.”

But that’s from the perspective of the companies that purchase and distribute solar energy.

While solar demand remains strong, supply is growing faster as solar producers and manufacturers ramp up, boosting competition and sending prices plummeting, Lockwood says.

The growing global glut in solar manufacturers is squeezing the industry from that perspective, she says, as evident by First Solar’s slowdown and some companies folding.

Lockwood predicts prices will stabilize in 2012, and solar supply and demand will reach equilibrium.

Brokerage
Nobody has a handle on the intricacies of the local commercial real estate industry like the brokers who buy, sell, market and lease properties. Their outlook for 2012 is guardedly upbeat, depending on the type of property and its location.

Phoenix’s overbuilt office market remains too over-supplied for new development, says Craig Henig, CBRE senior managing director.

In 2011, 1.8 MSF of office space was absorbed, dropping the vacancy rate to 25.5%, Henig adds.

And overall there was 5.9 MSF of “gross activity,” as plummeting rents prompted tenants to move to classier digs.

Most of the Valley’s Class A offices filled up in 2011, and Class B and C space could see an occupancy boost in 2012, whittling away at the surplus supply, says Chris Jantz, Cassidy Turley/BRE Commercial vice president of research.

But neither Henig or Jantz envision a big drop in overall office vacancy this year.

Empty industrial space was gobbled up in 2011, and that could spur development, Jantz says, but new properties likely won’t come online until 2013.

Retail real estate has been the big laggard throughout the recession, and while Henig doesn’t expect much overall absorption in 2012, he foresees “musical chairs” as retailers reexamine their footprints based on recent consumer trends. For example, the surge in online sales may result in smaller, or at least different, brick-and-mortar space usage and bigger warehousing needs.

Henig also predicts that Phoenix area retailers will take advantage of still-sinking rents to move into better locations in 2012.

Tucson’s prospects are rosy.

“All signals are pointing up for Tucson in 2012,” says CBRE Tucson managing director Tim Prouty. “Our vacancies have improved. We see a positive absorption in industrial certainly, office probably, and some improvement in retail as well.”

A recent University of Arizona study predicting 2.35% average job growth in Tucson for the next five years — a boost of more than 52,000 jobs overall — is nurturing Prouty’s confidence.

And Tucson’s successful wooing of biotech businesses, such as Roche Group’s planned major expansion, “will be a big story in 2012,” Prouty says.

Land
After bottoming in 2009, land sales nationally picked up modestly in 2012 and remained level in 2011, according to Grubb & Ellis.

Through 3Q 2011, land sales were just about even with the same period in 2012 at $13.6B, but the sales mix was different. Through 3Q 2011, industrial land sales were up 133% as the industrial leasing and user-sale market improved to the point where developers began ramping up for the next expansion cycle.

In 2012, according to Grubb & Ellis, expect a modest increase inland sales led by development sites for multi-family projects and distribution centers, which are further along the recovery cycle.

Key concerns
While all the players envision a slight, if spotty, up tick in Arizona’s commercial real estate market, they say job growth and the global economy are key concerns determining 2012′s prospects.

A couple of local legislative issues also factor into the mix, says Nick Wood of Snell & Wilmer.

Tax assessments paid in arrears for commercial structures built in the mid-2000s that experienced severely plunging values in recent years could hamper sales and renovations of languishing real estate, Wood says.

“If you look at values for 2007, some offices have lost 60% to 70% of their value, and there hasn’t been a corresponding reduction in taxes,” Wood says.

And recent revisions to government property lease excise tax (GPLET) rates for new commercial structures can act as a deterrent to economic development, especially in downtown areas, he says.

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

RED Awards 2012 - iPic Theater

RED Awards 2012: Best Retail Project, iPic Theater /Tanzy/Salt

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for Best Retail Project was iPic Theater /Tanzy/Salt.


Best Retail Project

iPic Theater /Tanzy/Salt

Developer: iPic Theaters
Contractor: A.R. Mays Construction
Architect: TK Architects
Size: 50,000 SF
Location: 15257 N. Scottsdale Rd, Scottsdale
Completed: January, 2011

iPic TheaterThe iPic Theater $6M retail project, an innovative movie and dining experience, took less than five months to complete at Scottsdale Quarter. The construction team overcame several challenges to produce a unique retail experience: limited scheduling, and weight restrictions involving acoustic concrete slabs. Working with an out-of-state architect and owner on this new prototype also presented challenges for the construction team. Changes were made from the beginning until almost opening day. Amenities include LED lighting around the radius  of the shimmer screens, which adds to the theatrical ambiance. At Salt, patrons sit at an oval-shaped bar set before a 28-foot-tall backlit wine bottle display.

ipictheaters.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


Honorable Mention

American Sports Complex- Retail Center

Developer: City of Avondale
Contractor: Sundt Construction, Inc.
Architect: SmithGroupJJR
Size: 20,000 SF
Location: 755 N. 114th Ave., Avondale
Completed: September, 2011


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2011

RED Awards 2012 - Fountainhead Office Plaza

RED Awards 2012: Best Office Project, Fountainhead Office Plaza

On March 1, AZRE hosted the 7th Annual RED Awards reception at the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix to recognize the most notable commercial real estate projects of 2011 and the construction teams involved. AZRE held an open call for nominations and a record 116 projects were submitted by architects, contractors, developers and brokerage firms in Arizona. This year, the winner for Best Office Project was Fountainhead Office Plaza.


Best Office Project

Fountainhead Office Plaza

Developer: USAA Real Estate Company/Metro Commercial Properties
Contractor: Sundt Construction
Architect: DAVIS
Size: 493,661 SF
Location: 1624 Fountainhead Parkway, Tempe
Completed: July, 2011

Fountainhead Office PlazaFountainhead Office Plaza A & B in Tempe is comprised of 6- and 10-story Class A buildings. The massive project, which is 100% percent leased to the University of Phoenix, began only after the challenging task of altering a neighboring lake and tearing down three buildings and parking structures. Once these were complete, construction of a 493,661 SF plaza could commence. The project sits on 12 acres and includes a parking structure that accommodates more than 2,000 vehicles. Fountainhead adheres to the significance of sustainability by incorporating an Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV) that acts as a cleaner for incoming air, protecting against pollutants and reducing energy costs. The USGBC recognized Fountainhead Office Plaza with LEED Gold certification.

sundt.com


Video by Cory Bergquist


Honorable Mention

UniSource Energy Corporate Office

Developer: Ryan Companies US, Inc
Contractor: Ryan Companies US, Inc
Architect: DAVIS
Size: 200,000 SF
Location: 88 E. Broadway, Tucson
Completed: November, 2011


Video by Cory Bergquist


RED Awards 2012 Winners & Finalists

AZRE Magazine March/April 2012

Commercial Development - AZRE Magazine January/February 2012

New Commercial Development Will Impact Growth In The Next 100 Years

Arizona’s economic strength and growth the next 100 years depend on the creation of new buildings, commercial development and new infrastructure

A high-speed train between Phoenix and Tucson. Toll roads on I-10 and I-17. A new shopping mall. Three outlet centers. A major development in West Phoenix. New casinos.

Solar manufacturing plants. A light rail that extends from Phoenix to Gilbert. A new interstate — I-11 — linking Phoenix and Las Vegas. State-of-the-art sports facilities.

Reality or wish list?

As Arizona looks ahead to its next 100 years, the future of the commercial real estate industry hinges on new infrastructure to keep the state’s economic engine churning while meeting the demands of a growing population.

Since the recession unloaded on the commercial real estate industry in the mid 2000s, it’s been an uphill climb for those in the industry, including general contractors, architects, engineers, subcontractors, developers and brokers.
Commercial Development - AZRE Magazine January/February 2012
“We will see a population shift to urban areas with a focus on transit- oriented development,” predicts Bryan Dunn, senior vice president at Adolfson & Peterson Construction. “Commercial property will need to be re-purposed into alternate uses due to the glut of vacant space in the real estate market.

“We will need to find creative ways to own and operate buildings in the future. There is a growing demand for public/private partnerships for municipal and educational facilities, similar to what has been done in Europe,” Dunn says.

AZRE Magazine asks some experts in commercial real estate how they see the industry changing in Arizona over the next decade and beyond. Here are their responses:

Planning and Development

“In the next 10 years, Arizona will finally adopt Tax Increment Financing (TIF) to remain competitive in the business world. The new normal is for less reliance on homebuilding as a jobs industry. Two more high rise office buildings with mixed uses on the lower floors will be built in Downtown Phoenix. In the next 100 years, high-speed rail
will run between Phoenix and Tucson in the Sun Corridor and a new, man-made lake/reservoir will be created north of Phoenix to collect upstream snow melt and serve the needs of Metro Phoenix.”
— Jon Froke, Planning Director, City of Glendale

“During the next 10 years, smaller developments that require less off-site infrastructure and result in lighter commitments from homebuilders are likely. Infrastructure requirements/costs will be lower and financial commitments will be smaller, both of which are desirable to financiers and homebuilder shareholders recovering from the recent downturn.

“In the next 100 years, development and homebuilding will undergo some of the most rapid changes ever. In Metro Phoenix and the Tucson area, densities will undoubtedly increase dramatically; we will grow upward rather than outward, as large metropolitan areas eventually do. The materials builders use will change dramatically, looking and feeling different. There will be stronger and lighter materials. Although hard to imagine, many unique, innovative homebuilding products that will be used the homes of the future have already been developed, we continue to wait for them to be rolled out to consumers.

“The continued development of solar technologies is going to have huge impact on all types of commercial development in Arizona.  Imagine buildings – retail, office, industrial, homes – not needing to be hooked up to the grid because they produce all of the energy necessary for their usage. The development of “net-zero” facilities in this market, where sun is plentiful, will have a dramatic positive effect on Arizonan’s lives.”
— Jim Belfiore, President, Belfiore Real Estate Consulting

Brokerage

“The beginning of the change is going on right now. The exchange of ownership has and will have an impact on our industry in the next 10 years. In the RTC days it took about 15 years to fully recover, this current cycle will take 5-7 years to process all of the inventory and for the next wave of owners to re-trade the properties. Banks, special servicers and the FDIC will be in charge of real estate for the long term and all of the assets that are currently under their control won’t make it back into private hands in total for 10 years.

“The medical use of retail space will be in full force, everything about this makes sense, retail buildings, namely big box spaces, have the power, the lower rents and the parking already in place to handle a medical user. This will create truly mixed-use locations.
“Internet sales fulfillment centers will hit a critical mass, even if and/or when the state begins to charge them sales tax, even at a much lower rate. Phoenix is well located, we have a growing economy and it makes a lot of sense that those are now starting to pop up here.

“In the next 100 years, buildings will be far more energy efficient, materials to build buildings will be so much more advanced than we can even imagine. In commercial buildings, there will be more bodies per square foot, more technology, less employees, smaller office size requirements. Thousands of new businesses will be created.”
— Pete Bolton, Managing Director/Executive VP, Grubb & Ellis

“Real estate growth over the next decade will be far more restrained than in the boom period in the 10 years before the onset of the recession. During that time, commercial property inventories routinely expanded by anywhere from 3% to 5% annually, driven by growing tenant demand for space and rents that steadily pushed higher. A return to that environment is unlikely anytime soon.

“Forecasting out over the next 100 years presents a pretty daunting challenge … but all of the demographic trends show Arizona will remain a growth market over the next century and population growth will spur demand for both commercial and residential real estate. Beyond demographics and quality of life factors, we believe global economic patterns will support growth in Arizona.”
— Bob Mulhern, Managing Director, Colliers International

Architecture

“The design and construction industry needs to be at the forefront of determining how Arizona is developed over the next 10 years. We need to take a hard look at the lessons learned from the past 10 years regarding unconstrained growth and sprawl, as well as from the positive developments of renewed urban focus, comprehensive transportation and development plans, and increased integrated project delivery partnerships.

“Architects have the responsibility for shaping the built environment that we all experience on a daily basis and need to ensure that built environment is increasingly sustainable, functionally practical, and aesthetically pleasing. Through technological advances and communication outlets, AIA architects will be continually educating ourselves about, and be more globally aware of industry trends and improvements that can be applied locally, so that Arizona becomes the ideal place to live, work, and play. In addition to increasingly becoming the leading stewards of our built environment through sustainable design and comprehensive planning, You are going to see an increasing significance in the role the design industry plays in the overall development of our communities.

“The industry will partner much more with government and lines will be blurred in community planning, design review, and construction inspection. Public-Private Partnerships and Integrated Project Delivery methods will become the norm, and the design and construction industry will have much more at stake in what they develop beyond their immediate financial compensation.”
— AIA response from Patrick Panetta, ASU; and Chris Knorr, SmithGroupJJR

“All industries, including commercial real estate and architecture, will need to continue to evolve and adapt to emerging technologies. Specifically in the fields of alternative energy and sustainability. I believe the next few years of those 10 years a lot of attention will need to be spent on repurposing existing buildings and facilities. We will obviously need to remain flexible to adapt to the process of becoming stabilized.

“Because technology and technological advances are changing at an exponential rate, I think the next 100 years is beyond reasonable comprehension. Who would have thought 100 years ago that we would be where we are today. However, architecture and real estate haven’t significantly changed over the past 100 years, but we also have not had the multiplying pace of technology at our disposal. Who knows, things like tele-transporting may be a reality over the next century, which of course would drastically change architecture and commercial real estate.”
— Patrick Hayes, President and CEO, PHArchitecture

Legal

“For approximately the first third or half of the next 10 years, commercial real estate will need to focus on absorption and modification to meet current needs of those projects that resulted from overbuilding during prior ‘blow and go’ times in our industry. Creativity and cost-effective adaptation will be needed to recast non-performing or under-performing commercial assets into assets that can meet the needs of current real estate users. As an example, big box retail spaces that have gone dark will need to be adapted and converted into creative uses to accommodate smaller and even different users. Cities and counties may need to modify their zoning to allow for a broader variety of uses that will meet the needs of today’s users.

“One hundred years is a long time and it is difficult and somewhat speculative to attempt to predict what changes will most impact Arizona over such a long time period. However, I suspect that big box retail will downsize as Internet shopping grows over the many years to come. I also suspect that growth in Arizona will have to adjust to demands upon the availability of water and our entire culture will eventually take on a more serious and long-term water approach to and conservation.

“Arizona will need to adapt its economy to more self-sustaining business that is not so dependent upon growth and real estate development. Thus, over the next 100 years Arizona will need to modify its tax and development schemes to accommodate more industry and manufacturing. Finally, Arizona will develop more political clout in Congress and the federal government as its population grows and the state’s economy continues to mature.”
— Don Miner,  Director, Fennemore Craig PC

Construction

“The impact construction will have in Arizona over the next 10 years will start with job creation. As the market comes back, the industry will be a leader in putting people back to work. We will need people to fill both direct construction jobs, and jobs that are indirectly related to construction. Every $1B spent in construction results in a total of 20,000 direct and indirect jobs. These jobs will help the middle class, the hardest hit in the last few years in terms of job loss.

“Construction is one of the top five industries nationally, and by then (10 years from now) it will be back among the top five industries for Arizona. Finally, the use of public/private partnerships will increase to meet community needs for amenities, infrastructure and growth.”

“Also, in Arizona, construction will be essential in reshaping the suburban landscape of our past into the more blended and integrated urban and semi-urban environment for the future. We are seeing new demographics that have families from multiple generations that live under one roof, and this factor along with other market forces will increase density in the mixed-use urban environment.”
— Eric Hedlund, Executive Vice President and COO, Sundt Construction

Finance

“Financing will always be a key part to Arizona’s growth. How products and services will be delivered will continue to evolve. As the market heals more competition enters into the marketplace thereby giving more investors access to capital. Assuming the economy has healed and is robust, I see a lot more choices for investors, developers and consumers in the next 10 years when it comes to the availability of financing.

“In the next 100 years? The market will always go up and down and therefore there will be more boom and busts as the decades roll forward. The difference in the future is access to information becoming more available than previous decade. The speed of that information will cause market trends to shift faster. Volatility could be more frequent.”
— William L. Spart, Senior VP, Wells Fargo Bank-Real Estate

For more information on Arizona’s construction projects and new commercial development, visit az.gov.

AZRE Magazine January/February 2012

Hospital Construction - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Please Do Not Disturb: Hospital Construction Zone

During hospital construction, constant planning and communication are top priorities for healthcare builders

The foremost focus in upgrading or expanding a hospital is keeping the work concealed from the patients. So says Steve Whitworth, Kitchell’s Healthcare Division manager, about hospital construction.

It’s not like adding or enlarging a store in a retail center, which might force shoppers to step around a construction barrier for a few days or have the piped-in music occasionally punctuated by a floor sander.

“In a mall, people will be inconvenienced. In a hospital, a patient’s health is at stake,” Whitworth says. “In every single project we strive to be invisible. The ability to heal depends on the environment a patient is in. It‘s the only thing that matters at the end of the day.”

The dilemma is that hospitals, as much or more than other commercial real estate structures, need to continuously get bigger and better, he says.

“Planning, planning, planning,”  is the key to keeping healthcare facilities humming smoothly while making major renovations, says Jay Stallings, associate administrator at Banner Desert Medical Center, which unveiled a major emergency department makeover in August.

That mantra is echoed by other key players — from hospital administrators to construction engineers — who are continuously upgrading and expanding Arizona’s top hospitals to address medical care’s changing needs and technology advances while keeping the work virtually imperceptible to patients and staff.

Finding solutions

Banner Thunderbird Tower - AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Unlike other types of commercial real estate overhauls or tenant improvements, healthcare property renovations come with a whole host of hurdles, from meeting infection control standards to keeping emergency entrances accessible.

The biggest hurdle — no down time.

“What makes a hospital unique, is that it’s a 24/7 facility. There’s never a good time to do the work,” says Sundt Construction’s Russ Korcuska, who has been piloting hospital construction projects in Arizona for two decades.

To maintain top-notch patient care, innovation and expansion is necessary, but upgrading existing facilities means you can’t turn off the power, the water or other utilities, you can’t block fire escape routes or ambulance entrances, you can’t let construction dust or other contaminants get in the air, and you can’t make a lot of noise or cause other disturbances that could impact patients or staff operations.

“If a surgeon is working on somebody’s brain, you can’t be creating vibrations on the other side of the wall,” Korcuska says. “It’s extremely challenging.”

That’s why planning an entire project and all possible contingencies to the tiniest detail before ever flipping a power switch is so critical, says DPR Construction’s Guy Sanders, who is just finishing up Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center’s three-story expansion of operating rooms and pre/post operative care areas.

Especially in renovating older hospitals where documentation of what’s in the ceiling and under the floor is not always complete or accurate, he says. “Knowledge of a campus is critical,” Sanders says. As is double-checking before digging.

During the Banner Good Samaritan project, he planned for alternative power sources to keep all ongoing operations running smoothly based on detailed building documentation. Still, during the planning process, he flipped a breaker and did a walk-through of the whole hospital to ensure the documentation was correct. It wasn’t.

Sanders found some equipment mislabeled and had to do some rewiring — and re-documenting.

Proper planning is crucial

Chris Jacobson of McCarthy Building Companies is just completing a major project at Banner Thunderbird Medical Center. He added a new six-story tower and emergency department expansion in the spot where the old ambulance entrance stood, and then renovated all the newly vacated space after 25 departments relocated to the tower. The project is slated to wrap in January.

It has been a five-year, multi-phased project, with planning for every phase starting almost a year in advance, he says.

Jacobson and his crew had to design everything from infection, noise and dust control to fire exits — and figure out how to get workers and materials in and out of the construction sites without bringing them through the hospital. They plotted everything, “even down to which tools to use.”

“You have to get creative about how to get the work done without coming in with a wrecking ball,” he says.

The biggest challenge was how to keep the existing emergency department functioning while “de-constructing” the old ER entrance. Jacobson says the solution devised in the planning process — building a covered bridge from a new temporary ambulance entry a short distance from the construction site — was key to McCarthy landing the job.

“It was a big challenge that nobody had figured out,” he says.

And that wasn’t the only temporary structure the construction experts had to design and build before even starting the main event. They crafted fire-rated, sound-insulated  temporary walls, new directional signage,  and a complete hospital kitchen in a trailer.

They even planned and built a temporary super-structure that looked like a massive, free-standing fire escape outside the hospital tower to get workers and materials to upper floors without ever opening a hospital door.

McCarthy used a similar technique for building out Yuma Regional Medical Center’s upper floors, which were pegged for expansion space when the hospital was first built. The engineers planned and built an outdoor elevator and trash chute to keep patients and staff below from commingling with construction workers or debris on indoor elevators.

At Banner Good Samaritan, DPR had to excavate an area between the central power plant and the new expansion. Before bringing in the backhoe, Sanders employed a “vacuum” truck to suck up some of the dirt and expose the utilities.

Among the most interesting planning tools McCarthy engineers use are laser scans of a hospital’s ceilings and floors to find exactly where all the pipes, wires and ducts are located, and 3D modeling software to virtually tuck new utilities amongst the old.

“The old way was you had guys with flashlights and measuring tapes,” Jacobson says.

Sometimes engineers have to detour planned utility upgrades to avoid a virtual collision. That’s much better than having workers face a real utility roadblock and have to rethink routes in the middle of a messy construction site, he says.

If planning is atop the experts’ priority list for minimizing patient disruption during construction, keeping everybody in the loop scores a close second place.

A critical component of both planning and construction stages of any healthcare project is communication with all the stakeholders, says Stallings, whose new triple-sized, state-of-the-art emergency department took seven years from drawing board to debut.

Stallings says involving every hospital department touched by the project from start to finish made the process as painless as possible for them and especially for patients.

“This was a collaborative project with physicians, staff, clinicians, infection control, environmental services,” he says. “All were impacted. We worked hand-in-hand with the architects and construction staff. We had weekly construction meetings, sometimes daily, with all who were impacted.”

“We provide an important service to the community. We couldn’t shut down the emergency department and continue to be a hospital,” Stallings says. “In the moment when somebody needs help, we have to be there. We take that very seriously. Our approach was  transparency (to patients), collaboration, a high level of communication and training.”

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www.kitchell.com
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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Commerce Authority, AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Commerce Authority Celebrates Its 1st Anniversary

With the Arizona Commerce Authority celebrating its 1st year, jobs remain the focus as the state’s CRE industry reaps the benefits.

Arizona Commerce Authority, AZRE Magazine November/December 2011In August, Tempe-based First Solar purchased 635 acres in Pinal County for $9.8M and announced plans to build a generating station on the property.

The rapidly expanding, clean-energy company is still constructing its solar module manufacturing plant in Mesa, expected to be up and running by mid-2012 with as many as 600 new, high-paying jobs.

The company also is building generating stations in Gila Bend and Yuma. In January, Power-One opened its first North American manufacturing facility in Phoenix. The California-based company, which makes inverters to convert renewable energy to usable energy, said it will employ as many as 350 people at build-out.

At Power-One’s grand opening ceremonies, Gov. Jan Brewer credited  the Arizona Commerce Authority for the big win and for wielding CEO clout and corporate incentives in making Arizona a hot spot for solar companies looking to expand or relocate.

“I have been consistently focused on ensuring Arizona is a magnet for business relocation, capital investment and a catalyst for the creation of new business and new jobs. And, with the work of my Arizona Commerce Authority, we’re seeing tremendous results in the solar space,” Brewer said at the time.

A year after the Arizona Department of Commerce, a government agency, morphed into the Arizona Commerce Authority, a public-private partnership led by a board of directors filled with many of the state’s top business leaders, six solar companies boasting a combined 1,700 new jobs have announced plans to expand or move to Arizona, says Bennett Curry, who has been piloting the organization’s business attraction efforts since it launched.

Besides growth in the renewable energy sector, diverse companies are finding Arizona attractive. They include:

  • Amazon, which recently announced plans to add another 1.2 MSF of warehousing space and 200 jobs to its existing Arizona enterprises;
  • Able Engineering, which hopes to expand into new manufacturing facilities in Mesa, eventually more than doubling its 230-employee roster within a few years of the expansion;
  • Ventana Medical Systems, which is expanding and adding another 500 jobs in Oro Valley.

Best is yet to come

Arizona Commerce Authority, AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Arizona Commerce Authority counts new jobs, not the square footage to house them, so it’s difficult to estimate the new office, manufacturing and warehousing space represented by the business growth, Curry says.

But while Arizona Commerce Authority’s mission is to generate jobs, Arizona’s commercial real estate industry is a big beneficiary of the growth, adds Mike Haenel, executive vice president Industrial Division at Cassidy Turley/BRE Commercial.

“Job growth creates absorption, construction and new development opportunities for the state’s commercial real estate industry,” Haenel said.

Arizona Commerce Authority has assisted companies such as Amazon, First Solar, Suntech and others with expansions and relocations, he says, but possibly even more important is the organization’s impact convincing local legislators and other Arizonans about the importance of proffering tax breaks and other enticements to snag coveted business.

He credits the prestige of the corporate leaders backing the group with influencing passage of the Arizona competitiveness package. And their combined weightiness as enticing to national business leaders looking for relocation options.

“Even though the Arizona Commerce Authority has only been in existence for one year, and the fact that we are in a slow recovery cycle, the Arizona Commerce Authority has  been instrumental in educating the business community and those businesses looking to relocate that Arizona has the incentives available for quality job growth,” Haenel says. “We’re still in a tough economy and having Arizona Commerce Authority can only help the state with job attraction.”

Sundt Construction chairman Doug Pruitt, an Arizona Commerce Authority board member, says the organization has logged some early successes.“Working with Arizona Commerce Authority partners, there has been a
massive reduction in vacant space,” he says.  But Pruitt says the biggest bang-for-the-buck is still to come as the organization spent much of its first year laying groundwork.

“Arizona Commerce Authority’s active projects are up 38 percent over a year ago,” Pruitt says. “One of our short-term plans includes aggressive recruitment of California-based firms within our targeted business sectors.”And the vision doesn’t stop at the Pacific Ocean. “Not only are we working to promote the state nationwide, we are taking the message that Arizona is the best place to do business to a global audience,” he says.

DMB Associates chairman Drew Brown, also an Arizona Commerce Authority board member, says each successful recruitment breeds more business. And as the expansions and relocations pile up, a boom in the state’s commercial real estate industry will be a welcome by-product.

“I think Arizona Commerce Authority’s function of attracting high-quality export jobs will be a big shot in the arm for the local economy,” he says. “The multiplier effect will encourage other new jobs.”

As more businesses come to the state, they will fill up vacant residential and commercial real estate, generating demand for new construction and development and the new jobs associated with that. “It’s out there. It will happen,” he says.

Building lasting relationships

Arizona Commerce Authority, AZRE Magazine November/December 2011Brown, like other Arizona Commerce Authority leaders, says the organization can’t take most of the credit for attracting the impressive influx of new business during its first year.

Arizona Commerce Authority has been forging important strategic relationships with key economic development groups such as Greater Phoenix Economic Council (GPEC) and Tucson Regional Economic Opportunities (TREO) to marshal joint clout, Brown says.

“We are working with the Arizona Commerce Authority on several active projects,” says Laura Shaw, TREO’s senior vice president for Marketing and Communications. “While the authority is still very new and thus getting its legs, so to speak, we have formed a close partnership and have many opportunities moving forward.”

And the Arizona Commerce Authority’s Curry says the new competitiveness package passed early this year opened a lot of doors for Arizona Commerce Authority to pitch the state’s wares.

“Before our toolbox didn’t have a lot of tools,” Curry says. “Now Arizona is ranked high among Western states.”

During a recent trade conference in San Francisco with international companies looking for a U.S. presence, the organization landed 19 meetings with interested prospects, and three are actively pursuing a possible Arizona relocation, he says.

Pruitt adds the Arizona Commerce Authority still faces hurdles — the uncertain global economy and Arizona’s somewhat tarnished reputation regarding school funding, immigration, gun laws and other issues. But he is optimistic.

“Some 300,000 of our residents have lost jobs since the recession began,” Pruitt says. “We realize that people are counting on us to do our job. The Arizona Commerce Authority takes this duty seriously and is focused on a single task — getting businesses to invest in Arizona to create jobs.”

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AZRE Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Forward - AB Magazine November/December 2011

Arizona Forward Hopes To Preserve Parks, Open Land

As one of the earliest pioneers of sustainability in the Valley, Valley Forward has had an Arizona presence for 42 years. The organization’s focus on land use and open space, air quality, water, energy and transportation has grown immensely since its inception. It is no surprise that this progressive group has once again embarked on the next sustainable step with the creation of Arizona Forward — a public interest coalition aimed at bringing together business, community and civic leaders to convene public dialogue and advocacy on sustainability in the state.

“By promoting cooperative efforts between Arizona cities and towns, the state’s livability, sustainability and economic vitality will be enhanced for both current and future generations,” says Kurt Wadlington, employee-owner at Sundt Construction, Tucson Building Group Leader and Arizona Forward advisory board chair.

Arizona Forward is initially expected to focus on the Sun Corridor, the region encompassing Tucson to Phoenix, hoping to encourage collaborative efforts between members and strike a balance between economic growth and environmental quality.

“We believe there is a strong connection between the health of our environment and the health of our economy,” says Pat Graham, state director of the Nature Conservancy in Arizona. “Arizona Forward provides an opportunity for like-minded businesses and organizations from across the state to come together and come up with solutions.”

First on the agenda for the coalition is spreading the message about the importance of parks and open spaces and their economic impact on the state.

According to the Outdoor Industry Foundation, nearly 5.5 million Arizonans participate in outdoor recreation. This leads to approximately $350 million in annual state tax revenue and supports 82,000 jobs in Arizona.  Arizona Forward leaders say the economic impact of parks and open spaces is just one reason why the business community should take notice and take a stand.

“One of the challenges today is the complexity of the problems we face,” Graham says. “It requires working together in new ways and with new partners to find solutions that improve the health of both the economy and our environment to maintain a good quality of life in Arizona.”

A study compiled by WestGroup Research on behalf of Valley Forward found that 93 percent of Arizonans categorize parks and open space as “essential” to Arizona’s tourism industry. The study also found that 23 percent of Arizonans visit parks or recreation areas at least once a week.

Just how much open space are we talking about? State and federal entities, along with Native American tribes in Arizona manage more than 70 million acres of land (excluding county and municipal parks). Not surprisingly, negative effects on our parks and open space have a big impact on the state’s bottom line.

“Economic development and new jobs rely on lifestyle considerations,” Wadlington says. “Parks, forests, refuges and other open spaces support the quality-of-life factors that can make a difference for communities seeking to attract employers and a strong workforce. Access to open space boosts property values and provides healthy outdoor recreational opportunities for residents and tourists alike. If we don’t prioritize our parks and open space, we will lose our most treasured resources.”

Prioritizing these aspects has a major economic impact on Arizona. A 2009 National Parks Second Century Commission projected that every $1 in taxpayer money spent on national parks returned a $4 economic benefit through tourism and private sector spending. A June 2011 press release from the Department of the Interiors’ Economic Contributions Report further emphasized this information, with data showing that Arizona’s public lands supported 21,364 jobs and contributed nearly $2 billion to Arizona’s economy.

It is figures like these that Arizona Forward hopes will get the public and policy makers involved with protecting parks and open spaces. State legislators must stop encroaching on the parks-system budget and instead focus on securing funding for their protection, Valley forward leaders say.

“A depressed economy has impacted parks negatively at every jurisdictional level,” Wadlington says. He noted that an already-weakened parks system could be further depleted if lawmakers don’t get the message from their voters about protecting these open spaces.

“As the economy recovers and state revenues return, legislators will be faced with many choices on how to best allocate these funds,” Wadlington says. “As a community, we have to step forward collectively and make a strong case for the parks system and open space preservation.”

Like the mission Valley Forward embarked on 42 years ago, Arizona Forward hopes to serve as the catalyst for change during these trying times.  A diverse membership group with a common goal of environmental stewardship hopes to protect the state’s important parks and open spaces and other environmental issues facing Arizona.

“Future Arizona vision: A place where people want to live and work, where growth occurs responsibly and does not diminish quality-of-life,”  Wadlington says. “A place where business thrives, creating public revenue that can be reinvested in perpetuating sustainability of our state’s natural resources and quality-of-life amenities.”

For more information about Valley Forward and Arizona Forward, visit www.valleyforward.org.

Arizona Business Magazine November/December 2011

 

University of Arizona College of Medicine

UA College Of Medicine Health Sciences Education Building Celebrates “Topping Out”

Health Sciences Education Building, UA College of MedicineA major Downtown Phoenix development project hit a big milestone October 5, 2011 with the “topping out” of construction of the Health Sciences Education Building on the campus of the University of Arizona College of Medicine.

The final beam of the building was ceremoniously lifted and secured at its highest point with workers and college staff and faculty celebrating midday Wednesday.

The $129M, 264,000 SF building – being built in a joint venture by DPR Construction and Sundt Construction, Inc. – will allow the state to take the next step in expanding its medical education facilities.

The new six-story building will house administrative offices, lecture halls, classrooms, class laboratories and a learning resource center. CO Architects is the design and executive architect; Ayers Saint Gross is associate architect and master planner.

The College of Medicine-Phoenix plans to expand its class size and add instruction as Northern Arizona University will also bring a physician’s assistant and physical therapy programs to the Health Sciences Education Building. 


In its fifth year in Downtown Phoenix, the College of Medicine currently anchors the campus with 192 medical students, admitting 48 per year. After the completion of the Health Sciences Education Building in 3Q 2012, the university plans to admit up to 80 students per class and eventually reach a capacity of 120 per class to address the critical need for physicians in Arizona.

Also on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus are the UA College of Pharmacy and the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, the headquarters of the Translational Genomics Research Institute and International Genomics Consortium, and Arizona Biomedical Collaborative building.

For more information about the Health Sciences Education Building, visit ahsc.arizona.edu.

Health Sciences Education Building, UA College of Medicine